Subject: Dear Cinda
From: "Catherine Litwinow" <litwinow62msn.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2010 08:53:11 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1


Dear Cinda and QHL friends,
I have a feeling you are very much like me and when a report from the
Eastern Shore is in my mailbox-I often skip the other posts and go
directly to your notes Cinda. Cinda you are so very special to me, first
your name Cinda, which maybe really be Lucinda, like the grandmother I
never knew. And taking the time to look at double pink fabric swatches.
I would be amiss if I didn't invite all of you to the "Field of
Dreams" which I hope you all know is in Iowa. Come to our IA/IL Quilt
Study Group meeting April 10, 2010 in Kalona, IA, the largest Amish
settlement east of the Mississippi. The study topic is Depression Era
Quilts 1920, 30 & 40. Come for extra days to enjoy all the quilts at the
Kalona Quilt and Textile museums, drive the Barn Quilt byways, and take
a trip near Dubuque and see that baseball field. (Just a side note. In
the book Shoeless Joe<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoeless_Joe_(novel)>
by W. P. Kinsella<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._P._Kinsella>. The
farmer was to get J. D. Salinger and go to a Boston White game--)
Like Gaye, there are some things we get to see in person and others
that we read and look at in books and magazines and store in our minds.
Each QHL member post often makes a beautiful quilt.
Catherine Litwinow
From, a wishing it was above freezing, here in Iowa, without quilt I'd
be much colder.
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Subject: Re: men's wear/types of quilts
From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2010 10:21:39 EST
X-Message-Number: 2


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Oh, yes, I remember the pallets of old quilts. Recently I received some
pictures of me as a toddler sitting on a Mariner's compass quilt my Granny had
made years before I came along. I always thought of her as making string
quilts out of flour sacks but in her younger days she did much more. I
remembered, after looking at the picture, that my cousins and I would lay on
pallets of quilts made of old quilts with dark fabrics unlike the cheerful
colors and patterns she was currently using in her quilt making. Even then all
I wanted to do was look at all the fabrics and patterns in the quilts.

Speaking of heavy quilts, did anyone add Denim quilts to the list? What
about the T-Shirt quilts people make for their kids going off to college?
Handkerchief quilts? Doily quilts? Calendar quilts made out of the old tea
towel calendars?

I do hope someone has had time to organize this discussion and make a list,
if so, I would love a copy.

Alma Moates
AQS Certified Appraiser-Quilted Textiles
Pensacola, Florida
_quiltsappraisedaol.com_ (mailto:quiltsappraisedaol.com)


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Subject: Re: men's wear/types of quilts
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2010 14:44:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3


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I think a lot of us on GHL would like a list of quilts as discussed recently - hopefully someone has kept the list.....
Mitzi from cold, cold Vermont



In a message dated 01/30/10 10:27:25 Eastern Standard Time, Quiltsappraised writes:
Oh, yes, I remember the pallets of old quilts. Recently I received some
pictures of me as a toddler sitting on a Mariner's compass quilt my Granny had
made years before I came along. I always thought of her as making string
quilts out of flour sacks but in her younger days she did much more. I
remembered, after looking at the picture, that my cousins and I would lay on
pallets of quilts made of old quilts with dark fabrics unlike the cheerful
colors and patterns she was currently using in her quilt making. Even then all
I wanted to do was look at all the fabrics and patterns in the quilts.

Speaking of heavy quilts, did anyone add Denim quilts to the list? What
about the T-Shirt quilts people make for their kids going off to college?
Handkerchief quilts? Doily quilts? Calendar quilts made out of the old tea
towel calendars?

I do hope someone has had time to organize this discussion and make a list,
if so, I would love a copy.

Alma Moates
AQS Certified Appraiser-Quilted Textiles
Pensacola, Florida
_quiltsappraisedaol.com_ (mailto:quiltsappraisedaol.com)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: List of Quilt-types
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2010 23:11:34 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

I am sure this list is going to make you think of a lot more. For
beginners, there are all those teachers. Second, there are all those lines
of fabric that come up with clever patterns and names. But are we actually
talking about many different <animals> here? Examples....

