Subject: RE: Macaroni---oh yes!
From: "Jeanne Henry" <woofstockaustin.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 23:49:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Vacation Bible School - macaroni covered wine bottles.

Now that I'm grown, I wonder where those wine bottles came from...
we were Southern Baptists and not allowed to drink!

I remember my VBS teacher was a very happy lady...

Jeanne Henry
Austin




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Union Corps Badges.
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 22:51:29 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

Hey, Donna, thanks for the imput; but it isn't the 16th Corps Badge either.
I like the idea of it being sometype of symbol; but the curve on the 16th goes outward, while the pattern for my block goes inward.

The quilt was made in Massachusets. Any possible symbols there?

Best, Don


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sandy Mitchell
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>


I too knew Sandy in the early years of my experiences with quilts. I think
nowadays people knowledgeable about mental health issues would be able to d
efine the particular personality disorder(s) that made her so troubleso
me -- and troubled. She had difficulty interacting socially in conventi
onal ways, she frustrated and alienated many, while at the same time sh
e was probably responsible -- as a resource and teacher -- for the deve
lopment of several careers in the quilt business.
 
Obsessive-compulsive, eccentric, surely. Asberger's? Autistic? She certainl
y was a savant about those quilts, seeking untouched condition, quilting,
color. When she died she owned two neighboring houses she had joined toget
her in Ohio, completely filled-- except for where she slept-- with collec
tions of Navajo rugs, Indian baskets, paperweights, jewelry, quilts, other
collectibles....and junk. A team worked forever to inventory the treasures,
made sure nothing was overlooked in the many bags still unopened, and sold
the collections. Her mother Sophie helped her right up to the end and outl
ived her daughter, who passed away from complications from diabetes, which
she didn't pay much attention to sadly.
 
I write this as I look up at a framed hooked rug from Sandy's estate (sold
at Garth's) that hangs over my front door. The only one of its type I h
ave ever seen, it shows a house with quilts hanging from a clothesl
ine in the yard, which I cherish for how it represents my two specialties -
quilts and hooked rugs, and how it reminds me of the diversity of players t
hat manage to thrive in this compelling antiques business.
 
Laura Fisher
 
Laura Fisher
--0-168815565-1255673129:42089--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: making things memories
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2009 04:17:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

From vacation Bible School I most clearly remember gluing buttons all
over a round metal tin and attaching an empty wooden thread spool to the
lid for a handle. I think this was a loose tobacco tin; I seem to recall
the fragrance more than the item. From school I remember making
topographic "maps" out of an awful-tasting concoction of flour, water
and salt that used food coloring to create a map "key," and of "carving"
bars of Ivory soap into...I don't remember what. These things happened
in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. I've been trying to figure out if
these VBS stories were regional, but how can we tell, since many of us
have moved?

Andi in Paducah, KY


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: new book
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com
Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2009 07:07:49 EDT
X-Message-Number: 5


-------------------------------1255691269
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I just saw that Barbara Brackman has a new Encyclopedia of Applique.

Nan in FL
www.mooreandmoorequilts.com

-------------------------------1255691269--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Photos of some amazing antique quilts from 2009 Quilt Festival in Houston
From: elpaninaroaol.com

Good morning fellow QHLers,



Had a great time with Mom at Preview Night down in Houston. This year, tha
nks to my finally caving in and getting an I-Phone, it was easy to take pi
ctures to share! And big thanks to the dealers who all kindly allowed me
to take photos.


And perfect timing, because this year I saw some incredible old quilts lik
e I have not seen before. Below is a link to the facebook album I created
along with what info I could remember about each (keeping in mind it is
a frantic exercise running from booth to booth so one does not miss anyth
ing lol.) It is a public album, so the link should work even if we are not
friended on facebook.



http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid3D158336&id3D543926257&saved#/album
.php?aid3D158336&id3D543926257



To Laura- would love to hear more on that Zig-Zag I posted if you have fur
ther information. Amazing piece.


To Pat- remember that really neat 9 block quilt you used a few years ago
to make a new pattern? The grapes and rose one that came from Cindy befor
e I got it. I posted it here before looking for info. Well, I spotted a mu
ch later piece at the show which is in this album! 1930s-40s and sure enou
gh that same pattern. Only other one I have ever seen. Hard to tell in the
photo, but the main color in there is not faded but just a bit of an eart
hy calico that is overwhelmed by the black piping around all the applique.



And to everyone, forgive if there is much hyperbole. I am not the seasoned
collector/student most of you are. At my level of experience though, ther
e were some amazing sights!


Take care,

Tom.


PS- If the link does not work, someone please email and let me know. I jus
t get the daily digest and do not see messages real time.

----------MB_8CC1C98774894CF_5878_66FB_webmail-m021.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fwd: Quilt Shows in Hawaii-Special Admission Prices
From: Loretta Woodard <Lwoodardhawaii.edu>

Okay, let's try again. Yesterday's message was sent in plain text and

is a mess of 3D20s, etc.

