Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 19, 2009
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>

Thank you to Sue Reich for her wise words.

Also, is there a place I can view QHL digests on line? I missed getting a
few of them this past week. I really wanted to read them as there was a
topic that I was interested in.
I thought I could go to some site and see them?
I did not receive digests on the 14th and 15th. I did ask if someone might
forward them to me, and no one did.
Linda Heminway
Plaistow, NH

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: More on Breast Cancer awareness
From: "Avalon" <malthausidcnet.com>

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services with Kathleen Sebelius as
director and the Secretary of Health. She just released this statement
(sort of) contradicting the Tasks Force "Indeed, I would be very surprised
if any private insurance company changed its mammography coverage decisions
as a result of this action."

The phrase "private insurance company" caught my attention. If the
government is successful in taking over the health industry, they would set
the coverage guidelines.

Mary




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Poole Forge Antique Quilt Display
From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net>


Make every effort to get to the Poole Forge Exhibit Barb Garrett is working on when you go to Lancaster next spring. I made a special effort to see the first one and I am so glad I did. The quilts were wonderful and the opportunity to see quilts that are privately owned is always exciting. Barb and the others who put the display together did a great job. The mansion is a lovely house and my husband enjoyed the outbuildings and the restoration that was going on there. It's worth the little side trip to see the display. Thanks, Barb, for doing another show!
Judy Knorr

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: EARLY 19th CENTURY BABY QUILT - WHITE
From: "Betsy Lewis" <lwslewiswritingservices.com>
Date: Fri, 20 Nov 2009 16:54:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

This is my second attempt at the list. My first attempt from the other night
has not been delivered. I hope this one works!

Good evening everyone. I'm pretty much a lurker here but you have all taught
me a lot. But now I have a couple of questions. I have recently come across
a baby/crib quilt. It is all white with white quilting. It is approximately
42" x 43" and the front and back are made from two strips. The batting
appears to be flannel. From some accompanying documentation, the quilt may
have been made in the 1800-1822 time period and probably from the latter
part of that period. The maker has been identified (not proven) however the
baby this quilt was made for was not mentioned. My belief is it could have
been made for one of two babies that were stillborn or died at birth, by the
grandmother of the baby.

One baby this could have been made for was the baby who died in childbirth
along with the mother. There were no other children born prior to this
child.

One other baby this could have been made for was for a stillborn baby who
had siblings before and after if the math is done.

I am trying to figure out, if possible, in which family (the babies would
have been cousins) would this quilt have been made for.

My theory is that the quilt probably would have been made for the baby who,
along with its mother, died in childbirth. My theory continues that if the
quilt had been made for the stillborn baby and if there were other children
born later, why was this quilt not finished for a subsequent baby? Would
that have been a common practice at the time, or not? Could it also be that
it was the mother who died in childbirth the one who actually was making the
quilt and that's why it wasn't finished? Would that have been a common
practice? The grandmother was known to live quite a long time after both
babies' births.

Why would a baby quilt not be finished if there were more babies coming
within a family (given a grandmother making the quilt)?

I would love to hear from any of you on any particular theories you might
have.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Blocks for families at Ft Hood
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Fri, 20 Nov 2009 15:15:12 -0800
X-Message-Number: 5

For anyone who would like to participate in making a quilt block to honor
the families who lost loved ones in the tragedy at Ft Hood, this is one
venue I found today.

http://otterwise.blogspot.com/2009/11/quilt-blocks-for-fort-hood.html

Karen in the Islands


---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lincoln themes for Quilt Show
From: textiqueaol.com

Hi all,

A member of one of the Lincoln Society branches in OH approached me with
a question concerning a
potential quilt exhibit to be done as a continuation of the celebration of
Abraham Lincoln's life. This is
an idea without boundaries, at this point, so we discussed commemorative
fabrics, specific patterns, etc.

I won't have any official capacity with this exhibit but I would like to
give assistance to someone who has
always been there to answer certain research questions of mine. Would any
of you have some ideas I could
forward to the Society about a Lincoln-themed exhibit?

Thank you.

