Subject: tulip kit quilt
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 2009 08:50:07 -0800 (PST)

Hello all,I posted an image of a tulip kit quilt to the gallery. If a
nyone knows the company and/or pattern name or number, I would very much li
ke to know that info. Here's how I came by this quilt:We just install
ed a new exhibit here at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, A Family of
Quilts: The Multi-Generational Craft of Quilting Through Time. The main
family represented is the Murphy family of Louisville, KY. This quilt wa
s added at the last minute. It was begun by Essie Ford Murphy in 1983 an
d finished byElsie Ford McFarland in 1995. The family did not have a
name forit, but I could see the little dots indicating that it isa ki
t quilt.Sandy Bartelsmeyer, a volunteer from Illinois (and a member o
f this list serve) and I were rodding the exhibit quilts when I got a call
from the front desk that a visitor wanted me to look at their antique quilt
. When Sandy and I saw the quilt, we couldn't believe it- the same exact
pattern and colors! And the blue dots were even more visible. The on
ly difference was that this quilt was finished off with a tatted or crochet
ed edge instead of binding. We couldn't believe it- seeing two of the sa
me quilt from completely different locations within an hour.So, I'd l
ove to know the company that made the kits and the pattern and/or name and
number if possible. It's a lovely design.Thank you in advance-J
udy Schwender
--0-707069049-1261500607:45696--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Portfolio of WPA Museum Extension Project, PA
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 2009 17:15:26 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Martha -

As a member of the Variable Star Quilters who produced the portfolio,
I'm glad you like it. I agree that the plates are stunning.

While researching the project, we didn't find any other quilt projects
except this one. It's my understanding that a similar museum project
was conducted with artists producing a portfolio of illustrations of
American Folk Art. Somewhere, sometime, I saw 5 or 6 plates from it.

The set of plates that you have is an exact copy of the set owned by the
Reading Public Library -- they were silk screened, reproducing the color
of the originals exactly -- that's why the oak tag backgrounds are
different colors. We left the "Reading Public Library" notation on so
they could never be resold as "antique originals".

We wish we knew more about the distribution of the plates originally.
.If I remember correctly, they were done in 1938 or 39, and by then the
war effort was building up so I don't know if there were plans for more
or not. Interesting thought.

Barb in southeastern PA.

ps -- For anyone who isn't familiar with this project, I just found a
post I sent to QHL in December 1996 (boy, I can't believe QHL has been a
part of our lives for so long. Thank you Kris). Anyway, I've added
it here on the end for anyone who is interested. Feel free to ignore.

begin copy -

I am a member of the Variable Star Quilters of Souderton, PA, and in 1988

we began researching a State wide Museum Extension Project of the Works

Projects Administration which took place in District 2 (Philadelphia
area) of

PA, involving quilts. We began because I was fortunate to find at
auction 25

silk screened plates of quilt patterns. They are really pretty, and we
began

investigating them. We learned that there are 30 plates in the entire

collection, and they were done in South Langhorne and Croydon, PA. The
project

began in 1938 or 1939, and appears to be very localized. Less than 5
complete

sets are known to be in existance. Funding ended in January 1941, so it
was a

very short lived project.

As was mentioned earlier, about 1/4 of WPA employment was in service

projects such as the Federal Writers Project, Index of American Design, and

Museum Extension Project. They were all under the Fine Arts Project which

employed out-of-work writers, artists, musicians and theater people. The

purpose of the FAP was to preserve and celebrate the traditions of American

culture of the past.

Also printed in addition to the 30 silk screened patterns was a manual

entitled "Quilts Pieced and Appliqued: Colonial and Pioneer Patchwork
Quilts."

The title page says - A series of thirty color plates of authentic old
pieced

and appliqued quilts showing working drawings including the cutting size
and

finished size patches, together with descriptive material necessary for
their

making.

Our research has led us to believe that the designs were based on Ruth

Finley's book, Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them, and

that the numerous errors indicate that the writers and artists were not

quilters. There is a high degree of comparison between the plates in Ruth's

book and the pictures of completed quilts on the WPA plates.

In 1990, the Variable Star Quilters and the Reading Public Library -

owners of one complete set of plates - reprinted the set of 30 plates
and the

manual. The new manual includes history and research about the WPA and this

specific project, as well as corrections to the original manual that would

allow more satisfactory quilt construction. Members of our group made
all 30

of the quilts using the patterns given - there are 16 of us so it was a

manageable project - and made the necessary corrections.