I also forgot to tell you that if you pay full admission to one
museum, and bring your ticket to the other museum, you will get in at

half-price.

There are not one but TWO quilt shows opening this month in Honolulu.

At the Mission Houses Museum, the exhibition is called: Hawaiian Flag

Quilts: Legacy of Patriotism
Exhibition dates: October 16, 2009 96 January 2, 2010
http://www.missionhouses.org/mhm/?q3Dnode/13
In celebration of Hawai91i92s 50th anniversary of statehood, the
museum
honors the concept of patriotism that is such an innate part of
American heritage. Nowhere is this more apparent than within Hawai91i92s

Flag Quilt traditions that have become so popular in the islands.
Created in the later part of the 19th century as a form of political
protest, Hawaiian Flag Quilts are still being made today. Mission
Houses Museum will feature its own historic collection of Hawaiian
Flag Quilts along with modern and contemporary works on special loan
for the exhibition.

At the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the exhibition opening in the Textile

Gallery is called In Honor of Grandmother.
Exhibition dates: October 22, 2009-January 31, 2010
http://www.honoluluacademy.org/cmshaa/academy/index.aspx?id3D4872

Special programming

December is for Grandmothers: Throughout the month of December, people

can bring their grandmother to see the exhibition and get in for free.

A $20 savings. Applies to the grandmother and grandchild only97not
whole families.



--Apple-Mail-2-389343157--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Photos of some amazing antique quilts from 2009 Quilt Festival in Houston
From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2009 16:43:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Whoa, now I am sorry I didn't go to Houston this year. What gorgeous
quilts. Old quilts just grab hold of me and won't let go. there's
something about them that speaks of another time and of the maker that
really entrances me. I guess they are full of secrets. Thanks so much for
the pictures.
Shari Spires



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Trends
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2009 16:01:31 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9

"Where do trends come?" from is always a fascinating question to me.

Here are a couple of links that may stir up some ideas as well as
"feelings". People seem to have some strong opinions about such things.

http://www.americancraftmag.org/blog-post.php?id9013

Quilting is actually mentioned in one of the comments that follows the
article below on.

http://www.artscatter.com/general/craft-commits-suicide-art-envy-arrested-on
-suspicion/

Karen Alexander in the Islands




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Trends
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2009 16:09:48 -0700
X-Message-Number: 10

"Where do trends come FROM?" was, of course, supposed to be the question in
my last post. <g>

Karen A.





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Quilt Shows in Hawaii
From: Loretta Woodard <Lwoodardhawaii.edu>
Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2009 22:17:31 -1000
X-Message-Number: 1

Cinda asked: Will there be a catalogue of the flag quilt exhibit?

I'm afraid not, Cinda, although you will be able to see most of the
quilts exhibited at Mission Houses on the Quilt Index sometime before
the end of the year. These are mostly quilts from museum collections--
Mission Houses, Honolulu Academy of Arts, and Kauai Museum.

There's an old, beautifully photographed catalog still in print that
has eight flag quilts, four of which are in the show: Reiko Brandon,
et al., HAWAIIAN QUILT, Tokyo: Kokusai Art, 1989.

Aloha,
Laurie



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Vacation Bible School
From: palamporeaol.com
 


Andi, I am sure the Vacation Bible School was done by a single church in
Winston-Salem. I grew up doing VBS crafts and LOVED them. I remember that
my sister learned to do outline embroidery at VBS when she was jr. high
age. I loved that pillow she made with the outline of Mary and baby Jesus
! We made wonderful things. I, too, made the salt and flour maps at Pikevi
lle Elementary (NC). I think I used the same stuff to make a solar system.
My children had projects going all the time in our house and for school
because of Will and I. (Infact the kids would often have to make us go aw
ay and let THEM do the project. Will and I just had wayyyyyyy too much fun
doing projects!) Unfortunately their friends thought we were the "excepti
on" not the rule. If they needed a creative costume they came to our house
. I worry about the lack of creativity in the lives of children these days
. If they do things it is often in a kit form.........already thought out
for them.



We still have VBS at our church and I love to volunteer to help out with
crafts. Best part about the whole thing in my opinion! Hmmm, then again
the music is pretty great, too!



I think that instead of us reminiscing this week, we should find a way to
put creativity into the life of at least ONE CHILD. Send some fabric to
a grandchild. Send a great book on drawing. Write your school board membe
rs and emphasize the importance of art and music IN the schools. I am tota
lly in favor of adding time to a school day by 1 hour if it would be for
physical activity, music and art. We listen to TV in our homes, radios in
our cars and look at ads all around us, and then art and music teachers
are CUT.



Off of my soapbox............ Love you guys! I know I am preaching to the
choir!

Lynn Lancaster Gorges in New Bern, NC



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: 1836 Godey's patchwork pattern
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
 



I was intrigued by two things about this printed pattern. More than 2
actually, but will comment on these:

1. "The outside border should be four long strips of calico, all of the
same sort and not cut into patches."

