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Subject: Quilting news - Henry Clay address to the Senate about cotton
fabric production.
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 21:06:37 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

The Sandusky Clarion
Sandusky, Ohio
March 28, 1832
Page 2
Mr. Clay's Speech, In defense of the American System against the British
colonial system. Delivered in the senate of the United States, February 2d, 3d,
and 6th, 1832.
....The next article to which I would call the attention of the senate, is that
of cot-
ton fabrics. The success of our manufacture of coarse cottons is generally ad-
mitted. It is demonstrated by the fact that they meet the cotton fabrics of
oth-
er countries, in foreign markets, and maintain a successful competition with
them. There has been a gradual increase of the export of this article, which
is sent to Mexico and the South America republics, to the Mediterranean, and
even to Asia. The remarkable fact was lately communicated to me, that the
same individual who, twenty-five years ago, was engaged in the importation of
cotton cloth from Asia, for American consumption, is now engaged in the ex
portation of coarse American cottons to Asia, for Asian consumption! And my
honorable friend from Massachusetts, now in my eye, (Mr. Silsbee,) informed
me that, on his departure from home, among the last orders which he gave, one
was for the exportation of coarse cottons to Sumatra, in the vicinity of
Calcutta! I hold in my hand a statement, derived from the most authentic
source, showing that the identical description of cotton cloth, which sold, in
1817, at twenty-nine cents per yard, was sold in 1819, at twenty-one cents; in
1821, at nineteen and a half cents; in 1823, at 17 cents; in 1825, at fourteen
and a half cents; in 1827, at thirteen cents; in 1829, at nine cents; in 1830,
at nine and a half cents; and in 1831, at from ten and a half to eleven. Such
is the wonderful effect of protection, competition, and improvement in skill,
combined. The year 1829, was one of some suffering to this branch of industry,
probably owing to the principle of competition being pushed too far; and hence
we observe a small rise in the article the next two years. The introduction of
calico printing into the United States, constitutes as important era in our
manufacturing industry. It commenced
about the year 1825, and has since made such astonishing advances, that the
whole quantity now annually printed is but little short of forty million of
yards-about two thirds of our whole consumption,--It is a beautiful manufacture,
combining great mechanical skill with scientific discoveries in chemistry. The
engraved cylinders for making the impression require much taste, and put in
requisition the genius of the fine arts of design and engraving. Are the fine
graceful forms of our fair countrywomen less lovely when enveloped in the
chintzes and calicoes produced by native industry, than when clothed in the
tinsel of foreign drapery?
Gentlemen. no doubt, are surprised at these facts. They should not underrate
the energies, the enterprise, and the skill of our fellow citizens....We possess
three great advantages: 1st. The raw material. 2d. Water power instead of that
of steam, generally used on England. And 3d. The cheaper labor of females. In
England, males spin with the mule, and weave; in this country, women and girls
spin with the throttle and superintend the power loom. And can there be any
employment more appropriate? Who has not been delighted with the clockwork
regularity of a large cotton manufactory? I have often visited them at
Cincinnati and other places, and always with increased admiration. The women,
separated from the other sex, work in apartments, large, airy, well warmed &
spacious. Neatly dressed, with ruddy complexions, and happy countenances, they
watch the work before them , mend the broken threads, & replace the exhausted
balls or broaches.

--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/


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Subject: Prince's Feather, Princess Feather etc etc
From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 12:10:12 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

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Okey dokey--been here at this thread before I think several years ago---the
pattern here has been named and written as both Prince's Feather and
Princess Feather. Some think HRH Duke of Wales (because of the feathers in
his coat of arms) are the pattern name's source. Others maintain that it's
for Bonnie Prince Charlie's heather sprig, worn in the caps of his followers
at the battle of Culloden (1746). Remember that in a nice twist of fate,
some Scots survivors of Culloden, having emigrated to the Colonies and in
particular my own state of North Carolina, actually ended up facing British
troops again during the Revolution. And then there's some who belive it's in
honor of the Polish aristocrat Kosciuszko who also fought on the American
side in the Revolution. The United States became his default homeland when a
Polish uprising against the Russians failed.
Pick the name you want. I favor the Bonnie Prince Charlie connection but
then again, one side of the family is Scots.
Pepper
..--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: names of prince's feather, princess feather, etc.
From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 12:41:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

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This topic sent me looking for my Uncoverings 2007! Carol Williams Gebel has a nice discussion on the derivation of the names. Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, where spring is "sprunging".
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Subject: OT -- NC and the Revolution -- a good novel
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 16:50:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

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I'm now reading the 7th book in the Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon,
titled "An Echo in the Bone." I can't get enough of these time-traveler
books. Many of its 814 pages take place in and around NC during the
revolution, although we've just abandoned Fort Ticonderoga NY (c. page 500).

And the hero is a Culloden survivor.

Judy Grow

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Subject: off topic -- Gabaldon interview
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 19:01:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

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http://paranormalromance.wordpress.com/2010/01/10/video-diana-gabaldon-on -how-she-started-outlander-series-when-will-it-end/

Love what she writes.

Her brain works at warp speed, as shown in the interview.

Judy


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Subject: Re: crocheted toilet paper covers
From: HKnight453aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 21:59:13 EDT
X-Message-Number: 9


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I have recently been told by two charitable organizations that handcrafted
items such as quilts are distinctly unwelcome, which original art is
highly desired. Quilts are art carried out in fabric, thread, and batting.
Ugly art which doesn't look like anything identifiable is fine.
This sent my boyfriend to tell me about the curler caddies that his
sisters had as teens. They were made from the bottom of bleach bottles,
painted brightly, punched with holes, and a crochet drawstring top added. He
felt these were the ugliest handcrafted items in existence.

Heather whose folks still have bathroom tissue dolls.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: crocheted toilet paper covers
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 23:06:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10


> This sent my boyfriend to tell me about the curler caddies that his
> sisters had as teens. They were made from the bottom of bleach bottles,
> painted brightly, punched with holes, and a crochet drawstring top added.

Oh my! A couple of weeks ago, at rehab for my new knee, I struck up a
conversation with a woman in the waiting room. She was crocheting a
drawstring bag through holes punched about 3" from the bottom of some sort
of plastic. She was so proud that she could do something for the friend who
was bringing her back and forth to the rehab center.

They are still being made!

Judy Grow



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Subject: NJ history in the textile industry
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 23:08:45 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

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I wish I could go to this --


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Subject: more on NJ history in the textile industry
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2010 23:26:34 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12

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Forgot to paste the information. The meeting is just too far and too late for me to attend. I couldn't find any information on the Eagle Mills, noted in Sue's post about textiles in NJ, but the earliest mill still standing in Paterson, the Phoenix Mill, is dated 1816.
---------------------------------------------
The project team working with the City of Paterson, the Department of
Environmental Protection, and the National Park Service will present the
findings of "Factories Below the Falls: Paterson's Allied Textile
Printing site in Historic Context" at a public meeting on March 25th,
7:00-9:00 PM, City Council Chamber, 3rd Floor of City Hall, 155 Market St.
Paterson

Come hear the remarkable story of the rise and evolution of industry in
the heart of Paterson.

Contact Sara Homer at the NJ Historic Preservation Office at (609)
292-0061 if you have questions

From the Paterson History website:
The City of Paterson, located on the Passaic River in New Jersey was once one of the mightiest industrial cities of the United States. It has a rich history as the Nation's first planned industrial city, as well as containing some of the country's oldest textile mills and businesses.