Type
Fabric
Method
Pattern name
In the Style of -- this good be followed by a teacher's name or a previous
style pre-1960


Here is what I gleaned from your posts, plus a few more.

Karen Alexander


African American-style Quilt
AIDS Quilt panels
American Country Look (U.K.)
Amish-style Quilt
Art Quilts AD enormous variety within this category alone
Baltimore Album-style Quilt
Bargello Quilt
Batik Quilt
Bicentennial Quilt
'Blended' quilts (low contrast)
Block of the Month Quilts
Calendar Quilts
Cathedral Window Variations
Colorwash Quilt
Computer digitized Embroidered quilt
Dear Jane Quilt
Denim Quilts
Doily Quilts
Double-Knit Quilt
Dusty Quits-Quilts of the 80s
Embellished Quilt (beaded, painted, 3-demensional)
Family Reunion Quilts
Flannel Quilts
Fused Applique
Gees Bend Quilt
Hand-dyed Quilts
Handkerchief Quilts
Hmong-style Quilt
Home of the Brave; American Hero Quilts; Quilts of Valor
Imported Quilt (this will have many variations)
I Spy Quilt
Jelly Rolls, etc. - pre-cut fabrics from full collections
Landscape Quilts
Layer Cakes - pre-cut fabrics from full collections
Linus Quilts
Long-arm Quilted
Machine Embroidered Quilt
Memorial Quilts: 9/11, Natural Disasters,
Millennial Quilt
Miniature Quilt
Paper Pieced - ie. Karen Stone type
Pictorial Community Sampler
Photo-transfer Quilt
Portrait Quilt
Pot-holder Quilt
Primitive figural appliquE9 Quilt
Quilt In A Day
Raw Edge Applique Quilt
Reproduction Quilts: Civil War, Depression Era, Medallion,
Ricky Tims Convergence Quilts
Rotary Cut Quilts
Round Robin Quilts
Row by Row Quilt
Sanitary Commission Reproduction Quilts
Stack and Whack Quilt
State Quilts
Stained Glass Quilt
Tessellated Quilts
Thimbleberry Quilts
T-shirt Quilt
Underground Railroad Quilt
Wall Quilt
Watercolor Quilts
Y2K Quilts




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: List of Quilt-types
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2010 10:02:00 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

Great compulation Karen!!
Two more I came up with were:
Methods: Candlewicking (taught it at my shop back in the 80's)
and (oh Lord!) Quilt as You Go....(the starting point for many an
unfinished quilt, but MANY pillows!! LOL)
which lead to the all emcompassing....
Style:
Class Sampler!!

Laura Syler
Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles
Teacher, Lecturer, Judge
Richardson, TX
972-345-2787
hi-spiritairmail.net



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: winter wind
From: "Catherine Litwinow" <litwinow62msn.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2010 10:26:31 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3


Hi,
I think most of you know your geography. The wind has been blowing so
hard-Kalona, IA got pushed into IL. Actually, it still is in Iowa. Where
we are celebrating temperatures in the 20s.
Catherine Litwinow


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Blank messages and Quilts since 1976
From: <gpconklincharter.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2010 9:12:54 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

I receive Mitzioakes posts with no problem. I'm on Charter.net and I have kept a list of the Quilt styles since 1976. I have 47 listed so far, after all the last minute entries, I can post the list for all.

I can't believe I had forgotten Handkerchief quilts, Pat Long Gardner author of Handkerchief Quilts has been so kind to me, she shared some of her quilt history books with me and for that I am ever so grateful.

Pam Conklin
AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles
O'Fallon, IL



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt storage question
From: elpaninaroaol.com
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 2010 00:16:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


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Good evening all,

Wanted to ask about the prospect of storing quilts in a higher humidity en
vironment.

At present, I store my wine and quilts offsite in temperature controlled
storage- in separate lockers for each with both being climate controlled
but the wine kept cold and at a higher humidity. If I move to a full unde
rground room at another facility, I can save a bundle- but it would requir
e storing the quilts alongside the wine.

