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Subject: Fwd: Looking for a name
From: Beth Donaldson <thequiltdrgmail.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 08:31:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

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I got a phone request yesterday, can anyone help out?
Thanks,
Beth

--
Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant
Michigan State University Museum
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/
http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/ <http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/%20>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Jody Jones" <qltgrosecomcast.net>
To: quiltsmuseum.msu.edu
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2010 1:55:04 PM (GMT-0500) America/New_York
Subject: Looking for a name

Hi,

I am looking for the name of a lady who was a well known quilt
historian/appraiser in the mid 1970's-1980's. She was from Bell Buckle
Tennessee and I think her first name was Mary or Marilee? She was
small, dark haired and at that time was in her late 60's?

I remember several articles about her being published in the magazines,
Quilters Newsletter and others.

If you can help supply her name, I would really appreciate it!

Jody

--00151747691624fca9047eb23ed6--


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Subject: Jane Alan Quilt Patterns
From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 06:58:31 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 2

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You might try contacting Susan Price Miller - she is in the American Quilt
Study Group Directory -A0to see if she could point you in a direction.A0S
usan is the expert on Carlie Sexton, Herbert Ver Mehren, and other pattern
designers from that time period.A0 A0If you don't have a directory, conta
ct me off-list and I will forward her e-mail address to you.A0 0A0ASue i
n Illinois0A0A0A
--0-2032856261-1265209111:4398--


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Subject: Looking for help!
From: Mitzioakes <mitzioakesaol.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 11:27:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3


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I realize (for some reason) many of my emails are coming thru with no message - have not found the cause of this in 2 years.
But, if someone can get my emails, I am looking for special displays that are currently being shared thruout the USA. I am looking for ones that might relate in some manner to the theme of our show that is scheduled for October - theme this year is HOMAGE TO GRANDMOTHER- NEW QUILTS FROM OLD FAVORITES. Anything that might relate back to the 'days gone by' would be wonderful to have available for our show.
Thanks in advance to anyone who can help (and to those who DO receive my emails.
Mitzi Oakes
Vermont
mitzioakesaol.com

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Subject: Re: Looking for help! (copy)
From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 12:02:18 -0800
X-Message-Number: 6

Here is a copy of Mitzi Oakes' post from this morning.
..........................

I realize (for some reason) many of my emails are coming thru with no
message - have not found the cause of this in 2 years.
But, if someone can get my emails, I am looking for special displays that
are currently being shared thruout the USA. I am looking for ones that
might relate in some manner to the theme of our show that is scheduled for
October - theme this year is HOMAGE TO GRANDMOTHER- NEW QUILTS FROM OLD
FAVORITES. Anything that might relate back to the 'days gone by' would be
wonderful to have available for our show.
Thanks in advance to anyone who can help (and to those who DO receive my
emails.
Mitzi Oakes
Vermont
mitzioakesaol.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Help with possible kit quilt identification?
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>

In my quest for a masters degree in history, I'm in a class that
requires me to analyze a "primary document" as part of the semester's
work. Imagine my delight when my professor enthusiastically endorsed my
proposal to anaylze a quilt as a "primary document."

In connecting with a curator at the Nebraska History Museum about that
project, I asked about quilts that the museum would like researched. I
offered to post to the Quilt History list to see if anyone could shed
light on these two recent acquisitions (which didn't "sing to me" as
possible subjects for my personal project).

Any ideas? Names of patterns or designers? Any help appreciated!

The link to see the quilts in question:
http://www.nebraskahistory.org/museum/collect/recent_acquisitions.htm

Thanks for any insights. I'll be forwarding whatever I learn to the
curator for the quilt files. I won't reveal your contact information
unless you give specific permission, so don't be concerned about getting
hounded :-). Thank you again.
Stephanie Whitson

P.S. I've narrowed down my own research project to five quilts in the
museum's collection. . . but picking one is going to be so. very.
difficult. I want to know ALL the stories!
------_NextPart_000_0055_01CAA4CD.730C0920--


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Subject: Fwd: Fwd: info on Mildred Locke
From: Beth Donaldson <thequiltdrgmail.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 15:18:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

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I put out a call this morning for information and got a reply this
afternoon.
Problem solved! You guys are the best, and a special thank you to Karan
Flanscha who's sleuthing work uncoverd the quilter in question, Mildred
Locke.
Beth

--
Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant
Michigan State University Museum
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/
http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/

--0023545bd3e05af8a1047eb7ecd2--


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Subject: Stephanie's quilt kits
From: "Rose Marie Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 15:00:46 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9

