Subject: eight pointed star
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

I love 8 pointed stars/ but have never seen this pattern either. Would y=
ou e-mail me a photo of it? I would like to add it to my collection. =
best, Don


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Indianhead
From: Laurel Horton <laurelkalmiaresearch.net>


Jeanne,

You might check out Etsy.com. This site allows sellers to set up "stores" to
sell items in three categories: Handmade, Vintage, and Supplies. I've mostly
checked out the first category, but I know people sell vintage fabric. The
fess are very reasonable. This might be a good option for you.

Laurel

-

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Happy New Year - just like 1999
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>

Dear list members,
I have had the happy accident of discovering that 2010 is the same
configuration as 1999. Consequently I am able to reuse/enjoy a few of my old
object oriented calendars: quilt engagment book, Historic Costume Calendar,
Shoes, etc.

Thought some of you might be able to do the same with other object oriented
calendars that had images too wonderful to throw out!

Happy New Year

Newbie Richardson
The Costume and Textile Specialists

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Antique quilt top triangle pcs tatted together
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 04 Jan 2010 17:13:09 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

http://tinyurl.com/y9vmywq

This is one of the more unusual quilts I have seen recently, though I wonder
if technically it is a quilt since it doesn't appear to have three layers
stitched together. A throw maybe like the more common embroidered Crazy
Quilts?

Karen in the Islands



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Antique quilt top triangle pcs tatted together
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 04 Jan 2010 21:47:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2


Karen wrote -

http://tinyurl.com/y9vmywq

This is one of the more unusual quilts I have seen recently, though I wonder
if technically it is a quilt since it doesn't appear to have three layers
stitched together. A throw maybe like the more common embroidered Crazy
Quilts?

Hi Karen -


That is indeed a very interesting piece. While I've seen puff quilts
like this where the "puffs" are sewn together using a whip stitch, this
is the first time I've seen one with the triangles attached in this manner.

I however would disagree with the seller. From what I can see in the
picture, I don't think this is either a tatting or crochet stitch. I
think it's faggoting, specifically Twisted Faggoting. Using google, I
found a definition --

*Faggot Stitches*
Faggoting is both useful and quite beautiful. It is used in joining
of two pieces of material by means of an insertion stitch.

I also found pictures -- Go to end of this article to see sketches of
Twisted Faggoting --
http://www.victorian-embroidery-and-crafts.com/faggoting.html

The quilts/comforters I've seen made from this technique (fold a square
diagonally in half, stuff with some batting and sew the edges, then
attach the triangles) have either been that shiny slippery 1920s fabric,
or cottons. My most recent sighting was made using 1950s fabrics.

Thanks for the link -- you always find such interesting things, and I'm
grateful you share.

Barb in very cold southeastern PA
But at least we didn't get snow.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 04, 2010
From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com>

Hi all,

Concerning the "triangle-pillow" quilt listed on eBay discovered by Karen
Alexander, I've seen several, but none joined together in this fashion. The
earliest is a set of blocks made in this method of printed cottons, probably
1920, and was given to me by a local friend (NH) who didn't want it. The
latest made around 1970, again, printed cottons. Other friends have sent
photos and shared quilts in their collections--three c. 1950 and another c.
1970. I have a photocopy of an old mimeographed set of instructions. All of
the examples listed above have blocks joined by whip-stitching.

I've been collecting info on this and other quilt-as-you-go methods since my
interest in "potholder" quilts began about 8 years ago. There are some real
quirky ways to make quilts one block at a time!

Pam Weeks, currently in West Hollywood, CA, feeling just a little guilty
that it's the only place on the weather map that's reasonably warm.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Help in locating four quilt artists
From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu>
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2010 07:36:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Dear QHLers:

I am trying to locate these quilt artists. If any of the following
are on QHL or if anyone has their email addresses, can you contact me
off-list?

Judy Beydler
Vicki Tymczyszyn
Sandy Harper
Cynthia Myerberg

Thanks so much.

Marsha MacDowell
Michigan State University Museum
macdowelmsu.edu


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Antique quilt top triangle pcs tatted together
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2010 09:50:31 EST


I am also fascinated by this type of quilt and other double sided quilts. A
friend of mine purchased two of these quilts at a church rummage sale.
Hers are made from 50s cottons in greens. I recently purchased one on eBay
which is made from rayons and silks and dates earlier, I suspect. The fabric
pieces of mine are joined with the same stitch as the one Karen posted
currently on eBay, but using black thread. I also have a copy of directions to
make a similar quilt. They are the type of directions you could get by mail
order in the mid 20th century.

