om: Tracy Jamar <tjamaroptonline.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2010 07:33:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1


I have a pillow made in the same manner, brightly colored felted wool
(mine is only 2 colors and only 1 color is bright.... otherwise it's
exactly the same ;-)) and I think it was from Czechoslovakia. That
was based on a checkbook cover I bought for a friend many years ago
with the same look and a tag inside that said Made in Czechoslovakia.

Best, Tracy Jamar


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Northern & Southern CA Quilt Lectures
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2010 05:48:11 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Hello All,

I will be giving some talks on antique quilts at two CA museums in the next
week.

Friday, April 2, 7 p.m. -- Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

http://www.famsf.org/deyoung/calendar/day.asp?calendarid=5243&day=4%2F2%2F20
10

and

April 10, 2 and 4 p.m., Museum of Ventura County, Ventura, CA

http://www.venturamuseum.org/JulieSilber/tabid/216/Default.aspx

Hope to see you there!
Julie Silber




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Fiber Reference Image Library is now released to the public.
From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2010 14:20:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

> Good evening, QHLers - Time to warm up those microscopes - Let the fibre
> sampling begin! <g>
> Regards,
> Meg
> . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________
Dear Meg,

I for one, am SO glad to finally see an online reference for microscopic
fiber identification, albeit they have some work to do in the animal
fibers still:-)
This is another great tool in the arsenal of the quilt detective that
can aid in more accurate determination of a particular fabric, like
whether
it's a cotton, linen, or a blend, or even if its a delaine or some other
type of blend. Of course, this will always be dependent on if a sample
set can be effectively extricated without damage to the piece.
Again, thank you for sharing this resource with us. I know I'll be using
this source in my teachings on fiber identification.
Martha Spark
Roseburg, OR

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Calico Man
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Thu, 01 Apr 2010 12:05:56 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

For those who might be interested who don't already have "Calico Man: The
Manny Kopp Fabric Collection" by Bobbie Aug and the late Sharon Newman. I
thought you might be interested to know that AQS (Paducah -
www.AmericanQuilter.com.) has the book on sale right now for $7.99. You
can find it used via amazon books for about the same price. It originally
sold for $26.00. It's a great addition to any textile study collection.

No affiliation.

I purchased an old quilt for a pittance on eBay that was signed and dated on
the back 1909. The seller warned that it was in very sad condition. No
matter, I thought, the fabrics were pre-1880, some as far back as 1850s, I
suspected. The quilt arrived yesterday and I am busy photographing each
fabric. I will post the story in another day or two on my blog as soon as I
finish photographing each fabric. I discovered after examining the quilt
that there is another top inside the quilt!

Karen Alexander



~Blogs are "patchwork" made of words.~

http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/
http://enchantedquiltersoflopezisland.blogspot.com/
http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilting News - A Good Looking Piece of Calico
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2010 12:25:18 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5

The Mountain Democrat
Placerville, California
August 12, 1854
Page 1
It won't pay--It won't pay. That's
what the world, all of us, one time and
another are saying. We apply it to re-
ligion, politics, manners, morals, social
life, love, philosophy--in short to almost
everything. It is often made the grand
determining point of our mundane af-
fairs; and as the special matter in hand
approaches or recedes from the stand,
we accept or reject--it gets our warm
arms, or cold shoulders.
Does a young man "kinder hanker"
after a good looking piece of calico, the
first and biggest question he asks is
"Will it pay?" He ascertains her heart
is affluent with affection--that she is a
rich treasure of sympathy and geniality
--that she is every inch and hair a wo-
man. Still throwing all these aside, he
puts in the cold query, will it pay. The
chances are that he decides it won't pay.
He finds the girl, perhaps, has no money
-- only the above qualities, added to a
virtuous character, a sweet disposition,
a refined mind, and charming principles.
Those he thinks won't pay. The cash
would....