The temperature would be 55 degrees, but also there would be 70% controlle
d humidity- give or take.

Does the humidity factor present any special problems for quilt storage ov
er a 1-2 year period? The quilts are properly wrapped and boxed- the only
concern is whether elevated humidity creates any special problems.

Thank you for any thoughts on this!

Take care,

Tom.




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Subject: Quilt Style
From: OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 02:52:23 EST
X-Message-Number: 2


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Pam:

You might want to add to the list - quilts decorated with heat-set
crystals. I've been seeing lots of these at the shows these days. Also quilts that
are heavily machine quilted on longarm machines.

Kathy Kansier
AQS Certified Appraiser
Ozark, MO.

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Subject: Re: List of Quilt-types
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersntlworld.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 10:05:09 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3


On 31 Jan 2010, at 07:11, Karen Alexander wrote:

> I am sure this list is going to make you think of a lot more.

Running through alphabetically made me think of Kaleidoscope quilts

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 31, 2010
From: "Virginia Berger" <cifbanetins.net>
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 2010 07:08:37 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

> Subject: List of Quilt-types

The lists are great but don't we also need to try and put
dates when these appeared or were popular?

Virginia Berger
IA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: List of Quilt-types
From: "Nancy Ray" <nancy.rayfrontiernet.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 07:57:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Karen,
It's a great list. Please add string quilts or string piecing; although
it's an old technique, I find it's still poorly understood in lots of
places. When I showed 40 of my old string quilts in a special exhibit at the
2005 Vermont Quilt Festival in 2005, a newly certified quilt appraiser came
to me after one of the gallery talks. She thanked me for the exhibit and the
talk, and then she said simply, "Thank you. They (string quilts) aren't what
I thought." I'm writing about them now--the stereotype that is most often
recognized looks like this: string quilts were made people who lacked either
the resources or the skills to make other quilts; put together fast w/no
thought or plan; quilted w/big uneven stitches or tied; most made by AA
quilters, made in the south and in the 1930's...well, you get the picture.
(I think it's a version of, "If the only tool I have is a hammer, then every
problem looks like a nail"...)
Nancy Ray in WV's cold, cold Northern Panhandle



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Exhibit of interest to list memebers
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>


Dear list,

Though NQR - this exhibit is relevant to quilt makers Iam thinking.

Newbie

F. "FLORA IN FASHION"

Through June 12 at the Ohio State University Costume and Textiles Collection
[Columbus, OH], this exhibit showcases botanically themed buttons, and the
floral aesthetic in clothing and accessories, including 19th and 20th
century period fashion with their original buttons, hats, gloves, handbags,
and shoes. A section featuring prints from the Chadwick Arboretum Emanuel
Rudolph Collection of Botanical Illustrations will accompany it. Textile
artifacts made from plant fibers including cotton, linen, pineapple fiber,
bark cloth, bamboo, and raffia will also be showcased. For details visit:

< <http://costume.osu.edu/exhibitions/flora-in-fashion/>
http://costume.osu.edu/exhibitions/flora-in-fashion/>


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Subject: Re: Blank messages and Quilts since 1976
From: MargaretFaheyaol.com
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 13:36:54 EST
X-Message-Number: 7

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Would thread painted quilts be a category? I can see a division of kinds
into broad categories and subcategories. What a good idea this is.
Margaret

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Subject: Re: List of Quilt-types
From: MargaretFaheyaol.com
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 13:58:51 EST
X-Message-Number: 8


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Thanks for the (beginning?) list. Might add painted quilt ala Hollis
Chatelaine. Trapunto??? Home-machine quilted

So, does "Method" mean a dominant technique quilt?
with Colourwash, deals with primarily design and color ..would they lump
into style?

Now into the confusing part, eh?

Carry on.
M.

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Subject: Re: types of quilts since 1976
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 2010 12:09:31 -0800

Hi Candy,

If you are already a QHL list member, all you have to do is send an email t
o
QHLlyris.quiltropolis.com with your suggestions and then someone will add
them to the list.