Nan in FL where it got so cold the past couple nights the elephant ears
froze.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Help with eight pointed star block
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>


Dear Dale,

I have never seen that particular overall configuration of LeMoyne Star
blocks. It must have been very pretty, in its day.

I like your quote by the late Jorge Luis Borges. He was flown in from
Argentina to speak at a ceremony of Sigma Delta Pi, a national collegiate
honor society for Spanish, into which I was inducted at the University of
New Hampshire. It was wonderful to meet this legendary poet, the "maker of
labyrinths." I have information about one of his (favorite) short stories on
my website.

Patricia Cummings

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Antique quilt top triangle pcs tatted together
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2010 12:06:09 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

I wish they'd photographed the back. Can anyone tell.. .is that really
tatting? I can't imagine how that would be done. How could that be
accomplished mechanically when the thread is attached to TWO pieces of
fabric? I've not seen tatting used as an insert but only as edging.

Just asking because I"m curious. . . the only thing I know about tatting is
I've watched it being done and realized I could never do it :-). And I have
a couple of shuttles with works-in-progress dangling, and a sheet of samples
(small bits of tatting sewn to a sheet of lined paper).

Stephanie Whitson




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ebay Triangles Quilt
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 2010 17:59:29 -0700
X-Message-Number: 6

I agree with Barb. It is a joining stitch and looks to me like a
variation on faggotting. It is
probably pulled out of line by the weight of the triangles. Not
tatting. Stephanie, if the
shuttle intimidates you, try needle tatting. I think it is easier.
jt



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Embroidery stitch
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>


Dear list,
The coverlet under discussion - the one with the thread joining the
triangles - is made using an "open hem stitch" to join the fabrics. It looks
like a feather stitch - but when the stitch is done to join fabrics, it is
called hem stitching. Faggoting - a close cousin - has lines of thread that
are perpendicular to the fabric, this stitch is going diagonally across and
twisting.

We usually see these kinds of stitches done on really nice linen bouses from
the 1930's and 40's. They are used in the seams to join the sleeves to the
armhole, or the placket to the fronts, etc.

Thanks - I had a nice half hour perusing my collection of embroidery
dictionaries - instead of doing real work!

Newbie in frigid northern Virginia and really grateful for indoor plumbing!



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 2010 20:18:56 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

Sorry Barb, but I'm switching my allegiance to Newbie on this one. :-)
Please give us your source. I went
through 10 stitch dictionaries and didn't find open hem stitch. Looks
like I need to buy another one.
I have enough trouble keeping up with the quilt, coverlet, and assorted
other textile subject books let alone
my husband's walking stick stuff and women's history. I need a live-in
librarian.
jt


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 2010 23:13:10 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Hi Jan -

I don't know, or do, fancy needlework stitches the way Newbie does. I
just knew it wasn't tatting or crochet. When I was looking through
other "joining" type stitches, the closest picture I could find was
Figure 2B at the bottom of this link --

http://www.victorian-embroidery-and-crafts.com/faggoting.html

They call it twisted faggot. When I put it and the enlargement of the
closeup of the quilt next to each other, they look similar to me. I'm
still looking for a picture of open hem stitch, but trust Newbie's
naming of the stitch.

Original ebay link to quilt --

http://tinyurl.com/y9vmywq

Barb in southeastern PA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 2010 23:18:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Sorry -- that should have been Fig B-2 at the bottom of the page. Call
it late night dyslexia <grin>. Bottom of this page --

http://www.victorian-embroidery-and-crafts.com/faggoting.html

Barb in southeastern PA



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 2010 21:47:08 -0700
X-Message-Number: 11

Barb, That's why I defected, leaving you in the lurch, like a bad
friend. :-) But, we made Newbie search for half
an hour for the name. That's gotta be worth something! I do needlework
although I gave up on the French Hand
Sewing - which I think you do, right Newbie? No girls in my family on
which to lavish handwork. Just teasing.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2010 11:32:42 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

I sent the link, and question, to a friend who is a member of the
Embroiderer's Guild here in the UK. I gave her no clues as to what
the list was thinking, but her vote went with 'twisted fagotting'.
Although she did say she would have liked a closer look to be sure.

Sally Ward
Sticking in her two pennorth from amidst the Winter snow in Yorkshire.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Antique quilt top triangle pcs tatted together
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com

Mine is not tatted, but just stitched with a heavy thread like pearl
cotton from one side to the other, going behind the last stitch so it is
"twisted" in a way. The triangles are fabric squares folded in half diagonally
with raw edges turned under and a piece of batting inside. The edges are not
sewn shut other than with the joining stitch. The back is identical to the
front. It really is a unique and unusual thing.