Copies of the portfolio reprint are still available - shops find it hard

to display due to its size - and if anyone would like information about
this

little known piece of quilt history, please contact me. The Variable Star

Quilters are a non profit group and donate all of our money from book
sales,

show prizes and quilt shows to woman and children's charities. We meet in

members homes so pay no rent, do not have expensive speakers or a
newsletter,

and no administrative budget. All proceeds do go to charity.

Hope somebody found this interesting and/or informative. Happy quilting!!
end copy

pps -- I don't know if there are still copies -- I would have to check
if anyone is interested -- they've been around a long time.








----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: tulip kit quilt
From: "Rose Marie Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 2009 18:37:41 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

Judy's tulip quilt is a Home Needlecraft Creations product, # 7261, called
Mountain Star.
Rosie Werner

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Portfolio of WPA Museum Extension Project, PA
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 2009 16:59:25 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 4

--0-1068734477-1261529965:41909
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii

I have a set of the reprints you all produced. I must have purchased them on ebay back in the 1990's. They are gorgeous but such a large format that I can't really do anything with them! It's nice to hear from one of the group who created them, Barb....thanks.


(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR



________________________________
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Tue, December 22, 2009 2:15:26 PM
Subject: [qhl] Re: Portfolio of WPA Museum Extension Project, PA

Hi Martha -

As a member of the Variable Star Quilters who produced the portfolio, I'm glad you like it. I agree that the plates are stunning.
While researching the project, we didn't find any other quilt projects except this one. It's my understanding that a similar museum project was conducted with artists producing a portfolio of illustrations of American Folk Art. Somewhere, sometime, I saw 5 or 6 plates from it.

The set of plates that you have is an exact copy of the set owned by the Reading Public Library -- they were silk screened, reproducing the color of the originals exactly -- that's why the oak tag backgrounds are different colors. We left the "Reading Public Library" notation on so they could never be resold as "antique originals".
We wish we knew more about the distribution of the plates originally. .If I remember correctly, they were done in 1938 or 39, and by then the war effort was building up so I don't know if there were plans for more or not. Interesting thought.

Barb in southeastern PA.

ps -- For anyone who isn't familiar with this project, I just found a post I sent to QHL in December 1996 (boy, I can't believe QHL has been a part of our lives for so long. Thank you Kris). Anyway, I've added it here on the end for anyone who is interested. Feel free to ignore.

begin copy -

I am a member of the Variable Star Quilters of Souderton, PA, and in 1988

we began researching a State wide Museum Extension Project of the Works

Projects Administration which took place in District 2 (Philadelphia area) of

PA, involving quilts. We began because I was fortunate to find at auction 25

silk screened plates of quilt patterns. They are really pretty, and we began

investigating them. We learned that there are 30 plates in the entire

collection, and they were done in South Langhorne and Croydon, PA. The project

began in 1938 or 1939, and appears to be very localized. Less than 5 complete

sets are known to be in existance. Funding ended in January 1941, so it was a

very short lived project.

As was mentioned earlier, about 1/4 of WPA employment was in service

projects such as the Federal Writers Project, Index of American Design, and

Museum Extension Project. They were all under the Fine Arts Project which

employed out-of-work writers, artists, musicians and theater people. The

purpose of the FAP was to preserve and celebrate the traditions of American

culture of the past.

Also printed in addition to the 30 silk screened patterns was a manual

entitled "Quilts Pieced and Appliqued: Colonial and Pioneer Patchwork Quilts."

The title page says - A series of thirty color plates of authentic old pieced

and appliqued quilts showing working drawings including the cutting size and

finished size patches, together with descriptive material necessary for their

making.

Our research has led us to believe that the designs were based on Ruth

Finley's book, Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them, and

that the numerous errors indicate that the writers and artists were not

quilters. There is a high degree of comparison between the plates in Ruth's

book and the pictures of completed quilts on the WPA plates.

In 1990, the Variable Star Quilters and the Reading Public Library -

owners of one complete set of plates - reprinted the set of 30 plates and the

manual. The new manual includes history and research about the WPA and this

specific project, as well as corrections to the original manual that would

allow more satisfactory quilt construction. Members of our group made all 30

of the quilts using the patterns given - there are 16 of us so it was a

manageable project - and made the necessary corrections.

Copies of the portfolio reprint are still available - shops find it hard

to display due to its size - and if anyone would like information about this

little known piece of quilt history, please contact me. The Variable Star

Quilters are a non profit group and donate all of our money from book sales,

show prizes and quilt shows to woman and children's charities. We meet in

members homes so pay no rent, do not have expensive speakers or a newsletter,

and no administrative budget. All proceeds do go to charity.