Stephanie,
They are both kit quilts. The one with the trellis background is called
Governor Winthrop and is #7107 (#7107X if the background is cream colored).
It is from Home Needlecraft Creations. According to Arene Burgess (the
expert on this company) they began business in Chicago about 1933 and were
probably absorbed by Gold Art around 1941.
The bouquet quilt is called Bouquet. I am not certain of the company that
produced it. It was sold by Needlecraft Company, the company that published
the Home Arts Needlecraft magazine from Augusta, Maine. In the catalog it
was given the number 36-9-20, which is usually a date of the magazine it
appeared in -probably September, 1936. It was also in the April 1937 issue.
Many of the quilts sold by Needlecraft were made by Home Needlecraft
Creations, but I cannot verify that this one is.
You can pass on contact information. I'm always happy to identify kits.
Rosie Werner
quiltkitID.com (in progress)



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 02, 2010
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 18:45:13 EST
X-Message-Number: 10


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Laura Fisher asked about contemporary construction techniques: "And, is
long arm machine quilting different from regular sewing machine quilting, and
discernible to the eye? And what difference does t make?"

I 'm a professional longarm quilter. I've been quilting for 40 years, and
longarming for 5 years. I spend the day quilting for others at the machine,
and spend the evenings hand piecing or hand quilting for myself.

I'd like to address your first question about the differences between
longarm and domestic machine quilting, but as to what difference it makes, I
will leave that up to others.

Sometimes different modes of machine quilting can be differentiated by the
patterns, sometimes not.

Part of the difference is due to the way the machines actually work. When
quilting with a domestic sewing machine, the quilter moves the quilt
through the mechanism with her hands. When quilting with a midarm or longarm
quilting machine, the quilt is held stationary, stable and flat, attached to
canvas leaders and clamps and the machine moves over it.

Added to these differences, there are computerized machines that can quilt
with incredible precision and without the quilter's hand guiding the
machine with a handle. Just choose the digitized design, push a button, go away
for awhile and let the machine quilt the design, come back in a half hour
and check the stitching. We won't even go there. It's quite difficult to
tell what longarm quilting has been computer produced or hand guided.
Sometimes the perfection seems to point to a machine, but I've seen gorgeous
precise quilting done by humans as well.

A domestic machine usually has a throat space of 7-10". A midarm has up to
18". Over 18" throat space is considered a longarm machine. Quilting with
a longarm is like sketching or doodling or signing your name. Quilting
with a domestic would be akin to moving the paper instead of the pen to sign
your name.

Pantographs are preprinted designs that can be traced with a laser attached
to a longarm machine. There are hundreds of patterns but some are quite
popular, and I can recognize 120-150 the most of the most common pantograph
designs by sight. Pantograph patterns would be a dead giveaway to longarm
quilting.

Another difference is the speed. Longarms are able to go quite fast and you
often see quilts at shows now that are quilted with thousands of yards of
thread. It is not unusual to see modern show quilts with dense background
fillers quilted closer than 1/2". There are background fillers commonly
used today and quilted quite densely-- a good indication that it was quilted
with a longarm. Although Diane Gaudinsky quilts with a domestic machine
in this same dense style, her work is the excellent, exceptional exception
rather than the norm.

If I see quilts with very dense background fillers of McTavishing, peacock
feathers, ribbons, bananas, dwirling, pearls or pebbles, I'd be fairly
sure those quilts were done with a longarm.

This brings up another issue. The terms I just mentioned are common in the
longarm world. I use them to describe my work on my work orders, on my
website, on entry forms for quilt shows. These terms describe certain
specific design motifs that are popular now in longarm quilting. If appraisers are
going to appraise these modern quilts, they may want to learn the
terminology to accurately describe the quilting that they see on machine quilted
quilts from the current time. At a show last summer, I counted 27
hand-quilted quilts among the hundreds of machine-quilted pieces. It's a brave new
world.

Bright blessings!

~Donna Laing
_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_
(http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)


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Subject: punxutawney phil
From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 18:16:29 -0600


Well, all I can tell you about this, is that in Minnesota we'd be very
happy with only six more weeks of winter.
Jean Loken, hiding out in Lake Havasu AZ right now
----------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Subject: Article about woman in question
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 03 Feb 2010 22:43:38 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Here is a link to an article about Mildred Locke

http://www.josiebrown.com/signal_editorial/files/Quilt_Lady.pdf

Karen Alexander




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Mildred Locke
From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2010 05:14:27 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

