Subject: liquid embroidery quilt
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 08:45:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


Nancy Roberts asked: "Do you remember the liquid embroidery phase?"


I recall with fond memories the liquid embroidery phase. My nieces and
daughters enjoyed the craft very much. Those squeezable paint bottles fit
into young girls' little hands perfectly. So we explored a variety of
'techniques' and one included using transfer designs and pre-printed items
intended for other types of needle work, especially the ones with all the
little X's in the design. The projects were super easy and fast for little
girls who loved to make gifts. They achieved the look of cross-stitch
without a single tangled thread. :)

I was already a quilter and I will admit that a few liquid embroidered'
blocks found their way into a couple of small quilt projects. I also
remember outlining fusible appliqu projects and then machine quilting
around the designs while being careful to avoid stitching through the thick
paint which bent and broke too many needles. I later wondered why I didn't
think to do the quilting first and the outline paint later. <g>

I will confess that just a couple of years ago I peeled the last of the
liquid embroidery off appliqud sweat shirts that have outlived their
usefulness. I replaced the liquid paint line with machine satin stitching
so they can be included in a memory quilt.

Nothing we did was as interesting and ambitious as the quilt Nancy posted
though. That is truly inspirational! Are there enough liquid embroidery
quilts out there to make it a category?

I suppose painting on fabric in the 1980's was another example of history
repeating itself. Crazy Quilts and Stenciled Quilts are two early examples
of painted quilts that I can think of. But were there earlier techniques
that focused on outlines or imitation embroidery like we did in the 1980's?


Greta VDBN

Reminiscing . . .




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: liquid embroidery quilt
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 06:40:00 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 2

... I suppose painting on fabric in the 1980's was another example of histo
ry repeating itself. ... were there earlier techniques that focused on o
utlines or imitation embroidery like we did in the 1980's?
Greta VDBN
Reminiscing . . .

Greta, I have three framed friendship samplers, two dated 1942 by the stitc
her, which are stamped designs (probably kits) then painted (or maybe crayo
ned?) and then outline embroidered. I wish I knew what company provided the
m, but there is no indication even on the edges of the cloth. Vogart and ot
hers offered similar items with cartoony-style dogs, cats, bonnet girls, et
c. stamped on household items including youth quilts, for tinting and embro
idery. Many of those designs are being copied now.
Barbara



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: liquid embroidery
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 15:12:25 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3

In the late 50s/early 60s I remember my mother decorating tray cloths
with some kind of paint which came in tubes. It was rather oily,smelt
strongly of thinners, and was very thick. The tubes had a fine point
with a ball, or maybe rod, in the tip. When you put pressure on the
ball it went back into the tube and allowed the release of the paint.
It was a horrible blotchy way of working, like early ball point pens -
except you didn't get the rolling ball point, you got a scratch tip
leaking ink. The tubes were like oil paint tubes, metal which bent and
folded as you emptied them.

I still remember loving the colours though, a range of soft 50s
pastels.

No examples of the dreadful work survive, and I don't know what the
paints were called or where she got them. Is this the kind of paint
you are talking about?

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 25, 2010
From: Beth Donaldson <thequiltdrgmail.com>

For me, the most interesting thing about the published patterns after 1976
is that the writer's are quilters. If you look at the multitude of patterns
published from 1880-1930, like Ladies Art Company and Kansas City Star, you
got an illustration. The authors drew the block, but didn't make a quilt
from it. Now you get a photograph of a finished quilt, or at least a top.

--
Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant
Michigan State University Museum
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/
http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/

--0015173fe650f2d7a7047e136f3a--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt categories since 1976
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

Hello all,Seems to me that the major category difference between quilts
made in the 1970s and quilts made before is wall quilts. All of a sudden
it was acceptable to make a small quilt that wasn't a baby quilt and its s
ole purpose was to hang on the wall and look good.Judy Schwender

--0-1959442603-1264529924:69310--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt categories since 1976, Fabric designers
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

Thank you, Beth, for the information about these quilt tops. However, it
is possible that hundreds of these tops will be sold over the years, where
as thousands of the import completed quilts have been sold. So, there is
probably a difference in abundance.Yes, future researchers will come
up against these. So, hopefully, someone is documenting the patterns of
fered by MidPenn and other such import quilt top companies so future resear
chers can sort it all out.Judy Schwender
--0-617861117-1264530799:54215--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [imports
From: "Shari Spires" <skspiresbellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 14:15:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Well one good thing about the imported ones - one washing and they fall
apart. Someone gave me one as a 'gift' and I put it on the guest bed.
First washing and it really did come apart. So we may not have so many to
worry about in the distant future afterall.
ShariS



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Future exhibits?
From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 14:12:05 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8

My local quilt guild (Huntsville, AL) is considering helping
underwrite a future quilt exhibit at our art museum. They are
wondering what exhibits that travel you all might recommend. They'd
like a few suggestions to take to the museum staff with their offer of
money. I can't think of a better source than this list and will
appreciate your input.
Thanks,
Pat Kyser


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Future exhibits?
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 15:26:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Sue Reich has an excellent exhibit and companion lecture on WW II
quilts; she is on this list and may respond to you about it.

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Future exhibits?
From: pollymellocomcast.net


Julie Siber offers several very nice exhibits. See Her site: The Quilt Comp
lex.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Future exhibits?
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
D


The Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vermont has traveling quilt exhibits - might be one place to look into.
Mitzi from Vermont where it has rained and we lost our snow for today.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Future exhibits?
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 15:04:04 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12

You might try to see if the University of Texas Center for American History
at Windedale will have one of Joyce Gross exhibits available. They are
stunning! Marcia Kaylakie



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Future exhibits?
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 16:52:54 -0600
X-Message-Number: 13

The INternational Quilt Study Center has exhibits that travel. Maybe on
their web site they'd have details, but I'm not sure. . .
STephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: history of shadow applique
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>


In looking up something else entirely in an old McKim Studios catalog (page
12, McKim Studios 1930-31) I came across this entry for some tulip-motif
curtains:

QUITE THE NEWEST THING-SHADOW APPLIQUE
Pattern number 550 (20 cents postpaid) furnishes wax transfers of the tulip
designs used in the shadow applique, that is between layers of the white
dimity which gives a charming dainty effect in both the wide bottom hems an
d
valances. These are so easy to do in the first place and as simply laundere
d
as a handkerchief. Colors are yellow, orange, and green, or pink and orchid
could be substituted for another room. Full instructions accompany the
patterns.
Bright colored organdie or percale are needed for the tulips. We furnish
them stamped on brilliant orange, green and yellow fast color percale,
together with the needed thee colors of thread, enough for one pair of
curtains and valance at 40 cents. Order No. 550M. we can also supply crisp,
small check, white dimity at 25 cents a yard.

*sigh* This is not the first time I have been transported back in time whil
e
perusing the McKim catalogs.
About Marjorie Puckett-when I knew her, she was one of the 'wild women' of
the quilt world. Not so much that her work (shadow applique) was wild but
she herself sported a two-tone bright red and platinum hair style and might
be found wearing a monkey fur coat topped off with outrageous bright cowboy
boots. Now Marjorie is an alpaca farmer and knitter. Found a picture of her
here in 2007 http://www.rocheharbor.com/aboutus_news07b.html
<http://www.rocheharbor.com/aboutus_news07b.html%20>Scroll down and
see if you recognize the artist who revied shadow applique!
Cheers
Pepper

Another quilt category that I don't think was seen much before the 90's is
the Shadow quilts (translucent fabric quilted, then stuffed with brightly
colored yarn or quilted over bright appliquC3A9s, was introduced by Marjo
rie
Puckett). A twentieth century adaptation of trapunto style!

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt categories since 1976
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 16:33:15 -0800
X-Message-Number: 15

I don't think anyone mentioned:
Blue Jean or Denim Quilts
Flannel Quilts.

Pam Conklin


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt-in-a-day
From: "Pat L. Nickols" <patlnickolsyahoo.com>


Alma
said,
"In the 1980's lots of us quilters in the
Florida Panhandle were going to
classes on "Quilt in a Day" the "Trip Around the World" was
one of the
favorites in this category. Ms. Burns became a
household name."

Sometime in the 1990s, Eleanor Burns and I were
standing around, waiting for
a train in a Dutch station (surrounded by our
mounds of huge luggage) and I
remember asking her, "Eleanor, how long did
it take you to come up with that
copy-righted chestnut 'Quilt in a Day' "? She
replied with a grin, "Four
years." And anyone who's ever made a quilt
knows the 'in a day' phrase is
merely marketing!
Pepper

It is surprising but a quilt top can be created in a day. To my surprise and utter delight I had a family group that wanted to make a quilt for a wedding anniversary gift to their parents. About 1984 they gathered in our kitchen and family room with two sewing machines, two ironing boards and two cutting stations. The group of two sons & their wives, two daughters and one husband, one 3 month old baby (mom was nursing). The fabric was washed before we stared. Assigning jobs to some new to ironing, etc. we began - and soon enough cutting was done, then the sewing machines started to hum (one of the daughters did know how to sew and she was invaluable). The boys learned how to press seams (not iron), Eleanor's instructions were excellent and we moved through page after page of her book on Irish Chain - our top grew, and by evening they had a quilt top. I was really proud of us, I had hoped we could do it but even I had doubts. After the quilt was
set all of the group and other family member helped do the quilting - they all loved the experience and have treasured memories of their "quilting bees"

Pat L. Nickols
In rainy So CA



--0-1104789088-1264562501:43639--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt-in-a-day
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2010 22:13:54 -0600
X-Message-Number: 17

My guild once tried to make a complete quilt in a day--including the hand
quilting!

We started in the morning with a pile of fabric, and ended at 5 PM with a
finished top only half quilted. It was twin size.

AND--we would have quilted the whole thing, but we ran out of room around
the frame. So we finished another day.

Got good TV coverage, too.

Kim



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Marjorie Puckett
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2010 00:26:53 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Oh my goodness, Pepper. Marjorie lives on San Juan Island!

Roche Harbor is on San Juan island, one of the four ferry stops in the
island chain that the island we live on is a part of. This island chain is
actually called the San Juan Islands. The ferry stops at Lopez Island, Shaw
Island, Orcas Island and San Juan Island. There are so many wonderful
artisans on San Juan. Well, on all the islands for that matter. The islands
are known for their excellent craftsmen and talented artists, plus organic
farms. To keep this quilt related, I am working on a documentation project
of the Signature quilts in the collection of Lopez Island Historical Society
and have lectured at the San Juan Island Historical Society about the quilts
in their collection. Some quilt groups hold retreats at Roche Harbor on San
Juan Island. It's a gorgeous venue in a huge old estate-now-hotel.

Karen in the Islands




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Colored yarn trapunto
From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2010 08:11:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

There were the Marge Murphy quilts that were silk and stuffed with the
colored yarn. I think she gave one to a president--not sure which
one. She did quilted wedding gowns and christening dresses, too.

Jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Future exhibits?
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>


The National Quilt Museum has traveling exhibits. You can read about the
m at http://www.quiltmuseum.org/exhibits_traveling.htm. To find out m
ore details and pricing please email me at the museum at jschwenderquiltmu
seum.org .Judy Schwender
--0-1293983917-1264609323:54828--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 26, 2010
From: Beth Donaldson <thequiltdrgmail.com>


>
> 8. Future exhibits?
>
The Michigan State University Museum has quilt exhibits for rent. I manage
the Traveling Exhibit Service. You can see our exhibits on this website:
http://museum.msu.edu/museum/tes/. If you have any questions, don't hesitate
to give me a call at 517-432-3800.
Judging by the responses on this list, it looks like there are lots of great
exhibits to choose from!

--
Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant
Michigan State University Museum
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/
http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Liquid Embroidery
From: "judy lyons" <judy.lyonssympatico.ca>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2010 12:39:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

For a long while now I have been talking to people about this topic.
I even did quite a few surveys to see how many people in different guilds
and women's groups including Women's Institutes that made quilts, quilt
blocks and aprons using the products. There were 3 different types of the
liquid embroidery tubes and the first dating back to the early 1930s. It
was funny how a small company that discovered demonstrating the product sold
more than just putting it on the shelves and expecting it to sell itself
turned into a big business. It eventually worked into a home sales business
which today is still alive in some area.
Judy Lyons



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt categories
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2010 14:44:32 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 6

--0-239671336-1264632272:9958
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi all - how could I overlook----MENSWEAR QUILTS! Oh my.The recent exhibiti
on I presentedat the New England Quilt Museumwas calledby some qui
lt historians the discovery of a new category in quilt study, and the term
menswear quilts a new appellation that had not been heard before, I am plea
sed to report. Imagine that!

By menswear, I include quilts made from wool suitings, uniforms, work cloth
ing, denim, shirtings in cotton, silk and wool; neckties; intimate haberdas
hery like pajama cottons, long johns underwear, socks;andaccessories
to mens clothing like ribbon hatbands, commendation ribbons, haberdashery l
abels, etc.

For Pat in Alabama, I would love to travelthis menswearexhibition and
others I have put together, so feel free to get in touch.

Also, for the Alabama museum possibility, why not something like 'Beyond Ge
e's Bend: Alabama Quilts...."

Laura Fisher

Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065
212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com
--0-239671336-1264632272:9958--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: How to join? NQR
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2010 18:49:07 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

Oh Stephanie, thank you, thank you, thank you for writing the word Scots
instead of Scotch. What a good little researcher you are! I'm a
DNA-tested descendant of three lines of Scots from Argyll: Campbells,
Cummins and Carnes. My Grrreatgrrrandfather, Marseilles Deeves
Campbell, told me Scots is a way of life and Scotch is something they
drink, which he apparently did, while living it. I'd like to learn more
about Scottish quilts.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: men's wear/types of quilts
From: mopalka <mopalkaalaska.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2010 20:58:38 -0900
X-Message-Number: 1

Laura, I remember attempting to sleep under a "men's wear"
quilt. It weighed a ton. Grandmother Mattie made it from wool
squares and then it was tied with red yarn. We cousins slept on in
rather than under it whenever we had a sleep over at our
grandparent's home. We made pallets on the floor. What wonderful
memories! Thank you for helping me remember this. Susan(in Alaska)



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Marge Murphy
From: Edwaquiltaol.com


Marge designed a quilt and a group made it for the Regans. I worked with
a woman at the time who had connections in the White House and Marge wanted
to make a jacket for Nancy. It was all arranged that Nancy would actually
see the jacket if sent but for some reason it didn't happen.

--part1_13db.77832f5.3892c85d_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Marge Murphy
From: Edwaquiltaol.com
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2010 06:02:09 EST
X-Message-Number: 3


--part1_1404.6677e331.3892c8b1_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

We all wondered at the time how Marge could get a patent on a technique
that had been around for centuries. I had a neighbor who worked at the
Patent Office and I called and asked why and was told that the one reviewing the
application didn't know needlework.

--part1_1404.6677e331.3892c8b1_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Traveling Exhibitions
From: <pcrewsneb.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2010 15:01:01 +0000
X-Message-Number: 4

The International Quilt Study Center & Museum offers a number of traveling
exhibitions that we are happy to share:

"American Quilts in the Modern Age, 1870-1940"
"Yikes! Stripes"
"Visual Systems: The Quilter's Eye"
"Design Dynamics of Log Cabin Quilts: Selections from the Jonat
han Holstein Collection"
"Partisan Pieces: Quilts of Political and Patriotic Persuasion"
"Perfecting the Past: Colonial Revival Quilts"
"Modern Marvels: Quilts Made from Kits, 1915 - 1950"

For more information visit our website at www.quiltstudy.org and then click
on Exhibitons, then Traveling exhibitions. Or contact Marin Hanson, Curat
or of Exhibitions, at 402/472-5218 or by email at mhanson4UNL.edu.

Patricia Crews
Willa Cather Professor of Textiles & Director
International Quilt Study Center & Museum
1523 N. 33rd Street, Quilt House
Dept. of Textiles, Clothing & Design
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68583-0838

PHONE: 402/472-6342
FAX: 402/472-2008
pcrews1unl.edu
www.quiltstudy.org

Collecting, Preserving, Exhibiting, Studying A6Discovering



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Paragon
From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net>

Hi list members,

I wondered if someone knows the answer to my question:

Is the Paragon quilt kit company the same company that put out the Paragon
Autograph Albums that were popular during the late 19th early 20th
centuries?

Appreciate your responses.

Sincerely

Leah Zieber

Temecula California

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: How to join? NQR
From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2010 15:13:37 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

I am interested, too.
I am from the Kerr line of Fernihirst Castle, who came to the US sin the
1740's...the name was changed to Karr is 1856 by a ggggrandfather.
Kerr's still live there while most of the castles were lost to the English.

Lonnie Karr Schlough
www.fixquilts.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: My farewell tour
From: "Lucinda Cawley" <lrcawleycomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2010 20:25:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

I am feeling much better and for the last week I've been back on the
Eastern Shore (probably for the last time) saying goodbye. Luckily a
meeting of the Eastern Shore Quilt Study Group was scheduled for Wednesday
which gave me a chance to appreciate what I'm leaving behind.
The theme for the meeting was "Stars," everyone's favorite quilt
pattern. What fabulous stars we saw starting with an Evening Star circa
1840. Fifty-six 71/2" blocks with half block on two adjoining edges were
pieced of a variety of super fabrics (lots of fondues) including one none of
us had seen: a full sailing ship and lighthouse in Prussian blue on a white
background. Making the quilt extra interesting was a note pinned to the
back identifying the quilt's owner (don't know if she made it) as living in
Pittsburgh and stating that she had used the quilt after the flood of June
1889--yes, indeed, the Johnstown flood. By the way, if you've never read
David McCullough's book on the flood you should.
A Lone Star on an indigo background was pieced in claret, brown, pink
and mourning prints. A Lemoyne Star from Montgomery Co., PA (circa 1925)
had grey floral setting blocks and pink and yellow stars on a green
background, the kind of fabrics that you might think were 1880s but were
still available in PA German country 40 years later.
We gave a standing ovation to a visitor who brought the Mathematical
Star quilt (circa 1840) which is pictured on p. 12 of A Maryland Album.
This glorious masterpiece was found as a top by the owner's mother who
quilted it in 1953. The family was from Baltimore. There are chintz
appliqués between the points (pieced in red, mint green, orange, floral
print on white, blue and beige) and a chintz border of lilies, peonies and
roses. The same lady had another 1840s quilt, a Sunburst pieced into an
octagon and framed in white. The fabrics were purple, brown, pink and blue
complex prints.
The Mathematical Star is Maryland's over-the-top version of the Lone
Star. Seeing one stops your heart. We saw three on Wed. afternoon. The
second version had Trophies at Arms in the corners and floral appliqués in
the triangles. The setting blocks were outlined with half square triangles
which gave the huge star (pieced in red, yellow, green and brown) a
feathered look. The border was a blue chinoiserie chintz. Number three had
peacocks and flowers appliquéd between the points and a border of pieced
diamonds. You can understand how reluctant I am to leave such a perfect
storm of quilts. I'm sure there are wonderful things to be seen in Central
NY, but still.....
We saw a Blazing Star (circa 1870) which someone described as a Postage
Stamp. There were nearly 400 half inch diamonds in each star. It was
bought several years ago at the AQSG auction. There was a pink and blue
Feathered Star from the 1920s and a Star Flower Garden (circa 1930) with
lavender and Nile green hexagons surrounding scrappy (and tiny) 8-pt. stars.
All that lovely work was crudely machine quilted!
An Evening Star top (circa 1830) had setting blocks of one fabric in
different colorways. Small scrappy star blocks with red triangles in the
corners (like a Snowball) made a secondary pattern of Bowties. Blazing
Stars (circa 1840) of fondue blue and orange had free from red stars in the
corners of each block. The sashing and border were Prussian blue polka
dots. Touching Stars from Lancaster County (circa 1860) was pieced in
cheddar, oxblood and green and set on a brown check background. A Lone Star
(pink, yellow, greens and red) on a dark green background had a lovely robe
print as the backing. A Carpenters Star (circa 1890) was made by an Old
Order River Brethren woman in red, green and orange with a double 1/2 square
triangle border.
A Touching Stars from Hagerstown, MD is signed Mary Daub May 18, 18??
(probably sometime in the 40s). The stars are green, red, brown and blue
and the quilting is simply amazing. Another 1840s beauty was a Lone Star in
apple green, chrome yellow, red and blue with a 1000 Pyramids-type border.
Here's a question for you. How early does the Broken Star appear. We saw
on in cheddar, orange and red quilted with hearts and stars and couldn't
decide whether it was late 19th century or 1920s. None of us could recall
seeing a 19th century Broken Star. Help!
With apologies to people whose quilts I haven't mentioned (I have pages
more notes), but I am exhausted and have to pack to leave early tomorrow
morning.
Cinda leaving the Eastern Shore



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: My farewell tour
From: Getfruitaol.com


Thank you, Cinda. I am glad I got to meet you and share time with you in

San Jose this past October. I wish you the best in the future and good
health.

Violet Vaughnes in California


In a message dated 1/28/2010 5:28:05 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
lrcawleycomcast.net writes:

I am feeling much better and for the last week I've been back on the
Eastern Shore (probably for the last time) saying goodbye. Luckily a
meeting of the Eastern Shore Quilt Study Group was scheduled for Wednesda
y
which gave me a chance to appreciate what I'm leaving behind.
The theme for the meeting was "Stars," everyone's favorite quilt
pattern. What fabulous stars we saw starting with an Evening Star circa
1840. Fifty-six 71/2" blocks with half block on two adjoining edges were
pieced of a variety of super fabrics (lots of fondues) including one none

of
us had seen: a full sailing ship and lighthouse in Prussian blue on a
white
background. Making the quilt extra interesting was a note pinned to the
back identifying the quilt's owner (don't know if she made it) as living
in
Pittsburgh and stating that she had used the quilt after the flood of Jun
e
1889--yes, indeed, the Johnstown flood. By the way, if you've never read
David McCullough's book on the flood you should.
A Lone Star on an indigo background was pieced in claret, brown, pink
and mourning prints. A Lemoyne Star from Montgomery Co., PA (circa 1925)
had grey floral setting blocks and pink and yellow stars on a green
background, the kind of fabrics that you might think were 1880s but were
still available in PA German country 40 years later.
We gave a standing ovation to a visitor who brought the Mathematical
Star quilt (circa 1840) which is pictured on p. 12 of A Maryland Album.
This glorious masterpiece was found as a top by the owner's mother who
quilted it in 1953. The family was from Baltimore. There are chintz
appliqus between the points (pieced in red, mint green, orange, floral
print on white, blue and beige) and a chintz border of lilies, peonies an
d
roses. The same lady had another 1840s quilt, a Sunburst pieced into an
octagon and framed in white. The fabrics were purple, brown, pink and bl
ue
complex prints.
The Mathematical Star is Maryland's over-the-top version of the Lone
Star. Seeing one stops your heart. We saw three on Wed. afternoon. The
second version had Trophies at Arms in the corners and floral appliqus
in
the triangles. The setting blocks were outlined with half square triangl
es
which gave the huge star (pieced in red, yellow, green and brown) a
feathered look. The border was a blue chinoiserie chintz. Number three

had
peacocks and flowers appliqud between the points and a border of piece
d
diamonds. You can understand how reluctant I am to leave such a perfect
storm of quilts. I'm sure there are wonderful things to be seen in Centr
al
NY, but still.....
We saw a Blazing Star (circa 1870) which someone described as a Postage
Stamp. There were nearly 400 half inch diamonds in each star. It was
bought several years ago at the AQSG auction. There was a pink and blue
Feathered Star from the 1920s and a Star Flower Garden (circa 1930) with
lavender and Nile green hexagons surrounding scrappy (and tiny) 8-pt.
stars.
All that lovely work was crudely machine quilted!
An Evening Star top (circa 1830) had setting blocks of one fabric in
different colorways. Small scrappy star blocks with red triangles in the
corners (like a Snowball) made a secondary pattern of Bowties. Blazing
Stars (circa 1840) of fondue blue and orange had free from red stars in
the
corners of each block. The sashing and border were Prussian blue polka
dots. Touching Stars from Lancaster County (circa 1860) was pieced in
cheddar, oxblood and green and set on a brown check background. A Lone

Star
(pink, yellow, greens and red) on a dark green background had a lovely ro
be
print as the backing. A Carpenters Star (circa 1890) was made by an Old
Order River Brethren woman in red, green and orange with a double 1/2
square
triangle border.
A Touching Stars from Hagerstown, MD is signed Mary Daub May 18, 18??
(probably sometime in the 40s). The stars are green, red, brown and blue
and the quilting is simply amazing. Another 1840s beauty was a Lone Star

in
apple green, chrome yellow, red and blue with a 1000 Pyramids-type border
.
Here's a question for you. How early does the Broken Star appear. We
saw
on in cheddar, orange and red quilted with hearts and stars and couldn't
decide whether it was late 19th century or 1920s. None of us could recal
l
seeing a 19th century Broken Star. Help!
With apologies to people whose quilts I haven't mentioned (I have pages
more notes), but I am exhausted and have to pack to leave early tomorrow
morning.
Cinda leaving the Eastern Shore


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: My farewell tour
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2010 23:22:38 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

Cinda, m'dear,

My Southern fortune-telling bones have been talking up a storm to me . Here
is what they are saying right now (I transcribe directly): Cinda, forget t
hat "last time" stuff. You will be back on the Eastern shore many times. Yo
u might not have to do the dishes and cook while you're there, but you will
be there and just like today, you will tell those in not-so-quiltful place
s all about the quilts you see there. And they will mumble things to themse
lves like "Who knew about that ship in Prussian blue?!" and make squiggly n
otes in their little moleskin notebooks. So you can forget "last time" and
just have a good time and keep your eyes open, hon.

That's what the bones said, Cinda. And they are not just Southern bones, bu
t Louisiana bones. They know things.

Let me tell you one of my old dreams. When I was perhaps 20 years old and a
lready in love with quilts, I came across a nicely photographed article in
a magazine called "American Home" on some of Florence Peto's quilts. A numb
er of the descriptions ended with "made in NY." Heart stoppers, they were.
Photographed in a walled attic with dormers and nooks papered in a 19th-cen
ury wallpaper. At the time I had never been to New York state, but I knew
the minute I saw those quilts that I wanted to go. I was already in love wi
th Bucks County and its stone houses. They too had come to me through the p
ages of a magazine, though I'd been to Valley Forge and must just have been
too busy staking out "territory" with my sister in the backseat of the fam
ily car to notice houses at the time. But Nat'l Geographic had done a piece
on Pearl Buck's home, and I knew that was just the sort of place I wanted
to live. It was fall, and the trees were in glorious color, making the grey
stone even more beautiful. In Louisiana, the pine trees just dropped straw
, which it seemed I had spent my whole life raking. No pines for me, I thou
ght: I would have a stone house surrounded by maples. And on the beds of my
house would be wonderful appliqued quilts. On cold, snowy days when the ye
t unborn and unbegot children were at school, I would do needlework by the
fire, every now and again checking the kettle of soup on the kitchen stove.
And a cat. I, who had never been permitted a cat, would have a fat yellow
cat. The Good Life. Naturally, in fine spring weather I'd garden, and in su
mmer I'd scour the antique shops. In fall, I'd visit fairs that included qu
ilt exhibits. It was a fine, fine dream, even if I did change my mind about
living it. I bet lots of folks have had that same dream.

So just think of it: if you spend most of the year in or near Rochester, yo
u will be living lots of folks' dreams. I know you: you will find quilts an
d fabrics and people, and you will learn all sorts of new things, and then
all of us on this list will be saying, "Huh! Who knew.....!" about the quil
ts of another place.

Another thought: remember the day you and Phyllis plopped me in the back of
your rented car and we drove up to Astoria to see the Pacific Ocean, which
neither you nor I had ever seen? You climbed up on a little rock, shaded y
our eyes in a "pose" and I tried to recite Keats' "Standing on a Peak in Da
rien". That's where you are: taking a first look at a new place. And I per
sonally shall expect you to relate what you see there.

And maybe in fall, you could drive down to Bucks County, visit Ms. Roche pe
rhaps.......

Be good and keep reporting, Otherwise we might fine you.
Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: My farewell tour
From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533frontiernet.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2010 06:59:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Good Morning QHL
Cinda, as Gaye has already foretold (with her bones mind you-so it must be
true), the quilts in Central and Upstate NY await your Cinda-Logs. You've
already been invited to attend the Vintage Quilt Study Group-NY and
although I agree with you that perhaps we don't see as many treasures as
you did on the Eastern coast, except in the local museums, there are still
a few lovely quilts that pop up from time to time. Besides that, you are
like the "Field of Dreams" for antique quilts! A real quilt magnet!!

Beth Davis in Rochester NY
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Paragon
From: "Rose Marie Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2010 07:17:05 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

I've done some research on the Paragon company, though I could not find a
beginning date for them. The earliest copyright date I could find for their
products was 1936. "Paragon" was a popular name for a variety of products
advertised in the early 20th century, which is why it's so difficult to find
information on a particular company. You have to sift through thousands of
possibilities.
Rosie Werner
quiltkitid.com