Jan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: WHOLE CLOTH BABY QUILT - EARLY 19TH CENTURY - QUESTIONS
From: "Betsy Lewis" <lwslewiswritingservices.com>


Good evening everyone. I'm pretty much a lurker here but you have all
taught me a lot. But now I have a couple of questions. I have recently
come across a baby/crib quilt. It is all white with white quilting. It
is approximately 42" x 43" and the front and back are made from two
strips. The batting appears to be flannel. From some accompanying
documentation, the quilt may have been made in the 1800-1822 time period
and probably from the latter part of that period. The maker has been
identified (not proven) however the baby this quilt was made for was not
mentioned. My belief is it could have been made for one of two babies
that were stillborn or died at birth, by the grandmother of the baby.

One baby this could have been made for was the baby who died in
childbirth along with the mother. There were no other children born
prior to this child.

One other baby this could have been made for was for a stillborn baby
who had siblings before and after if I have done the math correctly.

I am trying to figure out, if possible, in which family (the babies
would have been cousins) would this quilt have been made for.

My theory is that the quilt probably would have been made for the baby
who, along with its mother, died in childbirth. My theory continues that
if the quilt had been made for the stillborn baby and if there were
other children born later, why was this quilt not finished for a
subsequent baby? Would that have been a common practice at the time, or
not? Could it also be that it was the mother who died in childbirth the
one who actually was making the quilt and that's why it wasn't finished?
Would that have been a common practice? The grandmother was known to
live quite a long time after both babies' births.

Why would a baby quilt not be finished if there were more babies coming
within a family (given a grandmother making the quilt)?

I would love to hear from any of you on any particular theories or
comments you might have. Thank you very much.

Regards,
Betsy Lewis

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: EARLY 19th CENTURY BABY QUILT - WHITE
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Nov 2009 00:30:29 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

One reason not to use a baby quilt made for a child that didn't survive with
other babies would be the superstition that it was bad luck to do so.

Another reason would be heartbreak. It might have simply been too hurtful to
think of using that baby quilt because the memories that came with it hurt
too much.
And yet, it was special and so not something to be done away with. . .
something to be kept, but not used.

Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: EARLY 19th CENTURY BABY QUILT - WHITE
From: "Betsy Lewis" <lwslewiswritingservices.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Nov 2009 08:54:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks for your insight, Stephanie. I hadn't considered these two options
and ideas like this are what I'm looking for. I want to be sure to cover as
many theories as I can. I'm having some trouble finding information on this
very specific kind of question with regards to early 19th century
motherhood/childbirth and then relating that to the domestic "needlework"
kind of sphere in the home during that time. You have given me an additional
avenue to pursue.

BTW - I enjoyed your web site. I'm only slightly younger but I now have
three grandbabies and they are the most delightful little creatures in the
world. :) Thank you, again.
Betsy Lewis

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: EARLY 19th CENTURY BABY QUILT - WHITE
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Nov 2009 10:16:18 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

Betsy, I know that I ran across the "it was bad luck to use the quilt on the
next baby" theory in quilt books somewhere, but I can't for the life of me
recall whether it was stated as documented or folklore.

There is an AQSG paper on Quilts and grief that you might want to check and
an older book (been out for a while) by Sandi Fox called Small Endearments
that might shed some light on the topic as well.

Stephanie



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: More on Breast Cancer awareness
From: MargaretFaheyaol.com
 

Lots of concern here about tests. A mother of a friend of mine was sent
to have a mammogram in the hospital by her doctor. They showed nothing.
Her doctor then sent her to an oncologist anyway and she did have cancer and
operation. She was okay.
I asked my obgyn why the xrays didn't show the tumor. He said, "Did
Elizabeth Wende do the mammogram?" She is famous here for her clinic and
excellence. He said that not all are as good at xrays or reading them as others.
Could that discrepancy have figured into the numbers?

I saw the head of the Amer. Cancer saying that mammograms are not the best
test for accurate diagnosis. Is the "bandwagon" we need to be on the one
that insists better tools be developed NOW? Until women insist, little is
done. I understand that these studies were begun under Bush
administration...the mamogram and cervical tests. Shall we, say next week, hear the
results of the tests for prostrate cancer?