In 1792, Alexander Hamilton formed an investment group called the Society of Useful Manufactures (the "SUM") whose funds would be used to develop a planned industrial city in the United States that was later to become Paterson. Hamilton believed that the United States needed to reduce its dependence on foreign goods and should instead develop its own industries.


The industries developed in Paterson were powered by the 77-foot high Great Falls of the Passaic, and a system of water raceways that harnessed the power of the falls. The district originally included dozens of mill buildings and other manufacturing structures associated with the textile industry and later, the firearms, silk, and railroad locomotive manufacturing industries. In the latter half of the 1800's, silk production became the dominant industry and formed the basis of Paterson's most prosperous period, earning it the nickname "Silk City." Paterson was also the site of historic labor unrest that focused on anti-child labor legislation, safety in the workplace, a minimum wage, and reasonable working hours.


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Subject: V&A exhibition London
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 09:37:25 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1


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This week is seeing the previews and press launch of the exhibition
we've waited so long for. I have started collecting online reviews on
a blog page. It is a salutary experience to read what outsiders think
of our obsession, and I have with strong will curbed the impulse to
start commenting on what they say.

http://textilehunter.blogspot.com/2010/03/v-and-quilts-exhibition-reviews-online.html

The exhibition opens to the public on Saturday, and a lot of bloggers
went to a special preview afternoon on Wednesday. I'm lucky enough
to be going to the Friends of the V&A preview tomorrow (If only I
lived closer I could be there from early doors to 10 p.m. <G>). Over
the next few days I will start collecting the responses from bloggers
and let you have a link to the entry later.

What is clear is that the exhibition is a challenge to the quilt
world's pre-conceptions of how we view quilts both physically and
academically. Fears that there wouldn't be 'enough history' are
unfounded. Those of you who are travelling long distances will see,
as Mr Carter put it, 'wonderful things' that you will never have
another chance to be close to.

I also heartily commend the book published in conjunction with the
exhibition. One whose opinion I highly respect described it to me as
'Substantial in every sense. It will stand as a classic text for a
long time.' I'd add to that my own childish delight in a book which
is perfectly formed, of a size to sit comfortably in your lap, with
photographic reproduction of the highest quality, and a text which
draws you in. I confess my usual trick with a new book is to go
through several times looking at the eye candy, trying to dip into the
text but being constantly drawn back to the pretty things. This time
I kept finding the text drawing me away from the photographs. Quite
an achievement.

This is the review posted by the British Quilt Study Group

http://www.bqsg.org.uk/articles/Quilts-1700-2010-Book-Review

Go for the hardback if you can. At 10" square it is no coffee table
monster. No affiliation, but The Book Depository are now shipping at
a competitive price and with free air mail overseas shipping.

http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781851775958/Quilts-1700---2010

Sally Ward



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Subject: Vogart Transfers
From: "deb" <debquiltingposs.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 07:49:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Does anyone know who holds the copyrights for this bankrupt company? Or if
anyone has reproduced the transfers? I bought an antique quilt that I'd
like to turn into a redwork quilt with sashings - the original is appliqué
on a whole cloth but I am hesitant to produce a pattern without knowing
what's going on with the copyrights. If the transfers have been reproduced,
I'd like the contact info so I can order & put them in the kits.

Thanks Judy Grow for the info on the Patterson talk. I'm going to include
it in my weekly email tomorrow.

Thanks,
Debbie
Quilting Possibilities
Forked River, NJ
www.quiltingpossibilities.net



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Subject: Greek (?) and Amish (?) Quilts
From: QUILTMOOREaol.com
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 09:21:38 EDT
X-Message-Number: 3


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A client brought two unusual quilts with questions the other day. I posted
a picture of the Greek quilt under Quilts on the Eboard. She purchased it
from an interior designer who told her it was Greek. It is made up of many
small squares with an identical block pieced of ribbons or woven bands
with metallic threads. The block has a middle square on point surrounded by
four bands log cabin style with 4 triangles in the corners. An initial
internet search of Greek quilts brought me only the info that Greek quilts are
called paploma, whole cloth of shiny fabric, hand quilted by men paplomatas
(quiltmakers). Searching for ribbon quilts, metallic quilts, etc. brought
nothing like this particular quilt. Any direction would be appreciated.
The other quilt she brought was unusual in its own way. It was an "Amish"
Sunshine and Shadows, and very typically Amish in every way, colors and
color placement, wide border and binding, feather quilting in the borders, but
I would swear it was 100% polyester. The shopkeeper who sold it to her in
Lancaster told her it was wool and made by an Amish lady in the community.
It didn't smell like wool, look like wool, or feel like wool to me, or is
there a wool out there that looks like polyester??

Nan in FL
_www.mooreandmoorequilts.com_ (http://www.mooreandmoorequilts.com)

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Subject: crocheted margarine tub
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 12:05:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4


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This is not quilting related............but I had to respond to the Clorox bottle story. I saw the cutest little dolls in a basket recently. I looke d them up on the internet and saw that "Penelope Peapod" dolls were create d by a woman who remembered the margarine tub that her grandmother crochet ed with a draw string top and inside lived a tiny doll and a tiny QUILT. OK, I got a quilt reference there. She turned this into a great business. In case I wasn't 100% on the story, here is the website.
http://www.penelopepeapod.com/Story


Now how can we turn the covered tissue rolls into a great business?????
Lynn in New Bern, NC



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Subject: woven coverlet fabric & stenciled initials
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 12:22:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5


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Last Saturday I did an "Evaluation Day" for our local guild. I saw some gr eat New England quilts since we have lots of retirees in New Bern. One of them was great fun. It was a crazy quilt pattern using fabrics from 1870- 1890. It had lots of wonderful conversational shirtings, etc. but the most exciting fabric was a dark brown PRINT of an overshot weave. It was like a tiny overshot coverlet printed onto fabric. Never seen anything like it . It made me think of the conversation Jan Thomas has been having about th e influence on quilting by woven coverlets.




The other exciting thing I saw was a quilt FROM this area. It was probably made around the turn of 1900. It was an appliqued pieced......whigs defea t,oak reel, Democrat Rose all wrapped up together. The roses were stuffed with cotton and top stitched in place. The rose stems formed a cross in the center. The stems were muddy beige. On the stems were stenciled initi als. They were grouped in a manner that they were 2 initials or 3 initials . I have seen many signatures, but never a quilt with stenciled INITIALS all over it. I think there were 16 squares and they all had initials. The quilt was very worn so they were not easy to read. I am hoping to look at it more in the future.


Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

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Subject: Quilt shows
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 13:39:18 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

For those of us stateside who lust after information on the V&A
exhibit, and who don't yet have our very own copies of the catalog,
the Guardian, among other UK newspapers, is finally giving the
exhibit some well-deserved attention:

www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign

Click on "Editor's Picks - "The V&A Has Quilts All Stitched Up" for a
lengthy article and news about the catalog. Under the link to the
article is a second link (In Pictures: Quilty Pleasures at the V&A)
that will show you (on its upper left) thumbnails of 15 quilts in the
exhibit, which can be seen in larger format by clicking them. Then,
if you want to read a curious "op-ed" approach to the exhibit, read
Germaine Greer (same page, left side link), who professes to love and
to collect old textiles from other cultures - and make pillows of
them - but is less certain of the value of any sort of women's
textile art, historic or otherwise.

