Subject: RE: Hair ornaments
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Oct 2009 10:57:18 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

We're looking at cartoon satire on female excess, aren't we? I love
that the old gentleman has had his wig uplifted by one of the
creations. The headgear actually reminds me a little of Marge
Simpson's blue barnet.

Although having seen a dress in the V&A with a supporting frame the
size and shape of an upright piano, I'll believe anything is possible
<G>

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fries Museum - Netherlands
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sun, 25 Oct 2009 09:00:59 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2


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When we went to the Fries Museum in the Netherlands (Deb Roberts Tour) las
t year we saw some extremely LARGE lace hats that looked as if the women
would have flown away ---- Flying Nun style. Here is a photo below of one
. It is rather tame compared to others.
http://www.friesmuseum.nl/index.php?id3D2594 We all commented that the
Netherlands are known for WIND and it seemed so odd that for a time perio
d LARGE hats were the style. Sure many a child had fun chasing those down.

I think we also saw some at the Open Air Museum. It had an incredible coll
ection of textiles as well. http://www.openluchtmuseum.nl/en/index.php?pid
3D85 peruse the slides and you will see an example of one "sort of" large
item around the neck.
Back to cooking turkey, dressing, etc. My son who lives in DC will not be
home for Thanksgiving. He is home this weekend for a friend's wedding, so
I am doing an early Thanksgiving dinner for my family. It works for us.
We might just have steamed oysters and go fishing for the REAL Thanksgivi
ng!
Lynn Lancaster Gorges
New Bern

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Subject: Re: Fries Museum - Netherlands
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Oct 2009 13:56:18 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3

Wonderful hat Lyn! It seems to be about the same width as her skirt -
made me think of cat's whiskers; they could use the hat to judge
whether the skirt would pass through a gap!

Sally Ward


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Subject: American Fabrics: Winter 1950-51, Spring 1951
From: "Louise" <ltiemannstny.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Oct 2009 09:08:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Hello, a friend just gave me a couple of fabric ad / sample books from
American Fabrics, published quarterly by Reporter Publications. No. 16
Winter 1950-51 and No. 17 Spring 1951. They have interesting articles and
ads for fabrics, plus swatches of several of the new fabrics being
introduced. They are fun to read and look at. The Spring 1951 is devoted
to the Paisley - but no mention of the term Persian Pickle.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: off topic but relevant question
From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Oct 2009 12:21:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

BlankLadies, I have had some recent experiences with the newest update to
Microsoft Word and am wondering if any of you can advise me about the perils
or not of updating. The newest version saves its documents in a ".docx"
format which is not compatible with the older versions. I've learned the
hard way that attachments sent via Outlook in the ".docx" format cannot be
opened unless you also have the updated version. You get an error message
and if you ignore it you get unreadable "garbage". The bottom line is that
the sender has to save their document in the older version's format before
it can be sent to you to be opened successfully.

The update is now available on the commercial market and we are all going to
be having this problem with greater frequency, but an article I spotted in
the newspaper says updating Microsoft XP is very difficult and time
consuming and that it has to be treated as a "custom" install.

Do any of you who are more technologically competent than I am have any
advice? I don't think I'm up for the complications, but I've already had
enough "encounters" to know that ignoring it won't work, that this isn't
going away, and that I/we are going to have to do something...but what????

Comments or advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Kathy Moore
Lincoln, NE



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Hair ornaments
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Oct 2009 11:28:47 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

Leah,

The period is 1834 and it is a Spanish cartoon making fun of the size of
the ladies hair combs.
Jan

Leah Zieber wrote:
> Hi -
>
> I know this doesn't relate to quilts, but perhaps someone out there is a
> costume cross over and can tell me what in the world these ladies are
> wearing on their heads? The period is 1854 and I'm thinking France. but







----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: off topic but relevant question
From: "Susan Bleimehl" <bleimehltds.net>
Date: Sun, 25 Oct 2009 13:12:08 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

All you need to do to read the .docx files with an older version of MS Word
is to download and run the compatibility patch from MS. My work has the
Office 2007 version, but I have Office 2003 on my home computer. I installed
the patch and I can read anything I create at work on my home computer.

Find the Compatibility Patch at:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID941b3470-3ae9-4aee-
8f43-c6bb74cd1466&displaylangen

Installing this will let you read any of the new docx's and give you time to
see whether you want to upgrade your office suite to the 2007 version. I
myself am not upgrading, but if you're working off a really old version,
then you might consider it. Try the patch first and see how that works for
you.