Beth, I am curious as to your interest in Mildred Locke. She died a
few years back of Alzheimer's and I have felt the quilt world failed
to note her passing properly. She and our group Tennessee Valley
Quilters Association did a lot to help with the initial show at
Paducah and helping the Schroeders understand the value and reverence
of quilts. I am a charter member of TVQA but was not involved in that
early work. Mildred was a friend, a lady with determination and a mind
set to do things the way she considered "right." I think she deserves
far more honor than she has been given.
Pat Kyser in Alabama


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Subject: Fwd: Looking for a name
From: "Louise" <ltiemannstny.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2010 06:41:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I believe the name you are looking for is Florence Peto. Thanks, Louise
---------------------------------
Subject: Fwd: Looking for a name
From: Beth Donaldson <thequiltdrgmail.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 08:31:58 -0500

I got a phone request yesterday, can anyone help out?
Thanks,
Beth
--
Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant
Michigan State University Museum
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/
http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/ <http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/%20>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Jody Jones" <qltgrosecomcast.net>
To: quiltsmuseum.msu.edu
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2010 1:55:04 PM (GMT-0500) America/New_York
Subject: Looking for a name

Hi,

I am looking for the name of a lady who was a well known quilt
historian/appraiser in the mid 1970's-1980's. She was from Bell Buckle
Tennessee and I think her first name was Mary or Marilee? She was
small, dark haired and at that time was in her late 60's?

I remember several articles about her being published in the magazines,
Quilters Newsletter and others.

If you can help supply her name, I would really appreciate it!

Jody
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Query re Peto-- Looking for a name
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2010 11:27:40 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

Louise, are you certain of this? I ask sincerely, because Peto's collection was based heavily in NY quilts, her book is illustrated primarily from her collection, and her publisher was not the one used by most Southern writers of her time, Scribners. I know Bell Buckle, which is home of the famous school established by Chauncey Webb and is out in the middle of nowhere southeast of Nashville, and she might have lived there. It's near "horsey" country---near a place where Tennessee Walking Horses are raised and trained, so I can imagine some possible connections. Yet, I know of none and am really interested in this.

Gaye Ingram


---- Louise <ltiemannstny.rr.com> wrote:
> I believe the name you are looking for is Florence Peto. Thanks, Louise
> ---------------------------------


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Subject: Re: Query re Peto-- Looking for a name
From: "Louise" <ltiemannstny.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2010 14:46:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Gayle, I was guessing - her face popped up in my head - an early morning
guess - should of probably had my coffe first before I answered...Cheers,
Louise


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fwd: Re: qhl digest: February 04, 2010
From: Beth Donaldson <thequiltdrgmail.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2010 08:01:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

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I wasn't interested in Mildred, it was Jody Jones (qltgrosecomcast.net)
who phoned me. She
remembers Mildred giving lectures to her guild when she lived in Florida.
She didn't tell me why she wanted to know.
Beth


Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant
Michigan State University Museum
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/
http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/

--001517479462e5c983047eda0c98--


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Subject: The Infamous Turkey Red reproduction fabric search has ended....
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2010 09:26:22 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2


Dear friends:
Awhile ago, I posted my tale of woe. Where to find the fabric that
bears the closest resemblance to the much beloved Turkey Red solid
fabric I see on all those antique quilts. That fabric just has to have
the right shade of red, not too orange, not too burgundy, just the
perfect shade to make me have the warm and fuzzy feeling.
I am proud to say that The Busy Thimble quilt shop in Litchfield Maine
has fulfilled my fondest wishes. Cindi Black, the owner, kindly sent me
fabric swatches via US mail and there it was - the right one, finally.
I dared not order on line from various web sites without seeing and
touching, to be honest. I appreciate that many of you sent me links to
places where I could see what did, in fact, resemble the color I was
looking for, but colors on my monitor and colors transferred via digital
camera might not be exact enough for me and I just didn't want to spend
the money and end up with something that wasn't just right. This one is
truly just right, at least according to my personal feeling of what the
perfect Turkey Red should be.
I promised many of you who emailed me privately after I posted my wish
to give an update here to the group.
So, If you do want to order some of it (unless I bought it all?) you can
reach Cindi at:

Cyndi Black <bsythmblfairpoint.net>

I want to thank her for taking the time to find the right thing, to mail
me the swatches and give me that "spark" that I need to create to
special quilt of my dreams. This batch of fabric will be stashed away
and I am going to put a big note on it (I have so many UFOs and Home of
the Brave and other projects to worry about right now) that says "do not
touch until you start the Feathered Star quilt - do not cut if for any
other purpose". I'm even going to sign my note and date it as if I am
making a contract with myself. This is my stash and there shall be no
other project that will come up to steal this fabric from it's intended
purpose! Ah-ha!