Love to read your thoughts all. Margaret


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: More on Breast Cancer awareness
From: JLHfwaol.com
 

Dear Margaret,
Mammograms find 95% of breast cancers by detecting calcifications
which show up on the x-ray. Not all breast cancers form calcifications, thus
they are not found. Your friend's mother likely had a suspicious lump and
for that reason was referred to the surgical oncologist. There is no
perfect test to detect breast cancer. Sometimes a sonogram is a better tool.
MRI's can be valuable under certain circumstances. Breast cancer in
pre-menopausal women is much more likely to be a rapid growing and potentially
deadly cancer than the types usually found in post menopausal women. The
recommendations that mammograms not be done on women under 50 are based on cost
of services studies. If this standard is adopted, many pre -menopausal
women will have advanced cancer when and if they are diagnosed. I personally
will continue to recommend to my patients that they begin yearly
mammograms at age 40. Janet L. Henderson MD



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Museum experiences? (VERY LONG RESPONSE)
From: ag32040 <ag32040aol.com>
 


On Oct 23, 2009, at 10:52:48 AM, "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.co
m> wrote:

From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Subject: [qhl] RE: Museum experiences? (VERY LONG RESPONSE)
Date: October 23, 2009 10:52:48 AM EDT
To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Linda...this is a big can of worms, actually. Museums (and I can only spea
k
for the small and mid sized, the big boys are a different ball game) need
to
walk a fine line of pleasing and serving the public and preservation and
collections management.
When you donate an object, yes, indeed, you must relinquish your rights.
If
we didn't do this, 98% of the people would be fine -- we'd never hear from
them and they'd be content -- it's that evil 2% that makes you pull your
hair out. I cannot afford to lose any more hair.
We have to protect ourselves. The only way of doing this is to have donors
sign deeds of gift where they understand that they are relinquishing their
rights, and especially, the rights of their heirs (another lovely kettle
of
fish). I cannot describe to you what nightmarish circumstances can occur
otherwise.
That being said, however, I do make concessions on a case by case basis.
I recently had a significant collection of prehistoric Native American
artifacts donated, with a sort of sentimental family history. I did place
a
restriction on them to return them to the family in the event
of deaccession, but I can guarantee they won't be. At least during my
tenure...and my cold carcass will most likely be dragged out of here.
Having strong, fair collections policies in place helps institutions avoid
pitfalls, but I think that you have to balance that with savvy and insight
.
Good diplomatic and well informed staff is very necessary!
Linda, the fact of the matter is there is no "law" as to what museums must
do, though we do follow a code of ethics laid down by the American
Association of Museums (you can find out more on their website). Note that
not-for-profit regulations involve financial administration and nothing
really other than that. Not-for-profits can be anything, so there would be
no way to put in place rules to govern the wide range of organizations out
there.
Most of us who work for museums are here for a reason, and it ain't the
money.
If anyone ever has concerns about a museum, do your research. Talk to BOAR
D
members, not just to a staff member, if you're really wondering. NEVER EVE
R
drop something off with a receptionist unless that receptionist is also a
curator or exec. director.A0
The bottom line is this: curators do come and go. She who likes your quilt
may not like his rifle. She may exhibit your quilt frequently and not his
gun. But I guarantee you, that will cycle around. Personally, as a
curator I try to understand as much of the collection as I can, and use it
,
but you are going to see more samplers and quilts and fraktur exhibitions
from me than woodworking tools. For years former staff ignored a hair wrea
th
in the collection here, but I've exhibited it, and now it's going out on
loan! Go figure.
Museums should be responsible record keepers. They should have good
environmental controls. They should have full time professional staff. But
as you say.."lack of money." And that, truly, is the bottom line.A0
Museums are a strange thing. It's almost like marriage. You make a promise
to the public that you are going to do these things, but it's up to the
museum to keep its word, ultimately. And the public to understand what a
museum is.A0
Candace Perry
Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center




-----Original Message-----
From: Linda Heminway [mailto:ibquiltncomcast.net]A0
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2009 6:45 AM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] Museum experiences?

Have you ever donated something of value to a museum and then beenA0
disappointed with how it was handled after that?
Do you have a say in things when you donate an item, or do you relinquish
A0
all rights afterwards? Does the museum have any obligation to carry fourth
A0
a request about how an item of value and historical significance is handle
d?

Families who donate items have very noble ideas, after all, about notA0
hoarding an item and offering their "treasure" for public use/viewing. How
A0
respectful are museums to a family's wishes?

I know many of you historians may have had experiences with things of this
A0
nature and I would appreciate hearing your stories. Some of you work orA0
volunteer for museums as well, I'd be interested to hear your perspective.