Susan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: off topic but relevant question
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>

When I began using Offfice 2007 I "saved" in the earlier format anything
that I was doing to send out to others as I quickly heard back that the
new format was not readable by some. Now that I see a download is
available for the recipient enabling them to read docx documents it can
be done either way. There are features in 07 that I really like but I
will say the whole 'ribbon' thing is quite a change and takes getting
used to but it's inevitable, isn't it? We'll be forced to move forward
from 03 eventually - all of us.
jean

-----

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: off topic but relevant question
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>

FYI: I have the Word 7 (and Vista), and if I'm sharing documents I save them in the 2003 format,a feature which 7 kindly provides:Save as: Word 2003 doc.

Ask folks who are sending you these documents to save them in that manner, if you can.


(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR




________________________________
From: Kathy Moore <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Sun, October 25, 2009 10:21:52 AM
Subject: [qhl] off topic but relevant question

Ladies, I have had some recent experiences with the newest update to Microsoft Word and am wondering if any of you can advise me about the perils or not of updating. The newest version saves its documents in a ".docx" format which is not compatible with the older versions. I've learned the hard way that attachments sent via Outlook in the ".docx" format cannot be opened unless you also have the updated version. You get an error message and if you ignore it you get unreadable "garbage". The bottom line is that the sender has to save their document in the older version's format before it can be sent to you to be opened successfully.

The update is now available on the commercial market and we are all going to be having this problem with greater frequency, but an article I spotted in the newspaper says updating Microsoft XP is very difficult and time consuming and that it has to be treated as a "custom" install.

Do any of you who are more technologically competent than I am have any advice? I don't think I'm up for the complications, but I've already had enough "encounters" to know that ignoring it won't work, that this isn't going away, and that I/we are going to have to do something...but what????

Comments or advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Kathy Moore
Lincoln, NE

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Hair ornaments
From: "Lisa Kay Ruetz" <quilltraol.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Oct 2009 11:53:04 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

> I know this doesn't relate to quilts, but perhaps someone out there is a
> costume cross over and can tell me what in the world these ladies are
> wearing on their heads? The period is 1854 and I'm thinking France. but
> oh my - it's a crack up!
> Ebay Item number 130338634692\
> Leah Z

Leah,
It's Buenos Aries. Cesar Hipolito Bacle was a famous lithographer. These
lithos are making fun of the giant combs that were in fashion and reached
a meter in size around 1834.
Lisa
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Belles NQR
From: Crm793aol.com
Date: Sun, 25 Oct 2009 21:31:36 EDT
X-Message-Number: 11


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Okay, one of the 'quiet' Texans speaking up.

My great-great-grandfather lived in Marion County, Alabama before and
during the Civil War. There was one Union regiment from this county and C.C.
Roller and several of his friends, neighbors and relatives joined the 1st
Alabama Cavalry in late 1862. Yes, a union soldier in a confederate State.
He was shot in the leg and captured a year later. We don't know how long he
was held prisoner that first time but he was captured and sent to
Andersonville in May of 1864. The prison was closed later that year and the
prisoners were sent to other places. He was paroled in November of that year at
Savannah. He joined his family in Tennessee, they had been run out of
their home in Alabama because he had joined the union army. In 1882 the whole
family moved to Texas because they had heard about the 'better
opportunities' here. AND THAT IS WHY I'M A TEXAN.

On another note, Polly, my family has lived around Gainesville for the past
50 years. What part of the county did your ancestor live?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: off topic but relevant question
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Oct 2009 10:24:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Kathy:

I'll second the comment that the Word 2007 compatibility patch works very
well. However, for your future information, upgrading the operating system
(XP to Vista or Windows 7) is unrelated to your Microsoft Word issue. Word
2007 runs on both the XP and Vista operating systems, as does Word 2003.
(I'm assuming that Windows 7 handles Word 2003 because I haven't tested it -
if not, shame on Microsoft!)

With your compatibility patch you should be able to stay right where you are
with Word 2003. Or if you decide to upgrade to Word 2007, you don't need to
also upgrade the operating system (XP). The entire suite of MS Office 2007
does take getting used to - personally, since I really dislike Word anyway,
it's just made it more annoying than before.

Hope this helps.

Dale Drake in Indiana (programmer/analyst by day, quilt historian 24/7)




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: southern conference
From: Crm793aol.com
Date: Mon, 26 Oct 2009 12:21:26 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2


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Hi Gaye,

I think you just did the announcement! Stephanie and I will pin down a
date that doesn't interfere with the Dallas Quilt Show. The distance is
about 30 miles but there is no open prairie between the two cities.

I have a new antique 9-block southern album quilt and have a question about
one of the blocks. It is Brackman's #46.46 (Encyclopedia of Applique).
The source is plate 56 of the 'Quilt Engagement Calendar 1978'. I can't
locate this so if anybody has it could you tell me about the quilt and
whether it is pictured in another source.

Carolyn Miller

-------------------------------1256574086--


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Subject: Re: southern conference
From: Sarah Hough <dougandsarah1gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Oct 2009 12:45:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

--0016e6d78564fd7f170476da219d
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1

Did I miss an announcement? Just got the email from Carolyn Miller to Gaye
but didn't get an announcement.

Sarah

--0016e6d78564fd7f170476da219d--


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Subject: Re: re Andersonville and "infamous"
From: hknight453aol.com
Date: Mon, 26 Oct 2009 14:11:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Hiranya- I am so glad you are doing well. You sent me a piece of
fabric with koalas some years ago. The winners tend to wirte the
histories, so it's not suprising you hadn't heard the Southern view.
The War Between the States/Civil War took place over 140 years ago, but
the wounds have never been fully resolved. Sherman marched through
Georgia, vowing that the South would not rise again for a hundred
years. It has taken that much and more for economic recovery, and
wages are still lower there.

Heather


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: re Andersonville and "infamous"
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Oct 2009 14:57:54 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Just as a postscript to this, there is an interesting article in the NYT
about the re-evaluation of the Battle of Agincourt...it kind of relates to
what's been discussed here.
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: no announcement
From: Crm793aol.com


Oops,

Just shows I know very little about using the computer.

Thanks to those who let me know about the 'pineapple' block. Need to do
more research on the other blocks in the quilt.

Carolyn



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 9 block quilt
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>


Carolyn
The quilt in the '78 issue is 16 identical applique blocks set straight
(4 by 4)within sashing (red with a green edge along each side) It is c.
1860, PA origin and 104" x 102". Named Pineapplie of Hospitality and
from America Hurrah Antiques, NYC at that time. Background quilting
appears to be small wineglass (interlocking or overlapping circles)
consistently out to the edge including the sashing and border created by
the sash. The block itself looks like by-the-piece quilting and it seems
to be reverse applique on the pineapple but hard to be sure of that.
Solid red and green on white. At those measurements the blocks must be
20+ " each.


jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: MS Word XP update
From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Oct 2009 19:49:43 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

Blank
Just to update everyone. Elaine sent me a link to a Microsoft patch for my
XP 2003 software version. I installed it and it seems to work very well.

This patch gives us a solution to the problem of the disparity between the
newest version and our older versions. I can recommend it based on my
results.

Thanks to Elaine and to all who sent me informative replies. I'm so glad I
thought to ask ya'll about it.

Kathy Moore

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pineapple block From: Crm793aol.com Date: Tue, 27 Oct 2009 09:13:11 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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I found another quilt with this appliqued pineapple. It is in the New England Quilt Museum and is pictured on page 40 of their book by Jennifer Gilbert. Both of these quilts are from Pennsylvania but the album quilt is supposed to be from the south, pre civil war era.

Carolyn

-------------------------------1256649190--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fabric identification question From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 27 Oct 2009 08:58:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

At the Houston Festival a couple of weeks ago I found a Tom Sawyer fabric a vendor was using as a drape. It's a fabric that was probably released a year or two ago by Windham Fabrics (in association with the Mark Twain House & Museum; it's from the Mark Twain Collection style No. 27585 -- according to the selvage), and I missed it. I was able to grovel with the vendor and get a yard of her personal stash of this fabric and I was grateful. It has large vignettes of several scenes from the book.

When I got home from Houston, I did a google to see if I could find any more of this fabric. I found an offering on Etsy of a VINTAGE version of this fabric, probably the inspiration for this modern fabric. The vintage has similar scenes to the "reproduction" but not exactly. I can't tell how wide it was originally, since the selvage along one side has been removed. What is left is about 30". It might have been curtain material, since there is evidence that it was probably seamed together to match breaks in the vignettes. It is cotton and broadcloth weight. It has a blue background and large vignettes from the book. One that especially caught my eye was the skinny dipping scene. It also has a fishing scene, a picnic scene, and, of course, the fence painting scene.

