Subject: Re: Museum experiences
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 2009 08:45:22 -0800 (PST)
 

Hello all,Regarding this atatement:"most of which are away in s tores however I regularly get examples out on request of groups or individu als who may want to just see them or do research on them."You must find out what a particular museum's policies are regarding the above. M y guess is that most will not get out quilts just so an individual can see them, especially if the visitor has not made a prior appointment. Taking quilts out of storage requires staff, space, and time, all three of which are very dear to museum management. If you have a particular quilt you j ust want to look at and you are not doing research on it, ALWAYS make a pri or appointment. Do not be surprised if your request is turned down. ( I have had drop-in visitors ask me to get out a specific quilt when Iwas knee-deep in a gallery change, and there was no way I could do it.) If the staff accomodates your request, a donation would certainly be app reciated.Judy SchwenderPaducah, KY


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: family quilts
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
 


Hello all,
Who among you quilts and also has family quilts?
Judy Schwender


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: family quilts
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 2009 15:29:00 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

I quilt and I have two family quilt tops.

Christine Thresh
on an island in the California Delta
http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog
and
http://www.winnowing.com <-- website

Hello all,
Who among you quilts and also has family quilts?
Judy Schwender


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: family quilts
From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovichyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 2009 15:29:31 -0800 (PST)
 


I do. I quilt and have family quilts and tops..donna.stickovichyahoo.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: family quilts
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 2009 17:53:35 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

I always get sick when I think about this. I never had the priviledge of
knowing my grandparents but apparently my Grandmothers both quilted. My
Mother had two quilts that I remember. One was a Double Wedding Ring that
was scrappy with bright orange and white that her Mother made. The other
was a dark, dreary Crazy quilt of various fabrics brought from Germany by my
paternal Grandmother. When Mom died (Daddy had preceded her in death), my
brother and I went back to Kansas and loaded up what momentos we wanted. We
then had the church clean the house out and do what they wanted with
anything left behind. Yes, I left the two quilts. That's the part that
makes me sick. So, I quilt but do not have any family quilts. Thanks for
reminding me :{

Best regards,
Sharron .......................
.........in cold, drizzly Spring, TX where they are predicting snow for
Friday.........huh???..............


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Museum experiences
From: Kittencat3aol.com
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 2009 19:05:54 EST

I'd say that making an appointment at least a month in advance if you want
to see something that isn't on public display is mandatory. If given
proper notice you will be pleasantly surprised by how accommodating museum
staffs can be.

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Getting in to museums
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
 


I've found it all depends on who and where. With my first contact at the Burlington County Historic Society we were welcomed with open arms, every time we wanted to bring a group and see their quilts, or have our day with outside quilts being brought in.

On the other hand, the Historic Society of my own County, the Hunterdon County Historic Society nixed all efforts to get in and see their quilts for years. But just recently, the executive director that summarily turned us down every time was replaced by someone who was quite welcoming, and to their great advantage! We've done our first study day with their quilts -- ran it as a fund raiser for them -- and from our connection they have already gained....
20 brand new muslin pillowcases
a 1000 foot roll of archival tissue
7 archival storage boxes.

We hope to run another study day with their quilts in the Spring, and are trying to come up with other fund raising ideas.

Judy Grow
Flemington NJ




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: family quilts
From: pollymellocomcast.net
 


The closest quilting came to me was three of my Great Grandmothers. I have qults from all of them:

A 1930's Lone Star and a Crazy quilt from one.

A 1890's Seven Sisters and Trip Around the World from another.

And a 1930's Ruby Mc Kim pieced sampler, a Corolina Lily, and a 16 patch fr om a third.

I only knew one of them very well.

Strangly we were all born on the 31st of a month except one and she was bor n on th 13th which is also a "1" and a "3"

What does that mean? Who knows, it is just odd.

My mother did not quilt neither did either of my grandmothers. All of the q uilt genes trickled down and landed in my gene pool. I got the quilt genes with a vengence. I applique,collect, study, lecture and write about quilts. If anyone hangs a quilt out the door, I am there. I belong to The Baltimor e Applique Society, Mimi Dietrich's Grad Class,three study grou ps, and AQSG.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

via Texas


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: family quilts
From: Joy Neal <joyznealyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 2009 16:38:36 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 9

I quilt and am very fortunate to have my mother's quilts (she didn't make m any) and grandmother's quilts (she made lots) as well as one made by my gra ndmother's sister. I even have a couple I am not sure of but are probably family quilts, just don't know for sure. I was given the pieces of a double wedding ring my aunt was making when she died--finished that for my cousin 's 50th birthday so she could have a family quilt. I feel very blessed. Joy NealLa Conner, Mt. VernonI support the Alzheimer's Art Quil t Initiative, a program to raiseawareness and fund research to find a cu re for Alzheimer's disease.All proceeds will be donated to Alzheimer's r esearch. Learn more at:www.AlzQuilts.com.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: family quilts
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
 

I recently was given several tops from a great-aunt's family. She had ident ical twin daughters who were legends in my mother's prim family for what wa s called their "independence." They were legends in their community as well ---brilliant, well-educated, dressed alike until the end, lived way out in the country in their paternal great grandparents' 1870's house with few imp rovements, raised cattle and who-knew-what else. Never married, though a ch ild was born to them. When I asked my mother which twin had the child, she narrowed her eyes and harumphed most uncharacteristically, "Oh who knows? I assume BOTH of them! After all, they never do anything alone." She was not happy, but she was past being scandalized by "The Girls."

In a big family of strong-minded pious women who prided themselves on clean liness and domestic order, the twins stood as living proof that some things simply would not be tidied up or reformed, even by my intrepid mother, who never gave up trying her hand at total reformation. In return, she got hug e pans of fresh blackberries and huckleberries each spring and adamatine re sistance. After her death, one of them wrote me and said that if I had no o ther use for it, they would like the washing machine from Mother's home. I wrote back and told her it was broken, but I would be genuinely pleased if she would permit me to have a new one sent out from a local store. A week later the reply came. The writer was courteous, but declined, writing "Tha nk you for your generous offer, but we prefer broken washing machines. We l ike to repair our appliances." These women were good-hearted people, just r eally "peculiar" and "independent." They were absolutely committed to their mother's family, which caused consternation at more than one funeral. They never missed a funeral.

I have never washed a top before, but these are going to be washed! They ar e what my mother would call "FILTHY dirty!" I suspect they were made by The Girls' mother. Are everyday quilts. I intend to have one of them quilted, though, just to go with the legends.

Both of my grandmother's made quilts, and my mother had quilted as a girl a nd had employed others to make quilts for her later. Though she was gifted at handwork, she did not make another quilt until after my father died. She told me that she had worked in her garden from morning until dark througho ut that long summer, trying to outwork her grief. When winter set in, she p ulled out the scrap bags of her mother and grandmother along with her own a nd set about making a crazy quilt, using the foundation method and sewing t he blocks on the machine. She wanted something she would not have to think about, and she remembered the technique from childhood. She made two tops, bordered in a bright clear red, for me and my sister. I had mine quilted, a nd in 1984, we flew it at a local museum where Susan Roach and I had organi zed a quilt show. She later made a log cabin and a child's "Southern Lady" quilt for my daughter, the lone female grandchild.

I started my first quilt, a Double Wedding Ring, when I was doing doctoral work at the University of Georgia. My mother had given her Double Wedding R ing, after which I had lusted, to my sister. A neighbor's son who was an en gineering major at GA Tech helped me draft the pattern from pictures in Kre tsinger and Hall's "Romance of the Patchwork Quilt." Everyone who visited o ur little house had to cut out at least six pieces, so that quilt is recall ed by people who are now all over the nation. After that I made a Dresden P late, then quilts for babies and then children's beds, etc. When the reviva l got going full-swing, I was pre-occupied with work and family. Lapsed int o needlepoint. Came back more recently. Have always loved quilts, regarded them as important things that showed women were ambitious homemakers, good family members. Even as a child, I saw quilts as special legacies of their makers. Have always slept under quilts.

I think I might qualify as a "traditional" quilter since I've never had a f ormal lesson and have used patterns passed down in my family. I have all th e equipment to be otherwise, and a library full of books.

Well......you asked, Judy!

gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: family quilts
From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net>
 


Hi Judy - I do!

I love to quilt - mostly antique reproductions.. and yes, my maternal
ancestors were quilters that were quite prolific in both quilting and
other areas of sewing and needlework. I have quilts made by my great
grandmother (turn of the 20th century) and her oldest daughter (my great
Aunt Ruthie- who was my stand-in grandmother as my actual grandmother
was not very maternal.) My mother never quilted (seemed to skip a
generation) though she sewed clothing for all 5 of her kids. Since Aunt
Ruthie was alive while mom's children were small, all our quilts were
made by Ruthie or Great Grandma -

All of their needlework is a treasure to me and I can't convince my
siblings to treasure what they have or give it to me... Unfortunately,
for some people, there is no appreciation for the needle arts. They
look at it as junk in a trunk and not the labors of love that I see in
every stitch - perhaps because they have never done any quilting.