Nan in cold FL where the elephant ears are all droopy.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: auction quilt
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2010 10:19:29 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3


Check out lot 563 in the upcoming Sotheby's Americana auction. It is a fab
New England worsted quilt, late 18th/early 19th. The next lot, 564, is a
nice contemporary pictorial quilt.
Candace Perry



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Help with eight pointed star block
From: "Dale Drake" <ddrakeccrtc.com>
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2010 10:02:14 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks, all, for your thoughts on my apparently unique eight pointed star
block. As Don Beld pointed out, it's really a wonderful block. It would
make a great 19th Century star block study quilt - if anyone is interested
in actually doing this I could see if the owner would be amenable to sharing
pictures of the quilt for the project (I'm betting she would). Great
fabrics! Lots of madder browns (unfortunately), plus indigo prints, pink
prints and a few Prussian blue/buff stripes. I can provide additional
pictures off-line if anyone else is interested, and two pictures are up on
the Eboard under Eight Pointed Star Block.

Dale Drake in COLD and frozen Indiana (with the chickens under a heat lamp,
looking like future KFC victims)



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2010 9:33:44 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

If anyone reads "Sew Beautiful," she or he will see hemstitching used regularly. The thread on this one made me pull out a table cloth I had made when I was 18 or 19 years old, using Joan Kiplinger's beloved Indian Head. A German war bride with whom I worked in summers taught me the technique, and I thought it would be a snap. And on a real linen, I might have been. Drawing the threads out was the hard part. On finely woven French batiste, pulling the threads is easy.

A hemstitch foot, which really produces a faggoting stitch, has been a sewing machine accessory for a long, long time----long before the computerized machines, early 20th century. Of course, it is only practical on finely woven fabrics.

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: Patricia Cummings <quiltersmusegmail.com>
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2010 10:19:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

-
Looking at the eBay auction, it is hard to see the stitches, however, these
appear to be decorative stitches, not stitches that are holding anything
together. Having done a lot of Crazy Quilting myself and having taught
stitches for same, I would call this the Cretan Stitch. Again, the stitches
are for decoration only and are NOT holding the triangles together.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Wed, 06 Jan 2010 14:19:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Jan and list
The problem is that few of the embroidery dictionaries list the stitches in
the index in the back - so you have to page through and look at the
diagrams. I hit lucky in Caulfield and Saward's Dictionary of Needlework -
the 1972 facsimile of the 1882 edition. I found what I thought was the
correct stitch on pages 182& 183. I tried Therese de Dillmont's Ecyclopedia
of Needlework - but gave up paging through looking at diagrams, same with
Enthoven's book: The Stitches of Creative Embroidery. I will some of my
Mom's needlework books. I have not brought them over to my house yet - I
need more book shelves!

I know it is not fagoting as fagoting was a very popular insertion done on
blouses and lingerie in the early 20th c. The threads are very closely
spaced and are perpendicular. The stitch in question, though certainly a bit
loopy from being pulled out of plum, did not start out straight and
perpendicular to the triangles.

Newbie



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2010 14:17:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

So, Patricia -- What is holding the triangles together in your view?

It sure looks like empty space beneath the embroidery to me.

Judy Grow


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bar fagoting vs open hem stitch
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>


This may be a question of nomenclature. The site Barb referrenced showed
"bar fagotting" -and that could be it too. I have looked for that stitch in
a few of my books - but no luck. So it seems a question of vocabulary.
Remember, most embroidery stitches are variations on a theme and depend on
whether the needle goes under or over the thread, etc. Stitch names, like
quilt patterns, change names over time. Twist the thread left not right and
you have a "new" stitch!



Newbie


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>


OK, got it, Figure 337. Fancy Hem Stitch and you're right, it is much
/closer/ to the way this stitch is formed
than faggoting. I've scanned the illustration and put in on the
e-board. (ignore the 'blank' on it, how I can screw
up a simple picture is beyond me).
And, just before the embroidery stitch is a pic on polishing cotton. A
friend went to Thailand and photographed
a woman glazing indigo dyed cotton. She mixed a beeswax formula with
some indigo, slapped it on the cotton
and worked it with her feet and a flat rock. If anyone sees I have blue
feet at the next conference you'll know
what I've been doing.
Jan, happy in the Springs



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Wed, 06 Jan 2010 14:00:13 -0700
X-Message-Number: 11

Pat,
If you look at the enlarged photo, you can see the piece turned back on
itself. The triangles underneath
are visible through the joining stitches on top. These are functional
stitches.
Jan

Patricia Cummings wrote:

http://tinyurl.com/y9vmywq




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Embroidery stitch
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2010 17:46:53 EST


I have posted a close up of the stitching on my quilt on the eBoard in the
quilt section under reversible quilt. My description: It is a joining
stitch and joins the fabric pieces together. A stitch is taken on the edge and
the thread is taken behind this stitch then forward to the fabric on the
other side and repeated.