Do musuems possess a code of ethics with regard to the public and theirA0
interests? I recognize that items are ever-changing in exibits and museums
A0
lack money and staffing but when certain records, photos and information
are

requested, what kind of responsibility does a museum have, particularly if
A0
they are non-profit? I wonder if the non-profit situation also has certain
A0
regulations about how a museum must run itself.

I wonder if any of you have experiences to relay with regard to thisA0
subject?

Linda Heminway
Plaistow NHA0



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: More on Breast Cancer awareness/Janet H.
From: Jccullencrewaol.com
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2009 15:01:45 EST


Hi Janet,
Years ago I went to an oncologist who was top notch in women's health
and breast cancer. At that time, more than 30 years ago I'd say, I was
given thermography which as I recall was a thin rubberized piece that wrapped
around your chest. The room was rather cold, but the areas where there was
cancer showed up as a hot spot because of the heat the cells gave off. A
thermogram was taken and read by the doctor.
I read recently that it is being used again as a tool in breast care
management--it's safer and no radiation. Perhaps this is a case of
something old being new again. I think women will have to be advocates for their
own health and rally as a group to keep the focus on finding better
detection and a cure
Carol Grace


In a message dated 11/23/2009 9:19:05 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
JLHfwaol.com writes:

Not all breast cancers form calcifications, thus
they are not found.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Forward of interest from another list
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2009 04:46:50 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 5

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London is having their first quilt exhibition with quilts dating from 1700 to present day. Dates are 20 March - 4 July 2010, well worth a visit if you are in London during that time......and it is only a few yards from Harrods!

The URL is http://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/future_exhibs/Quilts/index.html

Kris


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: TQHF blog update - Merikay's work with The Quilt Index
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2009 20:23:11 -0800
X-Message-Number: 6

Dear QHL Members,

Thank you all for your wonderful support of the new TQHF blog which is
coming up on its first birthday the week of Christmas, all thanks to my
being snowed in for a week over Christmas last year!

A special thanks to all of you who passed the link around among your quilt
friends around the world. We have now had visitors from 32 countries! This
is wonderful! I hope you will continue to pass the word on and help us build
even more awareness of TQHF around the world.

I have just undated the blog again about Merikay Waldvogel's work with the
Quilt Index and the Index's new Signature Quilt Pilot Project. Do stop by
again and catch up on the news!

http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

Karen Alexander
Public Relations
The Quilters Hall of Fame

PS: I have also posted a story on my own blog in late October about my visit
to the Miao people of Southwestern China in 1996 and the needlework and
festivals I photographed while there. http://karenquilt.blogspot.com.
What inspired me to finally scan all the photos from hard copies was an
article I am working on about the 1971 Whitney exhibit, Jonathan Holstein
and Gail van der Hoof, and the on-going impact of new cultures on American
quilting.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Museums
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Nov 2009 08:07:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Thank you for your interesting remarks, Candace. I read them with keen
interest.

I'm wondering what you or others involved with museums think of a museum
that accepts a donation and then denies access to a person who wishes to do
extensive research on the item?

One of the reasons why I asked the question about museums awhile back was an
experience that I had quite recently with a museum.

Here is a quote from my original email:

"Families who donate items have very noble ideas, after all, about not
hoarding an item and offering their "treasure" for public use/viewing. How
respectful are museums to a family's wishes?"

I was disappointed, truly, when a certain unnamed museum denied me further
access to an item that had been on display. My research was purely due to a
keen interest and not for any kind of profit. I have always felt that it
was a museum's duty to share the items that are entrusted to them and that
researchers ought to be welcomed with open arms. Photos (that they have
taken) were denied, copies of writings that were on this item (and they had
all of it written in loose leaf right in front of the display) were denied.

I felt they were being overly protective. I was greatly disappointed as my
feeling about it was that the family who gave this heirloom did this from
the heart, with a willingness to share it with the public and to have a
museum preserve it. I was not requesting to touch it and disturb it, just
to be given copies of the existing photos as well as writings that were on
it. I have to say that if I were a member of the family who donated this
item to the museum, I don't think I would be happy to hear that the museum
was not welcoming of researchers. I would want the gift, given from the
heart, to be shared. Wouldn't you?