I am thinking your suggestion falls under a generic name that I would call
<Fat Quarter Quilts>. This name will probably have a whole long sub-list
under it! Go ahead and get it started. You could be in the subject line:
types of quilts since 1976 AD suggested sub-list. Just a suggestion.

Meanwhile, I will go ahead and add Fat Quarter Quilts to my list with the
two names you sent under it.

Thanks for sharing!

Karen Alexander
http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/



On 2/1/10 8:22 AM, "Candy St. Lawrence" <castle99wildblue.net> wrote:

> I don't know how to post to the list but wanted to add the quilts made fr
om
> large rectangles cut from fat quarters.A0 Such as "Take Twenty" and "Yello
w
> Brick Road".A0 Talk about making a quilt in less than a day!
> A0
> Candy St. Lawrence
> castle99wildblue.net
>


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charset"ISO-8859-1"
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<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>Re: types of quilts since 1976</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<FONT FACE3D"Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><SPAN STYLE3D'font-size:14pt
'>Hi Candy,<BR>
<BR>
If you are already a QHL list member, all you have to do is send an email t
o <a href3D"QHLlyris.quiltropolis.com">QHLlyris.quiltropolis.com</a> with y
our suggestions and then someone will add them to the list. <BR>
<BR>
I am thinking your suggestion falls under a generic name that I would call
&lt;Fat Quarter Quilts&gt;. This name will probably have a whole long sub-li
st under it! Go ahead and get it started. You could be in the subject line:
types of quilts since 1976 &#8211; suggested sub-list. Just a suggestion.<BR
>
<BR>
Meanwhile, I will go ahead and add Fat Quarter Quilts to my list with the t
wo names you sent under it. <BR>
<BR>
Thanks for sharing!<BR>
<BR>
Karen Alexander<BR>
<a href3D"http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/">http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/</
a><BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
On 2/1/10 8:22 AM, &quot;Candy St. Lawrence&quot; &lt;<a href3D"castle99wil
dblue.net">castle99wildblue.net</a>&gt; wrote:<BR>
<BR>
</SPAN></FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE3D"Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><
SPAN STYLE3D'font-size:14pt'>I don't know how to post to the list but wanted
to add the quilts made from large rectangles cut from fat quarters.A0 Such as
&quot;Take Twenty&quot; and &quot;Yellow Brick Road&quot;.A0 Talk about maki
ng a quilt in less than a day!<BR>
A0<BR>
Candy St. Lawrence<BR>
<a href3D"castle99wildblue.net">castle99wildblue.net</a><BR>
<BR>
</SPAN></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE>
</BODY>
</HTML>


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Subject: RE: Quilt storage question
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 11:55:20 -0800
X-Message-Number: 10

Good morning, QHLers - The short (ha!) answer is yes, there will be problems
if you store your wrapped/boxed quilts over a 1-2 year period at 55 degrees
and 70% relative humidity.

Now, for the long answer. Your quilts AND storage materials currently have a
resident population of mould and mildew spores all over them. Everything
does. The spores are just waiting for the correct environmental conditions
to start their life cycle. For a lot of the species of mould/mildew, those
correct environmental conditions are darkness, cool temperatures and
relative humidity levels over 60%. The lack of any air circulation also
plays a part. So I expect the mould/mildew population to rev up to high gear
- meaning digesting your quilts and storage materials, excreting,
reproducing at a rate that the population will soon make its presence known
thru a musty smell and mould/mildew 'staining' (which is a combination of
very large population of spores now visible to the human eye and the
excreting part interacting with your quilts and storage materials).

At that level of relative humidity, most paper wine bottle labels also get
very mouldy/mildewy for the same reasons.

I do not recommend storing your quilts in this storage scenario. If you have
any questions, feel free to contact me off-list.
Regards,
Meg
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________
Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator &
Collections Management Consultant
Professional Associate, AIC
mgmooneymoonware.net

-----Original Message----

...prospect of storing quilts in a higher humidity environment.
...The temperature would be 55 degrees, but also there would be 70%
controlled humidity- give or take.

Does the humidity factor present any special problems for quilt storage over
a 1-2 year period? The quilts are properly wrapped and boxed- the only
concern is whether elevated humidity creates any special problems....