Nan in FL
_www.mooreandmoorequilts.com_ (http://www.mooreandmoorequilts.com)

-------------------------------1262818013--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: so-called tatting quilt
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 06 Jan 2010 19:55:07 -0800
X-Message-Number: 13

Dear QHLers,

I have posted a compilation article about this quilt and thanks to the
seller who loaned me photos, you can now see it quite close up. Just follow
this link to my blog http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/.

I also finally figured out how to make it easy for readers to post comments
to the blog! Duhhh.

Karen in the Islands

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: fagotting stitch
From: Tracy Jamar <tjamaroptonline.net>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2010 06:27:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I always thought fagotting referred to fabric with long threads
removed (or never woven in) and the remaining cross threads were
wrapped or decoratively "bundled" together with a supplemental
thread. As Newbie says this gives a perpendicular stitch, though
some of the cross threads may be twisted a bit with the decorative
stitching.

The term may have morphed into any stitch that forms a narrow and
straight line between 2 woven areas, whether of the same fabric or
joining 2 pieces together.

Tracy Jamar


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Faggoting
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>


I just found this nice reference on google books, page 68 shows
several different types of faggoting and I'd say that my friend's
suggestion of 'twisted faggoting' for the quilt in question is not the
right answer, others are closer. But I'm fascinated at just how many
faggoting variations there are, and despite having seen it in print
I'm still confused about why an insertion stitch should be called a
hem stitch.

http://tinyurl.com/yb5ezav

Sally Ward
--Apple-Mail-13--1057055806--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Signature? quilt
From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2010 09:11:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I have been given a signature quilt to do minor repairs on. It has
one "maybe" date of 1858. Under the signatures, though, is just a
first name (not the same first name), on several blocks. Got any idea
what that would mean?

Jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Signature quilt
From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2010 09:51:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

OK, now I will do a study before I write. ;-) The fabrics are very
1870's. When I got the old camera out and got my big lens, the block
that says 1858, also says "Angels Attend". There is another block
that just says "Mother". I'm guessing it is a memory quilt?

Jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hem stitch Elightenment
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2010 15:49:34 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5

My embroiderer friend has sent me a scan of the whole page on 'that'
hem stitch, and I understand now that it has the name because the
stitch is used where the gap is created by drawing threads, as a
decorative way of turning up a hem. Sorry to have been dense.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Signature quilt
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2010 10:33:38 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

I would be cautious about assigning the reason behind the quilt's
construction based on "Angels attend" and "Mother." I've seen "Mother" on a
lot of signature quilts, and I think the mention of angels is probably not
all that uncommon in that era either in popular sayings and epigraphs for
signature quilts. The sentiment behind "angels attend" would work just as
well for someone marrying and leaving the area. . . . or not marrying but
just moving away. IMHO it's a nice sentiment that kind spirits will watch
over the recipient. Could be in any context, really.
Stephanie Whitson




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Signature? quilt
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2010 10:28:14 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

Perhaps the first name is who actually made the block.
Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Signature? quilt
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2010 11:58:53 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8

My Grandmother's engagement quilt (Chimney or Signature block) has a
block done by my great grandmother signed only "Mother"...1929 -
Central Texas...
Signature quilts are always circumspect!

Laura Syler
Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles '98
Teacher, Lecturer, Judge
Richardson, TX
972-345-2787
hi-spiritairmail.net



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Speakers in the area of quilt history
From: "Judy Anne" <anne_jatt.net>


Every so often someone writes through my quilt history site asking about =
speakers. Is there a list anywhere of quilt historians who do this?

Judy Breneman
http://womenfolk.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: technical question on tape bindings
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2010 15:07:22 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 10

--0-1875499962-1262905642=:31736
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi everyone, as part of my pet project, I am making a Civil War era quilt a=
nd the original has tape binding. I have ordered appropriate 3/4 inch bi=
nding; but am not sure, as I have never seen an original tape binding quilt=
, as to how it was sewn on.

My questions is this: Is it sewn on both sides as you would a 21st Centu=
ry back binding or did they sew it on by going through both the front and b=
ack (and in-between layers) with one stitch?

thanks for the help. Best, Don Beld


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Speakers in the area of quilt history
From: pollymellocomcast.net


Where the people wanting speakers are located might help in finding speaker=
s for them.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland