Subject: Re: Quilting news - Blankets and Quilts
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 04:14:50 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 1

GASOLINE? KEROSENE? OMG! No Smoking in bed! And I don't even WANT to imagin=
e how these blankets and quilts would smell! How did those quilts survive?!=
?

Iowans must have the cleanest beddings!=A0 Try this recommendation.
Nashua Reporter, Nashua, Iowa, November 5, 1914:
... Quilts Liable to Fade May Be Cleaned With Gasoline.
... If quilts are badly soiled, put kerosene in the first tub.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Textile Events in Virginia
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 06:56:56 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

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I am posting this announcement of three costume and textile "March Madness"
events in Virginia tha may of interest to list members.

Newbie Richardson



PATIENCE, NEEDLESKILLS AND CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY The Conservation of James
Monroe Costume Collection

March 4, 2010: Free Lecture, 7:00pm Combs Hall, Room 139, University of Mary
Washington Fredericksburg, VA, 22401

Contact: 540-654-1043 for more information

Colleen Callahan and Newbold Richardson will present a PowerPoint lecture
detailing the traditional conservation methods and innovative techniques
used to stabilize clothing in the James Monroe Museum's collection. Among
the items discussed will be the gown that Elizabeth Kortright Monroe likely
wore to her 1786 wedding to James Monroe. The stabilization of the gown's
overskirt and petticoat panels required several hundred hours of skilled
stitching, and collaboration with a graphics design firm using 21st century
technology to digitally reproduce fabric to recreate the 1786 bodice. The
conserved clothing is on display until April 30, 2010 at the James Monroe
Museum in the exhibit, Our Face to the World: the Clothing of James and
Elizabeth Monroe.

SYMPHONY OF STITCHES

Women Artisans in Shenandoah Valley History

March 6, 2010: Symposium, 9:00am to 5:30pm St. Paul's Heritage Center 106 S.
High St., Edinburg, VA 22824 Contact: Janet Wagniere,
<mailto:janwagshentel.net> mailto:janwagshentel.net or Juanita Leisch
<mailto:juanitaleischyahoo.com> mailto:juanitaleischyahoo.com

Four noted costume and textile historians, Juanita Leisch Jensen, Alden
O'Brien, Newbold Richardson, and Wanda Shoemaker, will lecture on diverse
topics related to the costume and textile history of the Shenandoah Valley.
Participants may bring antique textile items for discussion with the
experts. All proceeds from the $35 registration fee will benefit the
Edinburg Mill Museum.

A light reception sponsored by the CSA Southeastern region will be held at
the close of the symposium. Bring a friend who would like to learn about
Shenandoah Valley textiles and CSA!

A HISTORY OF THE COCKTAIL DRESS

March 11-14, 2010: Exhibit at the Antiques in Alexandria Antiques Show March
14, 2010: Lecture & Fashion Show, 1:00 pm Episcopal High School 3900 West
Braddock Road, Alexandria, VA 22304 Contact: Newbie Richardson at
571-224-5641 or <mailto:pastcraftsverizon.net>
mailto:pastcraftsverizon.net

In keeping with Spirits in America, the theme of the 2010 Antiques in
Alexandria Antiques Show, Newbold Richardson has organized an exhibit
featuring eight decades of cocktail dresses. aNewbie will present a
PowerPoint lecture about the cocktail dress in conjunction with champagne
reception and fashion show of contemporary and vintage cocktail dresses.
Tickets for the lecture are $35 (includes admission to the antiques show)
with a 10% discount for CSA members.

<http://www.antiquesinalexandria.com/> http://www.antiquesinalexandria.com


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Subject: Re: New York Quilt Project
From: "Anita G. Solomon" <solo57worldnet.att.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 07:53:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I saw the records, at least 10-15 years ago, on a computer in the
administrative offices of the American Museum of Folk Art. I had
computerized Citigroup's collection, from paper records in the late '80s,
and was asked to review the NY project database.
http://www.folkartmuseum.org
Perhaps Lee Kogan knows.