Much closer, but no less anticipated, is the coming AQS show in
Lancaster next week. If you are attending and need a place to meet
friends, sit for a few minutes, or talk "antique quilts" - I invite
you to visit my booth, Legacy Quilts, 2201-2300, on the Convention
Center's second floor Commonwealth Ballroom.

Xenia


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Subject: Names stamped on quilts
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 10:43:49 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

AQSG member, Stephanie Hatch is one of the experts on the tools used to sig n quilts. She gave a presentation at the 2006 Seminar and will be presenti ng this info again at the Greenwich Historical Society Symposium
"Stitching Our Stories: Quilting Traditions from Our Past"
Saturday, March 27, 9:00 a.m.=E2=80=934:00 p.m.
Probably 90% of the quilts on exhibit in conjunction with this event are si gned by one or more women and have strong provenance to Greenwich.
Thanks,
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/
http://www.majorreichaward.com/


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Subject: A Thank you on a personal note.
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 11:42:38 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

I have just added a new web site to the signature at the bottom of my emails.
This site was made possible by a childhood friend of my son, Major Stephen
Reich. It was launched this week to commemorate the upcoming 5th Anniversary of an event that changed our lives. Under "Other Memorials" you will find
recognitions, awards and memorials that many of you so generously made
contributions to. The Reich family would like to thank you for honoring
Stephen, his sacrifice and the sacrifice of his comrades and for keeping their memory alive.
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/
http://www.majorreichaward.com/


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Subject: Quilting News - Calico Printing
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 11:45:26 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9

The Adams Sentinel
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
June 27, 1836
Page 4
Calico Printing.--It is stated in
White's life of Samuel Slater, that more
than one hundred millions of yards of cali-
coes have been printed in this country with-
in the last year!
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/


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Subject: Re: crocheted toilet paper covers
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 17:17:08 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

You know, I wonder if anyone has ever decorated a restaurant with ugly kitch
like we've been talking about. I coudln't do it well, but I bet it COULD be
done with a sense of humor that would be fun. Paint by number paintings on
the walls, of course. . . with macaroni picture frames. I don't know but
that nostalgia would help people get a kick out of something like that.
Stephanie Whitson
>



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Subject: Re: crocheted toilet paper covers
From: Getfruitaol.com
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 21:04:01 EDT
X-Message-Number: 11


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Hi Stephanie. A few years ago, my friend had a restaurant called the Soup
Asylum. The decor was totally stuff from garage sales and thrift stores.The
walls and bathrooms were filled with all kinds of stuff. The food was
delicious. Every table was set with mismatched linens silverware and dishes. It
was so popular, one had to call ahead to reserve a piece of "to die for"
bread pudding.

Violet Vaughnes
San Bernardino, CA


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Subject: Re: crocheted toilet paper covers
From: "Jeanne Henry" <woofstockaustin.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 22:04:08 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

Visit the Shady Grove Restaurant, Barton Springs Rd, Austin TX--
wonderful stone lodge w/ great paint-by-numbers adorning the walls!
Come on down!!!

Jeanne Henry
Austin

-------------------

> You know, I wonder if anyone has ever decorated a restaurant with ugly
> kitch like we've been talking about. .... Paint by number paintings on the
> walls, of course. . . with macaroni picture frames. I> Stephanie Whitson
> >



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Subject: Re: qhl digest: March 16, 2010
From: DrMAZ4WCQNaol.com
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 2010 22:37:09 EDT
X-Message-Number: 13


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Gwen Magee was interviewed by the BBC World Service's daily arts and
culture radio program in conjunction with their coverage of the "Quilts:
1700-2010" exhibition which opens at London's Victoria and Albert Museum on March
20th. The interview will be broadcast as well as accessible on their
website.

Dr. Carolyn L. Mazloomi
Independent Curator, Author, Artist
5481 Oldgate Drive
West Chester, OH 45069
PH: (513) 755.3414
Cell: (513) 766.1106

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Subject: Re: peapod dolls
From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 06:01:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Lynn, thanks for sharing this. I love them! And i am SO impressed with
those young mothers!
Pat Kyser




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Subject: Re: Vogart Transfers
From: mickiemclaug58yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 05:21:34 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

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Deb, there is some information about Vogart on this website:
http://yellowzeppelin.net/vogart_history.html
According to the site, Plaid Enterprises holds the copyrights now. I know at one point,one internet site was shut down because itwas showing Vogart designs (for people to copy) and infringed copyrights. Others still have cropped up since then. Good luck!
Michele McLaughlin
Allentown PA

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: March 18, 2010
From: Beth Donaldson <thequiltdrgmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 08:50:18 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

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Growing up, my mother and grandmother (Mom's Mom) were crafty. My mother
made fabulous Halloween costumes and slipcovers. She and my grandmother also
painted China. My grandmother was fond of making the kind of items discussed
on this board. When she would pull in the driveway (and before she got in
the house), bringing her handmade gifts (tuna cans covered in contact paper
for bobby pins, etc.), my mother would exclaim, "Oh no, more crap craft."

--
Beth Donaldson
Collections Assistant
Michigan State University Museum
http://www.museum.msu.edu/glqc/
http://quiltdoctor.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Re: crocheted toilet paper covers
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 09:16:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Quick question: Why doesn't the QHL loop have the option to "reply" just to
the author of a message instead of to the entire group? I know I can
cut/paste to do that, but another loop I'm on has the option and it sure
makes things easier!
Stephanie Whitson




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "Crap Craft"
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 09:43:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Part of the impetus was probably the result of the great Depression. I think
women who were in their child-bearing-family-raising time of life during
that difficult time were forever impressed with the need to make use of
everything. Those women knew recycling like I never will. Hence, the
compulsion to make something useful of every. single. thing. possible.

Reminds me of the Tightward Gazette quote from 1830 about using everything
"no matter how trifling."

Remember the china-bodied pincushion dolls? I think they are collectible
now. My daughters remember their grandmother making birthday cakes where the
doll's skirt was the cake, baked in a bowl and then inverted. That was
recycling they LIKED. The crocheted toilet roll covers, not so much. . . . .

My daughter has a powerpoint presentation about ready to give to a group of
young homemakers that documents her clever use of "found objects" that she's
turned into "copies" of the Pottery Barn items her budget doesn't allow for.
She's starting a home-based business based on her "reclaimed" home decor
that includes revamped furniture, reupholstered classic chairs, etc. She has
a "martha stewart" gift that she didn't get from me. . . hopefully not "crap
craft". That term made me laugh because I remember thinking the same thing
when grandma visited sometimes. . . .and now I'm grandma. OH
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "Crap Craft"
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 09:54:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

> My daughters remember their grandmother making birthday cakes
> where the doll's skirt was the cake, baked in a bowl and then
> inverted. That was recycling they LIKED.


Stephanie,
My mother always made my birthday cakes like that!! Had a Madam
Alexander ballerina doll that sat in the center of an angel food cake
(with Seven Minute Icing) She surprised me with one for my 40th
birthday...She has just moved into a retirement apartment and given
me her angelfood cake pan! Don't have to look for a cake coming next
month! Whew!!

Laura Syler




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: crochet covers, etc
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 08:41:42 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

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OK - I guess the crochet toilet paper roll coversstruck a nostalgia nerv e, to the point where now I can envison a frieze around the upper bathroom walls of vintage ones--poodles, faces, flowers, etc.. Should be a modest $$ investment to build an amusing collection.