At any rate, I will not be renewing my membership with this museum and
making further donations. I have found it interesting that since this
denial of information, I have been getting lots of financial solicitations
from them. Yet, the sharing they want from someone like me, who has
supported them through good times and bad, is not reciprocated.

I also felt that, as a person who has made contributions and been a member
for a long period of time, that perhaps I might have been at least allowed a
photo or two.

I have to say that I was truly soured after this experience and lost a great
deal of respect. I would love to know what other museums and organizations
do when researchers ask for further information. Researchers, after all,
pay tribute to the item and if an article or book is written and mention is
made (not that I was doing that) the item would draw more attention and
perhaps additional income?
Perhaps those of you who are involved with museums might have a different
perspective to offer me that will make me be a bit more understanding?

Linda Heminway
Plaistow, NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilters in the Digital Age - call for essays?
From: Cassie Kilroy Thompson <cassiektverizon.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Nov 2009 09:41:04 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

In case anyone is interested on writing an essay...

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID172226

No affiliation, just passing the info.

Cassie Kilroy Thompson
cassiektverizon.net
Clarksville, MD


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Museum "personalities"
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>

Dear List and Linda,
Rather than condemn or justify any museum's accessibilty and photographic
policies let me just say that all institutions are run by individuals. "Some
folks are not like other folks". Who the director and/or curator is usually
who sets the tone - surely you have all had experience with a school with a
good principal and one with a bad one? Same thing goes for boards of
trustees. too.

You can express your dismay by way of a letter, and your delight by way of a
check - or not.

Nothing is forever, just wait for the next change in administration!

Happy Turkey to all

Newbie Richardson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Museum experiences
From: "Natalie Cadenhead" <ncadenheadcanterburymuseum.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Nov 2009 08:10:38 +1300
X-Message-Number: 4

I was interested to read the response from Candice re Museum donations.
I am a curator in a New Zealand museum and we have much the same
conditions - i.e. if something is donated then its ownership is legally
transferred to the institution. This is necessary to allow us to do the
job of the museum (research, exhibit, preserve etc) but also prevents
issues arising over time. It is worthy of note that most museum's world
wide have much bigger collections that those which appear on display to
visitors (sometimes down to 1% displayed, 99% in storage). Often donors
want to donate with the proviso that the object will be on display. This
is usually not possible to promise for several reasons including space,
fragility, medium (e.g. we do not exhibit manuscripts or textiles for
long periods of time as this damages them), sensitivity of the object
(e.g. objects which may relate to accidents or deaths), and research
(e.g. collections which are collected for research purposes not for
display) and so forth. This does not mean that the object is
inaccessible. Our museum (amongst other collections) has a wonderful
collection of quilts, bedspreads and textiles of all kinds, most of
which are away in stores however I regularly get examples out on request
of groups or individuals who may want to just see them or do research on
them. This again is a fairly common practice around museums. We look at
it that the collections we hold are being held in perpetuity for the
people of our country and therefore we are there to provide safety for
the objects and access to them. Sometimes objects do need to be
deaccessioned (removed permanently from the collections) and this rare
occurrence is usually due to their condition being so poor that they are
not able to be saved by conservation or because of their condition they
are endangering other collection items. In these cases we try our best
to let the original donors know what is happening and we always document
it. New Zealand (like the US) has a museum's association which has a
code of practice and then each museum has their own policies and
procedures relating to acquisition, management, use, storage,
deaccession etc of all the objects under their care.
When in doubt ask to see the polices etc of the museum and ask lots of
questions relating to what happens to the object you are thinking of
giving.

Natalie Cadenhead
Curator of Antarctic and Canterbury Social History
Canterbury Museum
Christchurch
NEW ZEALAND-

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New England Quilt musuem
F

New England Quilt Museum owns two 'mini -basket' quilts that I love. One
was donated by the Binney family in 1991 and is from 1895. Its acquisition
no. is 1991.34. The baskets alternate with red blocks.
The other quilt that I remember seeing was in the chest of draws that the
museum had on display. The view would open the draws which were sealed
with a plexi top to see the quilt without any dust getting onto the quilt.
That too was a basket quilt which I thought were smaller blocks than the first
one I described.
I would like to know how large the blocks are. Could anyone help???

Kathy B
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Fallen 13 - Ft. Hood
From: "Susan Mardock" <mardockmchsi.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Nov 2009 22:32:14 -0600


This may not be directly quilt-related, but it puts names and faces to the
list of The Fallen for those who are making quilts for their families.

Susan



The Fallen 13 - Ft. Hood


I'm glad---someone took the time to put this together and remember.... And
Please pass it along... And pray for their families.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: The Fallen 13 - Ft. Hood
From: SoldierGrrrl <soldier.grrrlgmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Nov 2009 07:57:02 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

On Tue, Nov 24, 2009 at 10:32 PM, Susan Mardock <mardockmchsi.com> wrote:
> This may not be directly quilt-related, but it puts names and faces to th
e
> list of A0The Fallen for those who are making quilts for their A0famili
es.

Thank you. My husband's unit took a full third of the casualties in
the shooting, and it warms my heart to know that quiters are
remembering us.

Jennifer Atkinson
Soldier and spouse
--
Blonde. It's not just a hair color; it's a way of life.

http://soldiergrrrl.livejournal.com/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New England Quilt Museum
From: Laura Lane <collectionsnequiltmuseum.org>
Date: Wed, 25 Nov 2009 10:58:51 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Kathy:
I just happened to be in the office today, and was able to research your
question. The "Mini Basket Quilt" which you metioned (1991.34) has
basket blocks that are between 3" and 3.5" on a side. It is all hand
pieced. The other basket quilt with small blocks is likely to be
#2004.09 which is a "Basket Crib Quilt". It has red baskets on a white
field with alternate white blocks. The basket blocks measure 3.5 inches
on a side. This block is Brackman #662. We have 6 Basket quilts in the
collection, and those are the only 2 with small blocks.

Laura Lane
Curatorial Assistant
New England Quilt Museum
collectionsNEQuiltMuseum.org


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New England Quilt musuem
From: KJB139aol.com
Date: Tue, 24 Nov 2009 18:13:12 EST
X-Message-Number: 5



New England Quilt Museum owns two 'mini -basket' quilts that I love. One
was donated by the Binney family in 1991 and is from 1895. Its acquisition
no. is 1991.34. The baskets alternate with red blocks.
The other quilt that I remember seeing was in the chest of draws that the
museum had on display. The view would open the draws which were sealed
with a plexi top to see the quilt without any dust getting onto the quilt.
That too was a basket quilt which I thought were smaller blocks than the first
one I described.
I would like to know how large the blocks are. Could anyone help???

Kathy B




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New England Quilt Museum
From: KJB139aol.com

Laura and Martha!
Thanks you for the information regarding the Museum's basket quilts.
I wish I knew whether or not the one I saw in the chest of draws was
published in a book so I could be sure that is one you gave me information
about. I think a trip to the museum is needed!

Happy Thanksgiving

Kathy

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Subject: Does anyone remember this quilt?
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
 

Happy Thanksgiving!

I have been trying to recall the name of the quilter and where I saw a quilt
with George Washington (on one knee?), in thanks. I believe the quilter's
first name was Chris and she lives in Kansas. It is a moving quilt. I just
can't remember where I saw it. Hope someone might know.

Pat

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings

http://www.quiltersmuse.com

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Does anyone remember this quilt?
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Nov 2009 11:27:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

The quilter is Chris Wolf Edmonds.

Happy Thanksgiving!


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Subject: Kneeling GW
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Nov 2009 11:13:07 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

You may have seen the George Washington quilt at the New England Quilt Museum for the Centennial/Bicentennial Quilt Exhibit a few years ago. The quilt was made to celebrate the Bicentennial in 1976. It was showcased right at the top of the stairs. Chris graciously shared it for the exhibit which then traveled to Paducah.
Too all, a blessed Thanksgiving.
Sue Reich


--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
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Subject: Re: Does anyone remember this quilt?
From: Judy White <whitey06029sbcglobal.net>
 


That was made by Chris Wolf Edmonds - Washington at Valley Forge.A0 She li
ves in Lawrence, Ks.
Judy White - a former Kansan

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Subject: Kneeling George Washington
From: Edwaquiltaol.com

Isn't this one of the quilts Chris made based on Norman Rockwell Saturday
Evening Post Covers.

Holice


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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 26, 2009
From: Jane Hall <jqhallearthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Nov 2009 07:43:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Chris Edmonds....a terrific quiltmaker/designer from a few years ago. She
also did the quilt about the removal of the indians to reservations in
Oklahoma. Jane Hall


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Subject: Document fabric -- Urn and Flowers
From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com>

Hi All,

Hope everyone had a safe and satisfying T-Day! We're looking at pumpkin
pie for breakfast!

Could someone please let me know what institution (other than Mary
Koval:-)might have the chintz fabric, either in a quilt or as yardage,
that has the large Urn as the centerpiece, filled with flowers? This is
the one that Mary reproduced in her "Remember Me" line by Windham Fabrics.
Here's the link to that repro chintz:
http://www.baumtextile.com/cgi-bin/fabricshop/gallery.cgi?funcshow&file1&Category145&Page1&v1


I have come across a quilt here in Oregon with that chintz as the border
(printed on a cream ground) and would like to get some more detailed info.
on that fabric.

P.S. The Baltimore Album quilt that was viewed at out last study group
meeting in Portland was awesome! Mary Bywater Cross gave a very detailed
analysis of the makeup of the quilt,and its history through the family's
generations. The amazing thing is that the present owner (steward) is a
Methodist minister, just like the original owner for whom the quilt was
made in 1853 in Baltimore.

Martha Spark
facilitator, Columbia Willamette Quilt Study Group
for Oregon and SW Washington
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Subject: Two unusual ?ISO-8859-1?B?YXBwbGlxdek? pieces on U.K. Auction site
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>

Just stumbled across this auction site. Has anyone heard of this piece
before? It's possible it has already been published in a book.

Lot 57: A rare appliquE9d patchwork coverlet depicting the the coronation of
Queen Victoria, English, worked by H.C. Simmonds, circa 1838....

http://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/a-rare-appliqued-patchwork-coverlet-depi...-1-c-4899fa36f8

Description: A rare appliquE9d patchwork coverlet depicting the coronation o
f
Queen Victoria, English, worked by H.C. Simmonds, circa 1838, cotton flap
attached to one side crudely embroidered in red cotton `H.C. Simmonds, near
the Mansion House at Weston near Bath, Somerset Shr' the central section
with a stylised church and Christ as a boy visiting the temple, the
bordering scenes of the Flight into Egypt and the Nativity, often
incorporating rather hairy angels, the upper edge with Coronation scene wit
h
large throne, three dimensional bishop, and courtiers and raisedwork royal
cypher, the lower border with a large thatched cottage, bird in a cage, one
of the figures with 1790s block printed cotton gown, the two side panels
with scenes from country life including a church, Cross Keys public house,
harvest scenes, animals, fine carriages, the outer border of ivy trails in
green roller printed cotton, size 237 by 203cm, 93 by 78in Stylistically th
e
fine robes of the Coronation figures are more 1780s in style than 1830s
which suggests that the embroideress was a little out of touch with
contemporary fashions and probably didn't see engravings of Queen's
Victoria's actual coronation. The cottons are mainly roller-printed dress
fabrics of the 1830s. Weston is a small village near Bath. The 'Mansion
House' may refer to Weston House, which stood in the High Street until
demolished in the 1970s. It was built around 1700 and would have been the
largest house in the village even in the mid 19th century. The Weston buria
l
church registrar contains several children named Simmonds/Simmons in the
1830s but no earlier records of the name which suggests that the familly ma
y
only have been resident in Weston for a few years. We are indebted to Colin
Johnstone of the Bath Record Office and Rosemary Harden of the Fashion
Museum, Bath for their help in researching the provenance of this piece.



Lot 58 another unusual silk applique (ca 1860) is equally interesting.

A rare silk appliquE9d patchwork cover, circa 1860, with central vignette of
an oriental lady with large butterfly, within ivory damask oval edged in
gold cord, the outer ground of plain white cotton completely smothered with
assorted motifs in velvets, floral and tartan ribbons, taffetas including
snakes, lion, butterflies with detached wings, dogs, cats, squirrel, some
further adorned by fine beadwork, blue fringe border and silk tassels to th
e
corners, the majority of silks 1850s-60s but a few pale green sprigged silk
s
from the 1790s, size 97cm, 38in
http://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/a-rare-silk-appliqued-patchwork-cover
,
-c...-1-c-147ce916ac

Several photos of both pieces on their website.

Karen Alexander




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