Anita Grossman Solomon/NYC
http://makeitsimpler.blogspot.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NY Quilt Project
From: "S Waddell" <swaddellhvc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 08:28:22 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

The New York State quilt documentation records are maintained by the
American Folk Art Museum and are stored in Brooklyn. I was able to get
access last year by contacting Lee Kogan. Her contact info is:

Lee Kogan
Curator of Public Programs and Special Exhibitions
American Folk Art Museum
45 West 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019-2925
lkoganfolkartmuseum.org

Sharon Waddell
New Windsor, NY




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilting news - Blankets and Quilts
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 10:23:02 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5

Could we say this was sort of "dry cleaning" at home?

Jan

Barbara Burnham wrote:
> GASOLINE? KEROSENE? OMG! No Smoking in bed! And I don't even WANT to imagine how these blankets and quilts would smell! How did those quilts survive?!?



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ***SPAM*** Re: Quilting news - Blankets and Quilts
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 12:17:06 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

Reminds me of an article I have that talk about beating the quilt with a
rolling pin to "liven up the batting".
Stephanie Whitson




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: conservator
From: <bearspawcox.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 14:45:30 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Hi All,

Can anyone recommend a quilt/textile conservator in the south or southwest? Thanks so much,

Donna Skvarla


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: conservator
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 13:06:39 -0800
X-Message-Number: 8

Good afternoon, QHL-ers - One place to check is the free online referral =
service offered by the American Institute for Conservation (AIC):

http://tinyurl.com/AICreferrals

Regards,
Meg
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________
Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator &
Collections Management Consultant
Professional Associate, AIC
mgmooneymoonware.net

-----Original Message-----

...recommend a quilt/textile conservator in the south or southwest? ...




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: conservator
From: <bearspawcox.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 17:00:12 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Meg,

Thanks very much. I found just what I needed. And bookmarked this site.

Donna




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Tristan Quilt & Its Mate
From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 07:14:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1


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I am delighted to pass on this message:

Dear friends of textile history:
The year 2010 is extraordinary for those interested in early quilt
history. Not only is the Victoria and Albert Museum=92s Tristan Quilt

now on public view in London for the first time in generations, but
the sister quilt in the collection of the National Museum of Bargello

and known there as the Coperta di Usella, will go on public display at

the Museo Palazzo Davanzati, Florence, from April 24 to June 24, 2010

under the auspices of the Italian Ministry for Cultural Activities.
These two quilts are known as rare surviving examples of all white
figurative quilting attributed to a Sicilian atelier circa 1360-1400
(1). As such, they are key pieces in understanding the tradition of
quilting from the Middle Ages to present day.

Please pass this message on to everyone you think may be interested

as you plan your trips to Florence and London!

And - wait for it - the Italian exhibit catalogue may be produced soon

in English! Interested?

Xenia


--Apple-Mail-2-1030055187--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: The Tristan Quilt & Its Mate
From: Kittencat3aol.com
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 07:27:50 EST
X-Message-Number: 2


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What wonderful news, Xenia! Thanks for passing it on!

Lisa Evans

(P.S. I know a marvelous little apartment in Florence that's within
walking distance of Palazzo Davanzati. Anyone who'd like more information=
is
welcome to e-mail me privately :) )


In a message dated 2/25/2010 7:16:51 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
xenialegacyquilts.net writes:

I am delighted to pass on this message:

Dear friends of textile history:
The year 2010 is extraordinary for those interested in early quilt
history. Not only is the Victoria and Albert Museum=E2=80=99s Tristan Qu=
ilt
now on public view in London for the first time in generations, but
the sister quilt in the collection of the National Museum of Bargello
and known there as the Coperta di Usella, will go on public display at =

the Museo Palazzo Davanzati, Florence, from April 24 to June 24, 2010
under the auspices of the Italian Ministry for Cultural Activities.
These two quilts are known as rare surviving examples of all white
figurative quilting attributed to a Sicilian atelier circa 1360-1400
(1). As such, they are key pieces in understanding the tradition of
quilting from the Middle Ages to present day.