So now I find myself collecting those old quilts that seemed to be
discarded by families that just didn't understand the treasure in their
hands...
I have quilts from as far back as c1830... and I treasure every one I
own.. Hope my kids will treasure my collection of family quilts as well
as all the quilts made by my hands...( and somehow I now need to
differentiate those quilts I've purchased that are not family quilts...
Sounds like a new project!)

Great question...
Leah Zieber
Temecula, California
(rain, rain come again...)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: family quilts
From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 14:15:43 +1100
X-Message-Number: 12

As far as I am aware I am the first quilter in my family. My mother and
grandmother were always sewing so I do have needlework genes.
The quilts I have made and those I have collected will form our family quilt
collection. DD#1 is an embroiderer first and foremost but recently has begun
to quilt. I have 6 granddaughters so hopefully the genes will be
transmitted. ;-)

Janet O'Dell
Melbourne Australia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilts in families
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
 

Hi all - I have got to stop looking at the computer at midnight, but then, I would not have taken the time to savor the quilts-in-families stories, es pecially adoring Gaye's tale of the twin sisters. Down my block on the uppe r west side of Manhattan are two now elderly male twins, alwayswalking t ogether, in identical clothes! (must be past 75 now)If I were a journali st I would love to interview them and find out more about their life, work, etc. I have lived here decades, and they always dress alike, even probably nowwithout a mother to instruct them! Ain't life grand?! Speaking of pa ssing on quilts to families, what to do with my little collection? My niece , newly engaged, wants nothing to do with them, even warned me against gift ing one for the wedding! Now that I am aging (too rapidly it seems) I need to make provisions to eventually donate, but without $$$ support which muse ums would be able to handle them (my landlord has all my$$ it seems
now!) Ideas? I have several not too big but interesting collections, would love to see them kept together.

Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com
--0-973889903-1259733271:81895--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: spanish chintz
From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 17:18:48 +1100
X-Message-Number: 2

I have no first-hand knowledge but the Textile Museum in Terrassa Spain may
be able to shed light on the subject:
http://www.cdmt.es/principaleng.htm
HTH
Janet O'Dell


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: family quilts
From: Joe Cunningham <Joejoethequilter.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 2009 22:39:39 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

I have several quilts my mother made, including my favorite double
knit scrap quilts.
Joe Cunningham
in sunny San Francisco


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: family quilts
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 2009 22:51:21 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 5

--0-581036091-1259736681:87030
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii

I quilt and I have 2 old quilts:
1. a Victorian crazy quilt with lots of pieces rotting away under the painted parts made by one of my great grandmothers.
2. A mostly double pink Ocean Waves top my grandfather hand pieced around 1900, while bedridden for a year with St. Vitus' Dance. He was 10. I can just imagine his martinet of a mother suggesting he do this. The piecing was pretty sloppy, but it's a great catalog of fabrics from the 1880's to 1900!


(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR




________________________________

Subject: family quilts
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 2009 04:43:49 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

Like others, the three most recent generations in my family did not
quilt, but I do. After my interest in quilting was established, the half
a dozen surviving last quarter 19th century/first quarter-20th century
quilts made by two great-great grandmothers suddenly emerged out of
attic trunks. Heaven only knows what would have happened to them if no
one cared about them. Actually, I do know: another quilt ended up in the
hands of my second cousin's wife, who wore it out taking it to the beach
as a sand blanket.

Although my mother did not know quilting patterns or block names, when
she inherited the quilts she could tell which quilt came from which side
of her family; the maternal side was poor, only one quilt survived, and
it's ugly-scrappy. She recognized the scraps from clothes. Her paternal
side owned a dry goods store; the fabrics were new, they matched, and
the quilts were more gently used (or perhaps needed).

There is a family story about why my maternal great grandmother refused
to quilt: she had three daughters and had to hand sew all of their
undergarments. Not a word about antipathy towards outer garment sewing,
but she hated making underwear. Additional needlework was out of the
question for her. All three girls did some, limited form of pretty work,
but no garment sewing or quilting.

By the way, these relatives were from the North Carolina/Tennessee
border counties, if that helps the inquiry.

Andi in Paducah, KY, who wonders why there is nary a word about quilts
from her paternal family -- Alabama and Kentucky roots


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ANN: Quilt Index -- New and Improved!
From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu>
 


Good news!

The Quilt Index (<http://www.quiltindex.org>www.quiltindex.org ), a
joint project of MSU's MATRIX, the Michigan State University Museum
and the Alliance for American Quilts, has launched a new and improved
website, featuring new zoom and compare tools and long awaited
databases from a number of documentation projects across the country.

The re-launched Index website now has nearly 50,000 searchable quilt
records from more than 29 contributors including 11 *new*
contributors, plus the groundbreaking Signature Quilt Project (the
first one to incorporate public submissions on a limited pilot
basis). An Institute for Museum and Library Services National
Leadership grant provided funding for new user tools including a Zoom
tool to examine digital images more closely and the capacity to
easily compare and contrast selected images.

New contributors funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities
Expansion grant and with time and funds of the contributors
themselves are: the Hawaiian Quilt Research Project, the Louisiana
Regional Folklife Program, the Minnesota Quilt Project, the New
England Quilt Museum/MassQuilts, The Heritage Quilt Project of New
Jersey at Rutgers University Libraries/ Special Collections and
University Archives, the North Carolina Museum of History, the Rhode
Island Quilt Documentation Project at University of Rhode Island, the
West Virginia Heritage Quilt Search, Inc., and the Wyoming Quilt
Project, Inc. Previously launched under the NEH grant are
contributions from the American Quilt Study Group, the Mountain
Heritage Center and the State Historical Society of Iowa. The Kansas
Quilt Project (images still being digitized) and the Connecticut
Quilt Search records will also be included in the re-launch, with
funding provided through the projects directly.

The IMLS funding along with a generous grant from the Salser Family
Foundation (thanks to Susan Salser and Shelly Zegart) made possible
another compelling component of the re-launch: the Signature Quilt
Project (SQP). The SQP provided an opportunity to pilot the public
submission of privately owned quilts with a narrow but deep focus -
signature quilts. Key project partners for the SQP were Karen
Alexander, Lynn Gorges and Nancy Hornback who began the project in
2003. They worked closely with four members of the Quilt Index
management team (Mary Worrall, Justine Richardson, Marsha MacDowell
and MSU doctoral candidate Amanda Sikaraskie) and interested
individuals around the nation to input data on Signature quilts,
devise and test training modules, and create galleries and an essay.

Your help in spreading this exciting news is much appreciated. For
now, send folks directly to the Quilt Index
(<http://www.quiltindex.org>www.quiltindex.org ). There's also a
feature on the expansion on the Alliance's home page:
<http://www.allianceforamericanquilts.org/>http://www.allianceforamericanquilts.org/

A great place to start your tour is the "Jamestown First Baptist
Church" quilt submitted to the Signature Quilt Project by AAQ board
alumni Jane Evins Leonard:
<http://www.quiltindex.org/fulldisplaynew.php?kid4-15-5C.>http://www.quiltindex.org/fulldisplaynew.php?kid4-15-5C.
This quilt is a real beauty and there is a great essay in the full
record that tells the story of the quilt that keeps on giving 70
years after it was made.

NOTE about the zoom tool: keep in mind that the zoom tool is offered
for the basic display pages (ex:
<http://www.quiltindex.org/basicdisplaynew.php?kid4-15-5C).>http://www.quiltindex.org/basicdisplaynew.php?kid4-15-5C).
The full record pages do not feature the zoom tool. However, for
records in the Signature Quilt Project for which multiple images were
provided, detail images are included in the full record display for
that quilt.


Enjoy,

Marsha MacDowell, Amy Milne, Justine Richardson, Mary Worrall, and
Amanda Grace Sikarskie

QI Management Team


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ANN: The Signature Quilt Project Launch in the Quilt Index!
From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu>
 


As you may have heard, the Quilt Index recently launched its expanded
website, with more quilts, a new look, and new zoom and comparison
tools. One of the most compelling components of the expansion is the
Signature Quilt Project (SQP). The SQP provided an opportunity to
pilot the public submission of privately owned quilts that carry
inscribed names and thus opens up new opportunities for using quilts
as primary records in research.

During spring and summer 2009, forty-seven Signature quilt owners and
researchers (mostly members of AQSG!) responded to our targeted call
for participation. The majority of respondents were able to
participate in our first public trainings for a pilot "public
submission" system. In all, 61 signature quilts were uploaded to
the Index, surpassing our goal. In addition, QI staff identified
more than 2,000 signature quilts that had already been added to the
Index by contributing institutions.

You can find the Signature Quilt Project at
<http://www.quiltindex.org/signaturequiltproject.php>www.quiltindex.org/signaturequiltproject.php.
Here, you'll find an essay, "Researching Signature Quilts," by Amanda
Sikarskie, Marsha MacDowell, Karen Alexander and Nancy Hornback, a
bibliography of recommended reading on signature quilts, and eight
curated galleries that group the SQP public submission quilts
thematically:

The Beginnings of Signature Quilts: The 1840s

Signature Quilts: Friendship and Family

Signature Quilts and Westward Expansion

Golden Age of Signature Quilts, 1876-1910

Redwork Signature Quilts

Community, Club, and Church: Public Signature Quilts

Contemporary Signature Quilts

Love to Wini: Signature

Quilts for Healing and Comfort

We have also created a special search page for signature quilts at
<http://www.quiltindex.org/signaturesearch.php>www.quiltindex.org/signaturesearch.php.
You can quickly browse all of the SQP public submission quilts by
following the links.

We invite you to try using the Quilt Index?s new zoom tool with the
signature quilts. A good one to try (because of the large file size
of the original image) is the Jamestown First Baptist Church Quilt,
contributed by Jane Evins Leonard,
<http://www.quiltindex.org/basicdisplaynew.php?kid4-15-5C>http://www.quiltindex.org/basicdisplaynew.php?kid4-15-5C.

We realize that the very definition of a signature quilt is open to
debate. The Quilt Index and SQP team has tried to be as inclusive as
possible with the definition of a signature quilt for the purposes of
this project. Quilts that fall under our broad definition of the
signature quilt include:

Quilts with names

Quilts with actual signatures

Quilts that carry multiple signatures or names inked, stamped,
embroidered and otherwise inscribed

Multi-signatures for fundraisers all done in one cursive hand and not
actually signed by participants but with participants? knowledge

Multi-signatures done in more than one cursive hand but not actually
signed by participants

Multi-signatures for fundraisers done in more than one cursive hand,
with some names actually signed by participants.

Multi-signatures for fundraisers where some signed a block; some
gathered the names and donations but stitched the signatures on their
block all in one cursive hand; and some folks didn't even know their
name was on the quilt because someone else paid to have another's
name on the quilt without their knowledge

Friendship quilts with all "real" signatures by participants

Album quilts made for a family or community member who was moving away

Presentation quilts made to honor a special person in the community
Commemorative quilts with multi-names but no knowing participation by
those featured on the quilt

Many thanks to the people and institutions who made the Signature
Quilt project possible: to Lynn Gorges and Nancy Hornback for
jointly beginning the Signature Quilt Project in 2003, to the Salser
Family Foundation for supporting a specific focus on Signature Quilts
in the Quilt Index (especially to Susan Salser and to Shelly Zegart),
to the Institute of Museum and Library Services (which is supporting
the development of public object submissions to the Quilt Index), to
Karen Alexander and Nancy Hornback for engaging and supporting this
project, and to the members of the American Quilt Study Group
listserv for sparking the conversation that led to the present
convergence in spring 2009.

Thank you to all who showed interest and participated in any stage of
this process. We will be evaluating this pilot over the next few
months so we welcome your feedback and discussion. Feel free to
contact any of us directly with any questions or comments that you
may have.

Best wishes,

Justine Richardson
on behalf of the QI and SQP staff team
Marsha MacDowell, Mary Worrall, Amanda Sikarskie, Amy Milne, Karen
Alexander and Nancy Hornback

The Quilt Index is a joint project of The Alliance for American
Quilts, Michigan State University's MATRIX: Center for Humane Arts,
Letters and Social Sciences Online, and the Michigan State University
Museum.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: They're Live!
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 06:51:24 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Many of you may have heard of the Itty Bitty Quilt Block challenge
offered last summer by the American Quilt Study Group as a fundraiser
for the Endowment. People were invited to make a 4" block and send
$5 for the challenge, and the blocks were to be made into little
sampler quilts. In a second layer of fund raising, the resulting
quilts are now on eBay!

If you go to eBay's main page and type in AQSG in the general search
box, it will take you to the first group of 11 little quilts, to view
or to bid. These auctions end on Sunday, and a second group will go
up on Monday, for a week. AQSG invites your participation!

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Family quilting
From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 07:42:38 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

I do quilt and I have quilts from both sides of the family and my
mother. It was a very casual thing among all relatives, except one
cousin. Kinda of like "Hmmm I''l make a quilt this year or maybe I'll
tat a tablecloth". Nobody made more than 4 or 5 quilts.

Jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: family quilts
From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 06:44:51 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11

I had no family quilts. All my grandparents died before I was born,
and only one grandmother quilted. Her quilts were "used up" in raising
her family on a dairy farm on the prairie outside of Houston,TX. I
felt very sorry for myself for a short time, then realized I could sew
better than most folks I knew, so I commenced to create family quilts
of my own. Nearly every quilt I've made is an original design and was
made specifically for a family member. My children and grand children
will be rich in "family quilts." And since many of my quilts have
been displayed in museums over the year, my descendants know that they
are valuable and won't let them go in a garage sale. I feel very
blessed by the joy NOT having family quilts has brought to me over the
past forty-plus years.
Pat Kyser


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 01, 2009
From: "Virginia Berger" <cifbanetins.net>
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 2009 07:45:21 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12

> Subject: family quilts
> Who among you quilts and also has family quilts?
> Judy Schwender
>
>

Hi Judy,

My paternal grandmother quilted all her life, beginning as
a young girl. The family legend is that she bought her
first "store-bought" coat at the age of 11 with money she
made quilting for others (this would have been in the
1920's).

I purchased a set of embroidered blocks in 1973 (McKim
Flowers) on my great-grandfather's household auction that
we believe were made by my step-great-grandmother (other
side of the family).

I asked my grandmother to help me make a quilt using these
blocks for 4-H in 1974 and got interested in quilting. My
maternal grandmother had learned to quilt as a child but
had never done much as she was a farm wife, raised 3 kids
and taught school etc. But when I started getting
interested in quilting, she found it fascinating and
started quilting again.

My mother always admired what we all did and was very
creative in other areas but was "handicapped" by a real
distaste for putting two prints next to each other. She
finally started quilting in the 1990s--though she still
struggles with putting prints together!

Both of my grandmothers are gone but left a legacy of
quilts. My mother and I are currently working on making
graduation quilts for all of my maternal grandmother's
great-grandchildren in Grandma's memory--none of the next
generation quilt but we hope to get them to appreciate
quilts before they become custodians of the quilt
collection!

Virginia Berger
Iowa


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Subject: RE: family quilts
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 08:33:46 -0600
X-Message-Number: 13

I started to teach myself about quilting in the early 70s. The first quilt
I started was a Cathedral Window, and it's my oldest work in progress. My
mother became interested in quilting after I did, so I showed her what I
knew. In 1976, we went to my brother's wedding in Denver and started our
fabric collection with a visit to Quilts and Other Comforts. Mom and I
wanted to make a hand-quilted quilt-as-you-go quilt with squares of every
calico we could find that year. That was a difficult quest at that time. I
remember that we were so proud that we could find at least 350 different
prints.

After my mom and I had made a few quilts, my grandmother said something to
my mom about two quilts from her mother than were in the bottom of her cedar
chest. My mom had not known these existed. Her mother (my grandmother) had
not quilted and probably didn't think these quilts were anything special.
But for some reason she had kept these pieces from her mother, who was a
Swedish immigrant.

I don't remember how or if these two quilts were finished. I think my mother
took them apart because they were lumpy." One was made from wool pieces,
sort of a hired man's quilt made from recycled men's suits. The other was a
Log Cabin. My mother wanted to finish that quilt and basted it together with
a gawdawful backing and polyester batting. She didn't get beyond hand
quilting the center square.

For Christmas several years ago, my mom gave me the Log Cabin quilt (my
sister has the wool quilt). It is precious to me. It could be related to
quilts I've seen in the book Old Swedish Quilts." It blasts the legend
about quiltmaking being a uniquely American craft, since I understand my
great-grandmother spoke little English and probably did not have an American
mentor to teach her quilting. She no doubt learned something about quilting
in the Old Country. It's a scrappy quilt that has some color sense to it,
and it's fascinating to look at the fabric collection. I'm thinking it was
made in the early 1900s, certainly earlier than 1930.

One thing this quilt has offered to me recently is an appreciation of the
fabric and color palette of a quilt made before 1930. This was important as
I was working on a project related to the new The Farmer's Wife sampler
quilt book, and I had to use vintage-related fabrics and colors. I'm not
sure if there was a big difference in fabrics and colors between the Civil
War period and the early 1900s. But there was a dramatic change of fabric
prints and colors in the 1930s.

A discovery I made from the Old Swedish Quilts book is that many of the
quilts in the book were utilitarian and made from recycled clothing. Those
Swedes were frugal, and the women of my family are among them. There is a
picture of a woman on the cover of the book who looks like she could be
related to my mother (so therefore, me, too).

My mother always said, The apple doesn't fall far from the tree." (She
didn't like it when I added, Neither does the nut.")


Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and
am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org
For lectures and workshops, see www.findaquiltteacher.com/vlackb.html




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Subject: Polly's question
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 08:33:46 -0600
X-Message-Number: 14

Polly wrote:
<< Strangely we were all born on the 31st of a month except one and she was
born on the 13th which is also a "1" and a "3". What does that mean? Who
knows, it is just odd.>>

RESPONSE:
I think I know. It means the mother was very regular in her cycle.

Way back in my childbearing days, possibly my sister and I were on the same
cycle. I had two boys and she had one who were born on the 3rd of different
months three years apart.


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Subject: Re: family quilts
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 07:04:39 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 15

Hello all, Who among you quilts and also has family quilts?
Judy Schwender

Judy, Good question! I've enjoyed reading all the responses. I hope you are all labeling your family quilts and documenting these wonderful stories for future generations!

I have only one family quilt, made by my maternal grandmother--she taught me to sew and embroider, but she was definately not a quilter. She was recruited to make this quilt as a fundraiser for her club "The Pine Tree Club" in the 1940s. Several cheerful house dresses were cut into large squares for the backing. Smaller squares were combined with solid green triangles to make simple "Pine Tree" blocks on the front. The "batting" was a bedsheet. My guess is that she laid it all together and attempted to machine quilt it all at once. The story, as my mother told it to me, is that she cursed the entire time, but got it done, and it holds together, if rather crudely by today's standards.
If you haven't already guessed, when the winning ticket was drawn, her name was on it. But I'm not sure who bought that ticket!
My grandmother had passed long before I discovered quilting and my mother gave this treasure to me along with it's story.
It was another family's grandmother's quilts that initially sparked my interest in quilting and collecting. But the Pine Tree quilt is my special family treasure.
Barbara Burnham, Ellicott City MD





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Subject: Re: Family quilts
From: Sarah Hough <dougandsarah1gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 09:58:20 -0600
X-Message-Number: 16

I have several family quilts. The oldest is a friendship crazy quilt
made by my maternal grandmother, Emma Lott Lee of Forrest County,
Mississippi, c1900. Each block was made by a different neighbor. I
wasn't wise enough to write down who made which block and now that my
mother has passed away, that information is lost forever. Another
quilt I have - the top was made by a great aunt, Victoria Lott of
Forrest County, before I was born. She made a top for three of us. My
younger brother wasn't alive at the time so didn't get a top. My
mother had a neighbor hand quilt it in the 1940s. I think she paid her
$5 to quilt it. Of course, not appreciating "old stuff", I used and
washed it many times so it is in bad shape. My mother, Ruby Lee Mixon,
wasn't a quilter but after my parents retired, they moved back to
Jones County, Ms from the Detroit area. Mother made a "biscuit" quilt
for my daughter in the 1970s (very heavy) and another quilt for my
son. I haven't been able to get a straight answer from him on where it
is but I have the biscuit quilt. It was given to me to repair as it
keeps falling apart since it is so heavy. It has been repaired and
will be returned the next time we drive to her house.

My paternal grandmother, Lou Storey Mixon of Jones County, Ms., made a
quilt top for each of her 10 children as a gift on her 50th wedding
anniversary. Not sure what year it was but I think it was in the early
1940s. My mother had the quilt quilted that my father received, a lone
star, and I have that one. Again, in very poor condition as it has
been used extensively. My sister has the quilt that was made for an
aunt who didn't have any children. She said that it was in good
condition but I don't know the pattern.

I have a quilt my sister made when I remarried in 1985, another lone star.

I think that is the extent of my "family" collection. It seems like we
made practical quilts that were loved and used.

Sarah Hough


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Subject: RE: family quilts
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 08:24:06 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 17

--0-1975641399-1259771046:98071
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Oh, Sharron, I am sorry to remind you of this. I remember sleeping under a Double Wedding Ring made by eith my Great Aunt Effie or my granma (or bo th) but all their quilts are lost.Judy
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Family Quilts
From: "Munsey" <sgmunseycomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 12:07:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 18

I quilt, as do two of my sisters and both my daughters. And I have a few
family quilts.

One prize is a whole cloth wool quilt in the classic New England color of
"butternut brown" with simple geometric quilting. Although the condition is
only fair, it came from the coastal New Hampshire family homestead that no
longer exists due to a fire last March. The quilt is from about the first
quarter of the 1800's from the period of my great-great grandparents. The
second prize is a Sunrise quilt (also known as Star of Bethlehem - or Lone
Star to you Texans). This quilt belonged to my great grandmother and has
been exhibited at Vermont Quilt Festival. Fortunately, these and other
antiques had been removed a couple of years before the fire.

Sandra on a chilly, but sunny, Cape Cod



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Subject: Dating a Pink and White Toile
From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com>
 

Hi all,
First, I apologize for the cross posting.
I need some help dating a pink and white toile. The original was an 1825 piece (The History of Joseph). I have a picture of the original, and th ere are subtle differences in my piece. So it has to be a reproduction.  But I know they were reproducing them for the past 150 years.
Anyone know they started producing the pink toiles?
Thanks,
Dana

Here a link to a pic:
http://www.materialpleasures.com/assets/images/fabric494.jpg



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Polly's question
From: pollymellocomcast.net
 


I have heard that when their are multiple females in a house they tend to a ll cycle together. My poor husband and son, my two daughjters and I were of ten on the same schedule.

The only problem with your theory, which I appreciate you commenting on, is that being my great grandmothers they all had different mothers that did not know each other and only half of the months even have a 31st day.

I guess it is just interesting.

Polly



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Subject: Re: family quilts
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 12:23:59 -0600
X-Message-Number: 21

I feel very blessed by the joy NOT having family quilts has brought to me over the
> past forty-plus years.
> Pat Kyser

Pat, I understand your feeling exactly. I might have made quilts (I had made a doll quilt), for my mother did not make quilts when I was growing up. But when my mother received a stash of family linens by her mother, she decided she would give two of her bed covers to me and my sister---a really nice crocheted bedspread and a Double Wedding Ring quilt, both of which she valued. I had grown up loving that quilt. It's yellow background was so cheerful, and I loved all the fabrics I found in it. It was a treasure chest for one who loved printed fabrics.

Of course, Mother gave my sister the quilt and me, the bedspread. I conceived it as one of the great insults to me and the universe and detemined to make one just as pretty. Because I was not at home then and had no photograph, I turned to a library copy of Kretsinger & Hall, the only quilt book in the Athens, Georgia, public library. With the help of a Georgia Tech engineering student, I drafted the pattern, found the softest yellow cotton sheet I could and washed it 3 million times to soften it up, pulled out my own scrap box and went to work. The pattern is sui generis in size, and its pieces speak of all those 50s and early 60s prints that had gone into skirts and shirtwaist dresses. It took me five years to complete because I was in grad school and first years teaching, but I finished the top and had it quilted by a lady who became my guide.

Right now, that crocheted bedspread lays over a white sheet on the guestroom bed, a bright PA red print and solid strippy at the foot of the bed. Perky. Mine. Bringing back so many memories. And because that spread was my lot, I became a maker and collector of quilts. I might have become the latter anyway, but I would never in a lifetime have crocheted a bedspread. I suspect the truth is I had wanted both of those pieces and had felt they should and would be mine in time by virtue of my seniority and proven needlework skill. I was a first child, after all. My mother was a middle child, cleverer by far than I.

Gaye


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Subject: family quilts
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 11:26:30 -0600
X-Message-Number: 22

I quilt but don't have any family quilts. To my knowledge, my paternal
grandmother, a professional seamstress who supported three kids and an
invalid husband, only made one quilt. The ubiquitous GFG which a cousin owns
is made mostly of shirtings (she made shirts, of course.) On my maternal
side I'm first generation American and there was no quilting tradition. I
own, however, many, many embroidered table coverings, etc. from them. They
were from northern Germany.
Jean Loken in MN



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Subject: Re: Who quilts and.....
From: "Marilyn Withrow" <mmwmarilynquilts.com>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 12:16:15 -0600
X-Message-Number: 23

Hi, Judy -- I quilt and have family quilts. I also judge and appraise and
speak to groups about quilting, write articles, and anything else having to
do with quilts. I have two Victorian puff quilts made by my
great-grandmother, a Drunkard's Path made by my grandmother and
great-grandmother, an embroidered squares quilt made by my mother and
grandmother, and I collect a lot of them of all kinds which I use in my
lectures.

Marilyn Maddalena Withrow
"The Quilt Psychic"
Professional Quilt Appraiser, Judge,
Historian, Designer and Speaker
www.marilynquilts.com
mmwmarilynquilts.com
Look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com
"The Quilted Rooster" Quilt Studio
now at Whispering Winds Ranch in Checotah, OK
"The woods would be very silent if only those birds sang who sing the best."
Anon.



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Subject: RE: family quilts
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 16:15:17 -0600
X-Message-Number: 24

We can commiserate together.
Sharron



________________________________
From: Sharron <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Tue, December 1, 2009 5:53:35 PM
Subject: [qhl] RE: family quilts

I always get sick when I think about this. I never had the priviledge of
knowing my grandparents but apparently my Grandmothers both quilted. My
Mother had two quilts that I remember. One was a Double Wedding Ring that
was scrappy with bright orange and white that her Mother made. The other
was a dark, dreary Crazy quilt of various fabrics brought from Germany by my
paternal Grandmother. When Mom died (Daddy had preceded her in death), my
brother and I went back to Kansas and loaded up what momentos we wanted. We
then had the church clean the house out and do what they wanted with
anything left behind. Yes, I left the two quilts. That's the part that
makes me sick. So, I quilt but do not have any family quilts. Thanks for
reminding me :{

Best regards,
Sharron .......................
.........in cold, drizzly Spring, TX where they are predicting snow for
Friday.........huh???..............



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: family quilts
From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 16:19:08 -0600
X-Message-Number: 25

My Grandmother taught me how to sew as a child. I remember her quilting with
the neighbor ladies and me playing under the frame that was hooked to the
ceiling with pulleys. Of course, I slept under a quilt and blanket every
nite.

My Mother was an only child so everything that Grandma had when she passed
went to her.
About 27 or so years ago, when I became interested in quilting, I asked Mom
what had happened to Grandma's quilts.

She said, "oh, Those old things!! I got rid of them long ago."

What a loss, and I let every one of my customers that have a family quilt
know how lucky they are and how much I enjoy and appreciate the opportunity
to work on their family quilt.

and, yes, I make as many quilts now as time will allow and my daughter,
daughter-in-law and step daughter know the value of the quilts that I will
pass on to them....son's, too!

Lonnie Schlough
www.fixquilts.com
...also drizzly and cold in Woodlands, Tx. I hope it snows!





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Subject: Family Quilts
From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2009 08:56:00 -0800
X-Message-Number: 26

My great grandmother, Sarah Elizabeth Harris Jenkins, was born in Northern
Georgia in 1857. Her father served with the 39th Georgia during the Civil
War; she married at 19 to a man whose family was also from Northern Georgia
and had sided with the North (two brothers-in-law served with the 12th
Tennessee Cav USA). Imagine what get togethers were like in that family!

After Sarah was widowed in 1917, she began visiting her many (11) children
for several months at a time, and during that time she sewed quilt tops.
I'm fortunate to have three of those tops. One is a scrappy double wedding
ring, which my sister (now deceased) finished; the second, a tulip design in
pinks and greens; and the third, a gold and yellow star motif.

I began quilting in the 1970s. My first effort was appliquE9d handprints of
my mother-in-law's children and grandchildren. The handprints were done in
felt. I haven't seen the quilt since. I have a feeling my mother-in-law
tried washing the quilt.

Live and learn!

Carol Berry
Merced, CA (Gateway to Yosemite)


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Subject: family quilts?
From: "Debby Kratovil" <kratovilhis.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 05:23:58 -0500 (EST)
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello all, Who among you quilts and also has family quilts?

WHAT? I forget that many on this list are historians and not always try
their hands in the craft. I inherited no family quilts because no one
quilted. I did get some tatting and crocheted items from my Italian
father's side. Since I have no family quilts, I've set out recreating som e
of the ones I've admired from the past. I have quite a pile of them in a
closet, "quilts my grandmothers should have made." I actually take them
out on the road from time to time. I have some of the series quilts from
the 1930s newspapers: Memory Bouquet, Garden Bouquet, Toy Quilt, Laurel
Wreath. Then I took some bundles of Grandmother's Flower Garden blocks
(50!) and sewed them into a largish twin sized quilt. I found two lovely
quilt tops made in 1930s prints at a junk shop back in the early 90s and
had them quilted (twin size). And I found a GORGEOUS Double Wedding Ring
in 1930s prints on bubble gum pink background (double size) quilt top -
pristine condition except for 3 tiny tears on Etsy a few months back - $4 0
gasp!!! and am going to finish that one. And another rather ratty hexagon
quilt top at the Sully Plantation Show this fall. What's funny is that my
oldest daughter (29), very modern, decorates her apartment very "Ikea" an d
modern, absolutely loves, loves these quilts and begs for all of them onc e
they get a house where she can set up one bedroom in "vintage". For now,
she just oggles them, swoons and shrieks at every feedsack scrap, every
vintage piece of fabric I come up with - and insists that all of them
become her family quilts! So, I'm quilting for the future, for someone wh o
wants MY family quilts. Then maybe in 20 years she'll join this list as a
quilt historian and brag about her historic finds in her mother's attic.
For now, I'm making up the ones I would have liked to have inherited if m y
mother and grandmothers had quilted!

--
Debby with a "y" and not "ie" Kratovil
Programs & Workshops
www.quilterbydesign.com



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Subject: Re: family quilts?
From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 05:14:39 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 2

--- On Thu, 12/3/09, Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> wrote:
For now, I'm making up the ones I would have liked to have inherited if my mother and grandmothers had quilted!

I love that! My grandmothers were deceased by the time I was a toddler so I never knew them. My mother didn't sew but she did buy me a sewing machine when I was in high school. I taught myself to sew then and haven't stopped since. I love the idea of making the quilts I would have inherited! Thank you for that thought.

Mary Anne



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Subject: Family Quilts
From: Edwaquiltaol.com
 


I have a few. The quilts my aunts made were more untility than
decorative. However, I have some that my grandmother made which are interesting in
the way she quilted. They are quilted in a diamond pattern - one direction
on a treadle sewing machine and the other direction by hand. Another which
we always called the "Voile Quilt" is made from dress scraps of the voile
type fabric popular in the late 20's and 30's.

Holice Turnbow

-------------------------------1259846977--


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Subject: Family quilts
From: Carol's Quilt Closet <imaquilter2msn.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 10:30:34 -0500
X


Good morning all

My sister and I both quilt and I have taught my daughter-in-law to quilt. My cousins quilt and I have many family quilts.
My mother and mother-in-law made quilts for my children and me and my aunt has quite a few of her own that she has made. My aunt and mother inherited quite a few from their mother and grandmother. Since my mom has passed I was fortunate enough to get her quilts. My great grandmother was still mak ing quilts in her 80's. I feel so blessed to have knitted and crocheted it ems a small doll cradle that my great grandfather made and many other me morabilia.

As a matter of fact one time I was visiting my aunt and instead of a wel come mat she had 3 quilts outside the door in a pile. I asked her why they were there and she said she was going to give them to the neighbor to put in the back of his pickup you know for when he was hauling anything o r when he wanted to put the dogs in the back. The blood drained from my bo dy. She was insistent that they were not worth patching but I did end up k eeping and restoring them. They are absolutely wonderful. I gave one to m y daughter and one to my sister. One more left to fix and it's been a true labor of love.

Happy Holidays to everyone
Carol
very warm in CT


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: family quilts
From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 10:19:06 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

Yes, I have quilt blocks from my mother, quilts from my maternal grandmothe r and great-grandmother, my fraternal grandmother, and my step-fraternal gr andmother. There are a few family members from my generation who quilt, an d I'm teaching my sister. Granddaughters were intrigued from early-on and demanded to learn to use the sewing machine. I've taught two of them quilt ing and they've each made two by machine (and entered them in shows) and nu merous quilts by hand on their own.

Yes, I quilt, teach, judge, write, and study quilts with two groups. I tried to formally study, but got slapped in the face on that one.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Family Quilts
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 10:42:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

--0015174766f8fb02f00479d4d541
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1

Joyfully enough, I have evidence that a quilt did exist in my family, but
the quilt has long ago made its way to quilt heaven, I believe. Within the
piles of family photos, there is one of my big sister (13 yrs. older than
me) and her dog, laying on a quilt, on the grass. Like so many other quilts,
it was relegated to a lawn/picnic/or beach quilt. It is a Flying Geese
pattern, and the photo was taken about 1945, I imagine. This picture appears
in my most recently-published e-book, Straight Talk About Quilt Care II. It
just goes to show how fragile quilts are. Even some that I have made have
been washed, dried in the dryer, got tears from heavy wear/animals etc. and
now reside in a landfill. People who don't make quilts themselves have no
clue as to how to properly care for them. For that reason, I've resurrected
the information I wrote previously, expanding it, adding more and larger
photos, and adding chapters. I wish I knew which grandmother made that
quilt. Both of them had sewing machines, and both made clothing for their
large families. Some things we will never know, especially when all who
could have told the tale are gone and have left no written record.

Best,

Pat

--
Patricia Lynne Grace Cummings

http://www.quiltersmuse.com

http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/

"Somewhere over the rainbow, bluebirds fly ..."



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: historic society fundraiser
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 15:36:53 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Our local historical society has recently had a change in their BOD. They
hired a gentleman for the part time position of librarian/executive director
who was taking the job as a retirement position after many years as
librarian at a Pennsylvania Museum, that coincidentally we had visited last
Spring.

One of our own study group ladies suggested that we contact him. We did,
and on our first meeting he pulled out all the acquisition folders and
photos of quilts in the collections for us to see. There, on the top of the
pile was my initial contact letter from years before, requesting their
participation in our first Regional Quilt Study Day where at least 15 or
more small historical societies brought their quilts to another venue for
the day. Written in pencil on my letter was the notation "rejected by the
BOD." They never bothered to notify me of the rejection.

He took us up to the top floor of the historic house where the quilts
were -- I hesitate to say "stored" -- piled would be a better word -- on a
bed, some in really soiled pillow cases, others piled one on top of the
other, folded in a dark, airless closet in this non-air conditioned house.

We suggested that this important collection deserved better treatment than
that and we'd be happy to help. He was very receptive. First thing I did
was go home, draw from my stash of muslin and make some new cases. Then I
went to a quilt shop and begged a donation of 15 yards of muslin and
altogether made about 20 or more pillowcases. I switched out their cases
for mine, took theirs home, and washed the heck out of them. When I called
to make an appointment to take his pillow cases back he said he had moved
the quilts to the brand new Archives building and he'd meet me there.

We set up a meeting for 4 of our group to go, see all the quilts, photograph
them and set up a day for a fundraising meeting. First, let me tell you
about the Archives building. It is only 5 or so minutes from my house, is
on a busy country road, has no name on it, and looks very much as a local
barn in good condition would look. Inside on the first floor are offices
and steel shelving units that roll on tracks. They have much of the paper
stored in cardboard boxes on these shelves, and on that day the quilts had a
row of shelves to themselves!