INteresting to me that 4 borders are recommended. Has anyone ever
seen this on a "honeycomb" quilt?

2. The CENTER piece was put in AFTER the "ring".

Just an interesting tidbit about how the piecing was "supposed" to
be done. This is English paper

piecing.

3. "Finish it with two or three rows of running at the edge, which must be
neatly turned in."



Do y'all think the finish would have been a knife-edge with 3 parallel lines
of running stitch? That's what

this says to me, but I'm not great at interpreting "sew-language" from 1836.
I'm just intrigued by this because

I don't think I've ever seen a quilt finished this way.



Stephanie Whitson






----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Vacation Bible School
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Sat, 17 Oct 2009 11:37:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4


Lynn's idea is a great one. . . putting creativity into the life of a
child. The good old fashioned hands-on-no-X-box-allowed kind.
That's one of my soap boxes. Too much technology at the expense of the
delight of using one's hands to create.
Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: a day in Chester County
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 17 Oct 2009 17:57:55 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Jan Whitlock invited the members of the Eastern Shore Quilt Study
Group to her shop in West Chester, PA to see quilts in a private
collection
that the owner is interested in selling. It was an unseasonably cold
and
rainy day, but the quilts warmed us up nicely. Of the twenty quilts we
saw
all but three were pre-1850; all were from the local area and most had
significant damage. There were two nearly identical chintz appliquE9s
made
of small blocks with sashing and a chintz border with an unusual pastel
green background. How exciting to see a Tree of Life crib quilt! There
was
a full-size Tree of Life with a glorious yellow pillar print border (I
love
pillar prints). There were several medallion-style quilts with the
printed
chintz centers that Merikay Waldvogel is studying. We were nearly
speechless when Jan unfolded a framed center with the Hewson vase as the
focal point (sadly damaged but still...) surrounded by big chunks of a
variety of late 18th century fabrics. Several of the serious Baltimore
Album people were in our group and they were thrilled to see an Achsah
Goodwin Wilson basket in a center medallion with three different chintz
borders (the cactus chintz was one). This quilt was huge, had super
quilting and a striped tape binding.
They weren't all chintz. An 1840 Oak Leaf and Reel had the many
turkey reds one finds so often in Chester Co. and environs. There were
a
couple of wholecloths, including one pillar print, a scherenschnitte
with
great quilting, Mariners Compass (red and white on a green background),
Sunflower, Crossed Branches with roses in the center.
Jan and Barb Garrett both recommended lunch at the Three Little
Pigs, a happy choice. One of my rules is "If mushroom soup is on the
menu
in Chester County order it." It was; I did; it was delicious.
Our next stop was the Chester County Historical Society to see the
second rotation of quilts from the recent documentation. Many of the
quilts
are pictured in "Layers, Unfolding the Stories of Chester County
Quilts." I
was most excited by a case containing perhaps 50 large pieces (12"?) of
turkey red (all different)with a name and date on a paper sewn to each
piece. Could this be the explanation of the profusion of turkey reds
found
in Chester Co. friendship quilts? You ask friends to give you the
fabric
with attached info and then make the quilt (or in this case not). Dawn,
what do you think?
The Rettie quilt (54"x34")dated 1879 is backed but not quilted.
White squares separated by red sashing with white cornerstones are
embellished with complex botanical drawings and religious verses. The
drawings are less accomplished than those found on friendship quilts of
the
1840s, but I was amazed to see them on something with such a late date.

The project included quilts made by quilters born before 1930 and
several contemporary quilts are part of the exhibit. There are Crazies,
Log
Cabin, four block appliquE9s. I didn't count how many quilts are
hanging,
but the have used the space to show a lot. Don't miss it if you are
anywhere near Philadelphia or Wilmington.
Cinda on the Eastern Shore (California was nice, but they are a little
light
on chintz-G)

Lucinda R. Cawley
104 Lakeview Drive
Salisbury, MD 21804
410-334-6303
lrcawleycomcast.net





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Houston Festival Photos- sorry for the difficulties!
From: elpaninaroaol.com
Date: Sat, 17 Oct 2009 19:09:27 -0400
 


Evening all

Sorry for the difficulties with the Facebook album. I did not realize a pe
rson had to be on facebook to view a public album.


In any event, have sent out the photos in email to those who asked, plus
just put 5 on the vintage board before it said the space was full. So wil
l come back in a few days and add some new ones.

And now that I know how to use the vintage photo board- will go right for
that option next time lol.


Thanks to all for the kind comments so far. Will respond to questions/comm
ents as I can in next couple of days.