Please pass this message on to everyone you think may be interested
as you plan your trips to Florence and London!

And - wait for it - the Italian exhibit catalogue may be produced soon =

in English! Interested?

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ooooeee--the benefits of gas
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 10:45:44 -0500

Gasoline at the time was pretty exotic and used for a lot of things. What's
NOT said is that a 'gas wash' also killed critters (bed bugs and fleas)
that, after a hard winter, were just getting cozy in thousands of beds...
Let's hear it for quilt sanitazation! (No, go away Fred, don't smoke that
cigar anywhere near this bed!)
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--001636ed68060de73b04806eadcb--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: The Tristan Quilt & Its Mate in Florence
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 12:17:19 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

I can't think of a better reason to go to Florence. Sigh.
Stephanie Whitson (who just ran across the business card from her favorite
restaurant there. . . . . )




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ooooeee--the benefits of gas
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 12:21:51 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

I can't find the reference at the moment but I know I've read of kerosene
being used in similar ways. . . and for head lice, too.
Stephanie Whitson




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilting News - The Washing of Fine Lace.
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 15:50:29 -0800
X-Message-Number: 6

Olean Democrat
Olean, New York
March 19, 1891

The Washing of Fine Lace.
The washers of nice lace form a class of
labor quite by themselves, and few people
have an idea of the amount of labor in-
volved in the cleansing operation and of
the skill and knowledge required. The up-
holsterer explains that the labor comes in
chiefly in drying, for the washing is but a
simple thing in comparison. A table is
cushioned and covered closely with a spot-
less cloth, and on this the lace is stretched
with an intricate care that is amazing.
Through every mesh a pin is placed to hold
it in place, and the whole pattern is thus
pricked out till every leaf and sprig is firmly
fastened, so that it cannot shrivel or con-
tract, a whole day being sometimes used
up in preparing a single yard of the lace,
so that when dry it is lifted all soft and
perfect and unimpaired in the design.

Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Copake Auction
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Feb 2010 15:42:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Good Afternoon All -

Fortunately, we didn't get as much snow as last time, but one of the
things I enjoy when snowed in is looking at auction pictures on the
internet.

Copake Auction in New York has posted the catalog for their March 6
auction. There are several interesting quilts -- a very nice crazy,
and interesting dated blue and white, a nice Pennsylvania Dutch with
strippie back, and a quilt documented in the Mass Quilts Project.

Steps to see the quilts --

1. Click on Copake's page for the auction --
http://www.copakeauction.com/2010-03-06.html

2. Scroll down to "click here to open web catalog"

3. On that page, where it says "search the catalog", type in "quilt"

And the list of quilts appears.

It is so cool to be able to see pictures of quilts that we aren't able
to view in person.

Barb in snowy southeastern PA
Where I'm hoping for a snow-free March


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Quilting News - The Washing of Fine Lace.
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Feb 2010 19:25:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

This is an accurate description of blocking lace to dry.
Newbie

-----Original Message-----
From: suereichcharter.net [mailto:suereichcharter.net]
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2010 6:50 PM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] Quilting News - The Washing of Fine Lace.

Olean Democrat
Olean, New York
March 19, 1891

The Washing of Fine Lace.
The washers of nice lace form a class of labor quite by themselves, and
few people have an idea of the amount of labor in- volved in the cleansing
operation and of the skill and knowledge required. The up- holsterer
explains that the labor comes in chiefly in drying, for the washing is but a
simple thing in comparison. A table is cushioned and covered closely with a
spot- less cloth, and on this the lace is stretched with an intricate care
that is amazing.
Through every mesh a pin is placed to hold it in place, and the whole
pattern is thus pricked out till every leaf and sprig is firmly fastened, so
that it cannot shrivel or con- tract, a whole day being sometimes used up in
preparing a single yard of the lace, so that when dry it is lifted all soft
and perfect and unimpaired in the design.

Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: I know I'm not Cinda, but.......(very long)
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <pnhahn01comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2010 15:23:04 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 1

I did want to share with you a wonderful experience I had recently at the C=
harleston Museum in Charleston, SC. Cinda had brought to my attention the =
mysterious, appliqued Charleston Battery Scene Panel residing there. Since=
I am about 2 hours from Charleston a few months of the year, it definitely=
was on my Bucket List. I have been waiting for another antique quilt love=
r to come visit me in South Carolina so we could plan such a road trip. Ho=
wever, in talking to a (non-antique) quilter in my SC quilt guild, she said=
, "I'll go with you if we can do lunch, also." When I easily agreed to tha=
t, she added that she knew others from the quilt group on Dataw Island woul=
d love to go also-if we went to lunch afterwards. Long story short, before=
I knew it, 11 other non-antique quilt lovers signed on! I guess food has =
a world-wide appeal!

If you are not familiar with the Charleston Battery Scene panel, it is show=
n in the 1991 Sandi Fox book, "Wrapped in Glory" and is written about in de=
tail with many photos. It is 17" x 202", (yes, that is 202 inches long) ci=
rca 1840 with detailed applique images of ships, houses, carriages, fashion=
s and household objects of Charleston. Initially thought to have been part=
of a quilt that was cut apart and then reassembled, it is now thought to h=
ave never been a completed piece as there are many items only basted. Howe=
ver, to see an appliqued strip of muslin 20 feet long is mind boggling, to =
say the least.

My real purpose for letting you know about this trip is to relay what a fab=
ulous job the Textile Curator, Jan Hiester, did for our visit to the Charle=
ston Museum. Easily contacted by phone a few months ahead of time, Jan was=
so agreeable to show us the Panel and anything else we wanted to see from =
the Museum's textile collection. I explained that other than myself, antiq=
ue quilts were still a new idea to the members attending. Jan suggested an=
assortment of quilts she would have ready for us to view, and of course I =
requested some of their appliqued chintz beauties. Jan also suggested that=
the current textile exhibit of star quilts, be left hanging a few addition=
al days so our group could enjoy that. Talk about being accommodating! Wh=
at more could we ask for?

To my surprise, when we got to the Museum Jan escorted us to a large confer=
ence room that she had set up with numerous quilts hanging about the perime=
ter and long conference tables down the center holding the fabulous 20 foot=
panel and many, many unfinished quilts and blocks for us to examine closel=
y. Needless to say, we were all in awe.

I took many, many photos, and if anyone would like to see them, please cont=
act me off-list and I will direct you to them. I tried to get close-ups of=
all aspects of the Charleston Panel but in my excitement some photos are s=
lightly out of focus.

Jan then led us about the room from the earliest quilts to the later. Many=
of the quilts and pieces are either shown in the book, "Mosaic Quilts, Pap=
er Template Piecing in the South Carolina Lowcountry" (2002) or the early 1=
983 "Chintz Quilts, Unfading Glory." We got to get as close as we needed/w=
anted to the fabulous 1840 chintz applique shown on pg. 39 of Chintz Quilts=
with its center medallion basket of flowers encircled with multiple other =
chintz cut outs. A dated 1806 white summer spread with trapunto detail was=
hung so we could get behind and study the stuffed work closely with the li=
ght shining through the fabric. A patchwork Caesar's Crown of early turkey=
reds initiated Jan's discussion of the importation of fabrics to the Port =
of Charleston. She also displayed a vibrant Baltimore Album Style Quilt th=
at took everyone's breath away. Needless to say, my other friends in atten=
dance had never seen one before, so to be able to get your nose as close as=
you wanted to this beauty was such a treat. I often stood back and watche=
d the expressions on my friend's faces as they examined these treasures, an=
d thought, "Maybe, just maybe, there will be a few more antique aficionados=
coming out of this group!" A detailed Crazy Quilt caught everyone's atten=
tion and the group delighted in finding all the embroidered and painted obj=
ects while Jan explained some of the symbolism.

On the center tables Jan chose to display the appliqued crib quilt shown on=
pg. 42 of Chintz Quilts. 35 individual motifs are appliqued in the most i=
ntricate manner, including highlighting much of the floral details with add=
itional stitches. The initial "E" is done in the center of the quilt but t=
he numerous cartouches, which would probably hold names, were never filled =
in. Perhaps one of the best things Jan did for this group was to add numer=
ous pieces of unfinished chintz applique blocks and mosaic hexagons for the=
ladies to study. They were intrigued by the methods of construction of th=
e pieces they were able to closely examine and I truly believe it gave them=
a greater appreciation for the finished products. And also, for the ladie=
s to really see that there is nothing new under the sun-these modern day fo=
undation piecing quilters were astounded to examine the ledger sheets used =
as templates in the 1830s hexagons and diamonds on the table!

But, for me, the highlight was the Charleston Battery Scene and to closely =
examine all its details. Whatever possessed its creator to put forth such =
a depiction of 19th c. Charleston? Most of the specific detail of the ship=
s and architecture is done as in the pictoral Baltimore Album quilts, with =
imaginative choices of textiles. Ships of the time, in the harbor, have in=
tricatly detailed rigging. Numerous carriages and coaches of the time are =
shown with the occupants in detailed fashions of the day. The magnificant =
architectual heritage of Charleston is shown in the 18 houses-some grand, i=
dentifiable Charleston mansions, others the more modest Charleston "single =
house" with side porches to catch the sea breezes. Decorative urns and even=
a goat!

Jan then took us to the Starry, Starry Night exhibit of antique star quilts=
. Again, the ladies were mesmerized by the variety, from mid-1800s hexagon=
/diamond pieced unfinished pieces to circa 1900 Lone Stars. A unique red a=
nd while Lone Star started off with an 8 pointed star in the center, but, s=
omehow, by the time you got to the star's edge, there were only 7 points. =


Our final stop was in the exhibit, "Aisle Style" where Jan has displayed ma=
ny wonderful wedding dresses. We were treated to seeing another appliqued =
chintz full size quilt, the 1852 Brides's Album Quilt, shown on pg. 43 of C=
hintz Quilts, that contains some of the same motifs and fabrics as the crib=
quilt we saw earlier on our visit. And, it was donated by the same donor =
as the crib quilt. It was displayed along with the wedding dress of the qu=
ilt's original owner. The appliqued border on it rivaled any Baltimore Alb=
um border I've ever seen in its complexity and amount of vines, leaves and =
flowers individually appliqued into such a tight space. Too bad all my pic=
tures of it are out of focus!

This note is getting to be much too long, but I just wanted to share this e=
xperience with you. I know there was some talk a short time back on QHL as=
to touching base with curators and arranging for special viewings. I did =
start contacting Jan Hiester about 6 months prior to our visit to discuss t=
he possibility and planned for a time that was convenient to her and her sc=
hedule. We touched base many times in between and even had to change our o=
riginal visit date to work around her calendar. But, the final result was =
a visit that will long be a highlight for me.

Thanks for listening!
Nancy Hahn, back in snowy Bowie, Maryland


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: SCQHG (Repiecers) Meeting reminder
From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2010 11:02:03 -0800
X-Message-Number: 2


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Hi to all -



I just wanted to send off a reminder that the Southern California Quilt
History Group (Repiecers of the Past) will be meeting on Wednesday, =
March
10th in San Marcos at Quilt in a Day quilt shop from 9:30am till 2:30ish =
pm.
See the web site for directions:



www.members.cox.net/repiecers



We would like to get a head count early this meeting so that we can
anticipate the attendance.



Our topic of study this month is Different Weaves - with a focus book =
Clues
in the Calico - Brackman chapters 1-3. Any additional sources of
information regarding different weave of antique textiles is always
encouraged and welcome.