--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/
http://www.majorreichaward.com/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Thu, 01 Apr 2010 20:29:47 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
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While I had hoped to see a presentation on Documenting Western PA Quilts
as part of the Pennsylvania Humanities Council televised programs for
2010-2011, I am glad to see that our own Candace Perry will be giving
one of the programs. Maybe next year on the quilts ladies! I spent my
happiest days as a child in Pennsylvania and learning PA lore but this
is the first I've heard of groundhog lodges. Would there be groundhog
quilts? Does this make Professor Donner the 'Grand Groundhog"? See the
link below for the presenters:

http://www.pahumanities.org/resources/presentations.php?sort=title

*Sunday, April 25 at 2pm . Schwenkfelder Library and Heritage Center* in
Pennsburg to host /PA German Groundhog Lodges/ with anthropologist
William Donner
<http://www.pahumanities.org/resources/presentations.php?speaker=59>


The Pennsylvania German Groundhog Lodges

Since 1934, Pennsylvania Germans have held annual meetings to celebrate
their culture and heritage while paying homage to the weather-predicting
abilities of the groundhog. At these meetings, humor, songs, plays and
speeches are offered, all in the Pennsylvania German language. Although
less-known than the famous Punxsutawney Phil, there are now 17
Pennsylvania German groundhog lodges that hold annual meetings. This
talk describes the cultural and historical background of Pennsylvania
Germans and explains how these lodges play an important part in
developing and maintaining Pennsylvania German ethnic identity in the
20th and 21st centuries. Illustrated with slides, this presentation
includes examples of Pennsylvania German humor.

*Speaker*

* William Donner
<http://www.pahumanities.org/resources/presentations.php?speaker=59>,
Kutztown
Anthropology Associate Professor, Kutztown University

Jan :-)


--------------010808030109080801020601--


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Subject: a new pool of quilters
From: Alice Kinsler <alicekinslercomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2010 20:32:50 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

This from my cousin who is a knitter...a new pool of fiber enthusiasts!
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704896104575139990857438962.html?mod=googlenews_wsj
Alice
Carmel Valley CA
 


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Wool "Quilt"
From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Apr 2010 01:25:00 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Jean, I will post some photos of this item which reminds me of the felt
quilt you posted. But I need someone to tell me the password to post to Eboard.

Susan in Raleigh NC
------------------
NCSU Gregg Museum
Felt rug from Afghanistan, Uzbek people

ObjectType: Felt rug
Title: Felt rug, Namat
Artist:
Category: RUG
Subject:
Object Date:
Accession Number: 2002.024.019
Dimensions:
Medium: wool
Technique: Felted wool, embroidery, made in sections and sewn together
Inscription/Marks:
Condition:

Description: Felted wool, embroidery (kanda-khayol and chain stitches), made in
sections and sewn together. Fine felts with complex designs were widely used in
central and western Asia in courts as well as nomadic dwellings. Historical
references and recent excavations in the Russian Altai and Chinese Turkestan
point to the existence of felt rugs and saddle mats before knotted and woven
rugs were known. An outstanding group of these felts is in the Hermitage, St.
Petersburg. Felts similar to the two shown here were made by Turkmen, Kirghiz,
Uzbeks, and Kazaks, who used them in their yurts and on their animals. Although
they are Sunni Moslems some of these tribal people retain shamanistic beliefs
and use symbols such as the ones in these felts for a ritual purpose, to pay
homage to a god or to ward off sickness.
--------------------------
Original message:

Subject: Wool "Quilt"
From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2010 09:40:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

I posted a picture of a wool felt quilt that came home from a WWII
soldier, who went overseas. The owner is a cousin and doesn't know
where he was during the war and would like to know the country of
origin for this. It is reverse appliqued using cotton(?) heavy thread
running stitch. It does have nail holes in the corners, so was
evidently used on a wall or window, at some time. Anybody recognize
the style? It is a really nice piece.

Jean

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Auschwitz quilt
From: Ady Hirsch <adamroninetvision.net.il>
Date: Sun, 04 Apr 2010 09:03:02 +0300
X-Message-Number: 1

Sorry, I have no idea who bought the quilt - I tried to interest Israel's
national Holocaust museum, Yad Vashem, but failed. As for the quilt itself -
judging by the Russian text, which ran "Thank you, [the] Red Army. For the
Liberation of Auschwiz, 1945", my impression was that it was made by
recently liberated inmates of the death-camp FOR some Russian representative
of the Red Army, or as a commemorative quilt, rather than BY a Russian
soldier.
Ady



Subject: auschwitz quilt
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Sat, 3 Apr 2010 08:21:40 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi everyone, remeber a couple of years ago, when e-bay had a quilt for sale that was made, supposedly, by a Russian soldier who had helped liberate Au schwitz. It was made from the uniforms the prisoners wore and had Russia n lettering on it.

There was an effort to purchase it and get it to an appropriate museum.

DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT HAPPENED TO THE QUILT?

best, Don
--0-2008191466-1270308100=:37242--





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Auschwitz quilt
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Apr 2010 10:05:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

I purchased the Auschwitz quilt and it will be featured in a book coming out this month called "World War II Quilts" published by Schiffer Publishing, Ltd.
I was able to do some research on the quilt.
It was purchased in Pittsburgh at a house sale in the East McKeesport area. This area southeast of Pittsburgh attracted many immigrants from Eastern Europe, Russia and Poland to work in the steel mills after WWII.
I have spoken to many people about the quilt including a man who wrote "Counterfeiting the Holocaust." I tried to interest the Holocaust Museum in D.C. without success. Someday, I may just walk in with it.
The quilt has been on display with my other WWII quilts at various sites across the U.S. stirring feedback from experts and professors in Russian, WWII and Holocaust studies. I even posted it on Facebook in the Holocaust sites for help to authenticate it.
There is till much research to be done on this quilt. Any assistance is welcome.
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/
http://www.majorreichaward.com/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: The Auschwitz quilt
From: Kittencat3aol.com
Date: Sun, 4 Apr 2010 20:28:27 EDT
X-Message-Number: 3


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By any chance, do you know *where* in East McKeesport it was purchased, or
the name of the family that originally owned it? I grew up in Pittsburgh
and may be able to help with research/local knowledge.

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Auschwitz Quilt
From: Edwaquiltaol.com
Date: Sun, 4 Apr 2010 23:34:10 EDT
X-Message-Number: 1


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The quilt may be the one exhibited at the quilt show on the Pier in NYC in
the late 80's or early 90's. the organizers of that show may have some
information on it. I do know an employee of the Museum of Am Folk Art
organized some of the special exhibits. It was hanging in from of The Stencil Co
booth along with other WWII quilts.

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Subject: posts to QHL
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 01:05:42 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

May I respectfully ask that folks actually sign their posts to QHL. Often
e-mail addresses don't give the actual name of the poster, and I really like
to know who I'm chatting with.

Many thanks

Judy Grow



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest
From: LinusDonnaaol.com
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 08:35:53 EDT
X-Message-Number: 3


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I need information about parramatta cloth. Does anyone know what this is?
Was it worn during the mourning period in the 19th century?

Many thanks! Bright blessings!
~Donna Laing

_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_
(http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)


--part1_91364.12f9cf.38eb3329_boundary--


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Subject: Paramatta
From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 09:00:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Montgomery says, in Textiles in America 1650-1870 (Winterthur, 2007),
that paramatta is "A cloth developed from eighteenth century Norwich
bombazine of silk warp and worsted weft generally dyed black.
Paramatta was first made with cotton warp and woolen weft, but by
1856 it was made of silk and worsted. Coburg was a similar cloth,
and they were both woven in 2/1 weft faced twill. They were used for
mourning and for raincoats." (page 317)

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 13:56:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Jan -- thanks for the PR! Dr. Donner I don't think is even a "member" -- it
is a wonderful Dutchy phenomenon that helps in preservation of the dialect,
mainly. It's a throwback to the old-timey all-male lodges, and they say a
pledge "Ich bin ein Bruder Grundsau" -- and hold up their hands like little
groundhog paws. My dad was a member and would do the pledge to the
amusement of all our non-Dutchy relatives. They have a wonderful big meal
and a program in dialect with lots of earthy jokes (lots of bathroom and
manure humor) and singing in the dialect (the Schnitzelbank song!). There
is also a ladies' lodge that I believe is a bit less raucous.
We could definitely do with a good quilt program through humanities council.
There was one a few years back that was a bit iffy. My program, on PA
Germans and the Paranormal, should be great fun!
Candace Perry
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 14:01:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

---- Candace Perry <candaceschwenkfelder.com> wrote:
it is a wonderful Dutchy phenomenon that helps in preservation of the dialect,
mainly. It's a throwback to the old-timey all-male lodges, and they say a
pledge "Ich bin ein Bruder Grundsau" -- and hold up their hands like little
groundhog paws.

Oh Candace, I love this! Especially the emulation of groundhog paws!!!! Thank you for telling us about it.

I've been impressed by Beecave Bob's (of Beecave, Texas) accuracy re spring's arrival down here. But I just don't think a brotherhood of "armadillos" will emerge. The armadillo is simply a pest who, so far as I can tell, does no good for humankind.

gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
Oh, come on Gaye, they eat bugs. Whatever good that does. They also
break ankles when one steps into one of their tacky holes. Janet Henderson in
Fort Worth

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Mon, 05 Apr 2010 16:57:39 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8

Dear Candace,

When I cross from West Virginia into PA on 70, I smile and can feel my
whole body relax as I know I'm
home. Grandpap was the historian. He took me to all the beautiful old
churches, graveyards, monuments,
little towns and out-of-the-way spots to teach me about history and how
I related to it and them. Grandma
taught me to sew and helped me embroider my first sampler. One of my
favorite visions of those two is her
swiping away his hand as he pinched her on the bottom, blushing and
murmuring "Not in front of the kids,
Clarence." He'd just smile our way and wink. He still holds the
position of best prankster in my heart.
Put history and sewing together...hmmm...what can one do with that?

Do you know about when the programs will be aired? I can have my sister
dvr them.

Well over a year ago, I posted pictures of 4 pieces of clothing to the
e-board and Newbie graciously
confirmed what I suspected: that three of the pieces, jacket, skirt and
pants were part of a c. 1870 reform
costume and very rare. I didn't post the second costume, which is
cotton, and has little ears of corn printed
on the lining. I know the museum registrar thought I was having a heart
attack the day we were re-boxing
and photographing part of the collection and I saw the two of them. I
kept saying "no,no,no" and then "yes,
yes, yes", and everything blurred until I made the connection that the
founder of Colorado Springs was a
Quaker from Philadelphia. The costumes were worn by members of a very
radical sect of Quakers, with
Irish roots, from the burned-over district of NY whose descendants
eventually ended up in Colorado
Springs.

As a researcher, you know it is never that simple. This project has
lead me into the field of 19th century
health reform, spiritualism, seances and the paranormal. It ties
directly to women's history in the Springs
with Nova Scotian-born, Lawrence, KS, traveler, Julia Archibald Holmes:
self-described in an 1858 copy
of "The Lily" as "the first white woman to climb Pikes Peak" (thereby
acknowledging she was not the first
'woman' to do it). Gail Bakkom alerted me to a quilt in the MN book
that is alleged to have been made by
spiritualists and I plan to look at it this fall. Laying aside opinions
and biases makes a better researcher, in
my opinion.

My point is that I want to make sure you know I'm not implying that the
PHC made silly choices in the
Groundhog Lodges or Germans and the Paranormal. The 'social' in history
gives it life and meaning
beyond plain facts and traditions are very important. My grandpap
taught me that learning history, with
humor, also helps it stick in your brain. It was a little hard for the
grandkids to understand why one branch
of our Campbells get so excited about their heritage that they dress up
in only one specific plaid and go toss
logs a few times a year, until we introduced the musical one to bagpipes
and the one with the lip ring (he
tells me the girls think it is sexy) to body decorations of the picts.
So, now they laugh with Uncle Bill in
has kilt. Part of what I love about PA is the diversity of her people
and that everyone's culture has a place.

Jan, who has her paw in the air

PS: If you have a quilt from SW PA, Jan Rodgers is heading a
documentation program that includes
Brenda Applegate. If one of them will be in MN this fall, perhaps you
can have your quilt documented.

I purchased a signature quilt, for twice what it is worth, made for a
woman in Westmoreland County, PA.
It isn't a wonderful quilt, not made well, and the ink has migrated to
the point that I've had to perform several
computerized scans of the names to read all the signatures. But, I had
to have it because most of the people
on it are either buried in, or are children of those buried in the
little church just a few miles from my grand-
parents home, where a good number of my relatives were buried. Grandpap
showed me that church and
those graves years ago. I understand one of the sessions at the AQSG
conference this fall in MN will be
on collectors and collecting. Will there be a psychiatrist on the
panel? :-)

Dr. Donner I don't think is even a "member" -- it
is a wonderful Dutchy phenomenon that helps in preservation of the dialect,
mainly. It's a throwback to the old-timey all-male lodges, and they say a
pledge "Ich bin ein Bruder Grundsau"...My dad was a member...program in dialect
with lots of earthy jokes (lots of bathroom and manure humor) and singing in
the dialect (the Schnitzelbank song!).
My program, on PA Germans and the Paranormal, should be great fun!





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 23:06:47 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 9

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They also make cool sewing baskets.

Polly Mello

Hot in Maryland


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Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: JLHfwaol.com
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 19:16:19 EDT
X-Message-Number: 10


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Dear Polly,
You must tell us more. Did your Bowie grandmother have an armadillo
sewing basket??? I can just imagine. BTW, will you be going to AQSG
seminar this year? Your must be distant cousin. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth

--part1_126b5.359419aa.38ebc943_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Beecave Bob & Dutchy parallels
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 18:31:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

---- JLHfwaol.com wrote:
> Oh, come on Gaye, they eat bugs. Whatever good that does. They also
> break ankles when one steps into one of their tacky holes. Janet Henderson in
> Fort Worth

Mea Culpa, Janet: orthopedists benefit from armadillos, and in the specific case of Beecave Bob, all of us who depend on animals for our weather forecasts. Over here east of the Sabine River, we believe the little buggers also are available for carrying leprosy, a belief that might be (writer is aghast here) pure superstition.

And come to think of it, from the account forwarded to me by the Austin harpist-quilter, I rather feel that B. Bob's testing of the sun also provided an opportunity for locals to practice their regional dialects, just as the groundhog lodges provided the Pennsylvania Germans with a place to practice theirs. Still, I have to admit that not even the residents of Beecave, Texas, seem to have come up with anything so wonderful as declaring brotherhood with raised "paws."

I do not wish to invite more members of Bob's group to my place to root among my roses and azaleas and paeonias. But I've been a fan of Bob's prognostication from the start. I had faith and planned my gardening accordingly. Wisely.

Gaye Ingram, Member
Possums Unlimited

The minute the harpist from


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Mon, 05 Apr 2010 17:32:20 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12

FYI! and gross. Jan

http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2008/10/01/armadillo-farm-is-oddest-money-maker/





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: JLHfwaol.com
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 20:14:12 EDT
X-Message-Number: 13


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In a message dated 4/5/2010 6:33:33 PM Central Daylight Time,
textiqueaol.com writes:

http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2008/10/01/armadillo-farm-is-oddest-money-mak
er


Dear Jan,
Think about it. In 1933 that was a creative way to earn a living.
Better than selling moonshine that was made of methyl alchol and killed the
drinkers. That was really gross. Janet H enjoying a glass of Australian
chardoney

--part1_15f04.68db1a6c.38ebd6d4_boundary--


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Subject: Re: qhl digest
From: "Lorraine Olsson" <svenpnc.com.au>
Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2010 10:59:53 +1000
X-Message-Number: 14

Donna, do a google search. Some really interesting information

Cheers, Lorraine in Oz


>I need information about parramatta cloth. Does anyone know what this is?
> Was it worn during the mourning period in the 19th century?
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2010 01:29:11 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 15

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Dear Janet,

=C2No, I had never seen an armadillo sewing basket until the Dallas AQSG conference. I went on one of the tours to McKenny, Texas. They let us out on the square in McKenny=C2to shop in the antique stores. I had been in those stores many times on other trips to visit my family in the Dallas are a and had never found an early antique quilt. But, I believe it was Judy Gr ow that found an early chintz quilt in one of the stores. But, I found an a rmadillo basket that I just love. I never begrudged Judy that quilt because I found something that I treasure even more.

=C2 Unfortunately, I will not be at AQSG this year. I can not always go. I will be at the one in New Jersey in 2011. I missed you in San Jose last fall. I heard you were on a medical missionary trip. I know you were needed more there but=C2I missed you.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland=C2

=C2

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Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Mon, 05 Apr 2010 19:28:38 -0600
X-Message-Number: 16

Janet,

So, you're telling me those guys in the BAMA t-shirts were trying to
kill me?...and here I thought they
were just trying to get me drunk! While it may have been and probably
still is, a noble profession to
farm 'dillos, I think that lamp and the baskets reek of origins in the
Victorian era. They could turn a
sow's ear into a silk purse and, if it moved, it went to the taxidermist.

Jan
> Think about it. In 1933 that was a creative way to earn a living.
> Better than selling moonshine that was made of methyl alchol and killed the
> drinkers. That was really gross.
>



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Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: JLHfwaol.com
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 22:47:21 EDT
X-Message-Number: 17


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Dear Polly,
I missed you as well. I hope that all is well with family. Yes, I
will see you in NJ next year. As for the armadillo sewing basket, I am
jealous. To think that it was just sitting there in Dallas waiting for you to
come claim it. It was meant to be. Hugs, Janet H

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Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: JLHfwaol.com
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 22:50:11 EDT
X-Message-Number: 18


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Dear Jan,
Armadillo lamp shades, purses, no I wouldn't buy one, but there is no
explaining peoples' tastes. As for the BAMA guys, only you can tell (but
don't). Isn't it a strange world we live in. Janet H

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Subject: Re: Wool "Quilt"
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Mon, 05 Apr 2010 21:51:05 -0600
X-Message-Number: 19

Hi all,

I've been waiting for a response from a friend who collects textiles
from the regions mentioned in Susan's description of the felted rug from
the Gregg Museum below. She still travels to the area collecting for
the textile school at Colorado University, where all her pieces have
been going for the last three years.
She writes "This looks very much like my Kyrgyz (Kyrgyzstan) felt rug...
See the current issue of Surface Design. Article on page 12. Photos
look similar. Check out shyrdak. (It is the style)."
It appears from her response that she would agree with Susan's thoughts on
the origin.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shyrdak
http://www.shyrdak-felt-rugs.com/
http://www.lavivahome.com/textile/shyrdak.html

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Subject: Re: Wool "Quilt"
From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com>
Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2010 00:44:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Jan, Jean, and others,

Jan sent some great links. In particular, http://www.shyrdak-felt-rugs.com/ has
a video on the steps of making such a felted wool piece with applique in modern
Kyrgyzstan. Striking Turkic motifs in contrasting colors!

Thanks!
Susan in Raleigh NC where NC State Univ has a good textile collection at the
Gregg Museum.


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Subject: Re: Wool "Quilt"
From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au>
Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2010 15:10:21 +1000
X-Message-Number: 2

There must be a fascinating story about how the quilt in question came to be
in the possession of a US soldier. Would Army records show where he was
stationed? This may give some clue as to the quilt's origin (or its
travels).

Janet O'Dell
Melbourne Australia




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Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2010 10:08:28 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Jan -- the sect didn't happen to be that led by the Publick Universal Friend
did it? If so -- that is very important to me at this very moment!
Actually, what is a little sad is that PA Humanities Council has found that
popular topics will "play" better and they are urging those of us who apply
to make sure our topics are well suited to general audiences. My current
topic is something I have always been interested in, but I think attendees
will be surprised -- and I hope in a good way! At least part of the program
will focus on mysticism among the PA Dutch (major!) and mythical beasts in
decorative arts, for example -- not so much emphasis on witches and hexes
and ghosts, oh my!
For any who are interested -- I would HIGHLY recommend the book The History
of the Occult in America by Mitch Horowitz. It's not what you think it is!
A good deal of what we believe in today as a part of the mainstream -- i.e.
the power of positive thinking -- is a descendant of the somewhat wacky
spiritualist movements of the 19th century.
I've found in my journeys that pre-conceived notions will always, somehow,
bite you in the butt!
Sorry this went way off topic, now back to quilts!
I'll keep you posted on air date -- we don't know as yet.
Best to all,
Candace Perry


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Subject: going places
From: <lrcawleytwcny.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2010 11:44:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

My first quilt adventure since November was an unqualified success thanks to DH John who came with me to Lancaster lest I should fall over in some quilt filled venue. I rendezvoused with some friends from the Eastern Shore and even though it was too cold to bike as he'd planned John had a great time enjoying a luxury weekend at the new Marriott.
The AQS show, like most of the big commercial shows was really a vendor show. There just weren't a lot of quilts and somehow I managed to lose the only thing I bought (a specailty ruler). But the antique quilts at the various local spots were wonderful and just what I needed.
Trish Herr has curated an exhibit at the Quilt Museum called "Family and Friends: Quilts and Their
Connections." Many fo these quilts are uniquely Lancaster County. You can see some of them in Trish's book on Lanc. Co. quilts (I can't give you good references because all my books are still in boxes). There are three Sawtooth Diamonds circa 1890 with the most elegant and extravagant monograms. One is is red and gree, the second yellow and red, the third pink and yellow. Most spectacular (IMHO) are the two diamond samplers circa 1860, the only known examples of this pattern (see Trish's book). Elongated diamond shapes contain sampler blocks separated by sashing. The quilts of the Spangler family, recently given to the Museum, include quilts from 1870 to 1965 with photos of many of the makers.
A second small gallery contains three full size Joseph's Coats and a doll and crib quilt in the same pattern. Of course, the Esprit collect of Amish quilts is waiting for you in the main exhibit space.
The Mennonite Historical Society has some interesting quilts and other textiles on display. A coverlet from the early 20th century made by Susannh Gehman has farm scenes: haymaking, horses, birds a wagon. Harriet Carpenter made a PA map quilt with an elaborate monogram in 1902. She obviously used an old map because she did not include Lackawanna Co., the Commonwealth's youngest county split off from Luzeren in 1878 (I know this obscure fact because Scranton is the county seat).
There's an early (circa 1890) Amish Chimney Sweep, don't think I've ever seen an Amish version of that block, in teal, red, brown, purples with a greeny-brown border. A wool bedcover from 1925 is decorated with animals, birds, flowers and houses. There are pieced and fringed pillowcases (circa 1850) and show towels.
Imagine seeing 50 privy bags in one place. The Historical Society of the Cocalico Valley is giving you that opportunity. Even better, you can get a really beautiful catalogue with pictures of each bag for $12.95 (maybe it's $13.95). Call 717-733-1616. This is a "must have," especially if you like PA. stuff.
The ladies a Poole Forge have done it again. They gathered quilts from the local area and hung them in the mansion during the week of the show. The house was filled. Many of the quilts were distinctively southeastern PA, others were typical 20th century in color and design. My favorites were those you don't see anywhere else, especailly the Bowmansville Star. I absolutely loved the 9-block Prince's Feather: red and green feathers with an orange star in the center on a solid red background. Wow!

Cinda in Central NY, glad to be back online





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Subject: Re: Wool "Quilt"
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2010 10:30:40 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

Jean,

Would it be possible to get a detail picture showing construction?

Jan


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Subject: RE: NQR - The Groundhog has Groupies - an update on Phil!
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>
Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2010 14:27:01 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

Oh Candace, I wish I could say yes. Although my study will involve
Jemima Wilkerson and "New
Jerusalem (and other utopian societies), this group was part of the
"Friends of Human Progress"
out of Erie County, New York. The husband of my costume owner became a
spiritualist minister.
I loved Jane Kirkpatrick's book on the Aurora Colony in Oregon.

Contact me with what you are looking for. The Publick Universal Friend
is a fascinating story and
I might be able to help.

Jan

Candace Perry wrote:
> Jan -- the sect didn't happen to be that led by the Publick Universal Friend
> did it? If so -- that is very important to me at this very moment!