Take care,

Tom.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Achsah Goodwin Wilkins
From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 17 Oct 2009 20:16:20 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

I hate to be a name dropper and I am not one of the Baltimore Album
mavens. Debby Cooney knows a lot about Achsah, but here's what I know
(mostly from "Baltimore Album Quilts" by Dena Katzenberg). Achsah
Goodwin
Wilkins (1775-1854) was the daughter of a wealthy Baltimore merchant.
She
became estranged from her family when she converted to Methodism and
married
a Methodist.
She is credited with designing 14 chintz appliquE9 quilts, choosing a
central design and accompanying elements from three or four English
chintzes. One favorite motif was the woven wicker or latticework basket
of
fruit or flowers. According to family tradition Achsah had a skin
disease
that prevented her from sewing so that she concentrated on design and
supervised the execution of the work by a group of young black women
(her
servants or possibly slaves?). Both her husband and father were dry
goods
merchants and she had access to all the chintzes she could use.
Katzenberg believed that Achsah Wilkins influenced a number of
Methodist women who translated the cut out chintz style into the
appliquE9d
Album blocks of the 1840s. Many of the classic BAQs have Methodist
connections.
Achsah's daughter left an account of her mother which her
granddaughter passed on to the famous Dr. Dunton whose book "Old Quilts"
(1946) provides the earliest study of BAQs and related quilts. Dr. D.
recognized the similarities among a group of chintz appliquE9 quilts
and
discovered that the owners were all descended from Achsah Goodwin
Wilkins.
Debby how about some more info?
Cinda on the Eastern Shore

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Houston Festival Photos- sorry for the difficulties!
From: Getfruitaol.com
Date: Sun, 18 Oct 2009 13:19:59 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1


-------------------------------1255886399
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

No need to respond to this post. Just wanted you to know that I was able to
get your first posting of photos without any problem. Thanks for your
efforts. The quilts are wonderful.

Violet Vaughnes in California

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Sunny Sunday
From: "Catherine Litwinow" <litwinow62msn.com>

Hi,
Yeah for sun & both Hawks and Cyclones won. I'm glad it worked out to
get the second name on the speaker fund acct.
qhllyris.quiltropolis.com<mailto:qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> is how to
put something on QHL. The message will go through Kris and if
appropriate put it on line. I'm delighted that there are quilters out
there who will support us. Marilyn, my article will be done by the 7th
of Nov. I am to turn in my school paper on that Friday, so I'll do some
editing and send it to you. There are 2 pictures off the Red and Green
Wreath on my disk.
Pets do become family.
Bill's b'day was the 15 and our anniversary is the 23rd & 38 years.
Cathy


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re Cultural Tenacity
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sun, 18 Oct 2009 15:37:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Yesterday on C-Span Book TV Michael Barone discussed his current Almanac of American Politics, which comes out bi-annually.

In his discussion of election analyses and trends, he remarked that to understand contemporary voting patterns, one must understand historic migration patterns. In many respects, he said, we see earlier preferences reflected directly even today.

As an example, he cited the migration of the Scots-Irish (Ulster Scots) into the South. He noted that the great migration of the sons of wealthy Atlantic seaboard families of the South, English and Scots-Irish, into the Black Belt of Alabama and the Old Southwest in the 1830's and 1840's helped account for the high vote count for Democratic candidates from the regions they settled. The descendants of slaves who accompanied these familes retain a strong presence in those regions and vote solidly Democratic tickets in all elections. Similarly, the smaller, self-sufficient members of Scots-Irish clans, who could not afford vast tracts of land in that earlier period and so settled in other areas tend to vote Republican since 1964. He noted the group's historic support of strong military establishment, aversion to large government, and related historic views as grounds for choices.

His analysis was not the broad-stroke generalization of James Webb's "Born Fighting," though it did not mention such important considerations as the lingering influence of conservative religious views and preference for local/state political control (These were English-haters who had been burned twice or thrice by the Brits).

Baronne is not a Romantic and his almanacs are analytical, rooted in statistics.

I cite his introductory essay to the new almanac as yet another example of a growing tendency to acknowledge the tenacity of original cultures in America. Lots of relevance for quilt historians seeking to account for various preferences in quiltmaking, I think.

Gaye Ingram


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: List Moderation
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 18 Oct 2009 16:24:46 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 4

Um, I don't moderate - except for new people. Sometimes I get involved if people post in MIME or HTML, which blocks not only them but also people that post after them. Not always. It depends on Lyris, the listerve. It usually bounces mail without my intervention.

Kris
(List Mom)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Louisiana quilt - double wedding ring with star
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>


All:

I'd love some feedback on this Ebay quilt: 250515954472

I have a filter set for any quilts sold in the Lafayette/Breaux Bridge
Louisiana area, and this one came up today. It really tickled me ...
I'm thinking that only a Southern woman would figure that a DWR just
wasn't challenging enough so she'd stick a fancy LeMoyne star inside
each center. Shades of Talula Bottoms! Gaye, doesn't this one just
warm your heart? Has anyone else seen this DWR variation?

Please don't tell me this is a China rip-off ... I'd be so disappointed!


On a side note: apparently Ebay has changed the way photos are handled.
I used to be able to grab the photo and save it, but I haven't
succeeded in doing that with this new format. Has anyone else solved
this problem?

Dale

I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library. - Jorge
Luis Borges


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Our saincere apologies!
From: "Catherine Litwinow" <litwinow62msn.com>


Dear group, My sincerest apologies. You now know the IA/IL Quilt Study
group leaders much better. As all of you know, studying quilts and
talking to other quilt historians brings about wonderful friends!
Marilyn, Susan and Juanita have become close friends. QHL is a lovely
start to my day. Again, I'm sorry for the non-quilt related news. Now to
work on an outline for "Stories in Stitches" for a class I'm taking.
The very embarrassed, Catherine Litwinow
------_NextPart_000_0037_01CA5099.ACC10630--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Louisiana quilt - double wedding ring with star
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2009 10:00:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

that is a happiness quilt for sure.

I had no problem capturing it to save to My Pictures. Just right click over
the image and the drop down menu appears with the "save as" line.

Judy Grow
Mailing out about 24 CD's today.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2009 08:46 AM
Subject: [qhl] Louisiana quilt - double wedding ring with star



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Louisiana quilt - double wedding ring with star
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2009 10:16:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

I have seen that Wedding Ring variation in solid blue and gold, and
called "Golden Wedding Ring." In fact, BB's Encyclopedia lists it by
that name (#313) and attributes it to Home Art (the VerMehren pattern
studio in Des Moines, not the magazine from Augusta, Maine).

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Andersonville prisoner quilt
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

Hi all,
I missed this quilt if it is any book.  It is a quilt made for James Geor
ge, a Union soldier who had been captured and stayed at Andersonville six m
onths, later recovered at a Washington D.C. hospital, where Boston women ma
de him an album quilt.
Go to:
http://quiltsandcreativity.com/
Scroll down to find the picture of the quilt.  It is 5 bocks wide and 7 b
locks long.  it just struck me as being really long and skinny, and I won
dered if it was related size-wise to the Sanitary Commission quilts.  Doe
s anyone recall this in a book?
Judy Schwender
Paducah, KY0A0A0A
--0-190749318-1255962063:2995--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Louisiana quilt - double wedding ring with star
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2009 09:20:04 EDT
X-Message-Number: 6

-------------------------------1255958404
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


Dale, I have seen that pattern before. It is listed in Brackman's #313,
Golden Wedding Ring from Home Art(no date). I do not believe it is a foreign
copy. It looks very '40s vintage to me.
Nan in Fl
_www.mooreandmoorequilts.com_ (http://www.mooreandmoorequilts.com/)





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Louisiana quilt - double wedding ring with star
From: Judy Kelius <quiltsptd.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2009 09:07:05 -0400

I had the same problem but figured how to get around it - on the eBay
listing page, click on the photo you want to copy, and THEN click the
enlarge button - that way it will be the primary photo on the
enlargement page and you can then left-click to copy it to your
computer. Aggravating since if you want to copy several photos, you
will have to do this for each one. - Judy

At 08:46 AM 10/19/2009, you wrote:
>On a side note: apparently Ebay has changed the way photos are
>handled. I used to be able to grab the photo and save it, but I
>haven't succeeded in doing that with this new format. Has anyone
>else solved this problem?

--_12790687.ALT--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 15, 2009
From: mem914yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2009 10:12:42 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8


Trying this again!

Don - I found the block in a book called "Beautiful Quilts". The quilt was dated 1848 and just called "Crosses". The crosses were used around a center appliqued medallion. It does look like a greek cross and I have seen needlework from my grandmother (who was danish) with a greek cross in 3 colors. I don't know if that helps.

As to the lady who used duct tape on her prosthesis - wow what an image. And what a lesson - don't try to read QHL on my lunchbreak at work!
Mary



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bible School Projects 60's - 70's
From: LAHudlowaol.com
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2009 13:29:45 EDT
 


Well I have to tell you my favorite and most fun Bible School project was
painting a Mrs. Buttersworth syrup bottle. There were many many paint colors
to choose from and boy did I think I was an artist and so proud to present
this lovely bottle to my mother at the end of the week. This bottle is
still around somewhere in the boxes of JUNK stored in the basement. So much
fun and lots of fun memories.

Lori Hudlow
Antietam Controls, Inc.
5404 Porterstown Road
Keedysville, MD 21756
301.432.3930
301.432.3931 fax

-------------------------------1255973385--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: new 1840s reproductions
From: "Pat L. Nickols" <patlnickolsyahoo.com>
 


Some of you know about the new lines of reproduction fabric I0Aam doing wi
th RJR Fabrics but many of you may not know they are now out, coming0Ato q
uilt shops as we speak. If your0Afavorite quilt shop does not have them i
n yet, ask when they will be coming.0A 0AI have given out many Fairhaven
circa 1840s brochures, which are illustrations of all seven prints E280
93 twenty pieces0Ain the line (with a bit of history) but you can downloa
d your own from their web-site www.RJRFabrics.com, everyone can have their
0Aown brochure for handy reference to the prints you want. The second lin
e is called Reproduction0AClassics, which is a gathering of the many small
er prints we sometimes call0Ashirtings. If the number of the print0Aends
in 01 it means that is a document print and is true to scale and color. Pu
tting0Athese examples in a notebook will start your document print noteboo
k, a handy reference0Ato dating prints.0A 0AThe third line, coming in De
cember, called Waving Old Glory,0Ais a group of seven Centennial prints, a
uthentic 1876 red, blue, brown and navy, a0Atotal of thirty pieces. You c
an see all0Aof the patterns and color-ways on their web-site.0A 0AI look
forward to hearing which prints you like the best,0Acolors too. Your fee
dback is a big help0Ain making more authentic reproductions available.0A
0AFall is in the air, even here in San Diego.0APat L. Nickols0A0A0A

--0-1847574203-1255993038:39139--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Andersonville prisoner quilt
From: <parsnips1verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2009 18:27:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

Judy,
You can find this quilt on page 253 of Massachusetts Quilts: Our Common
Wealth. If you google "Andersonville prisoner quilt", you'll get a result
that is a review of the book and shows the quilt. You can click on the
picture to enlarge it.

Pat Roth



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 15, 2009
From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2009 23:13:23 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12

> As to the lady who used duct tape on her prosthesis - wow what an image.
> And what a lesson - don't try to read QHL on my lunchbreak at work!


> Ha ha ha - little coffee spew I take it!
Shari Spires




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Useless Trivia
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
 




I just learned something I'd not heard before. In the 1930's2C Fanny Bric
e was in a play by Billy Rose. It was the play that introduced the song "I
Found A Million Dollar Baby in a FIve and Ten Cent Store." The name of th
e play was "Crazy Quilt."

I found that interesting2C particularly since crazy quilts were decades pa
st being fashionable. Go figger.

Teddy Pruett
www.teddypruett.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Andersonville Prisoner's quilt
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 07:52:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

With regard to Judy's question about the Andersonville prisoner's quilt....
It is, indeed, a similar size and stature to the Sanitary Commission quilts.
I was at the N.E. Quilt museum to see the exhibit it was shown in, I
actually came back twice to get a better look at it and take some notes.
The museum is VERY protective of this quilt.
It is my personal belief that this quilt is, in fact, a Sanitary Commission
quilt. But, it can never be categorized as an official one due to the lack
of a Sanitary Commission stamp on the back of it. Yet, the same size,
colors, spirit, dates of production of it, writings are of similar character
to those few surviving Sanitary Commission quilts that we have seen.
Good luck persuing more information about it, I hope the museum is more
forthcoming with information in the future.
Linda Heminway
Plaistow NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ***SPAM*** new 1840s reproductions
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 09:19:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Pat, the "Waving Old Glory" pattern on the top row. . . largest scale. . .
brought back a quilt memory. About 20 years ago I was looking through some
stuff with one of the "old time" dealers (the kind who has stuff in every
grain bin and chicken coop on the farm) and when I expressed interest in old
quilts, she brought one out to ask me about it. It looked brand new. Still
had the faint pencil markings from the quilting. Gorgeous quilt, but
something seemed "wrong" to me because it just looked so new. And the fabric
didn't look "old" to me. About 2 years later I realized that I had been
shown a pristine quilt made entirely of this centennial print and that not
only was it "the real thing" it was a prime example. The quilt wasn't for
sale and I don't know where it is now, but wow. . . I wish I could have a
"do-over" of that experience!!!! As I recall the owner had bought it "for a
song" (her words) at a farm sale in Northern Nebraska.

Your fabric line is gorgeous. The eagles print is my favorite and of course
the brown because that's what was in the quilt I saw all those years ago.

Stephanie Whitson




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: mystery block and Andersonville quilt
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 07:33:18 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 4

Mary, thanks for solving my little mystery for me. "Crosses" it is.

The Andersonville quilt was never put into the system for the SC; as it was apparently directly given to a returning wounded POW by the folks that made it--thus no stamp. However, the Susannah Pullen Civil War quilt at the Smithsonian and documented in Uncoverings was clearly given to the SC; but lacks the stamp. Not everything was stamped. But the Pullen quilt has documentation of usage in two Washington, D.C. military hospital, so it clearly is a soldiers' quilt.

Personally, if it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck (so long as that duck was a Civil War soldier). best, Don


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ***SPAM*** Andersonville prisoner quilt
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 09:03:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Distant family speak of an ancestor who died at Andersonville. When my
husband's great uncle told of finding the grave of said Andersonville, he
did so with tears in his eyes. Having read Bruce Catton's book, I still
shudder when I see the word. Thank you so much for taking time
to show the quilt. How many stories it houses. . . . .
Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Louisiana quilt photo
From: "Robins-Morris, Laura A" <lrobinsscharp.org>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 08:27:33 -0700
X-Message-Number: 6

Dale, (and others having difficulty copying the photo),
Re: Ebay quilt: 250515954472
I couldn't do it either, even with the suggestions. But I was using
Mozilla Firefox. When I switched to Internet Explorer, I could do the
normal right click and copy.
Laura, in beautiful colorful fall-ish Seattle



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Useless Trivia
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 11:24:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

The sheet music/logo/artwork for that show has a quilt motif!
Candace Perry
(major musical theatre fan)

-
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Useless Trivia
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 12:23:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

This is the type of information I'll remember twenty years from now --- when
I can't remember my name!!!