As always we encourage you to bring your show and tell items that do or =
do
not relate to the topic we are reviewing. Also bring along any other =
topics
that have spurred your interest in the past two months since our last
meeting. (I know I have a couple of new things to share.)



Please respond with your intentions for attendance -



If you are not a member of the group, but would like to join us, we
encourage your attendance and look forward to meeting some new antique =
quilt
and textile enthusiasts. See the web site for directions to our meeting
location at Quilt In A Day in San Marcos.



Sincerely,

Leah Zieber

Temecula California

leah.zieberverizon.net




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Subject: Quilting News - "Restless Women of Today Should Take Up Quilting."
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2010 13:02:03 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

Although this article was written yesterday 56 years ago, the observations of famous quiltmaker, Bertha Stenge could just as well apply to today.

Ames Daily Tribune
Ames, Iowa
November 23, 1954
Page 8

Restless Women of Today Should Take Up Quilting
CHICAGO (UP)--Trouble with American women is, they don't quilt these days.
"They're too restless," said Mrs Bertha Stenge, America's quilting queen. "They're lacking something. They chase from store to store.
If some one gets sick, they raise a fuss and run out for nurses. They
have no patience, for they never learned it--never practiced it."
But Mrs. Stenge, a 63-year-old grandmother who has taken all
the top prizes for quilting in the United States and Canada and has
had her works displayed at museums, believes the art of quilting
is here to stay, even if there aren't as many women wielding the nee-
dle now as in the good old days.
Entered Contest
Mrs. Stenge said that quilting knowledge is one of those hidden
skills that help a family in the event of an emergency, such as a
devastating bombing attack. "Rags and tatters may be all
that are available," Mrs. Stenge said. "The woman who can quilt
will find she has a very practical resource."
The slender, gentle woman shakes her head, however, when
discussing her own three daughters. Two married and one is
making a career as a dietician. "Two of them made one quilt
and one tried two quilts in her teens," she said. "But none of
them quilts now. It just didn't take, I guess."
Mrs. Stenge said she began her hobby by entering a newspaper
contest. Friends taught the needle craft.
A native of San Francisco, she attended the University of California
at Berkeley and showed talents in working with colors and design. After
school, she went to work designing stained glass windows, which required
the same skill in mosaic that her quilting does.
Many Prizes
Her exquisite color sense and her bold and dramatic patterns won first
prizes in world fairs at Chicago, New York, and San Francisco, and at
Canadian National Expositions.
The Smithsonian Institution in Washington has asked her to will to them
the "Palm Leaf" quilt which won first prize at the New York Fair in 1940,
she said.
Mrs. Stenge's husband, a retired attorney, didn't pay much attention to
his wife's hobby until she copped first place at the New York world's fair
exhibition.
"We all went to New York and rode in a car they used for visiting royalty"
she recalled.
"From that time on," she said, "my husband became my best press agent."

--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: nc quilts & Erma Kirkpatrick
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2010 21:21:10 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4


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On Thursday I had the distinct pleasure of spending the day with Erma Kirk=
patrick (Uncoverings,NC quilt documentation book, etc.). I had read about=
her for years. Knew all about things she had done and we share many commo=
n friends, but we had never met. What a grand day we had driving to Alaman=
ce County where we took in the Alamance County Museum http://www.alamancem=
useum.org/portal/ and the Textile Museum in Burlington. http://www.textil=
eheritagemuseum.org/ We talked quilting, family, friends, traveling, and=
textiles all day long. We were very tired when I dropped Erma off at her=
home in Chapel Hill late that afternoon. We saw some sample books, many=
plaids and flannels made in Alamance County, a fabulous broderie perse,=
a nice postwar Courthouse Steps signature quilt, machines that produced=
textiles and socks, etc. We didn't see any of the cheddar color or teal=
color or oxblood colors I was hoping to see. But it was still a wonderful=
day.
Watch this video of Erma telling about the NC quilt documentation project.=
I had never seen this video until tonight.
http://www.ibiblio.org/folkart/modules/erma.swf
Enjoy!
Lynn

Lynn Lancaster Gorges
Historic Textiles Studio
New Bern, NC



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Subject: Re: Copake Auction
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 01:41:16 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

Is that blue and white "summer spread" reverse applique? That's one of the
more unusual quilts I've ever seen. It's #28.
Stephanie Whitson.