My groveling with the vendor for what turned out to be reproduction goods (no problem to me, I love it) started with the reason why I HAD to have that fabric. My parents were born on the same day and knew each other in grade school. In eighth grade, they were both in their 8th grade musical, "Tom Sawyer." This is one of those family history stories we grew up knowing. 30 years ago my parents divorced. About 7 years ago they were both diagnosed with Alzheimer's. My mother died last year, and when we went through some of her boxes of personal ephemera, we found the program for the play. It listed the cast; my mom was Mary and my dad was Huck Finn. I had made a quilt with vintage 30s fabrics and had used a reproduction fabric with a small print of Tom Sawyer scenes (nothing like the fabric described above) as a commemoration of my parents' event in 1938. I made a copy of the program and printed it onto fabric to sew onto the back of that quilt. I was thrilled for that documentation.

Fast forward a few months after my mom's death, when my son and I were visiting my dad. He is now in an assisted living facility and can be coherent but very forgetful. Sometimes he remembers my name. His favorite activity when we visit is to bring out his scrapbooks and tell us stories. This is great, because he's now showing me things I had never seen before. My son was browsing through one of the scrapbooks and said, "Mom, you're not going to believe this. Here is the script for the Tom Sawyer play, and it's signed by cast members, including Nana."

So the plot thickens. I really want to make a Tom Sawyer story quilt about my parents. I have 5 yards of this vintage fabric and 1 yard of the reproduction. I'll probably put the vintage on the back, so I don't have to cut it up (that's my favorite trick for fabulous fabric I can't cut into --- show it off on the back).

Finally, I'll get to my question. Does anyone know an approximate date/era for the "vintage" Tom Sawyer fabric? I'm guessing 50s.

Thanks!!

Barb

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have made a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org Mission accomplished, but I continue.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pineapple From: Crm793aol.com Date: Tue, 27 Oct 2009 12:31:02 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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The quilt that Jean described from the Quilt Engagement Calendar appears to be the same one owned by the New England Quilt Museum.

Carolyn

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Subject: Computer science and research possibilities in The Quilt Index From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Tue, 27 Oct 2009 14:12:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Dear list subscribers,

The Quilt Index team has been working with some computer scientists who are interested in knowing what kind of research questions (for quilt studies or other studies) could be asked by developing and applying algorithms for pattern and color recognition on the data in the Quilt Index AND what kind of other research tools (i.e. different kinds of visual searches) would be useful to researchers (again, for quilt-related studies but other studies as well)

For instance, one example that discussed was content image retrieval (with one image chosen, find me other quilts that look like this one).

The Quilt Index team is looking for suggestions of both research questions that image recognition tools might help investigate as well as suggestions for new searching tools.

Perhaps there are even some computer scientists on this list who are quiltmakers or quilt scholars....?

With thanks in advance for your responses,

Marsha Marsha MacDowell, Ph.D. Editor, H-Quilts Co-Director, H-Quilts

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Subject: Kyra Hicks tonight From: Tracy Jamar <tjamaroptonline.net> Date: Tue, 27 Oct 2009 18:58:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Anyone interested in listening and/or talking to Kyra HIcks, tonight is the night to do so via Kim Wulfert's tele-conference call. It starts at 5 Pacific time and 8 Eastern.

The information on how is at http://womenonquilts.blogspot.com/ scroll down to the second entry, it's easy peasy and VERY interesting!

Tracy Jamar

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Subject: Kim Wulfert's interview with Kyra Hicks on Harriet Powers From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 28 Oct 2009 04:36:31 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

--0-1365628954-1256729791:20702 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Tracy,

Hello! The Women on Quilts interview with me about the new Harriet Power s book is now posted on Kimberly Wulfert's blog. We had a good time!  Thanks to all those on this list who listened in and those who asked questi ons. It was such a pleasure to talk about the new findings regarding Mrs .. Powers: the lost 1882 Lord's Supper quilt, the connection with Keokuk, Io wa, the story of the little boy who drew on the Pictorial quilt now at the  Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and more!

http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/WOQ_library/Women_On_Quilts_audio_library ..html

I look forward to listening to other interviews Kim hosts! What a fabulo us service for quilt history.