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Oops
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 2010 12:18:52 -0800
X-Message-Number: 11

That last mail was just meant for Candy. Sorry about that.

Karen in the Islands




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Are you proficient with Blockbase?
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 18:19:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

I could use some expertise.
Do you have the Blockbase program?
Do you know how to attach rotary cutting instructions on how to make a quilt
to an email?
I am not all that great with computers so have failed at this.
I printed a pattern, and then scanned it with my scanner and then attached
it to an email and only 1/2 the pattern showed up and the measurements
didn't print.
I know there has to be an easy way to do this.
I'm hoping someone here might have some simple pointers for me?
Thanks if you can help,
Linda Heminway
Plaistow, NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fabric Purchase Musings
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 2010 20:27:44 -0700
X-Message-Number: 13

This quote comes from another list but I just couldn't resist passing it
on. The poster
did give her permission and names have been removed to protect the
innocent. I don't
know anyone on this list who could be accused of buying too many tools.

jt

"My "ex" complained about me buying fabric! The Judge at our
divorce was a woman and she actually laughed out loud at the statement!
There were other very serious things going on....but she might have been
a quilter!
As a ps....I worked at a quilt shop a long time ago and a customer was
buying a LOT of stuff...when I gave her the total, she handed me a credit
card and asked if I could write "tools" in the description line! LOL..."


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: storage textiles - humidity
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 2010 09:08:40 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


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You can reference the article below written by the Smithsonian regarding
temperature and humidity. Humidity should be between 40-50% with a temper
ature from 60-75. (I didn't commit the temps to memory so I might be off
a little with that.) All I know is that it cannot be warm and moist, but
even cool and moist isn't good. Think of mildew and rot.
http://www.si.edu/encyclopedia_SI/nmah/antqtext.htm
Going to have to keep the wine and quilts in different locations. I am ass
uming this is for valuable collectible wine. Our wine seems to do just fin
e at 70 degrees and 50% humidity. But then again, it isn't saved for years
and years.
Lynn

Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
3910 Hwy 70 E
New Bern, NC





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Subject: RE: Are you proficient with Blockbase?
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 10:13:43 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

Linda wrote:
<<I could use some expertise.
Do you have the Blockbase program?
Do you know how to attach rotary cutting instructions on how to make a
quilt
to an email?
I am not all that great with computers so have failed at this.
I printed a pattern, and then scanned it with my scanner and then
attached
it to an email and only 1/2 the pattern showed up and the measurements
didn't print.
I know there has to be an easy way to do this.
I'm hoping someone here might have some simple pointers for me?>>

RESPONSE:
I might be able to help.

Do you have a program that will create a PDF file? There are some you
can
download for free on the internet. PDF-Creator is the name of one of
these
programs. You could 94Print94 to the PDF file and create a document
that can
be attached to an email. The PDF creator becomes one of your printers.
When
you go through the Print steps, you are not setting up to print but
rather
to create a document that can be saved as a PDF file.

You would create the PDF file when you go to the print dialog box for
Rotary
Cutting. Know that the rotary cutting instructions you print from
BlockBase
are only for the block. You would have to multiply any cutting amounts
by
the number of blocks in your quilt.

It will be to your accuracy advantage to size the block a multiple of
the
grid used to draw the block. For example, for a block drawn on a 5 grid,
size the block 2.594 or 594 or 7.594 or 1094 for easier measurable
cutting of
strips. Also, I recommend that you print out templates for the block in
order to check the sizing of the templates against the sizing for rotary
cutting strips. The templates will always be accurate. Sometimes the
rotary
cutting instructions could be off due to the rounding of the
measurements.




Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research
and
am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at:A0
www.AlzQuilts.org
For lectures and workshops, see www.findaquiltteacher.com/vlackb.html




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fabric Purchase Musings
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 10:13:43 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

In my fantasy life, I would own a quilt store named 94Grace Ries." A
customer
could write the name of the store and make it look like 94Groceries."

You can probably think of some more names with a similar distortion.
94Chair
Itty." 94Carre Pair Shoppe."

OT:
Did you see the email about a child in school who called the picture
94a
Frickin' Elephant94? His teacher was upset with his language until she
realized he was misreading 94African94!

Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research
and
am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at:A0
www.AlzQuilts.org
For lectures and workshops, see www.findaquiltteacher.com/vlackb.html





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Feedsack Secrets: Fashions from Hard Times - Gloria Nixon
From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 08:15:51 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 4

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I just got a copy of Gloria Nixon's new book Feedsack Secrets: Fashion from
Hard Times in the mail yesterday.A0A0This is the type of book presentati
on I REALLY enjoy and want to see more of.A0 Well done - very well done.
A0 0A0AI'm not sure if it is available on Amazon or not -- it probably i
s, but I do know you can get a copy of this book by calling (816) 234-4636
(Say "Operator.") Kansas City Star Books.0A0ACongratulations Gloria!0A
0ASue in Illinois0A0A0A
--0-2061443748-1265127351:19393--


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Subject: construction techniques
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 10:06:51 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 5

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Hi all - listing the varieties of contemporary quilt construction technique
s has made my head spin, as I have little contact with any of it,A0because
theA01950s is my cut off dateA0for the vintage and antique quilts I buy.

A0
By looking, can someone tell if a top, for example, has been made with a ro
tary cutter instead of individually cut, and would that have an impact on v
aluing the piece, as mightA0be the caseA0if something were machine quilte
d rather than hand quilted?
A0
And, is long arm machine quilting different from regular sewing machine qui
lting, and discernible to the eye? And what difference does it make?
A0
I would love someA0guidance, as I expect we all will be encountering more
of this material in the secondary marketplace from now on.
A0
Also, is there a computer program for recording quilt or other antiquesA0i
nventory for home insurance? Or should one follow the examples of museum da
ta bases or the AllianceA0for how to record info?
A0
thanks
A0
Laura FisherA0
A0Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com
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Subject: RE: construction techniques
From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 07:57:20 +1100
X-Message-Number: 6

Laura Fisher wrote: >>>Also, is there a computer program for recording
quilt
or other antiquesA0inventory for home insurance? Or should one follow
the
examples of museum data bases or the AllianceA0for how to record info?

May I echo this question? I thought I had a program of this kind but I
cannot find it anywhere on my computer. I need a simple database with a
search/sort facility that can have photos added.

Thank you
Janet O'Dell
Melbourne Australia



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Subject: Bee Cave Bob vs Punxsutawney Phil--60% Difference in Reliability
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 14:01:55 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

In the interest of science, I report news shared with me by a Texas harpist
. It might be of some help to any who crawled back under the covers screami
ng, "NoNoNo!!" upon learning that Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow, thereby
signaling six more weeks of real winter. To wit:

"In Texas, The Benevolent Knights of the Raccoon have named the state mamma
l, an armadillo, to predict when the spring season will start.

Last year the Senate decided that the Texas spring forecast will be determi
ned by Texans at the West Pole on February 2 of each year.

The Lone Star Meteorological Society found E2809CBee Cave Bob," an area
armadillo, has been right in his prediction 98.6 percent of the time.

Bee Cave Bob is scheduled to come out at 12:30 p.m. at the West Pole on the
98th Meridian in Bee Cave, Texas."

At this writing, I have heard no news from Bee Cave re shadow or no-shadow,
but for those of us west of the Mississippi, Bob would offer another chanc
e. And since Phil's accuracy rate is only 38 percent, there is the element
of accuracy to consider before turning on our televisions and sorting throu
gh the ads for anti-depressants, selecting one, and calling up our doctors
and requesting an immediate prescription.

I personally look forward to the Texans on the list reporting the results (
if good).

From Louisiana, where critters human and otherwise only perform for lots of
money, up front
Gaye


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Subject: Re: Bee Cave Bob vs Punxsutawney Phil--60% Difference in Reliability
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 15:32:22 -0600
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Gaye,
Just so everyone will know you are not pulling their legs....I copied
this from an Austin area blog...

Will Bee Cave Bob agree with Punxsutawney Phil?
Six more weeks of winter is not something that Austinites like to
hear, especially after the sub-freezing temperatures we experienced
the first week of January. But today, Punxsutawney Phil (the most
famous groundhog) DID see his shadow meaning six more weeks of
winter, but Texans now have their own way of predicting if spring
will arrive sooner rather than later - Bee Cave Bob, an armadillo!

Today is officially the first Armadillo Day. Armadillo Day is a
Texan version of Groundhog Day. The festivities will be at the West
Pole in Bee Cave, Texas and Bee Cave Bob is scheduled to come out at
12:30 p.m.

Marcia...have you heard anything? I know they are sweating bullets up
north!! LOL

Laura Syler
Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles
Teacher, Lecturer, Judge
Richardson, TX
972-345-2787
hi-spiritairmail.net


From one of the few Native Texans left around here!!



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Subject: Re: Bee Cave Bob vs Punxsutawney Phil--60% Difference in Reliability
From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 14:15:55 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 9

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We here in Wisconsin have Jimmy the GroundHog and Jimmy didn't see his shad
ow so maybe Pennsylvania will have 6 more weeks of winter but here in Wisco
nsin we are trusting Jimmy and hoping for an early Spring.C2A0 Just thoug
ht I would share that with everyone. Altho we are getting snow today. :)
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Subject: Jane Alan quilt patterns
From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilterwindstream.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 17:37:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

Is Jane Alan's name for quilt patterns of the '30s familiar to you? I was
given two pamphlets dated 1933. They're shown on my blog, along with a
pretty Iris applique quilt, if you'd like to take a look. The publications
are from the John F. Dille Co., Chicago. I've learned that John Dille was
the president of the National Newspaper Syndicate, and the producer of the
first Buck Rogers film which was released and shown at the Chicago World's
Fair. But I haven't learned much more about Jane Alan. Will do a bit more
searching, but thought someone in this group might be a good source.
Nancy Roberts
http://quiltnans.blogspot.com/



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Subject: Re: Bee Cave Bob vs Punxsutawney Phil--60% Difference in Reliability
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 16:33:22 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11

Well, down here in Houston where, if you don't like the weather just stand
around ten minutes or so and it will probably change, we gave up on
Punxsutawney Phil and came up with Alamo the longhorn. I tried to forward
the picture to you all but couldn't get the job done. At any rate, Alamo
the longhorn says no more winter!!! Consider we never have winter in
Houston (I was born and raised in the northeast corner of Kansas - I know
what winter is) I feel sure we're safe down here on the coast with Alamo's
prediction. Here's hoping Bee Cave Bob will have a good day as well.

Best regards,
Sharron Evans....................
........in balmy 57 deg. Spring, TX where it's a gloomy day - don't know how
that big ol' cow saw his shadow.


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Subject: Re: Bee Cave Bob vs Punxsutawney Phil--60% Difference in Reliability
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 16:21:58 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12

Well the secret's out..... I am the "un-named" Texas harpist to whom Gaye
was referring! We are awaiting word from Bee Cave Bob. I was unable to
attend the festivities due to a "sprung" back. Am on the couch contemplating
a quilt to commemorate the occasion of Armadillo Day ( not the back!)
Marcia

Marcia Kaylakie
AQS Certified Appraiser
Austin, TX
www.texasquiltappraiser.com



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Subject: late breaking news on Lone Star Bob
From: "Marcia Kaylakie" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 21:00:18 -0600
X-Message-Number: 13



This just in....Lone Star Bob says spring will be early! Local news has
reported that Lone Star Bob did not see his shadow and did not go back
to his burrow right away so spring is on the way. This on a day when it
is still 15 degrees below normal for this time of year. go figure.

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Subject: Re: late breaking news on Lone Star Bob
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2010 22:16:54 -0600
X-Message-Number: 14

Marcia K., thank you so much for reporting the good news. It was hard for me to put my hopes on an armadillo, but there was something about Bee Cave that gave me hope. And the Loyal Order of Raccoons. And "Bee Cave" is sooo much easier to spell than Pauxsa....., where Phil lives.

An early spring!

Gaye