Hope somebody found this interesting and/or informative. Happy quilting!!
end copy

pps -- I don't know if there are still copies -- I would have to check if anyone is interested -- they've been around a long time.----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Smithsonian Native American Quilt Collection
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 2009 19:10:49 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1


--------------070600050706090709080108
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1; formatflowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Merry Christmas to you all! It actually snowed in the Springs last
night so for the
first time in my eight years here, I think we will have a white
Christmas. Please
see the link below for an interesting story on the Smithsonian's
collection of Florence
Pulford's Native American Quilts. About a third of the way down, page
center, is a
photo gallery link for several wonderful pictures.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/78435422.html#

/Morning Star Quilts/ by Florence Pulford, Leone Publications (Los
Altos, California)
1989, reissued by Dover Publications, 1996

<http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/78435422.html##ixzz0aZGIUAMQ>Jan-

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: pricing Gee's Bend quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Here's a holiday poser about which I am interested in getting your thoughts
: someone asked if I would be interested inselling quilts made by relati
ves of and some of the quilters themselves whose works appear in the Gee's
Bend books. Some of the names are now well known to those interested in the
works of that community.

As I do not sell new quilts this would be a different venture for me if I c
hoose to undertake it. I have not keep up with that market, I have no idea
what 'historic' published Gee's Bend quilts have sold for (I do recall hear
ing the Whitneybought some for $50,000 a pop, but have no confirmation o
f that). I don't know whether there is an activemarket for newquilts
made by this community, now that the exhibition circuit seems to be conclud
ed here

I believe new Gee's Bend quilts were, or perhaps still are, being sold by o
thers. I know the Gee's Bend quilt patterns from the books have been licens
ed and appear on rugs from several companies, for example.

I am curious what you all think the price levels should be, given they are
made by known quilters some of whose works and families have been recognize
d in the landmark books about the community. What kind of increment might t
hat add in relation to values of quilts generally. I have no idea yet what
the ladies might be expecting. I have no idea what contemporary art quilts
sell for.

When the exhibitions took place, people called seeking authentic documented
Gee's Bend quilts. If I offered themgraphic, visually interesting, sout
hern quilts I had boughtpurportedly picked from African American homes,
some even with names andphotos, clients were rarely interested. It had t
o be Gee's Bend. If I had had any, would they actually have sold?

I see African American quilts all the time on ebay for example(some with
outrageous titles, what imagination and advertising chutzpahone seller
attempts. Mostare offered for not a lot of money, certainly not the thou
sands I think the Gee's Bendquilters may expect.

Would love input from the list......

Thanks and happy holidays to all (though I thought I would never do this, O
K, here goes), from New York City, where they finally figured out the stree
t cleaning thing so well there is almost no snow anywhere given the blizzar
d we were supposed to have had. It is brilliantly sunny, crisp,clear blue s
ky. If you are coming here the Tavern on the Green is closing forever on
December 31, so if anyone has nostalgic memories from there you can buy a
piece of it at auction in mid January.

Laura

Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com
--0-1327566527-1261674128:72480--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: pricing Gee's Bend quilts
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 2009 13:57:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2


--f3499f03-03e9-4031-9f71-0078b291044f
Content-Type: TEXT/plain; charsetus-ascii

Tavern on the Green closing? As a child of the NYC/NJ area I have wonderful memories of that place and of NYC itself (I loved it then and would love to return someday).....
As for Gee's Bend quilts (copies, originals, whatever), I personally think the whole 'thing' has been over-sold and romantically soiled by individuals/companies trying to make a name for themselves......
As a volunteer at Shelburne Museum in VT I have seen hundreds of quilts (many with African/American backgrounds) and Gee's Bend quilts (and the like of them) do not make me want one. I can not even think of setting a price on original ones, let alone copies. You will have to get better input than from this Yankee......
Enjoy the city - my brother and I have just finished our annual rememberings about the City and how we loved our monthly trips there with our Great Aunt........
Mitzi from snow covered Vermont (where that is a good thing! - specially since my DH has about 40 snowmobiles he is gearing up to ride over hill and dale....)




In a message dated 12/24/09 12:09:16 Eastern Standard Time, laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com writes:
Here's a holiday poser about which I am interested in getting your thoughts: someone asked if I would be interested in selling quilts made by relatives of and some of the quilters themselves whose works appear in the Gee's Bend books. Some of the names are now well known to those interested in the works of that community.

As I do not sell new quilts this would be a different venture for me if I choose to undertake it. I have not keep up with that market, I have no idea what 'historic' published Gee's Bend quilts have sold for (I do recall hearing the Whitney bought some for $50,000 a pop, but have no confirmation of that). I don't know whether there is an active market for new quilts made by this community, now that the exhibition circuit seems to be concluded here

I believe new Gee's Bend quilts were, or perhaps still are, being sold by others. I know the Gee's Bend quilt patterns from the books have been licensed and appear on rugs from several companies, for example.

I am curious what you all think the price levels should be, given they are made by known quilters some of whose works and families have been recognized in the landmark books about the community. What kind of increment might that add in relation to values of quilts generally. I have no idea yet what the ladies might be expecting. I have no idea what contemporary art quilts sell for.

When the exhibitions took place, people called seeking authentic documented Gee's Bend quilts. If I offered them graphic, visually interesting, southern quilts I had bought purportedly picked from African American homes, some even with names and photos, clients were rarely interested. It had to be Gee's Bend. If I had had any, would they actually have sold?

I see African American quilts all the time on ebay for example (some with outrageous titles, what imagination and advertising chutzpah one seller attempts. Most are offered for not a lot of money, certainly not the thousands I think the Gee's Bend quilters may expect.

Would love input from the list......

Thanks and happy holidays to all (though I thought I would never do this, OK, here goes), from New York City, where they finally figured out the street cleaning thing so well there is almost no snow anywhere given the blizzard we were supposed to have had. It is brilliantly sunny, crisp,clear blue sky. If you are coming here the Tavern on the Green is closing for ever on December 31, so if anyone has nostalgic memories from there you can buy a piece of it at auction in mid January.

Laura

Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 24, 2009- Gee's Bend quilts From: elpaninaroaol.com Date: Fri, 25 Dec 2009 02:02:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Laura,

An interesting prospect indeed. As for how to handle it, I think the below quote from your email to the list is key to the answer,

"When the exhibitions took place, people called seeking authentic document ed Gee's Bend quilts. If I offered them graphic, visually interesting, sou thern quilts I had bought purportedly picked from African American homes, some even with names and photos, clients were rarely interested. It had to be Gee's Bend."

The Gee's Bend phenomenon derives from so many tempting themes- African Am erican quiltmaking, a "new" genre not formally recognized and studied to the extent of- for example- Baltimore Album quilts, works of art crafted by people living in dire poverty, and the appeal of an art form arising and developing in a completely isolated environment.

I think the real value and appeal of Gee's Bend quilts comes from the last of the 4 points I listed above. A few years back, I spent a week in the Galapagos Islands. They are extraordinary, and I can see why Darwin found them so appealing. In a grand analysis of species development- many of th e animals to be found there are "throwbacks"- lacking in the evolutionary development of species who had to compete on a more global scale for surv ival and are much more advanced as a result- but at the same time brillian tly suited for their very specific and isolated environment. As pretty and intriguing as they are, if you put most of those animals in a more well-t ravelled environment, they would not last long enough to evolve.

Put a Gee's Bend quilt in your average quilt competitive show, and I expec t much the same would apply.

While a true student of quilting would be able to get past that and apprec iate the pieces for their great value from the standpoint of understanding quilts, the sad reality is that Gee's Bend quilts- as well as their actua l and perceived value in a trading marketplate- is subject to the politics , whims and fancies of individuals who lack this level of appreciation and , for that matter, often lack any kind of interest in quilting. It is like you said above, "Gee's Bend" is what matters- not the quality of the piec es or even that the maker was African American. It is an extension of the UGRR myth really. The fable of the quilt code can have a powerful effect on the market value of a piece attributed to that tall tale only because many who buy into that story want to own a piece of it and could care les s if that piece comes their way in the form of a quilt versus another arti fact.

I believe this also makes the market value of the pieces far more volatile . Right now, very high quality quilts are still selling reasonably well- as are, to give an example, very high quality old wines of top vintage. Anything less than best in any sense of that word has drastically more di re prospects in this market for at least another 6-12 months. When the eco nomy is riding high, it is much easier to find people dabbling in art piec es with lots of free cash willing to pay the Gee's Bend premium that more serious devotees of the art are not willing to pay in tougher times when the serious collectors are the ones dictating market prices.

For your purposes, and given how Gee's Bend quilts have been promoted and handled (along with the fallout- regardless of whose side one takes) plus taking into account the economy at present, I think it is safe to assume in the current marketplace that your sellers are very prone to thinking their pieces are worth far more than they will actually fetch, and that if you need to make an expedient sale within 1-2 years potential buyers are going to be willing to pay a good bit less than typical advertised pr ices for more recent Gee's Bend pieces attributed to specific known makers (less than $10,000) unless you have a particularly spectacular quilt made by someone of particular fame.

I am no expert on Gee's Bend quilts- I come at this more from a general st andpoint of understanding, through my appraisal work and various hobbies, how pieces like this tend to fare in given market conditions.

My advice would be to find out ASAP what your sellers think the pieces are worth and how quickly they want to sell them- and then compare that to pr evailing prices at auction and also asking prices by dealers offering auth entic pieces at reasonable prices (email me privately for my take on that one because I sure won't say it on this list.)

As you surely are well aware, there are fewer greater nightmares than deal ing with a consignor/client who has unrealistic ideas about the value of their quilts relative to how quickly they need to sell them (which in a hobby like quilts matters a great deal.)

Given the politics surrounding these quilts and recent developments betwee n the region and those who first promoted it, I think you are at very high risk of finding yourself in an unworthwhile situation unless you are very comfortable up front with the expectations of the sellers.

Hope this helps and good luck. Do please post if you offer them- will be interesting to have a look.

Take care,

Tom.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: tulip kit quilt
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Dec 2009 03:42:48 -0800 (PST)
Thank you so much, Rose! You are a peach!

Judy Schwender
________________________________


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: gee's bend conclusion
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>


Happy holidays and thanks for all the input on the current value and market
ability of Gee's Bend quilts.

I was shown photos and several in person, and my first instinct was how fre
sh and derivative they looked, with their new store bought denim and bright
poly cottons. But something was missing. The prices expressed rangedfro
m a few hundred dollars for smaller throws, to over $10,000 for some more i
ntricate quilts

On the one hand I am fascinated learning the quilt'scontext as I am with
the background on any regional quilt. On the other hand I want to see each
one hung on the wall (imaging the vast Whtiney Museum space) and in silenc
e, without the back story, so I cancontemplate the visual and decide for
myself whether I think a piece is art (and would have monetary value) Afte
r all, isn't that how we approach contemporary paintings, viewing the graph
ics, then learning about the artist.

I don't think I could sell these new Gee's Bend quilts, but perhaps someone
who is more an art dealer might. It is still worthwhile exploring would th
ere be a market for this work continuing. I think the ladies are quilting a
way down there, not for their personal use but because they need income, th
inkingthat market hasa significant price level,

I am grateful to the Gee's Bend phenomenon for opening our eyes and minds t
o thealternative aesthetics they presentthat should be studied and va
lued. Now, not only flat, symmetrical pieced blocks represent American quil
tmaking.

I oftendelighted in 'utility quilts' of rough construction i encountered
,though they were notrespected or even understood in the marketplace
until all this discussion of African American quilts emerged, Now I underst
and better why I responded to them visually and emotionally. And if I had a
loft in NYC instead of one and a half clear walls in a rent- stabilized on
e bedroom, surely I would hang some and enjoy them.

Here's toa muuuuuuuuuuch better next year. I was wondering how2010 wa
s going to be represented inthe souvenir New year's eyeglasses, Until
now the glasseshad two zeros for the eyes, the 2 on right and the year
number on the left. I just saw my first pair, but didn't photo them to post
, they worked it out OK, but after this, the glasses won't look the same.

Laura Fisher
at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: nice quilt at upcoming PA auction
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Dec 2009 11:08:56 -0500

http://www.pookandpook.com/cat/2010-01-16/576



Samplers too, for those who are interested!

Candace Perry




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Dolores A. Hinson question
From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com>

Hello -

This afternoon I was reading a quilt history article from the early 1970s w
ritten by Dolores A. Hinson. Is she still doing quilt history? I can't f
ind any current information about her on the internet.

