Subject: Quilting News - Calico and Queer institutions.
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Apr 2010 7:19:36 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

The Mountain Democrat
Placerville, California
December 23, 1854
Page 2
Curious what notions often get into women's heads. There's Mrs.
Finglefum thinks she is a beauty, when she is a perfect 'fright.' Mrs.
Jenkins thinks she can spend a thou-sand out of her husband's six hun-dred dollars salary, and not be ex-travagant. Mrs. Sinkum wants a three hundred dollar diamond pin because Mrs. Snobbs has got one. Miss Wrinkles must get married'right off,' because her friend Miss Honeypot, has hitched on. Queer institutions, those calico.
--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/
http://www.majorreichaward.com/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sock quilt?
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>

Okey dokey--a friend emailed me and said an older lady just told her about a
sock quilt. That's when the sock tops from mens' work socks were recycled
into a quilt. Lady was from Tennessee and and added men wore long socks
because they wore work boots in the fields. After darning and the rest of
the sock wore out is when the tops were used. I can't find anything on the
web so am asking if anyone on the list has seen this technique. Am
scratching my head trying to envision it.
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Sock quilt?
From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net>


Hi Pepper,

Here's a brief mention in the Google News Archives from 1970. Polly's
Pointers, "Make A Bed Quilt from Orlon Socks"

http://news.google.com/newspapers?idbwEsAAAAIBAJ&sjidBsgEAAAAIBAJ&pg3080,514950&dqsock+quilt&hlen


If you have any trouble bringing it up, please email me.

The Google News search shows a photograph is available of the "Husband's
Socks Quilt." They charge a small fee to see it. The preview is:

Date: August 6, 2007
Publication: Chronicle, The (Centralia, WA)


Photograph submitted by Lee Hollis, Chehalis
Sheila Brown hosted a tea party for fellow quilt enthusiasts on Sunday, July 29, at her home in Centralia. Here, with her dog Bingo, she is displaying a unique quilt made from the tops of her husband's worn out socks.

To access, go to Google, click on news, then advanced news search, then archives search. I typed "socks quilt" in the news bar, both with and without quotes. There may be more hiding in there and I just didn't type
in the right words. Have fun! The News Archives is addictive. I have to
be careful or our mastercard is filled with $2.95 fees.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Sock quilt?
From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com>


Pepper,

Mentioned in _Texas Quilts, Texas Women_ by Suzanne Yabsley, pub. 1984
by TX A&M U. Press.

see:

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/QQ/liq1.html

Jan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Sock quilt?
From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 2010 00:00:43 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Jan's finding led to this mention and a photo of a sock quilt:

Michigan Quilts: 150 Years of A Textile Tradition, page 122. It says the
October 1984 issue of Ladies Circle has an article on the quilt.

It can also be seen on the Quilt Index, ID Number: 85.0819, Quiltmaker:
Ramsey, Suzanne Kathryn



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: question on leather suit
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>


Dear Colleagues
I am looking for someone with some knowledge of "western" wear.

We have a small client museum in Ohio who has a "Buffalo Bill Cody" all
leather cowboy suit, c1890. This suit, which has been conserved, is their
pride and joy. They are under the assumption that is a very rare survivor -
but have asked us if that is a correct assumption. I am not so sure....It is
certainly not fancy. It consists of a simple over shirt with fringe down the
outside sleeve seam and fly front trousers with fringe down the side seams.
No ornament or embroidery.

Any thoughts?

Thanks

"Newbie" Richardson
The Costume and Textile Specialists



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: socks quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>


Hi - I went to the eboard, found the 'post' place, but don't know the password! Help!!! How do I then upload the image, not just the info? thanks for guidance

Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sock Quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
D

Hi all-I am the happy owner of a two different socks quilts now. Let's see
if I can post them on the eboard!

One is made of cotton jersey (lisle?) in argyle-ish patterns, arrayed by co
lor tone so that a corner-to-corner X appears as the large scalemonument
al pattern. It is one oftwo I boughtmade by the same person (I sold t
he other). It was included in my menswear textiles exhibition MASTER PIECES
.

No information came with them except their discovery in mid New York State.
We can only conjecture that the maker had access to lots of socks (perhaps
unsold store stock, manufacturers overage, factory scraps, factory seconds
) as the number of blocks and the variety seems greater than anyone but a s
artorial obsessive could have owned.The material is thatearly-to-mid
20th century knit in wonderful colors and geometric designs.The same stu
ffalso was used for sweater vest fronts in the 1940s-50s, usually combin
ed with languid solid rayon gabardines (you can findsuch period gems at
vintage clothing dealers, and inpictures of Holywood male stars posing a
t leisure)

I also have a girls/womens sock tops quilt, this one made of rows of bright
pastel rayon and cottonknits probably from the 1950s. Several hundred s
ame size blocks that seem to be the fold-down tops that were cut off socks
and sewn together in horizontal rows without any color orchestration. Whims
ical and unconventional, wonderful colors and fine knit details.