Best regards,
Sharron Evans......................
....in Spring, TX where fall has arrived - no beautiful foliage but we're
happy for the cool weather!...........


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NRA Eagle Quilts
From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 12:46:03 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 9

--0-1420442259-1256067963:83455
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


The NRA Eagle Symbol seems to have inspired more people than quilt makers.
  Did you know that the Philadelphia Eagles owners Bert Bell and Lud Wray
(and their board) named their team after FDR's symbol about 1933?
 
I know of three NRA Eagle quilts:
 
One is at FDR's library, one is in the West Virginia State Museum, and on
e is in private hands in Minnesota -- does anyone know the whereabouts of
any others in public or private collections?
 
Thanks --
 
Sue0A0A0A


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Index to books on the Internet
From: "Mary Persyn" <Mary.Persynvalpo.edu>
 



FYI - I just saw an announcement of a new web site called bookserver which
is designed to help researchers find copies of digital books on the
internet. I don't know how widespread their index is yet.

Searching under "quilts" I found Marie Webster and Mavis Fitzrandolph.

The URL is

http://www.archive.org/bookserver

Mary


Mary G. Persyn
Associate Dean for Library Services
School of Law
Valparaiso University
656 S. Greenwich St.
Valparaiso, IN 46383
(219) 465-7830
FAX (219) 465-7917
mary.persynvalpo.edu

--__Part4863D1A1.0__--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: mystery block and Andersonville quilt
From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayrenesa.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 16:41:24 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

Hello Donald and All,

The Andersonville quilt, which had been receiving a great deal of
discussion on the list lately, is owned by the New England Quilt Museum
in Lowell, MA. It is part of their permanent collection.

The information about the quilt, which I have read on the list over the
past couple days, is incorrect. There is no definitive evidence that the
quilt was given directly to the Union soldier James George by the
makers. Since I first saw this quilt ten years ago, I have been
gathering information on its history. There is no indication from either
the family history, including documents, which states this was the
process. If you wish to read what has been uncovered to date, please see
the book "Massachusetts Quilts Our Common Wealth". An essay written by
Anita Loscalzo and myself, along with wonderful photographs, can be
found on pages 252 through 256. I am continuing the search for
information and hope to complete a paper on this wonderful quilt in the
near future.

I hope your autumn day is as beautiful as ours in New England.

B/W
Vivien in MA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: mystery block and Andersonville quilt
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

You can see a piture of the quilt online at http://www.thequiltshow.com/os/
newsletters.php/newsletters_id/1236
Judy Schwender
Paducah, KY
 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NRA Eagle Quilts
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 16:49:25 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

Sue, Within the past four years, I spoke with someone at a museum in/near Salem, MA,
who had been referred to me by a Louisiana folklorist, possibly because she had traced the maker to Louisiana. The museum was considering acquiring the quilt. I don't recall what the curator wanted to know.

What I do remember is that it was signed and dated by a woman whose retired
husband had been the custodian at the school I attended and whose entire family
had been members of the church in which I grew up.

I wanted that quilt, asked the person with whom I spoke to make an offer on my behalf if they did not want the quilt. Dumb. I never learn. I should have proceeded differently. I never
heard from the museum after providing information. Nor did my friend. So has
anyone seen a NRA quilt living in the Salem area that was made by a Mrs Stinson or
MacManeman? I cannot recall the name of the museum, but seem to remember it was small and not one I associated with textile collections.

Gaye
--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts spotted in Movie
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 19:53:39 -0700
X-Message-Number: 14

This past weekend one of the classic movie stations aired "Conrack," with Jon Voight ( looks like the late 60's early 70's) based on Pat Conroy's novel, "The Water Is Wide." I spotted two quilts, both scrappy, utility quilts seems very appropriate for the period and setting. There may have been more but I missed the beginning of the movie. In one scene Voight was doing needlework, I think it was needlepoint, can't remember. Voight played a teacher on a South Carolina island inhabited by mainly, if not completely by African-Americans living in poverty and ignorance, and virtually forgotten by the mainland (outside world). I was reminded of Gees Bend and the Arnetts. The quilts in the movie weren't that visually interesting but the story was stirring. Now I can't wait to get the book.

Pam
O'Fallon, IL



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: star question
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2009 01:52:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

After watching for meteor showers from Halley's comet tonight, I'm
wondering: why do we depict stars as pointed? It's pretty dark in my
part of the world here in western Kentucky, as it was in southeast Iowa
(although nothing like the velvet night on a reservation in New Mexico
years ago), and to my un-aided eyes, stars seem round. The closest thing
to an answer I can find has to do with sailors creating a star-like
indication of directions on their bodies (which led to the Mariner's
Compass), but was that the first intended depiction of stars as pointed
objects? And, in fact, do all cultures show stars as being pointed?