On a collecting note, I went to a photography show, where one entrant desig ned the interior of the bathroom 'exhibition' space by completely covering the walls from floor to ceiling side to sidewith flea market framed phot os of brides and grooms taken overover decades. The kind of things that sadly wind up atflea markets because no family member wants them. They framed formal photographs werepacked edge to edge,like a pieced qu ilt, different size rectangular'blocks' all fit together. It was anin credible 'artwork' installation and the talk of the show.

I knowit is possible to do photography transfers on fabric to make photo quilts, butpeople chooseusuallyone or a few images. The concept o f these walls with their dense and varied photo sizes. andshowing fashio ns and appearancesfrom different eras, made me think this could be a won derful way to display all those old family photos -- an antidote to the eve ntuality thatthey might wind up at aflea market.

Laura Fisher, off to the Architectural Digest Home Show to see the trends, whether quilts are still influencing interior design accessories.

Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com== --0-617903516-1269013302=:52646--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: crocheted toilet paper covers
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 15:55:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Stephanie asked -
Quick question: Why doesn't the QHL loop have the option to "reply" just
to the author of a message instead of to the entire group? I know I can
cut/paste to do that, but another loop I'm on has the option and it sure
makes things easier!

My thoughts --
Personally, I'm grateful that Kris has it set that when a question is
asked, "we all" get to read the answer. I've been on lists where
someone asks a question, and people respond privately, as Stephanie
suggests doing, and I hate it when the "question asker" sends a note to
the list "thanking all those who responded to her question", and there
have been no answers on the list, they were all private. And we are
still wondering what the answer was to her question. Kris -- I hope
you will continue to keep the "spirit of the list" -- answers shared
with everyone.

Barb in southeastern PA




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lancaster County Quilt Opportunities Next Week
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2010 21:40:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

Our annual "Quilt Week" is here again, and the festivities begin on
Monday March 22, with some changes and new opportunities throughout the
week.

1. In the last week I've been to Hayloft, Sauders and Zooks and they are
filled with fabric for your shopping pleasure, and the sales ladies are
waiting. I'm so lucky that these are my "local fabric stores", and I
won't be going anywhere near them next week.

2. The Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum reopens on Monday, and their
new exhibit of quilts, Family and Friends, features some wonderful
quilts -- and two sets of PA pillowcases -- one pieced, and one
appliqued with signatures. The stories, and accompanying pictures of
the makers, add greatly to the history of the quilts. For me the most
interesting quilts were the three "Dear Jane quilts done the PA German
way." The ladies who made these sampler quilts created amazing
quilts that need to be seen to be believed. The pieces are so tiny.
The museum has a produced a pattern to make a wall hanging (or
pillowcase) size section of one of the original quilts which will be
available for sale. Many more quilts to enjoy (Joseph's Coat,
Sawtooth Diamond, baskets, etc), in addition to the regular exhibit of
32 antique Lancaster County Amish quilts. And if by chance you aren't
coming to Lancaster next week -- you have until Christmas to see this
exhibit. http://www.quiltandtextilemuseum.com/

3. Also opening on Monday is Quilts In The Mansion II at Historic Poole
Forge in Churchtown. Approximately 55 wonderful vintage quilts will be
displayed throughout a late 1700s Ironmaster's Mansion which is located
in a very scenic park, complete with a covered bridge you can drive
through. Featured quilts include a Bowmansville Star, PA German
sampler with signatures, Teenage Sunbonnet Sue, smashing wool log
cabins, a 4 block log cabin quilt done in Dutchy colors, and many, many
more. http://www.historicpooleforge.org/

4. Another double exhibit opening on Monday are the quilts at the
Mennonite Historical Society and the coverlets at the Hans Herr House.
I've not seen either of these exhibits, so do not know what they
have. http://www.hansherr.org/ and go to "events page"
http://www.lmhs.org/

5. On Wednesday the AQS Lancaster Show opens at the new Convention
Center in downtown Lancaster and Liberty Place in northern Lancaster
City. I was early for my training session at the Quilt Museum this
morning, so I checked out the Center. It is very beautifully done
and the elevators and escalators are centrally located, so it should be
a pleasant venue. All of the rooms appear to be well signed with
their names. And....I spotted water fountains near the restrooms --
something that the most recent owners of the Host didn't allow at the
former Quilter's Heritage Lancaster Show.
http://www.americanquilter.com/shows_contests/lancaster/2010/general_info/

6. Also opening on Wednesday is the Spring Quilt Blossom Festival on
route 30. Vendors and an exhibit of quilts commemorating the Civil
War will be available. http://www.springquiltblossomfestival.com/

7. Also opening on Wednesday is the Privy Bag Exhibit by the Cocalico
Valley Historical Society in Ephrata, PA. Approximately 30 wonderful
examples of this unique PA German textile hanging bag.
http://www.cocalicovalleyhs.org/

Hope you all have safe travel and a wonderful visit to our little corner
of the quilt world. Should be a wonderful week, and you do need
several days to do it all. I was told today that there will be quilts
in the store windows in downtown Lancaster City, like in Paducah -- I
haven't seen them, so can't comment on them.

Barb in southeastern PA
where the snow is finally gone,
the sump pump finally stopped running from Friday's 3 1/2 inches of rain
and I saw 3 crocuses in my yard this afternoon



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: V&A exhibition
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2010 12:04:17 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

One of our UK news channels when reporting the exhibition focussed on
a quilt made by children in the notorious Changi prison camp during
WW2. I don't know whether the video report will play for you overseas,
but I do hope so. It is a short report, but incredibly moving.

http://www.channel4.com/news/articles/uk/patching+together+a+story+of+war/3583662

Sally Ward/Tatters


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: crafty things..
From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilterwindstream.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2010 11:07:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

I've gotten a chuckle out of the crafts discussion stemming from the
crocheted toilet roll covers. But the "doll cake" with the frosting skirt
reminded me of two others- first, the doll with a milk filter skirt. It was
the same doll body as in the cake, but this one wore a very full skirt that
was kind of honeycombed by tacking milk filters (probably a thing of the
past, but think interfacing or coffee filter) together with, I think, floss
or yarn. Anyone else remember those? I saw many displayed at the county
fair, crafts division. And second, the ever-jaunty crocheted beer can hat.
So when they weren't quilting, I guess these other crafts beckoned! Regards,
Nancy



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Loop response options
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2010 11:50:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Good point, Barb. I just sometimes want to ask questions about a post that I
figure everyone else knows the answer to, so I don't want to clog up the
loop so to speak. Maybe I'm underestimating our quilt history listers
curiosity :-).

Stephanie




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ***SPAM*** crochet covers, etc
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2010 11:39:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I have boxes full of those sepia-toned photographs because I need them as
charcters for my novels (I go hunting for faces after I know a charcter I've
created and, strangely enough, I usually "know them" when I see them,
although I'm terrible at envisioning them without this aid.)

Because I've purchased so many over the years, I just wanted to chime in
that that art installation was probably not inexpensive. Even at flea
markets here in the midwest, specific shots like photos of brides/grooms can
bring $5-10 a piece now.

I'm fascinated, though by the idea Laura described and may have to try
something like that with the photos of the women who've inspired MY women's
characters. HHHMMM.

As to hanging them in the bathroom. . . I don't know. Seems like the
humidity might be a problem in a home.