I have come to the conclusion that quilts have been/can be made of anything
, even early cellophane bread wrappers, ribbons yardage, souvenir textiles,
pants cuffs, upholstery swatches, and on and on and on, mostly for utilita
rian purposes. It will be interestingif there will be similarinventiv
enessby quiltmakers using21st century materials.


Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com0A0A0A
--0-1768215014-1271789774:80151--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re post on sock quilts
From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 2010 16:03:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------_NextPart_000_002D_01CAE0A3.0C127DF0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;

BlankI know for a fact that the International Quilt Study Center has at
least one quilt made of the top portion of tube socks. I have seen it
and helped fold it for storage in the study center's storage facility. I
believe the one I am thinking of is part of the Robert Cargo
collection...made by black quilters from rural Alabama.

Isn't it interesting how many references have already been posted on
this really unusual and innovative use of leftover textiles? Who would
have guessed it?

Best wishes,
Kathy Moore
Lincoln, NE

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sock Quilt
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 2010 14:49:16 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5

This list is amazing!

I had never heard of a Sock Quilt before. Quilters are amazing!

Here is a new page on the Library of Congress website I just stumbled
across.

http://frontiers.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/collections/quilts/thinking.html

Karen Alexander
San Juan Islands


~Blogs are "patchwork" made of words.~

http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/
http://enchantedquiltersoflopezisland.blogspot.com/
http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: socks quilts
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 2010 17:00:44 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

Laura (and group)

You don't have to remember passwords:-)) All the information you need is on the subscribe page at http://quilthistory.com/subscribe.htm

Kris

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Variegated embroidery floss
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 2010 19:18:57 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

When did VARIEGATED embroidery floss first become available commercially?

Candace Perry wrote in a post dated Jan 31, 3003 <<I have a ca. 1890 quilt
in the collection that has names embroidered in variegated thread...>>

This would indicate then that it was available by 1890, but how common was
it? Was it something women were readily buying even if it wasn't showing up
in that many quilts yet? Did it simply rise steadily in popularity in quilts
from 1890 or were there very few appearances in quilts until the 1920s with
a big jump then?

Thanks for the help,

Karen Alexander
San Juan Islands

~Blogs are "patchwork" made of words.~

http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/
http://enchantedquiltersoflopezisland.blogspot.com/
http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: leather suit
From: Mary Waller <mwallervyn.midco.net>
Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2010 11:38:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Newbie,

Try the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming,
http://www.bbhc.org

Mary Waller
Vermillion, South Dakota, USA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: question on leather suit
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2010 23:26:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I've seen many examples of this kind of western wear in other museums. I
believe the Nebraska State Historical Society and the STuhr Museum in Grand
Island, Nebraska both have one on exhibit. The Fur Trading museum in western
Nebraska may have one as well. . . I'm not certain. The ones I have seen
have been heavily beaded.
Steph Whitson
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: CRQSG
From: <lrcawleytwcny.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2010 9:41:57 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

I was thrilled to be invited to join the Capital Region Quilt Study Group last Saturday at the Saratoga Co. Historical Society in Ballston Spa, NY to see the quilt collection. The curator is hoping to mount a quilt exhibit and was anxious to get the groups input. Like so many small museums, for years the Historical Society accepted donations without provenance. Very little is known about the origin of most of the quilts, but they are most likely from Saratoga County.

I knew that these New York quilts would be unlike those from PA, MD and VA which I've been looking at for years. Even though geographically NY is grouped with the Mid-Atlantic states, stylistically it is more closely related to New England. Here's a question. Has anyone seen a fugitive cheddar/orange? There was a Lone Star quilt with stars in the corners made in rather drab colors (blue gray, brown, green) with a center and tips of orange (seen clearly in the seams) faded to beige. None of the group had seen this before; we all thought that orange was very stable. A wool challis Log Cabin (circa 1880) with a scalloped edge is masterfully executed.

An almost pristine Feathered Star (indigo on muslin) was set block to block so that the impact of the stars is diminished. There are a variety of indigo prints, including some with orange. The information that came with the quilt says it was made for an 1851 wedding. We were all intrigued by a very worn Album Block (circa 1850) made for a Saratoga man. In addition to the names there are wonderful drawings of railroad cars, a canon, a book, etc. One of the blocks with an intricate drawing of a rr scene contains the inscription Mitchell v. Orr which we thought might possibly be a legal citation rather than a name. I haven't found anything relevant by Googling. Any ideas? A second Album Block made of a single (difficult to date brown fabric) is a quilting sampler.

A Rose of Sharon made by Sarah Sherwood when she was 15--16 is as fresh and lovely as the day it was made. A more unusual applique is what appears to be an original desigh of a spray of flowers with birds sprouting from a hill. The birds and leaves are in reverse applique; the other elements are in traditional applique. The fine stems are double fold bias.