Best, Kyra

Kyra E. Hicks www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com

--0-1365628954-1256729791:20702--

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 27, 2009 From: <aquilterwindstream.net> Date: Wed, 28 Oct 2009 6:20:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Tom Sawyer quilt... a great idea, Barb. Can't help with the date, but an idea popped into mind. Maybe use the scraps to make a fabric book that includes various images and memories? It seems as if that might be stimulatng to pick up and peruse. Nancy

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt indexing From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 28 Oct 2009 09:18:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

--0-1687645224-1256746696:53056 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

In looking through the quilt index and other on-linecollections as I sur veyed quilts for recent projects of mine, I was interested to see the under -attention paid to the variety of the fabrics in most pieces. It was tough  to findlistings parsed to indicate what types of fabrics were in any par ticular example beyond using general terms like wool, cotton, etc.  Reading howthe existance of suiting swatch quilts, for example,relate d closely to the Industrial Revolution anddevelopments in the mens cloth ing industry,it would have been helpful tofindgreater definition o fa quilt'sfabric contents (beyond what I recognized from small photos on screen).  As a dealer, I know what fabrics are in a quilt is of primary importance,  because that is what is seen first no matter what the pattern, andtha t is what will present issues of condition and viability over time which af fect sellers' and buyers' investment decisions.  Some fabrics in quiltscause buyers and sellers both to avoid them becaus e the quiltsmay require special handling, orimply inevitableissues about cleanability, durability,and longevity.For example, a blue cha mbray from the early 20th century, though older,would likely be more dur able than a solid blue cotton produced duringWorld War II years which might disintegrate afterafew washings.  Things like stitch counts, whether the binding is folded over from the back or applied, comeup forconsideration later, or even rarely, in valuin g the general line of quilts in the marketplace.  Any thoughts to categorizing the cotton, wool, silk, etc. as to probable type orsource of those materials? Not everything was purchased yard goo ds.  Laura Fisher --0-1687645224-1256746696:53056--

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Subject: Re: help identifying pieced pattern From: KJB139aol.com Date: Wed, 28 Oct 2009 17:24:05 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

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I have been searching through all the books I own and also searching on line. I cannot find the name of this pattern. I'll do my best to describe it and hopefully someone can help. The quilt has a solid background color, usually light. The color I saw was yellow. There are large blocks maybe 16" square in a different light color. The one I saw was light blue. Inside the 16" squares were smaller squares set on point (maybe 3 or 4") and there were four of them across and four of the down for 16 small squares on point. They were blue. Each of the 16" blocks contained the same background color but the smaller squares were different shades of blue.

I thought at first it was a checkerboard quilt but....then I knew of something similar and it was called cobblestones.

help!

Kathy

-------------------------------1256765045--

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Subject: re-sending suggestion to indexes identify fabrics in more detail From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 28 Oct 2009 22:45:03 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

HI - I'm sending this again in rich text to see if the AO3D signs do not i nterfere.............

In looking through the quilt index and other on-line collections as I sur veyed quilts for recent projects of mine, I was interested to see the under -attention paid to the variety of the fabrics in most pieces. It was tough  to findlistings parsed to indicate what types of fabrics were in any par ticular example beyond using general terms like wool, cotton, etc.  Reading how the existence of suiting swatch quilts, for example,relate d closely to the Industrial Revolution and developments in the mens cloth ing industry,it would have been helpful tofindgreater definition o fa quilt'sfabric contents (beyond what I recognized from small photos on screen).  As a dealer, I know what fabrics are in a quilt is of primary importance,  because that is what is seen first no matter what the pattern, andtha t is what will present issues of condition and viability over time which af fect sellers' and buyers' investment decisions.  Some fabrics in quiltscause buyers and sellers both to avoid them becaus e the quiltsmay require special handling, orimply inevitableissues about cleanability, durability,and longevity. For example, a blue cha mbray from the early 20th century, though older,would likely be more dur able than a solid blue cotton produced during World War II years which might disintegrate afterafew washings.  Things like stitch counts, whether the binding is folded over from the back or applied, come up for consideration later, or even rarely, in valuin g the general line of quilts in the marketplace.  Any thoughts to categorizing the cotton, wool, silk, etc. as to probable type orsource of those materials? Not everything was purchased yard goo ds.  Laura Fisher

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Alden O'Brien on museum donations From: "Debby Cooney" <resmarcomcast.net> Date: Wed, 28 Oct 2009 21:15:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I have been reading some of the recent thread about whether you can  control what a museum does after you've donated something. The short answer is,  as has already been explained, No. But let me, as a museum curator  sympathetic to donors' concerns, but bound by museum practices and ethics, explain a little further.

The best thing you can do when seeking to donate an object-quilt or what have you, whether it's a family heirloom or part of a carefully built-up collection-is do your research beforehand to choose the right place for  it. Find out what their storage and display conditions are-more important longterm considerations than the unlikely possibility of deaccessioning. (Better yet, offer to buy an acid free box and paper for the donation-or whatever they use--or make a donation towards supplies; there is no such thing as a free gift when you are a museum, and a donation to offset  storage costs would always be appreciated.)