This building was started at the height of the market, but when the market
tanked the HS had to dip into their endowment to pay the bills. So, they
were very receptive to our overture to bring people in to see the collection
and donate to their maintenance.

Before our contact they had 21 quilts in the collection, but after our
initial contact someone had donated 5 additional quilts with local
provenance. They now count us as their good luck charms. At the end of our
day looking at the old collection they brought the newly donated quilts from
the office and we spread them out, one by one. At which time we noticed a
couple of bugs left on the table! We suggested that they immediately
isolate those quilts and before integrating them into the collection they go
into a freeze/thaw/freeze/thaw. One of the board members was able to donate
a chest type freezer, and with our directions I think they will now put the
entire collection through the process -- just to make sure.

All this happened before our Regional Quilt Study Day in September, so I was
able to announce the special day with the collection and put out sign-up
sheets. Because of space limitations at the Archives I limited attendance
to 24 or less. As it turned out we had 20 of our people and 3 people from
the HS. Because the timing was so close to a major holiday I did have to
put the word out on the QHL and my Study Group Contact list to fill the
seats. Many people wanted to come but couldn't because of timing, and will
come when we schedule another day with the quilts in the Spring. I
announced the day twice at my local quilt guild (attendance around 65) but
not one member (other than the 2 who attend regularly) bothered to contact
me -- and these are their own county quilts!

In setting up the day I went a few days earlier and with the director
settled on a roughly chronological airing, doing a table turning. I
numbered each quilt and on the day one of the board members was ready with
the next quilt as we folded the previous one and slipped it back into its
case.

On the day we met in town at the Historic House, parked cars in the
municipal lot across the street, and car-pooled to the Archives Building,
just a few minutes away.

Because we had been allowed to bring food into the BCHS for our Regional
Days, I was caught off guard when I was told we wouldn't be allowed any food
or drink in the Archives building! But, our local caterer was able to
accommodate 20 people and we just carpooled back to town to the restaurant
and then went back to the Archives for the rest of the day. Lunch, with
travel took exactly an hour.

As to costs -- I charged attendees $30.00 for the day. $10.00 for lunch,
$10.00 for donation to the HS, and $10.00 for the MAQSG treasury. (We are
the hosts for the 2011 AQSG Seminar) As it turns out we actually donated
more than $200.00 to the HS -- more like $275.00, for the archival boxes
and tissue I ordered.

Next time we'll be able to order at least a dozen boxes. We are thinking
that we could also do a quilt turning or exhibit on one day for their
membership at some point. The last membership meeting they had, which I
attended, was at a local church and almost every seat was filled. A local
artist and his wife had taken a few of the samplers from the collection and
"restored" (shudder! shudder!) and re-framed them, and because they did
extensive geneology on them were able to get a 2 hour talk together. I'll
bet we'll be able to do that with many of their quilts. They are mostly in
remarkably good condition, some very early ones in nearly "as made"
condition. Some come with very good documentation.

Stephanie, I hope that answers some of your questions. Really, most of the
people at the Historic Societies are generalists and are so anxious to hear
experts' opinions of their collections. The members in attendance were
writing as fast as their pencils would allow!

The board member who kept us out for so long really thought she owned
everything herself and I've heard that even folks seeking geneological
information had a hard time getting past her. There is another local
historic society that is very private, with the same kind of woman at its
head. We've never been able to get in there either -- but some day she has
to be replaced, and then, watch out Hopewell!~

Judy Grow



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] historic society fundraiser
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 15:51:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

Wow, Judy! A terrific blueprint for dealing with recalcitrant
historical society members, putting together a study day, raising
funds, working with HS behind the scenes to set everything up!
Thanks for sharing!

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: historic society fundraiser
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 16:27:20 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Great post Judy!! What amazing progress...and I know who the sampler guy
is...tee hee
Candace
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: historic society fundraiser
From: "Mary Persyn" <Mary.Persynvalpo.edu>
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 2009 15:43:59 -0600

Congratulations, Judy! That's great.

My little local museum has been very helpful to my local Guild. They are also grateful for the 20 acid-free boxes we donated. It turns out that we are the first group interested in a certain type of "artifact," for want of a better word, that has shown an interest in the items in their collection. They are now hoping to interest other groups.

Mary



Mary G. Persyn
Associate Dean for Library Services
School of Law
Valparaiso University
656 S. Greenwich St.
Valparaiso, IN 46383
(219) 465-7830
FAX (219) 465-7917
mary.persynvalpo.edu

--__Part052F5B0F.0__--


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Subject: Re: quilts in families
From: jocelynmdelphiforums.com

Speaking of passing on quilts to families, what to do with my little col lection? My niece, newly engaged, wants nothing to do with them, even war ned me against gifting one for the wedding! Now that I am aging (too rapi dly it seems) I need to make provisions to eventually donate, but without $$$ support which museums would be able to handle them (my landlord has all my $$ it seems

Laura,
You need to adopt yourself a quilting daughter. :) Surely there's some yo unger woman in your guild who'd love to have those quilts. Find someone w hose company you'd enjoy, make a relationship out of it. You'd both benef it.
I have a family quilt that was made by the mother of an aunt. The aunt ha d no children and was closer to our side of the family than to her biolog ical kin, so she was giving out quilts as each of her nieces married. I w as still unmarried when she died, and my mother went into her house and t ook down the GFG that was hanging over her bed, and smuggled it out to me . <G> Each of the pieces in the rings are fussy-cut. The quilting shows t hat it was one of Eliza's last quilts, because the stitches are long, but the design elements are still glowing.
As far as I know, this aunt only made one quilt, a Cathedral Windows. I r emember her bringing it to family gatherings, and each of her SILs teasin g that she was making it for them. My aunt would just smile. Then one day , a big box arrived at our house. My mother ripped it open on the porch, and there it was....the completed Cathedral Windows quilt. She sat down o n the steps and cried, cradling the quilt in her lap. It's the spread tha t's on her bed now. :)
I also have a quilt in shabby condition that my own grandmother made, and I should be in line to inherit some of my mother's.


----_vm_0011_W8078216502_17870_1259881168--


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Subject: Passing on our quilts
From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 15:25:42 -0800 (PST)

Hi all,
Passing on our quilts, whether made by ourselves, or collected antiques, ne eds forethought and planning...decades of it.
We can't assume that just because we treasure something, the next in line w ill also treasure it.
Start your children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews while they are still young. Get them involved with quilts in age appropriate ways. When t hey are young, make them a quilt, have them help, draw and color patterns o n paper. Teach them to sew and make a quilt with them when they get olde r. Take them to museums and shows to appreciate them as young adults. Only with knowledge and exposure will they truly appreciate quilts as a pa rt of you to be handed down, or an as art.
Besides having two wonderful young daughters, I am around children everyday . And one thing I have learned is children love adult attention. Most children will do anything to spend quality time with you...take advantage of it. As they get older, they may lose interested, but you've planted a seed that may grow!
My daughters get angry with me when I sell a quilt. But are always eager to see what's coming in the door next and who has dibs on it if Mom doesn' t sell that one, too.

Last year, both daughters picked out their colorways for the Saturday Sampl er.
Right now my 11 year old and I joined a Saturday Sampler together.
Over Xmas break I have 2 young ladies coming over to learn to sew (and one mom).
And I am working with a local quilt shop to start a program for Girl Scouts after the holiday.
Start 'em young!
My best,
Dana

Material Pleasures, LLC Antique and VintageTextiles - Wrap Yourself in History www.materialpleasures.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: historic society fundraiser
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
 


Great story, Judy. Also a good reminder not to give up on an institution - things change in time and hopefully for the better as yours did. What a lot of work but how rewarding. Win. Win for them, you and especially the quilts!
Jean

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Passing on our quilts
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 19:31:12 -0600
X-Message-Number: 14

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.