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Subject: Exhibits at the Franklin G. Burroughs and Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
From: "joyce delucia" <jdeluciaatmc.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2010 23:09:16 -0500
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I just learned today of two exhibits that might be of interest to those in
the area of Myrtle Beach South Carolina



Now throrough March 9, 2010 Apron Chronicles: A Patchwork of American
Recollections



And



June 8, 2010 - Octoer 3, 2010 A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts

A third exhibition has been created for smaller venues. The museum is the
second small museum in the country to host this dynamic display of quilts
that defy tradition and expectations. There will be special programs for
this exhibition, which are not yet listed on their website.



Event Location:

Franklin G. Burroughs / Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum

3100 South Ocean Boulevard, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

www.MyrtleBeachArtMuseum.org <http://www.myrtlebeachartmuseum.org/>





Hope you can enjoy!



Joyce DeLucia




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Subject: Fabric dates
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 12:46:25 -0700
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Hi all,

I received a question about the date of a fabric today and my thought
would be 60s but it occurred to me that y'all might have a better
answer. It is described as a polished cotton. "The background is ivory
and it is covered with signatures of Hollywood stars in black and red
like Doris Day, Eddie Cantor, Jerry Lewis, Bob Crosby, Sid Caesar,
Audrey Meadows, Frank Sinatra, Jackie Gleason, Lena Horne and many more.
It is 34-1/2" wide.

Any thoughts?

Thanks, Jan



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Subject: Re: Fabric dates
From: MargaretFaheyaol.com
Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 22:25:19 EST
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Am waiting on baited breath for the answer to this one. So exotic!

Margaret, in REAL upstate NY where we have had a nice little storm, not
the upper NYC variety.


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Subject: Exhibits at the Franklin G. Burroughs and Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
From: "Marlene O'Bryant-Seabrook" <marlobsbellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 2010 00:57:08 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Joyce DeLucia wrote: " I just learned today of two exhibits that might be of
interest to those in
the area of Myrtle Beach South Carolina". I'd like to add a third, also
presently at the Burroughs-Chapin Art Museum, which opened on January 17,
2010.

(copied/pasted from Museum site) Through April 25, 2010: Milestones:
Celebrating 70 and Beyond
Sculptures, paintings, prints, quilts, batiks, photographs, collages and
hand-carved bowls by a veritable list of "Who's Who" South Carolina artists,
all of whom have reached the age of 70, yet are still actively producing new
works. More: http://www.myrtlebeachartmuseum.org/Exhibitions/index.cfm

Twenty seven of us were invited in January 2009 to exhibit two pieces
created no earlier than 2008. Dottie Moore and I have the only quilts in
the Exhibition.

Marlene

Marlene O'Bryant-Seabrook, Ph.D.
Educator, Lecturer, Fiber Artist
E-Mail: marlobsbellsouth.net
URL http://www.MarleneOBryantSeabrook.com



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Subject: AQSG Red & Green Quilts - Travelling Exhibit
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 2010 11:57:12 -0500
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Just a quick note for anyone who might be in the Lebanon, Ohio area later
this week!



The 2008 AQSG Quilt Study of Mid-19th Century Red & Green quilts

will be on exhibit March 5-7, 2010 at:



Warren County History Center

105 South Broadway

Lebanon, Ohio

513-932-1817



This special exhibit will take place during the Lebanon Quilt & Fiber Arts
Show, an event that is more than 25 years running. The event hosts over 35
vendors of quilts old and new, fiber arts and supplies and more.



For additional information please contact the Museum or visit their website
at http://www.wchsmuseum.org/.



Enjoy!



Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

AQSG Quilt Study Co-chair