Stephanie Whitson




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Crafty items
From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2010 10:56:01 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

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Our poor mothers had to suffer for our art by gathering up=All thatjun k for our art projects at school, scouts, and 4-H.Things like:Mr a nd Mrs. Santa out of spray-painted Reader's Digests, critters out ofyour dad's pipe cleaners,egg carton caterpillars, ice cream stick forts, jew elry Christmas trees, an volcano with oozing lava made of some kind of w eird paste that I can't remember the name of, ecology art which produced se ashell treatments on Folger's coffee cans, and paper mache. Thenthere was all that cool junk that you could get at LeeWardsto make just about anything you wanted out of nothing at all-- all of this led some of us to the path of quilting -eventually. == --0-1155407937-1269107761=:84728--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Crafty items
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2010 13:10:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

I was in Austin for the past 5 days helping my mother clean out 50
+years of what she calls "treasured junk". We found paper mache pins
of a rose, a sailboat and a bracelet that I made when I was staying
with my grandparents in Monterrey, Mexico back in the 60's. Also,
bread dough roses (couldn't believe they were still around) and a box
purse covered with egg shells.... Needless to say, we laughed and
reminisced over them, and promptly chunked them !!
Laura
In frigid (but not snowing YET!) Richardson, TX

On Mar 20, 2010, at 12:56 PM, Sue Wildemuth wrote:

> Our poor mothers had to suffer for our art by gathering up all that
> junk for our art projects at school, scouts, and 4-H.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ***SPAM*** crochet covers, etc
From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au>
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 09:54:05 +1100
X-Message-Number: 7

I once visited public rest rooms in a seaside town in the West of England
where both the Ladies and the Gents were in the voluntary care of an elderly
couple who greeted everyone as if they were a visitor to their home. The
Ladies was sparkling clean and the cubicle facilities were decorated with
all kinds of knitted and crochet covers and cushions, all trimmed with laces
and ribbons.
DH informed me that the Gents was decorated with tasteful pin-up girl photos
from magazines of the 1950s.

Janet O'Dell
Melbourne Australia








----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Textile Exhibit in NJ
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2010 22:21:18 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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This textile artist uses vintage textile items. There is an explanatory video at her web site. Seen in the background, it looks as though she has an enviable studio.

The Hermitage is a gorgeous historic Gothic style pile with earlier "bones."
Judy Grow

There is a exhibit/ installation at The Hermitage National
Historic Landmark in Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey (in the North-East corner of the state, near the NY border). Closet Archeology combines the contemporary
textile art of Passaic artist Diane Savona with historical textile artifacts
from The Hermitage Museum Collection. To learn more about the exhibit and
read reviews go to www.dianesavonaart.com <http://www.dianesavonaart.com/>
and plan a visit to The Hermitage. http://www.thehermitage.org/
------=_NextPart_000_0143_01CAC87B.A97FFB70--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Loop response options
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 08:03:11 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Stephanie wrote* --
*Good point, Barb. I just sometimes want to ask questions about a post
that I figure everyone else knows the answer to, so I don't want to clog
up the loop so to speak. Maybe I'm underestimating our quilt history
listers curiosity

Hi Stephanie --

In my former life as a math teacher, I used to tell students that if
they have a question, chances are there are at least 5 others in the
room who have the same question, so "be brave" and do everyone a favor
and ask your question. Considering 30 students to a classroom,
multiply that out to the number of members on our lists, and I doubt if
you are the only one who has a question, or who would enjoy knowing the
answer to that question. When I think about the list members, I think
they are very curious -- about any and everything to do with quilts and
the mostly women who made them.

Just my perspective on the nature of a list and it's members,

Barb in southeastern PA
where I'm very tired after setting up our Poole Forge Show all day
yesterday.
I didn't take time to count, but I know there are at least 55 quilts and
tops
and hopefully we'll have good weather and good attendance


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: V&A exhibition
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 12:37:11 +0000
X-Message-Number: 2

I have now actually *seen* the V&A Exhibition and have posted a my own
review and a roundup of other UK bloggers' opinions on

http://textilehunter.blogspot.com/2010/03/quilts-at-v-personal-view.html

I thought long and hard about what I would write, how many of the
'things I would have done differently' I would mention <G>. I But my
mind was cleared by listening to the comments of four reviewers on a
BBC radio arts programme. Complete quilt virgins they went along
reluctantly, and found themselves captivated. I've put a link to the
review on the blog entry.

Whatever your opinions about what should and shouldn't be included,
how the exhibition should have been done, or how the press comments
distort 'our' view of the quilt world, this show is an absolute must-
see. And if you can, must-see more than once. And the reactions to
it are making me think hard about what I thought were my certainties
about quilt history.

BTW apologies to anyone who might have been emailing me in the last
few days. The email telling me my mailbox was full was - er - not
delivered because my mailbox was full!

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: BBC Interview
From: DrMAZ4WCQNaol.com
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 00:15:29 EDT
X-Message-Number: 3

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Gwen Magee was interviewed by the BBC World Service's daily arts and
culture radio program in conjunction with their coverage of the "Quilts:
1700-2010" exhibition which opens at London's Victoria and Albert Museum on March
20th. The interview will be broadcast as well as accessible on their
website.

Dr. Carolyn L. Mazloomi
Independent Curator, Author, Artist
5481 Oldgate Drive
West Chester, OH 45069
PH: (513) 755.3414
Cell: (513) 766.1106
_www.carolynlmazloomi.com_ (http://www.carolynlmazloomi.com/)
_www.papermoonpublishing.com_ (http://www.papermoonpublishing.com/)
_www.wcqn.org_ (http://www.wcqn.org/)
_www.saqa.com_ (http://www.saqa.com/)



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Subject: Re: BBC Interview
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 13:51:07 +0000
X-Message-Number: 4

Do you have any more information about the programme title? I've been
trying to find it on the iPlayer site to no availal
Sally Ward



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: American Coverlets
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 20:46:32 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5

Forgive me if I haven't been paying attention. There was talk
recently of woven coverlets, did anyone mention this site (which I
just found when looking for something else)?

http://www.coverletmuseum.org/default.htm

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Suggestions for fabric scrapbook?
From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 14:02:17 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

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Hello -
=I am going to go through a pruning of my fabric stash and thought it=m ight be a good time to also make a scrapbook of my favorite fabrics.=I 'll keep a swatch, record the info on the salvage and any notes on=when o r where I purchased the fabric. It's mostly cottons.
=Does anyone have other suggestions for such a favorite fabrics=scrapbo ok? Is there any particular kind of scrapbook that is best for=such a task?
=Thank you - Kyra
=www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com
--0-1655705595-1269205337=:36902--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: bathroom art
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 18:27:23 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7


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My brother has a bathroom totally wallpapered in travel brochures. It has held up for many many years. I think it has mod podge over it. Great read ing while in there!!
Lynn in New Bern,NC




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Subject: Re: Suggestions for fabric scrapbook?
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 18:48:26 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Kyra,

For my historic fabrics I use baseball card binder sleeves -- swatches are
about 2 x 3 1/2, and I can get 9 to a sheet, being able also to see the
backs of each fabric.

For new fabrics I use a full 8 1/2 x 11 binder sleeve. Soemtimes the
selvedge info is longer than 11, so I cut as needed and then fold over.

Gosh I haven't worked on my books in ever so long..

Judy Grow

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: BBC interview
From: DrMAZ4WCQNaol.com
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 19:05:54 EDT
X-Message-Number: 9


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Gwen Magee was interviewed by the BBC World Service's daily arts and
culture radio program in conjunction with their coverage of the "Quilts:
1700-2010" exhibition which opens at London's Victoria and Albert Museum on March
20th. The interview will be broadcast as well as accessible on their
website.