People incorrectly think that museums constantly are getting rid of collections, whereas in fact this is quite rare. The usual reasons for deaccessioning are that the object didn't fit the collection in the  first place, not a random housecleaning or a new curator's different taste. Mostly, museums simply hold on to stuff for decades even if it doesn't really belong there or storage is crammed. We don't just say "hm, I, the  new curator, am not as fond of crazy quilts as the last one was, think I'll deaccession a bunch of them," or even "gee, getting crowded here, better dump a few quilts." Rather, we say, "Better get very, very picky about  what we accept, we have so little room," and "Well! Guess I don't need any  more crazy quilts."

(Please remember this next time you want to feel offended that someone  turns your donation offer down: it probably is no reflection on the worthiness  of the quilt, but the fact that the museum already has similar examples and  no more room to duplicate the collection.) It's a big deal to  deaccession-it's not done lightly and museums do it rarely and cautiously; mostly they  are very selective taking donations, knowing they are making a very, very longterm commitment. I don't know where this idea took hold in the quilt community that deaccessioning is a common practice and every museum is suspect--it's just not so. A reputable museum will say no, thanks to  things it doesn't think it should have or can take responsibility for for the  long term; we only take what we intend to keep.

Once you've donated something, however, you have to let it go. It's the  same as if you've sold it, or left it to someone in your will. You no longer  own it. You have had the care of it for a portion of its "life," and now  it's moved on. You do not have permanent right to weigh in on its future, any more than you can tell the new owners of your house not to get rid of  your favorite wallpaper, or tell someone when or how to use a gift you gave  them. Nor do you have the right to claim it back if the museum does get rid of  it. The AAM presumes you have taken a tax deduction on the gift, and it  would be illegal to just take it back. They don't want museums and donors making  nice little deals with each other-think of the potential for fraud. Getting  rid of an object is done either by finding another suitable collection for  it or by selling it at public auction. A museum that promises to give stuff  back should not be doing that-they could promise to notify the donors of the transfer to another collection or of the auction, but that's all.

I know it's a wrench to give away something you care about.  Understanding that, we let donors and even other relatives of our objects' owners or makers to come "visit" things in storage. I also try to notify donors  when I put their things on display, within about 10 years, so they can  hopefully see the exhibit or at least know that their donation is being used and appreciated. But if you give something away, you have given it away.  Choose a place you can basically trust and let go.

Alden O'Brien, Curator of Costume and Textiles, DAR Museum:  aobriendar.org

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Subject: New Digital Index to Indiana Records From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2009 09:39:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

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For those of you who might be trying to track people in Indiana, the Indiana State Archives has just issued the following announcement concerning vital records.

A new online platform from the Indiana State Archives connects genealogists and researchers to millions of digital records. The * Indiana State Digital Archives <http://www.digitalarchives.in.gov/default.aspx> *simplifies the process of searching the State Archives' holdings by enabling patrons to instantly locate records from their own computer, saving them time and money.

The Digital Archives differs from * Indiana Memory <http://www.indianamemory.in.gov>* because it is record-based. It provides individual listings of vital records available in the State Archives' collections as opposed to Indiana memory, which is document/manuscript-based and provides a digital copy of original Indiana newspapers, historic documents and state publications, among others. The Digital Archives provides listings of commonly sought-after materials such as death, prison, military, and naturalization records. However, it also contains many rare indices like slave and adoption records, and registries such as negro and mulattos by county, the Indiana School for the Deaf, and the Soldiers and Sailors Children's home.

Please visit * www.digitalarchives.in.gov <http://www.digitalarchives.in.gov/default.aspx>* often as its online platform is continually updated with new indices and resources. If you or a patron cannot locate a desired record and believe it may be found at the State Archives, feel free to contact a collection specialist at (317) 591-5222 or * arcicpr.in.gov <mailto:arcicpr.in.gov>* for assistance.

-- Mary G. Persyn mary.persynvalpo.edu Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917

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Subject: Re: Alden O'Brien on museum donations From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2009 09:12:28 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Excellent essay on the topic. Thank you, Alden.Judy Schwender National Quilt MuseumPaducah, KY_

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Subject: Donations From: Jonathan Holstein <jonfourscore.com> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2009 11:32:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

The subject of donations, raised in a previous posting, is a fascinating one that involves public policy, tax codes, economics, ever-evolving museum standards, fashion and taste, and, well, just about everything. A number of people have posted informative responses here to a question about donations to museums. I will add a few thoughts about a subject seldom discussed, and which museum personnel are constrained from discussing with potential donors: values, as in monetary, to the donor.

Donations are crucial to the growth of museum collections. While well-funded museums can make significant purchases, these days the money for them usually comes from funds solicited from trustees and drawn from established endowments and member’s groups. But certainly of equal importance are acquisitions acquired through donations; these, obviously, do not draw on increasingly scarce available purchase funds and thinner trustees pocketbooks. Sometimes, people simply want to give something to a museum, historical society, etc., and that is the end of it. Other times they are interested in its donation value, as it may usually be subtracted from federal taxes. I have seen this change remarkably over the years. At one point several decades ago, people could claim dollar-for-dollar deductions from their federal taxes for the appraised values of donated objects. They had to have been held a certain length of time, as they still do (at least a year before a deduction for donation can be claimed) etc., but the situation was ripe for abuse, and it was changed to a formula with a maximum based on peoples’ incomes.

As one commentator has noted, things are very different in different-sized and funded institutions. In general, however, storage costs are a major consideration when institutions consider gifts. Things don’t just go from your attic to theirs, but to their storage facilities, which, say in an art museum, is a very expensive piece of real estate with an associated and necessary staff, curators, registrars, art handlers, etc. Something has been in your attic at no cost to anyone for several generations. It is donated, and now becomes part of a public/private trust with real costs attached IN PERPETUITY, or until it is deaccessioned. Every institution has or should have a “thanks but no thanks” protocol, I have written several, so they can gracefully refuse things that do not meet their missions or functional requirements enough to be worth the costs of holding and preserving them. But, as one commentator here noted, most curators can advise prospective donors of alternate possible institutions for their donations.

Donations values, if donors intend to take a tax deduction for the objects they are donating, must be set by a qualified appraiser, and the IRS has recently established new guidelines for that. Receiving institutions and their personnel (curators, etc.) cannot and must not offer opinions about value; this is, logically enough, seen as a conflict of interest.

One museum I have had an association with has both fine arts and living history components, so it has what I consider a good policy, dividing objects they want, basically, into art (permanent collection) and non-art (educational department), which is to say, arbitrary, though necessary, divisions, which could be given many different labels. Things accepted for the permanent collection receive the full preservation and conservation treatment. It is understood that things accepted for “education” may be handled by curators, docents and in some cases the public, not necessarily with white gloves, displayed in uncontrolled environments and eventually, perhaps, simply used up. Donors are fully informed about where offered objects would go and how they would be treated. Both functions for this organization are of equal value, and which collection the object is accepted for has nothing to do with its value for donation to the donor.

Respectfully posted by Jonathan Holstein

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Subject: double wedding ring with star From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2009 16:12:05 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

See ebay auction 140355891933 in the second picture, the Laura Wheeler pattern (newspaper clipping) for "Golden Wedding Ring Quilt"

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Subject: Cotton production history in U.K. From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2009 20:17:45 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Just stumbled on this website tonight.

http://www.cottontown.org/page.cfm?pageid319

On another note, while in the U.K.on one of Deb Roberts wonderful tours in 2007, I found an interesting read in a local bookshop. It is a novel about the author's exploits as a textile salesman in 1950's Lancashire. He wove a lot of the history of the demise of the textile trade in England into the novel. Interesting read...."The Broken Thread" by Walter Pennington.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: RE: potholders From: "tpfletcherearthlink.net" <tpfletcherearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 29 Oct 2009 19:15:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

One of the potholder posts that explains exactly what a potholder quilt is, but not why it is called a pot holder. Tam

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Subject: Sending in Plain Text From: Jon Holstein <jonfourscore.com> Date: Fri, 30 Oct 2009 07:27:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

It is easy to send your posts to the Quilt History list so they appear in an easily read format without the distracting and extraneous html and other command signals that didn’t produce the expected results because of the way the list is constructed, the broken lines and spread out text, etc. that come from sending it in html or mime,or rich text. If you use Microsoft word, once you are in email mode and after you have clicked “Write” in the tool bar and a page for your email has come up, before you write or send it, go to “Options” in the upper tool bar and click on it, scroll down the drop-down box that appears to “Format” and click on it, another drop down box will appear, click on “Plain Text Only.” That's it. Remember that normal punctuation marks will appear, and you can capitalize, but things like Bold and Underline and Italics and other such commands will not work, but will mess up your text. If you send in Plain Text Only the message will be posted in continuous, normally compressed text with appropriate paragraph breaks and no extraneous command signals that didn’t do anything and make reading the posts difficult. I am not sure what the procedure is in Mac computers to send in Plain Text, but someone out there is and perhaps could post it. Respectfully posted by Jonathan Holstein