By owning the right fabric, I am now committed to making that beautiful
Feathered Star red and white quilt. I can see it now, with all it's
gorgeous hand quilted wreaths in the corners and beautiful feathered
borders.... it will be my masterpiece, or should my ego allow me to say
one of several masterpieces? : )

By the way, if any of you have any links to photos of a Feathered Star
quilt (antique) that I have described, I would LOVE to see it. I will
probably print the photos and pack them away with that fabric.
In the meantime, it's time to get back to making 5" Jane Stickle quilt
bocks and working on all my other stuff, but the Turkey Red is mine!
Of course, I wouldn't have been foolish enough to post this information
until a commitment of 4 yards of this fabric is on it's way to my home.
: )

Linda Heminway
Plaistow NH
heminwayfineart.com
http://heminwayfineart.ieasysite.com/index.html
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Subject: Who will be there?
From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net>
Date: Fri, 05 Feb 2010 10:04:25 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3


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Hi all -



Hope you are keeping up with your reading and getting your different weave
samples together for our meeting. Plus, don't forget to bring anything else
you would like to share.



Would like to get a head count of who will be attending out meeting next
Wednesday at The Temecula Quilt Company?



Please respond.



Thanks, Leah


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Subject: calling Merikay and other 30s experts
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2010 17:22:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

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Hello all-Can I tap your vast knowledge? Doing a quilt history day and a
1940s baby quilt comes in. It's a dandy little deco sailboat appliqued onto
a sea/sky background. When blocks are set side-by-side, the quilt looks like
rows of dainty little boats. Done in cobalt blue, red, and the sails were
formerly yellow (I think). Does this ring a bell with anyone? I am trying to
recall scraps of knowledge about some artists who drew modern quilt
patterns in the Depression...am I out of my mind? Any light you shed would
be much appreciated. Preferably by tomorrow AM as I head back to the Museum
on Harkers Island for day #2 (Ding!) of Quilt Appreciation Days.
Thanks for your time
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt storage
From: elpaninaroaol.com
Date: Sat, 06 Feb 2010 00:29:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


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Thanks everyone for all the public and private comments on storing quilts
in higher humidity environments! I really appreciate it. The quilts are
gonna stay where they are- away from the wine lol!

Take care,

Tom.

----------MB_8CC750487AF3DD4_81C0_FCF3_webmail-m053.sysops.aol.com--


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Subject: Ethics
From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2010 13:34:55 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Help please! I just sold my first art quilt in a gallery. I have also
been selling this design as a pattern. Is that okay? I did not really
intend to sell my sample but the quilt store/gallery owner thought it
would be interesting to see if it would sell. I have sold a sample to an
individual once before. So, my question is, can I sell the same design
as a pattern and as an art quilt? The ones I've sold are still on my
website. Thanks for any advice.

Linda Laird
www.lindalairddesigns.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: This quilt has me a bit buffaloed
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sat, 06 Feb 2010 17:16:40 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

Do you think is a 1980s imported quilt? Look at the rest of his quilts?
There is a look about them that is "different".

http://cgi.ebay.com/VINTAGE-BUTTERFLY-AND-FLOWER-APPLIQUE-PATTERN-QUILT_W0QQ
itemZ320481963858QQcategoryZ947QQcmdZViewItem#ht_5951wt_941

Karen Alexander




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: This quilt has me a bit buffaloed
From: Kittencat3aol.com
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2010 20:27:00 EST
X-Message-Number: 4


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It doesn't look 1980s to me.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: This quilt has me a bit buffaloed
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2010 18:23:59 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 5

I would say it is an import (size of the stitches is a big clue) but a fairly well made one. Could this be one of the Smithsonian licensed reproductions from the late 80's?

Kris




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: This quilt has me a bit buffaloed
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2010 21:32:15 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6


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Hmm....The fabric used on the binding (?) in photo 8, and the same
fabric on the blue butterfly in the upper right corner of photo 7 ARE
fabrics from the 80's. I have some in my stash (for restoration
purposes) that I gleened from Texas Quilt Co - my retail shop from
1980-1985. I'm not certain, because they weren't that good about
putting information on the selvedges back then, but my best
recollection is that it is either a VIP, Peter Pan or maybe Yours
Truely fabric. Some of the others look a little familiar (the two
color-ways in lavender and green of the same tone on tone floral).
Don't know about the imported aspect. It has been my experience that
almost none of the fabrics used in the foreign made quilts would be
recognizable fabric that we as American quilters/home sewers would
have ever seen or purchased, or lusted after, or ....
so, that being said, and with the size of the stitches.....it's open
for debate (at best!!)

Laura

Laura Syler