Dr. Carolyn L. Mazloomi
Independent Curator, Author, Artist
5481 Oldgate Drive
West Chester, OH 45069
PH: (513) 755.3414
Cell: (513) 766.1106
_www.carolynlmazloomi.com_ (http://www.carolynlmazloomi.com/)
_www.papermoonpublishing.com_ (http://www.papermoonpublishing.com/)
_www.wcqn.org_ (http://www.wcqn.org/)
_www.saqa.com_ (http://www.saqa.com/)

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Subject: Re: Lancaster County Quilt Opportunities Next Week
From: JLHfwaol.com
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 20:41:11 EDT
X-Message-Number: 10


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Dear Barb,
What a tantilzing, tempting venue. I so wish I were free to just fly
away to your part of the world and enjoy all the rich treasures that will
be on exhibit. How is your granddaughter? I missed sharing AQSG with you
this past fall. I hope you and yours are well and happy. Big Texas hugs,
Janet Henderson in Fort Worth

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Subject: Quilting News - Sewing Glazed Calico
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 2010 19:45:36 -0700
X-Message-Number: 11

The Adams Sentinel
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
June 21, 1837
Page 5
Sewing on Glazed Calico.--Passing
a cake of soap a few times over a piece
of glazed calico, or any other stiffened
material, will cause the needle to pene-
trate without difficulty.
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: V&A Slideshow
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 10:51:12 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

A short slideshow from the V&A, voiceover by the Curator. It is
heavy on the modern stuff, with only tantalising glimpses of the real
treasures that lie beyond. The final still is of the Rajah Quilt (http://nga.gov.au/RajahQuilt/
) without even mentioning what it is or its significance. She has
written in her blog about the personal significance to her of a cot
quilt which features in the slideshow, what you can't see in the case
next to it is the most extraordinarily fine embroidered and quilted
linen cot cover from 1703.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/arts_and_culture/8578091.stm

BTW, those of you coming to visit might want to brush up on your
Bannister Hall textiles. There is one applique cover which heavily
features them.

Sally Ward





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Julie Silber lectures in CA, April
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 04:24:10 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi All,

I will be lecturing in California twice in early April, both times in
conjunction with exhibitions of quilts at Museums:

April 2, 2010:
Fine Arts Museums of California (deYoung), San Francisco, 7 p.m.

And

April 10:
Museum of Ventura County, Ventura, CA, 2 p.m.

Contact me directly for more information: quiltcomplexhughes.net

Thanks,
Julie




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: BBC interview - apologies for cross posting from BQTHL
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 12:49:07 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3

I am still searching for Gwen Magee, but have found an interview on
Woman's Hour with the Curator, Sue Prichard, and quilter and author
Linda Seward. Again, the focus is heavily on the modern work, but it
is none the less interesting for that.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00rd85f/Womans_Hour_22_03_2010/
and the item starts at 13.39.

What frustrates me a little is that it is becoming evident from the
press interviews that there is an enormous amount of information found
on some of the quilts which is not even mentioned on the display
boards. I guess we should all read the book first, but the casual
viewer isn't going to do that. I'm trying to find someone who has
used the audio guide and can tell me how much there is on there.

And I've had an epiphany. I've been thinking about the fact that
there is so much you can't see when the quilts are flat on beds, or
too far away (I SO want to know how Grayson Perry made his applique,
and to read some of the embroidered inscriptions). And then I
remembered the little pair of binoculars I take on walks. They're
definitely going in the backpack next time!

Sally Ward



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: overshot weave printed fabric
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 09:43:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4


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I didn't get one comment about the fabric that was a printed textile of an overshot weave in brown and biege. Is it a common fabric and I just had not seen it? Or has it never been seen before? Comments?
I also commented on a quilt that only had INITIALS, not names, stenciled on it. Have others seen that?
Enjoying the "threads" on the V&A show. Excited about seeing it in June.
Lynn in New Bern, NC




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Subject: re: Textile Exhibit in NJ
From: RBCochranaol.com
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 11:12:03 EDT
X-Message-Number: 5

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Judy--

My article "History in the Making" about Diane Savona and her work was just
published in the April/May 2010 issue of Fiber Arts magazine.

--Rachel

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Subject: southern textiles
From: Laurel Horton <laurelkalmiaresearch.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 10:30:11 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

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For those interested in early southern textiles, the Museum of Early
Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA), in Winston-Salem NC, held a fantastic
textile seminar last week. They've been doing these for a number of years,
but I've only recently recognized how valuable they are. The two-day program
featured invited speakers selected around the theme of "New Research,"
including papers on quilts, samplers and other girlhood embroidery, imported
and domestic blankets, and research on family and museum textile
collections. I talked about, not on a quilt, but a white coverlet woven by
my great-great-great-grandmother in Kentucky. I was pleased to see Newbie
Richardson, as she's a wealth of information.

This year's seminar coincided with the opening of a new textile gallery.
It's not huge, but this opening means that there will always be a rotating
selection of MESDA's textiles on view. MESDA has over 100 southern quilts
and coverlets from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This year's
seminar was preceded by an afternoon of workshops and followed by a
"coverlet turning," which allowed researchers--and staff-- to see 26 pieces
from the MESDA collection, some for the first time in many years.

As an outreach experiment, MESDA will hold the next textile seminar (2012)
in Harrisonburg, Virginia. The theme will be the influence of Pennsylvania
German textile traditions accompanying the 18th-century migration down the
Great Wagon Road into the Shenandoah Valley, the Carolina backcountry, and
beyond.

MESDA places a high priority on research, and every summer they sponsor a
month-long institute for the study of southern decorative arts. They rotate
among the three large cultural areas of the south, and this year the focus
will be the Chesapeake/Tidewater (early Virginia, Maryland, and northeastern
North Carolina). The other regions are the Carolina Lowcountry and the
Backcountry (Kentucky, Tennessee, and western parts of Atlantic states).
MESDA's focus has long been the period before 1820, but, particularly for
the backcountry, their collections and research sponsorship extends later.
I've never been to the summer institute, but I'm giving it serious
consideration. My colleague, Suzanne McDowell has taken it a number of
times, and she's doing some fantastic work looking at quilts in western
North Carolina.

If you're interested in any of these programs, contact Sally Gant, Director
of Education. I haven't taken the opportunity to explore MESDA's website
(MESDA.org will get you there), but it's on my to-do list. And, now that
they've got the textile gallery, MESDA is well worth a visit any time. They
welcome researchers, though, of course, it's essential to make an
appointment, as the staff is small. MESDA is part of Old Salem, a
preserved/reconstructed 18th century Moravian settlement right smack in the
middle of the city.

Laurel Horton

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Subject: Re: bathroom art
From: Jeanne 2 <woofstockaustin.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 12:16:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

I wallpapered my bathroom w/ 72 rejection letters I rec'd over a two
year period -- when I applied for professorships throughout the USA.
My favorite went over the toilet paper holder & read, "We had a
teaching job and you didn't get it."