I get worn out thinking about what should happen to my quilts, fabrics, machines, books for heavens sake! etc (or anything else) when I'm gone. I have left instructions on my computer and have thorough database and photo albums with info on each quilt - whether in my vintage collection or made by me. I assume my family will be most interested in those made by me but here's my most recent thought....I believe SOMEONE will end up with each quilt and if it's a stranger who loves it that may be better than a family member who is just keeping it in a chest because I made it.
Many vintage quilts in my collection are everyday quilts in the sense that they were made to be used - I recently got one at a Goodwill Outlet (did you even know there WAS such a thing? I didn't!) I came upon the place by accident and it's too long a story but the bottom line is that everything is sold by weight and nothing is over $5. I paid $4.64. I posted photos on eboard under Goodwill Quilt- it's a 1950's big flower with stem. I want to say Dahlia but it's not the single huge Dahlia image you may think of....blocks with green sashing - terrific selection of fabrics of that era. Not used much if at all by the looks of it. Unwashed. I washed it - and the quilting pops....it's hand quilting in light pink thread! And it gives me so much pleasure!! (of course, the price alone is a thrill ) but it was sleep-tested last night when I got chilly - I had it hanging over the banister after showing some quilting friends that evening - so grabbed it and ummmmm....it passed the test.
So - what I'm thinking is that SOMEONE will end up with each of my quilts and I hope they love it, no matter who they are!
Jean




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Passing on our quilts
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
 


I get worn out thinking about what should happen to my quilts, fabrics, machines, books for heavens sake! etc (or anything else) when I'm gone. I have left instructions on my computer and have thorough database and photo albums with info on each quilt - whether in my vintage collection or made by me. I have made and given away many quilts to family and friends......I assume my family will be most interested in those made by me but here's my most recent thought....I believe SOMEONE will end up with each quilt and if it's a stranger who loves it that may be better than a family member who is just keeping it in a chest because I made it.
Many vintage quilts in my collection are everyday quilts in the sense that they were made to be used - I recently got one at a Goodwill Outlet (did you even know there WAS such a thing? I didn't!) I came upon the place by accident and it's too long a story but the bottom line is that everything is sold by weight and nothing is over $5. I paid $4.64. I posted photos on eboard under Goodwill Quilt- it's a 1950's big flower with stem. I want to say Dahlia but it's not the single huge Dahlia image you may think of....blocks with green sashing - terrific selection of fabrics of that era. Not used much if at all by the looks of it. Unwashed. I washed it - and the quilting pops....it's hand quilting in light pink thread! And it gives me so much pleasure!! (of course, the price alone is a thrill ) but it was sleep-tested last night when I got chilly - I had it hanging over the banister after showing some quilting friends that evening - so grabbed it and ummmmm....it passed the test.
So - what I'm thinking is that SOMEONE will end up with each of my quilts and I hope they love it, no matter who they are!
Jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cinda Cawley
From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu>
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 2009 09:59:11 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

You all know Cinda from her wonderful "Cinda-grams" describing quilts
that she sees in her travels around the Mid-Atlantic states. Cinda is
also a Vice-President of AQSG.

Cinda has had some health issues and is currently staying with her
daughter in Syracuse NY where I understand she will having some physical
therapy/rehab. Please keep Cinda in your thoughts and prayers for a
speedy recovery.

I don't know whether she has email access, but if you'd like to drop her
a card or note, her address is Cinda Cawley c/o Coughlin, 204 Audubon
Rd. Fayetteville, NY 13066.

Mary Persyn
Incoming AQSG President

--
Mary G. Persyn mary.persynvalpo.edu
Associate Dean for Library Services
School of Law Library
Valparaiso University
656 S. Greenwich St.
Valparaiso, IN 46383
219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilts our grandmothers should have made...
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 11:24:38 -0500
 

Oh Debby! You've hit a nerve here. I am going to adopt your philosophy
consciously and make quilts with my grandmothers in mind but in my case, I'm
obliged to go back one more generation: my great-grandmothers.

Grandmother from Mother's side: Mom's mother died the year I was born but
she was a Mississippi lady and thought kit quilts were wonderful. One
surviving kit quilt of cotton sateen--absolutely washed to death.
Mom's maternal grandmother, again from Mississippi, was a teacher who lived
through the Civil War. Gotta be some scrap quilts made on this side of the
family.
Mom's fraternal grandmother was a Sooner and made the Oklahoma Land Run. Too
busy to quilt much, she helped her husband in their bakery. Mom did remember
however that she pieced quilts later in life with her church group.

Grandmother from Dad's Mother: I did know and grow up with her and she was a
non-quilting educated flapper who thought quilts were tacky.
Dad's maternal grandmother was part Seminole Indian and a champion quilter.
She used to invite ladies over to quilt and then later pick out their
stitches if they didn't meet her high standards. It was a point of pride
that she 'out quilted' the white ladies and that she always was up by dawn
and made biscuits for breakfast.
Dad's fraternal grandmother was a Scotswoman-who knows there but I bet she
did every sort of practical needlework.

From this lineage, I deduce the following: genetically I am a Southern scrap
quilter with a respect for English (Scots) roots and an appreciation for
good work and fine stitches. That about sums it up.

Pepper


--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--00504502b44356600a0479e98bbf--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: starting 'em young
From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 06:05:12 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 3

--- On Thu, 12/3/09, Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> wrote:
Start your children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews while they are still young.Get them involved with quilts in age appropriate ways...Start 'em young!

Over the Thanksgiving holiday, I made doll quilts with my granddaughters (a ges 6 + 7) on an old Singer 99 that I converted to a handcrank for them. I brought precut fabrics, batting and backings with me. They had a ball and, according to my daughter, are still making them. The younger one surprised me by starting her third doll quilt before the older one had finished her f irst. I think they're hooked. :) :) :)

Mary Anne



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: family quilts of immigrant families
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
 



I'm loving these stories, and wish I had an extended family that did needle work or cherished anything they had. All I have is the stained Russian dinn er cloth from Aunt Rose that i saved from the rag pile.

Here's another challenge--how many have quilts that were brought from the ' old country' rather than made here by some apple-cheeked grandma?!

I would love to know if people have, say, Scandinavian or British or Dutch or French older quilts that were brought with families when they emigrated here. For example, I've seen in museums captions that report a certain quil t came from England with the family. I have an antiqueuniforms pieced qu ilt that was given by a British sailor to his aunt in Connecticut.I alwa ys wondered if in pictures of Ellis Island arrivals, theremight be someo ne carrying their pieced bedding, ora big bundlewrapped with a pieced quilt.

And by the way, still thinking about the male older twins in my neighb, the y dress alike even up to their hats, it's always matching caps-summer and w inter styles-or fedoras!

Ithink also of an absolutelystrikingcouple in their 80s probably, who always were together, walking slowly down my block, arms intertwined' h e wastall and stillhandsome and white haired, she with a corona of wh ite blond braid, anddraped in abeautiful shawl. One day, he walked ou t alone, and then I never saw either again Gasp. We never spoke but smiled when we passed. When I saw him aloneI dreaded what had happened. Urban l ife gives experiences like these.

Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com
--0-490683228-1259948680:35915--


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Subject: Re: Cinda Cawley
From: Senoperaaol.com
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 13:12:25 EST
X-Message-Number: 5


-------------------------------1259950345
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I'm so sorry to hear that Cinda is feeling under the weather. Her
"Cinda-grams" are a highlight of this list for me.

All good wishes to her and hope she's back to her quilt tours in no time -

Sue


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: historic society fundraiser
From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 13:19:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Subject: historic society fundraiser
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 15:36:53 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

>Our local historical society has recently had a change in their BOD.
They
>hired a gentleman for the part time position of librarian/executive
>director
>who was taking the job as a retirement position after many years as
>librarian at a Pennsylvania Museum, that coincidentally we had visited
>last Spring.

Dear Judy,

I was so pleased to read your story on the collaboration between your
quilt study group and the local historical society’s new director. I agree
that it takes the right kind of person at the helm of the administration
of these organizations to be able to have a ‘public minded’ perception of
why the organization was set up in the first place, what its mission
really is all about, and being able to implement that mission for the
benefit of both the institution and the public.

I have had a wonderful opportunity to work with an historical museum here
in Oregon where the director is so willing to share their quilt collection
with interested groups. The local quilt guild meets at the museum, and has
been a large supporter of the institution for years. When select guild
members would like to see quilts from the collection, they ask the museum
for a viewing day, and the museum is most gracious in pulling 15+ quilts
for that day. We know that with smaller museums their budgets are
stretched to the limit in this economy, but there are still those
institutions that see the benefit of making their collections available to
broader audiences. It promotes trust and goodwill throughout the
community, and in turn, creates a positive response towards the
institution when topics, such as funding, are brought up. This institution
works with the community in so many different ways. Just recently, they
had a “sleep over” for one of the local school’s 4th grade class,
supervised by their teacher and the museum director. The kids got to play
games relating to the current exhibition, and later were able to stretch
out their sleeping bags right in the exhibition gallery. It was ‘Night at
the Museum’ in practice!

Judy – you’ll be pleased to know that our next meeting of the Columbia
Willamette Quilt Study Group was inspired by your regional quilt study day
at the Burlington County HS back in September. Ours will be a tad simpler
in concept, but nonetheless seeing some great quilts from the museum’s
collection and giving back to them with donations for their collections
management projects. We are grateful for the opportunities of working with
institutions in our state -- to be able to view their quilt collections.
Both our study group members and the institutions benefit – the former by
seeing amazing quilts that broaden their knowledge of the art form and its
history, and the latter by making their collections known to interested
individuals whose appreciation may express itself in potential beneficial
ways. This, to me, is one of the best parts of keeping quilt history
alive, and why it keeps me coming back for more!

Martha Spark, facilitator
Columbia Willamette Quilt Study Group
Serving Oregon and SW Washington


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: family quilts?
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 05:42:57 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

I want to comment on Debby's post, since I would if we were having this
conversation in my living room.

Debby said:
<<I inherited no family quilts because no one quilted. I did get some
tatting and crocheted items from my Italian father's side. Since I have no
family quilts, I've set out recreating some of the ones I've admired from
the past. I have quite a pile of them in a closet, "quilts my grandmothers
should have made." I actually take them out on the road from time to time. I
have some of the series quilts from the 1930s newspapers: Memory Bouquet,
Garden Bouquet, Toy Quilt, Laurel Wreath. Then I took some bundles of
Grandmother's Flower Garden blocks (50!) and sewed them into a largish twin
sized quilt. I found two lovely quilt tops made in 1930s prints at a junk
shop back in the early 90s and had them quilted (twin size). And I found a
GORGEOUS Double Wedding Ring in 1930s prints on bubble gum pink background
(double size) quilt top - pristine condition except for 3 tiny tears on Etsy
a few months back - $40 gasp!!! and am going to finish that one. And another
rather ratty hexagon quilt top at the Sully Plantation Show this fall.
What's funny is that my oldest daughter (29), very modern, decorates her
apartment very "Ikea" and modern, absolutely loves, loves these quilts and
begs for all of them once they get a house where she can set up one bedroom
in "vintage". For now, she just oggles them, swoons and shrieks at every
feedsack scrap, every vintage piece of fabric I come up with - and insists
that all of them become her family quilts! So, I'm quilting for the future,
for someone who wants MY family quilts. Then maybe in 20 years she'll join
this list as a quilt historian and brag about her historic finds in her
mother's attic.
For now, I'm making up the ones I would have liked to have inherited if my
mother and grandmothers had quilted!>>

RESPONSE:
I'm with you. My trunk show of 30s quilts I've collected is titled, Quilts
My Grandmother Didn't Make, though I do show the ragged quilted slipper
scuffs that my grandmother did make and my husband still wears every night
and morning between the closet and the bed and back again. They've lasted
more than 30 years with that limited wear. Her legacy in my family are those
slippers she made every year at Christmas for each member. Most are worn to
shreds now, but I have a couple of packrat cousins who saved some slippers
in pristine condition for sentimental reasons. I guess that's part of our
family history. I inherited her picnic basket full of paper patterns and
corduroy scraps she used for the slipper soles.

I think Debby's daughter's decorating sense with blending Ikea and 30s
vintage fits right in there with Shabby Chic." I love it. The magazines are
calling it cottage as well. For me, it's a reminder of years when my
grandparents were the ages my children are now, and they were raising their
families under the challenging conditions of the Depression. Remembering how
they survived and coped gives me hope for the present and future for us and
our children (though I'd love to fast forward to find a confidence that it
all will work out well). The colors of the 30s were a happier palette than
colors used earlier, and they work for today as well.

What are we thinking when we have stacks of works in progress/unfinished
quilts and then buy those unfinished projects from the 30s and finish
_them_? The 30s was an era that produced a LOT of unfinished quilts. I have
not done any research to see if any previous era produced as many tops as
well as finished quilts as those from the 30s. I have some tops from the 30s
that I have finished and will finish. I consider them to be part of a round
robin project, and it's my turn. There is a book out now about finishing old
tops and says something about the approach: Same story, different ending."
I figure that the quilts I have do not have a unique historical
significance, so I am not ruining anything by enhancing the finishing in my
style. It's fun.


Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and
am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org
For lectures and workshops, see www.findaquiltteacher.com/vlackb.html





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: family quilts?
From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 10:59:57 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 8

On Fri, 12/4/09, Barb Vlack <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> wrote:
The 30s was an era that produced a LOT of unfinished quilts. I have
not done any research to see if any previous era produced as many tops as
well as finished quilts as those from the 30s.

That makes me wonder if perhaps they went unfinished because their makers couldn't afford the batting and backing fabric to complete them during the Depression...

Mary Anne





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: passing down of family heirlooms
From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmvyahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 11:21:10 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 9

--0-209343637-1259954470:20488
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I am getting ready to "gift" some family heirlooms and was just curious abo ut the tradition of handing down through the family. Both my maternal an d paternal grandparents gave me many family antiques as heirlooms because I was the oldest granddaughter on their side. Does anyone know how the tr adition was started and/or why? That seems to be the way it has been don e for the last 25 years or so. In the past it seemed thatmost of the time families passed property down through the oldest son (and sometimes th e other siblings got nothing). Any comments?In the pastI think the boysgot the lands, houses, & moneywhile the girls got dry goods a nd home furnishings--probably due to laws governing women owning property. But why do we pass things down through the oldest female now?
Thanks-Connie Ark-- Springfield, Ohio
--0-209343637-1259954470:20488--


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Subject: Re: passing down of family heirlooms
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 17:11:32 -0600
X-Message-Number: 10

goods and home furnishings--probably due to laws governing women owning property. But why do we pass things down through the oldest female now?
Thanks-Connie Ark-- Springfield, Ohio
---------------------------------------------------


Because of evolution, Connie.

Slowly, slowly, everso slowly, the human being has gotten more intelligent.

First there was a written alphabet, then rules written and passed along in stone, (framed by the gender whose brain was less gifted in organizing human beings), then there were wars organized to defend these particular stones,

Things went that way for centuries and centuries. By then, the race had learned to put all the stones together in one pile. In the English-speaking world they named these piles "constitutions," from "institute" (laws made ) and "con" (together).

In the U.S., where the creatures were a wee-tiny-bit more inventive, some members of the race recognized he could write on another little stone some law everybody agreed on and put that little stone adjacent to the others. That was big news and took a while to sink into the brains of the gender that carved the laws.

But by then, the other gender, the increasingly large number of the ones whose brains were organized to tie things together---maybe three, four, or even five ideas, say---had learned to read. Because of their ability to compare and contrast the carving on the stones with that on the stones that God had thrown at the other gender, hoping to encourage them to behave themselves, some of them began to see that everything the carvers carved wasn't like those older, more binding stones.

And some of them recognized they had pretty much been left out of things. It was as they had suspected: they had been dealing with creatures like themselves, only less skill socially, and not with the Gods or God. Well, you can just imagine what effect that had.

In the past, they had relied on an ancient trick to force the stone carvers to behave themselves (see "Lysistrada"), but it appears that trick was wearing thin, both in its appeal to the them and to the carvers, who had grown vain indeed from being the only the carvers on the block. You know how that can happen.

So they announced they too wanted to be carvers. As you might imagine, this idea absolutely shocked the stone carvers. They said, "Who do you think you are? You aren't strong enough to carve stone. Besides, these stones say people like you can't carve. So there!"

"So there!" did cut it with the more-flexible-brained human beings. As I said, they had already learned to read the older stones that had been tossed down by God in God's many guises. And because the aforementioned brains gave them skill in comparing things, the American ones looked around and noticed they were not the only human beings left out of things. There were black slaves who were left out even more. These people, whose brains promoted compassion (a feeling for others) felt particularly sad for the black slaves, whatever the organization of their brains

The bottom line is that they began to raise a lot of racket about the carvers' treatment of these creatures who differed only in skin color from themselves. It turned out, the stone carvers had wanted to fight one another for a long time. They had a big disagreement, and that was the way they had always settled disagreements and so it seemed the reasonable thing to do again. But they had been hoping for some better reason that sounded like a better excuse. All this talk about the black folks was just what they'd been looking for and before you could say "civil war," they were firing off guns and dressing up like club members and having a rip-roaring war. They felt renewed and just kept going that way until one club tuckered out. The whole thing ended with the stone carvers adding some new rules declaring the black folks human beings.

Of course, they thought that was all there was to it. If truth be told, they felt bold but a little afraid of what they'd done, adding the the old rules and all. And they certainly did not intend to make a habit of adding rules. That sort of thing was not in their brains or their bones.

Unbeknownst to them, however, the more flexible-brained members of the group thought otherwise, and before you knew it, they had gotten themselves declared both human beings and citizens, just like the black people.

By that time, this group had enough opportunities to see that they seemed to have more gifts for some things than the carvers. In fact, all over the land, they looked at one another and said, "Why have we listened to these folks all these eons?" They even suggested that they could have found a better way than a great big fight to figure out the deal about the black people.

In short, these people, who had long before been named "women" by guess who? you're right, men(!), recognized they could do a few things themselves. Even insisted on doing them.

And among the things they started doing was deciding who got their quilts and a lot of other material objects they cared a lot about, like, for instance, their private inheritances of capital and real property.

They also got the idea of using pencils and ink to record things, so they could be erased or scratched out if somebody discovered they didn't make any sense.

They had also observed this---what sons did with inherited items depended entirely on what the women they married wanted done with them.

Not a good idea, said they to one another. They remembered how they had felt when some yahoo of a brother had gotten the entire home place and all that was in it simply because he had the luck to be born first and how from the time they could remember anything, they'd known their fates depended on latching onto some other firstborn male. Because in many parts of the U.S. they hadn't even had the control of who would get their most personal and beloved object---say, their cat or their jewelry.

And so, Connie, that is why and when women started passing things down to the more socally-conscious and compassionate members of the race---women.

Gaye


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Subject: Learning to quilt spreads healing among male prisoners too
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 2009 19:21:06 -0800
X-Message-Number: 11

More great news links about how quilts have impacted lives.

1) Interesting video with the prisoner article.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/specials/times_appeal/article6943249. e
ce

2) Grandmothers make quilt for President Obama -
http://www.wxii12.com/news/21802483/detail.html

3) Tough love from a grandmother-in-law
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId3D121035348


4) B3My mother has beat cancer three times and she says that the quilting is
one of her strengths. And I think when you find a passion in life thatB9s
really something you can constantly return to, and thatB9s what IB9m
referencing.B2 http://theontarion.ca/viewarticle.php?id_pag3D2885

Karen Alexander