Thank you - Kyra
www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Dolores A. Hinson question
From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com>
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Kyra,Dolores has passed. She passed September 26, 2002 (Waco, Texa
s). If you have a collection of Quilters Newsletter Magazines, you can f
ind alittleinformation about her (with a Cuesta tribute)in aQNM
(2003) magazine 353:14. She wrote someimpressive quilt articles i
n ANTIQUES JOURNAL - this is a guess, but her articles appeared in that pub
licationcirca 1960s/1970s.Hope this helps
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sewing roll-ups, housewifs and pockets
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2009 15:06:24 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Found these today while browsing the Internet. Great photos of fabric for
study as well as just for the items themselves.

http://edythoneill.blogspot.com/2008/07/sewing-from-my-pockets-and-rollups-b
ook.html

eBay store

http://stores.ebay.com/Homespun-Country_Sewing-Roll-Ups_W0QQ_fsubZ1115154016
QQ_sidZ173376106QQ_trksidZp4634Q2ec0Q2em3

Or try this "tiny" link to the same page:

http://tinyurl.com/y9yaggl

Karen Alexander




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Exhibit announcement: Apronology
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2009 15:00:36 -0800
X-Message-Number: 2

"Apronology" is defined as "the study of the art of the apron. Lesly Claire
Greenberg has a quilt, "Strings Attached," included in this fun, mixed media
exhibit entitled, "Personal Armor: Artists' Concepts of Aprons." It will be
held at the Blackrock Arts Center in Germantown, MD, from Wednesday, January
6 through Friday, January 29, 2010." Gallery Hours: Monday to Friday 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Also open during evening classes and
performances. Admission is free. Artist Reception Saturday, January 9, from
5:30 - 7:30 p.m. For more information, go to: www.blackrockcenter.org
Blackrock is located at 12901 Town Commons Drive, Germantown, Maryland.

From Quilters Unlimited of Northern Virginia newsletter

Karen Alexander




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Swing roll-ups
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2009 15:11:31 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

Probably should have pointed out that the blog address I just sent is
actually photos of recently made roll-ups and pockets, not antiques.

Just keep that in mind as you browse thru them. The eBay link is for antique
versions of the same thing.

Karen




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Sewing roll-ups, housewifs and pockets
From: "Deborah Russell" <russhillbeecreek.net>
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2009 21:08:46 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

I know Edyth O Neill. If fact we spent Christmas Day with her and her
family at a dear friends house. She has designed lovely rugs. She has
written several books one on rollups and one on her red cape and her rugs.
We are going to make rollups much like the ones you mentioned at our 19C
Ladies Conference this spring. We made pockets last year. The pictures
will be nice to show the ladies of various kinds. Thanks
Debbie Hill-Russell
russhillbeecreek.net
http://russellhillranch.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Dolores Hinson - where are her papers?
From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com>

Hello -

Thank you for the note that Mrs. Hinson passed away in 2002. Does anyone kn
ow if her quilt history papers are at an institution? Or, is there a bib
liography of her articles that has been published?

Best, Kyra
www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com

--0-1240780031-1262260555:31482--


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Subject: Question
From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507yahoo.com>


I have alot of Vintage Indian Head fabric, I am cleaning out and making roo
m for fabric in my new (Small) sewing room. Joan Kiplinger and I traded Ind
ian Head fabric for a long time. I am not sure how much of it I am going to
keep and how much I want to sell but I am wondering ifI decide to sell
some of it where the best place to sell it is? Is there a sale site for vin
tage fabric other than Ebay somewhere? TIA, Jeanne



--0-1000301487-1262288197:35711--


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Subject: Help with eight pointed star block
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>

All:

I've posted two photos up on the Eboard under Quilts, Eight pointed star
block. Has anyone else ever seen this block? It's close to a few of
the blocks in Brackman, Category 22 (see #3801 and #3802 especially),
but those are complete stars in the corners - not partial stars. Any
help would be much appreciated.

Dale Drake in Indiana

I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library. - Jorge
Luis Borges


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Subject: Re: ***SPAM*** Question
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 2009 15:42:52 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

If you go to the AQSG seminar maybe you could find a way to get a vendor
there to sell it on commission for you. It's a perfect audience.

Maybe an ad in the AQSG newsletter if they allow things like that.

I wouldn't be surprised if this list has snarfed it up before you get this
reply :-).
Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Help with a tufted bedspread
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>


All:

I've posted two pictures on the Eboard under "Tufted bedspread." Can
anyone identify the technique used on this bedspread, and in particular
the type of thread used? I'm calling the technique "tufting" for lack
of a better word - it reminds me of a hand-made version of a chenille
bedspread.

The thread feels like a soft fluffy cotton thread. Each "tuft" is eight
strands, tied once. I've tried duplicating the look with candlewicking
thread, but it doesn't fuzz up enough even after washing. Plus I can't
find candlewicking thread in white - only ecru. Crochet thread is not
nearly soft enough.

I'm repairing the spread and would like to be able to fill in a few of
the missing tufts. Any suggestions?

Dale Drake in Indiana

I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library. - Jorge
Luis Borges