Jeanne Henry
Austin

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Subject: Link to BBC interview

Here' the link. It's 13:15 minutes long and Gwen Magee's interview is in
the second half.
_http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/arts/2010/03/100317_strand_quilts.shtml_
(http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/arts/2010/03/100317_strand_quilts.shtml)

They also have a link to Magee's website and there are 4 images of her
work in their slide show about the exhibit:
_http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/arts/2010/03/100317_strand_quilt_gallery.
shtml_
(http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/arts/2010/03/100317_strand_quilt_gallery.shtml)


Dr. Carolyn L. Mazloomi
Independent Curator, Author, Artist
5481 Oldgate Drive
West Chester, OH 45069
PH: (513) 755.3414
Cell: (513) 766.1106
_www.carolynlmazloomi.com_ (http://www.carolynlmazloomi.com/)
_www.papermoonpublishing.com_ (http://www.papermoonpublishing.com/)
_www.wcqn.org_ (http://www.wcqn.org/)
_www.saqa.com_ (http://www.saqa.com/)

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Subject: Wedding fashions archive at the V& A - NQR
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 18:32:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

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This from my colleague, Alden O'Brien, curator of quilts etc at the DAR
Museum.



Dear Colleagues and friends all,

Browsing on the V&A's website last night, I found this-very cool: the V&A is
inviting people to send (I think you can upload somehow, I didn't get to
that part) their wedding photos, so they can have a large photo archive of
wedding fashion. They ask you for the year and what sort of ceremony
(religious or civil-I wonder whether they ask what time of day as that would
have been important once upon a time! Not now when dinner dress may appear
at 10 am, always looks odd to me!) and maybe a few other things. The idea is
to create a research resource for them and scholars, but also to help other
people date their photos by comparison to the archive.



What a cool project.and useful. Thought folks would like to know.

Alden





http://www.vam.ac.uk/things-to-do/wedding-fashion/home
<blocked::http://www.vam.ac.uk/things-to-do/wedding-fashion/home>


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Subject: Calico production - the Height of Absurdity
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 21:04:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

The Adams Sentinel
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
May 2, 1853
The Height of Absurdity.--Raising cot-
ton in Georgia, sending it to New York for
a market, then shipping it to Liverpool,
from thence transporting it on a railroad 40
miles to Manchester, there weaving it into
calico, sending it to Georgia merchants to
be taken back to its native soil, there to be
worn by the wife of the man who raised it.
At every removal of the raw material it has
had to pay a percentage on its cost to some-
body, besides a profit to the seller, the cost
of it transportations, and two duties, one
when it was received in England in the
shape of cotton, and another when it came
back to New York in the shape of calico.--
All of which might have been saved by
manufacturing the raw material near where
it was produced. It is very well to import
Italian singers, Porto Rico sugar, Havana
cigars, and Irish servants, because these are
articles that we cannot raise at home, but
the idea of sending our raw materials to
Europe to be manufactured, and then bro't
back and re-sold to us, would make a horse
laugh. But then it is democratic to do so!
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/
http://www.majorreichaward.com/


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Subject: Re: woven coverlet fabric & stenciled initials
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 21:50:23 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11

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Lynn et all;

This came across my computer several days ago:
http://www.newbernsj.com/news/secrets-78495-heirloom-annual.html

(In reference to: /Last Saturday I did an "Evaluation Day" for our local guild.) /

./..but the most exciting fabric was a dark brown PRINT of an overshot
weave. It was like a tiny overshot coverlet printed onto fabric. Never
seen anything like it. It made me think of the conversation Jan Thomas
has been having about the influence on quilting by woven coverlets.

/This/ /is exciting Lynn since I've never seen a print like this
anywhere near that early. Do you have a pic?

Jan


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Subject: Question about archival storage.
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 2010 00:38:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

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Following is a note from the Hollinger web site . I'm looking for good pricing for storage boxes for the historic society I'm working with..............

"Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc. buffered box boards are acid-free, lignin and sulfur free to provide the best storage protection. ..... Hollinger Metal Edge fiberboard and corrugated board have a slightly alkaline pH with a 3% calcium carbonate buffer. This means that the box will retain its own integrity, and that the buffering material will neutralize environmental acids. Laboratory aging tests indicate that Hollinger boards will provide archival protection for five centuries."

The last sentence really bothers me. Can it be true? If so, what need is there for an acid testing pen?

Judy Grow

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Subject: RE: Question about archival storage
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 2010 21:57:13 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Good evening, QHLers - Consider the source: It is basically PR hooey. Is the
company gonna be in existence in five centuries?Who is gonna have their
receipt in five centuries?!

That said, there is no way to know because of all of the uncontrolled
environmental factors. And how contaminated are the textiles/objects you are
storing in the box(es)? Perhaps if the box is kept empty for 500 years?

Boxes that are buffered to slightly alkaline pH should not be used to store
textiles/objects that are made from protein fibres (i.e. silk, wool, furs,
leather) and/or have embellishments made from protein fibres (i.e. feathers,
leather).

Feel free to contact me off-line if you have further questions.
Regards,
Meg
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________
Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator &
Collections Management Consultant
Professional Associate, AIC
mgmooneymoonware.net

-----Original Message-----
Following is a note from the Hollinger web site . I'm looking for good
pricing for storage boxes for the historic society I'm working
with..............

"Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc. buffered box boards are acid-free, lignin and
sulfur free to provide the best storage protection. ..... Hollinger Metal
Edge fiberboard and corrugated board have a slightly alkaline pH with a 3%
calcium carbonate buffer. This means that the box will retain its own
integrity, and that the buffering material will neutralize environmental
acids. Laboratory aging tests indicate that Hollinger boards will provide
archival protection for five centuries."

The last sentence really bothers me. Can it be true? If so, what need is
there for an acid testing pen?





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Subject: Re: Lancaster County, PA quilt opportunities
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <pnhahn01comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 2010 14:15:50 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 3

Since I will be out of the area during the Lancaster quilt happenings, I can't offer a place to sit or gather as Xenia, but I do want to remind everyone about the antique quilt and textile treasures at the Paradise Village Antique Center on Route 30, just a few miles east of Lancaster city. When I was there last week a good number of the dealers were stocking their booths with some wonderful eye candy. Ask at the desk about any special "quilt week" discounts various dealers are offering as they don't display that information in the individual booths. I'm sure you'll find something special to take home!

Nancy Hahn, off to the airport, hoping British Air won't cancel my flight again, due to their strike.


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Subject: two more
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:06:49 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 4

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If you sometimes skip reading the messages, don't skip these two.

This quilt is going to be so tremendously important. The center medallio n block is almost finished--it is an applique oftwo spread wing eagles f ound in an 1850's quilt with their heads facing opposite each other. Und er one will be the words Union Forever 1864 and the other God Bless America 2010.

best, Don
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Subject: more vintage quilt tops
From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilterwindstream.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 2010 20:30:45 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

In case you get a chance to take a look, I've added two more photos to my
blog of old quilt tops that were given to a friend. She really hit the
jackpot with these! Regards, Nancy
http://www.quiltnans.blogspot.com/



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Subject: Haitian Peace Quilts
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2010 00:10:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Good Evening All -

I'm not connected to this organization, but a friend sent me this press
release and asked if I would "send it on to my various lists." From what
I read, it appears that there is an exhibit of Haitian Peace Quilts at
Ladyfingers Sewing Studio, in Oley, PA, from now through April 17.
Ladyfingers is hosting it's annual "Quilters Heritage Sale" through this
Saturday, March 27, with extended hours 9 am to 8 pm -- so you can view
quilts and shop in one location.