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 30, 2009--potholders From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2009 07:51:40 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Potholders are called potholders because the individually finished block lo oks like a potholder used to take hot pots off stoves. I suspect that during the Civil War period that is exactly how they made "potholders" to  use in cooking--afterall they didn't have supermarkets like we do today. It's a cute term for a small finished block. By the way, it is also an  easy way to make a few bucks. I sale my entirely by hand made "potholder s" for 20 bucks and they go like hotcakes (pun intended). best, Don

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Subject: crib quilts From: "Cinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net> Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2009 16:36:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I wish you all could have been with us on Wednesday to see Debby Cooney and Polly Mello's collections of crib quilt from 1820 to 1940. Arranged chronologically the program took us from early chintz  appliqu to kits of the mid-20th century with a focus on imitation and innovation. We Started with Mary Ball's Framed Center with a Lemoye Star in the middle surrounded by 7 borders of half square triangles and plain  strips. The quilt which has a tape binding descended in a collateral line  through the family of George Washington's mother, nee Mary Ball. When someone mentions Maryland quilts you probably think first of the Baltimore  Albums., I think the finest MD quilts were made in Frederick County. A  Delectable Mountains, circa 1820, had an indienne print border and the palm tree  chintz in the blocks. A printed center medallion, christened the "Polly block"  by Merikay Waldvogel at the AQSG Seminar in San Jose, was surrounded by diamonds. Another pre-printed center, Basket of Fruit, framed by half square triangles came from Lancaster Co., PA. A Lone Star, circa 1830,  had chintz setting pieces, drab colors and swag quilting.  Another Frederick Co. beauty was a pristine chintz appliqu with a reverse appliqu border of laurel leaves with red bows at the corners.  The Apple Pie Ridge Star from Franklin Co., PA which we saw last week at FVF made an appearance. A two-sided scrappy 4-Patch with a One Patch back, circa 1840, offered a joyful variety of great fabrics. This is a quilt  you could look at all day. I think the 19th century baby liked it too. A  Tulip pattern taken directly from a woven coverlet had an appliqud border  of seaweed-like leaves. Red, green and yellow, it was made in central PA around 1840. A Frederick Co. quilter made a Whig Rose with a vine and  daisy border and piped edge circa 1850. The second half of the century was well-represented. 1860 seems early for Ocean Waves but that's what the fabrics told us. The blocks  were contained by a border of diamonds. A pink, yellow and brown Delectable Mountains with a striped back was from PA (of course). A very scrappy 9-Patch variation from York Co. had red setting blocks and a brown  border. Also from PA a President's Wreath with orange flowers and a pale pink border, circa 1870, really appealed to me (was it the orange?). Tiny 9-Patches on point, circa 1880, in various red prints with white were  simply adorable. Stars from York Co., circa 1890, were made of orange and red prints with dark floral setting blocks  Polly had redwork patterns dated 1886 with instruction for pricking and pouncing, even a container of the pouncing powder. The collection  of embroidered quilts with motifs which appeal to children was amazing.  Polly talked about the characters she refers to as "Imaginary Friends" in her latest program, Brownies, Water Babies, Snow Babies, Campbell Soup Kids  and, of course, Sunbonnet Babies, all of whom appeared on quilts. I did not  know that the earliest Sunbonnet Babies have a flap on the back of the  bonnet. We saw two panels which appeared to show Kewpies hanging their baby  brother. There was no end to the various patterns of nursery rhyme embroideries. Nobody else could identify the block label "Shave a Pig, so I promised  to include this: Barber, barber shave a pig. How many hairs to make a wig? Four and twenty that's enough. Give the barber a pinch of snuff. An interesting Ocean Waves, circa 1900, had the lozenge shaped blocks set to form a large X. The background was faux patchwork. We  even saw a couple of Amish baby quilts, one from western Pa and the other  from Holmes Co., Ohio. Polly and Debby are incredibly generous in sharing their fabulous quilts. We are blessed with a huge selection of marvelous books, but  they really can't replace being able to see the real thing. Cinda on the Eastern Shore

Lucinda R. Cawley 104 Lakeview Drive Salisbury, MD 21804 410-334-6303 lrcawleycomcast.net