Andi in Paducah, KY


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: star question
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2009 6:13:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Andi, for scientific accuracy, see the Several Pointed Star on Julie Silber's FACEBOOK album. No two points equal in distance arpart to any other two points. Slightly ajar along point of center joint, Maker was not a mathematician, though a superb quilter. And, no doubt, an astronomer<g>

I think all the geometric stars are efforts to capture the "sparkling" qualities of stars as seen from earth abstractly----the way the churning "Kansas Troubles" seeks to capture the unrest and lack of equilibrium in Kansas in the time of "Bleeding Kansas."

I think the term is "abstract representational," the effort to represent a figure or event geometrically, abstracting the signal elements. And maybe it is not confined to geometry. I suppose in some way pointellisme might fall into he general category, though the term is, I think, associated with forms created geometrically.

Twinkling in Louisiana, where four days of sun have brought the early sansanqua camellias into bloom and set the Japanese maples on their course to fall brilliance,
Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Andersonville quilt
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2009 07:22:17 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

the Massachusetts's Quilts book states the following: James (George) was captured during the vicious Battle of the Wilderness on May 5, 1864, and imprisoned in the infamous Andersonville Prison. James was fortunate--his incarceration at Andersonville was only about six months, but that was long enough for the cruel starvation and unsanitary conditions suffered by all the prisoners there to permanently affect his health.

JAMES GREGORY PROBABLY RECEIVED THIS SIGNATURE QUILT AS A GIFT FROM WELL-WISHERS WHILE HE RECUPERATED IN A WASHINGTON, D.C., HOSPITAL (italics mine) sometimes between February 1965 and his discharge from the Union Army in June 1865."

If our information is incorrect, this the information in the book is misleading. Either way, the quilt was the same size and of similar construction to the Sanitary Commission quilts and in may even have been donated to them; but lacks their stamps. Not all Sanitary Commission gathered supplies were stamped.

We don't mean to step on anyone's toes who is writing articles about this period as we all know the sesquicentennial is coming up. Look forward to seeing the article.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Louisiana quilt - double wedding ring with star
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2009 10:44:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Xenia and all: Thanks for the feedback on the quilt. I'm impressed by the
woman's tenacity.

Dale in Indiana

>I have seen that Wedding Ring variation in solid blue and gold, and
> called "Golden Wedding Ring." In fact, BB's Encyclopedia lists it by
> that name (#313) and attributes it to Home Art (the VerMehren pattern
> studio in Des Moines, not the magazine from Augusta, Maine).



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Louisiana quilt photo
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2009 10:40:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

All:

Laura is so smart - I didn't even think to try IE, since I avoid Microsoft
products whenever possible. That explains why some folks are having more
success than I. Thanks, Laura!

Dale in beautiful sunny Indiana, with glorious golden leaves outside my
window



Laura said:
I couldn't do it either, even with the suggestions. But I was using
Mozilla Firefox. When I switched to Internet Explorer, I could do the
normal right click and copy.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Centennial prints
From: "Pat L. Nickols" <patlnickolsyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2009 07:55:24 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

--0-68386562-1256136924:20148
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii

Stephanie,

Glad you like the Reproduction lines we are doing, I love them all (just depends on what I am working on at the time), but these patriotic prints are special.
Enjoyed your story about, "the Centennial print quilt that got away". When I saw my first few Centennial prints they were all in brown, some years later and many quilts, I was thrilled to find some in blue, then red. Now it is fun to be able to add these reproductions to a charm quilt I am making.

Pat L. Nickols

Subject: RE: new 1840s reproductions
From: <StephanieStephanieWhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Oct 2009 09:19:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Pat, the "Waving Old Glory" pattern on the top row. . . largest scale. . .
brought back a quilt memory. About 20 years ago I was looking through some
stuff with one of the "old time" dealers (the kind who has stuff in every
grain bin and chicken coop on the farm) and when I expressed interest in old
quilts, she brought one out to ask me about it. It looked brand new. Still
had the faint pencil markings from the quilting. Gorgeous quilt, but
something seemed "wrong" to me because it just looked so new. And the fabric
didn't look "old" to me. About 2 years later I realized that I had been
shown a pristine quilt made entirely of this centennial print and that not
only was it "the real thing" it was a prime example. The quilt wasn't for
sale and I don't know where it is now, but wow. . . I wish I could have a
"do-over" of that experience!!!! As I recall the owner had bought it "for a
song" (her words) at a farm sale in Northern Nebraska.

Your fabric line is gorgeous. The eagles print is my favorite and of course
the brown because that's what was in the quilt I saw all those years ago.

Stephanie Whitson



--0-68386562-1256136924:20148--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kent State Museum - Embroidery Exhibit
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Wed, 21 Oct 2009 22:26:26 -0400


Look and this and droll................... What a fabulous museum!

http://dept.kent.edu/museum/exhibit/embroidery/collectionINTRO.htm

Lynn Lancaster Gorges
New Bern, NC