Their information is --
6375 Oley Turnpike Rd
Oley, PA 19547
610 689 0068
www.ladyfingerssewing.com

Barb in southeastern PA
hoping that it won't rain tomorrow
and enjoying the 72 quilts and tops at Poole Forge

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A special exhibit and benefit sale of original quilts made by Haitians
under the guidance of PeaceQuilts on display at Ladyfingers Sewing
Studio March 20 through April 17. All proceeds of the sale of the quilts
goes to Haiti PeaceQuilts. We are collecting donations of fabrics,
threads, and sewing supplies at Ladyfingers.

Ladyfingers Sewing Studio, 6375 Oley Turnpike Rd., Oley, PA 19547.
www.ladyfingerssewing.com ph 610-689-0068

Peace by Piece – PeaceQuilts Relieves Poverty in Haiti

The PeaceQuilts Project, a non-profit, all-volunteer organization
founded on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, is relieving poverty in
Haiti by establishing and supporting women’s quilting cooperatives,
providing a living wage through meaningful, creative work. The women
design and create one-of-a-kind quilts using Haitian imagery. They earn
a daily wage plus a handsome commission when the quilts are sold. The
goal is to make each cooperative fully independent, owned and operated
by its members.

The story of PeaceQuilts is a novel and highly unlikely one; In a
tropical country, the poorest in the Western Hemisphere, the concept of
quilts and quilting is introduced into a Haitian training school
curriculum by Jeanne Staples, a visionary artist from Martha’s Vineyard,
and Maureen Matthews McClintock, a master quilter and clinical
psychotherapist from rural Vermont, then nurtured by a pair of Haitian
Catholic nuns who teach needlework, into an entrepreneurial success in
less than two years.

Just as improbable, a well-respected New England museum mounts an
exhibition of the quilts last fall, attracting large and enthusiastic
crowds. The exhibition, Patience to Raise the Sun, organized by the
Bennington Museum in Bennington, Vermont, is now being developed as a
national touring show, featuring twenty-two original art quilts, as well
as photo enlargements of the quilters and their environs, and objects
such as a charcoal iron and brazier, used in the absence of electricity.
A beautiful sixty-page catalog has been published to accompany the
exhibition.

Today, in the wake of unimaginable devastation, the quilters are
continuing to create beautiful quilts, even amidst the rubble. About
fifty women are now in various stages of being trained and organized
into cooperatives. In a country where work is scarce and one job-holding
Haitian often supports three generations of family, the women of
PeaceQuilts are not only earning a living wage, but are themselves
currently setting up additional PeaceQuilts workshops at schools and
locations in other parts of Haiti, including the newest one in Cité
Soleil, Port-au-Prince’s most notorious slum. Here in the US, volunteers
have contributed their time and talents to the project, and quilters
throughout New England and as far away as Phoenix, Arizona have donated
materials and supplies. For more information on PeaceQuilts, go to
www.haitipeacequilts.org .

Contact: Jeanne Staples
Organization name: PeaceQuilts
Telephone number: 508-274-1104
Fax number: 508-628-9822
Email address: infohaitipeacequilts.org
Web site address: www.haitipeacequilts.org
5. Re: [SPAM] madder dyed fabric WHAT I KNOW ABOUT

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Subject: World War II Quilts by Sue Reich
From: Karan Flanscha <sadierosecfu.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2010 08:59:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

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I had a notice from Amazon.com this morning- they sure like to share book
ideas... sometimes I don't get the connection but this one I was glad to
read:

<As someone who has purchased or rated Georgia Quilts: Piecing Together a
History (Wormsloe Foundation Publication) by Anita Zaleski Weinraub or other
books in the Antiques & Collectibles > Textiles & Costume category, you
might like to know that World War II Quilts by Sue Reich will be released on
March 31, 2010.>

As I have both of Sue's previous books, and really enjoy them...and also got
to see her WWII Quilts exhibit when it was at the Grout Museum in Waterloo,
IA...
I am really looking forward to her new book! I contacted Sue, and she said
we have the option to order from Sue directly, or from our choice of other
sources.
Congratulations, Sue, on adding to our wealth of quilt knowledge, and
especially the WWII era, which is not as well documented as the earlier eras
in quilt history!
Karan from Iowa

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Subject: Early American Life
From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2010 08:19:07 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

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Good Morning from sunny and warm California -



I just wanted to remind all my kindred spirits of the Early American Life
magazine - The April issue has a couple nice articles with textiles (not
specifically but they are part of the article) included. Additionally -
there is a nice piece about the Eastern Shore - wonder if this is the same
one I heard mentioned on QHL from time to time?



Anyway - for a 5.00 publication with limited advertisements I think it well
worth the investment - especially for historians, re-enactors, textile and
furniture lovers and just about anyone with an interest in something
historic.. I am never disappointed when the magazine comes.



(And no, I have zero connection with magazine - I just love it and hope you
get a chance to see it for yourself.)



Sincerely wishing it would rain some more before summer hits-

Leah Z

Temecula CA

No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.791 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/2766 - Release Date: 03/23/10
12:33:00


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Subject: madder dyed fabric WHAT I KNOW ABOUT
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2010 13:29:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3


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Last week I saw an 1870ish madder dyed stripe/print that had these words written over and over as part of the fabric ----- WHAT I KNOW ABOUT WHAT I KNOW ABOUT WHAT I KNOW ABOUT.......... Does anyone Know About this????
Oh, for those who hate getting tons of individual emails from QHL, do the DIGEST. That way you only get a few a week. I know that most of you KNOW ABOUT this (teh he!) but for the new folks.......
Thanks,
Lynn Lancaster Gorges
New Bern, NC



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Subject: What I know About ....print
From: Sylvia Galbraith <sylviajgalbraithgmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2010 15:12:28 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

Lynn and All,

There is a wonderful article about this very fabric in the Summer
2005 issue of Blanket Statements (AQSG), written by Lynn Z. Bassett.
It is the cover article titled: " Horace Greeley, Mark Twain and an
1872 Calico Print".
The fabric was printed in 1872 for Horace Greeley's presidential
campaign. According to the article, the "What I Know" phrase was
derived from Greeley's 1871 book : What I Know of Farming. In this
same fabric there is a stripe with turnips, which references a Mark
Twain writing and a stripe with a white duster/coat which was part of
Greeley's signature attire (along with a wide brimmed hat and
spectacles).

I purchased a small piece of this fabric from Xenia Cord and she also
included some research from Pam Weeks Worthen.
Lynn lists Manchester Print Works Company as her source of the
sample, and Pam found hers in Amoskeag Mills swatches.

Sylvia Jennings Galbraith

Temecula, CA



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Subject: Re: [SPAM] madder dyed fabric WHAT I KNOW ABOUT
From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2010 21:08:05 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Horace Greeley, candidate for president in 1872 (Liberal Republican
AND Democratic ticket!), founder and editor of The New Yorker, was
famous for treatises on various subjects: "What I Know About
Farming," for instance, in which he discussed scientific methods of
farming. During the months before the party conventions, Greeley was
lampooned in Harper's Weekly by cartoonist Thomas Nast, who portrayed
Greeley as a farmer plowing his way toward the White House - a direct
attack on Greeley's supposed expertise in various areas. Several more
cartoons along the same lines followed.

The fabric appeared in at least two formats, one with top hats and
glasses, another with beets and coats, in madder stripes, with the
words "What I Know About." I believe Pam Weeks knows more about
these, including the printworks from which they came, if she will be
so kind as to respond. I am in Lancaster, and without my usual
resources <g>!

Xenia