I'm looking forward to a return visit to see the rest of the collection.

Cinda in Central NY delighted to have met the CRQSG


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fugitive orange
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 06:32:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

--00163630ff99ef0f4e0484e5c6a1
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8

Hello all-Read Cinda s description with interest. In my experience, the
thing that makes 19th century cheddar and orange fade is urine, as in, I set
the baby on the quilt and uh oh! look what happened. That will take the
starch out of orange right quick. But again, cheddar (referred to in the
19th century more often as golden orange) was possible through home dyeing
early on. If someone did not mix the dye right...Loved the reference to the
sketches on the worn quilt and hope someone can find the RR reference.
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--00163630ff99ef0f4e0484e5c6a1--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Fugitive orange
From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 07:43:20 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

I have seen orange that spots olive green.

Xenia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Cinda in Central NY
From: LinusDonnaaol.com


Cinda in Central NY delighted to have met the CRQSG


Oh, that's wonderful! And I'm guessing that they are delighted to have
met you also, Cinda!

I know that I'm always happy to see you in a crowded room filled with
quilts and quilt enthusiasts. In my experience, every quilt study has been
greatly enhanced by your knowledge.

Bright blessings!
~Donna Laing

_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_
(http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com/)

--part1_288ab.384116d2.3902e49c_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fwd: Quilting Lessons
From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com>

What do you think of this? Scam or real? I can't do it since I'm booked
for that period. Anyone else in KS want to? Linda Laird

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Alex Walter <desmond.hills50yahoo.com>
> Date: April 22, 2010 6:06:48 PM CDT
> To: clproductsgmail.com
> Subject: Quilting Lessons
> Reply-To: alexwalteralexyahoo.com
>
> Greetings,
> I found your info while i was searching for a professional Quilting
teacher in your area and i want to believe you are a quilting
teacher/instructor a reliable one with a
> good teaching experience.i have been contracted to book for 10 persons
that will be coming from Turkey, they would like to book for 2 weeks
lesson for 3 hours each day, Monday to Saturday (morning hours) for a
group of 10.
>
> Their age range is 18,20 and the rest 8 are 21 years of age.In case if
you are disposed to offer lesson then kindly get back to me with the
type you teach along side with the cost.
> They are asking for 3 hours per day for 2 weeks - Monday - Saturday. A
total
> of 28 hrs,while they await their performance within your state.But it
is flexible,if you have a better offer they will be arriving on the Date
of 18th of June and starting classes by 19th of June till 2nd of July
> 2010.(Please give me total cost for the period specified including all
> applicable taxes).what is your payment options? Hope you accept credit
cards?
> How ever,am the agent has been contracted for their accommodation and
flight logistics.so all am asking of you is to get back to me with the
Grand total cost for the whole of their training in your facility for
the period
> specified.You can call me for further details or by a returning email.
> Your prompt reply will be appreciated.
>
> Alex Walter
> Cell: +447045-701-499
>
>
>


--Apple-Mail-2--471955437--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Fwd: Quilting Lessons
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 09:53:00 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

I think this is a scam - the "hope you accept credit cards" is a dead giveaway. I suppose you could respond with "cash only - no credit cards, no travelers checks" and see where that goes.

Kris

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fwd: Quilting Lessons
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 12:13:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Linda--

This looks legit to me. All he wants now is your prices and any changes in
the schedule--he's certainly not asking you for money.

Where are you located?

Kim

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fwd: Quilting Lessons
From: "Sharron" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 12:53:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

I received the same email yesterday. I decided it was a scam and deleted
it. I suppose I could have said I don't accept credit cards but I felt like
starting a dialogue with this person might not be a good idea.

Good luck.
Sharron Evans.........................
..............in Spring, TX where it's a beautiful sunny
day.........................


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Cinda in Central NY
From: <lrcawleytwcny.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 19:49:54 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Thank you Donna for the lovely compliment.
Cinda


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Fwd: Quilting Lessons
From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 23:14:34 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

I had a similar message last year, supposedly on behalf of a French-
speaking American girl attached to an African embassy, and attending
college in Paris. The email was supposedly sent by her father, who
would pay generously for her to learn all about American quilts and
quilting, and he would pay all bills with a credit card. To
"validate" himself and his request, he named an American naval attache
in London for whom he had previously worked.

I got curious and actually called the embassy in London (toll free)
and the Navy man whose name was being used (a real person) assured me
that he would track down whoever was using his name and see him
punished. Of course the original request was a Nigerian scam, and I
don't know if he was successful, because the Nigerians change internet
locations rapidly.

So yes ... it's a scam.

Xenia




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Fwd: Quilting Lessons
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net>

As much as I would love to believe it's legit....I've seen this before.

When I first got this email .... maybe 2 years ago, they were coming
from France or Spain, and it was some diplomats children his
relatives and their translator.... wording is identical....

>> I found your info while i was searching for a professional
>> Quilting teacher in your area and i want to believe you are a
>> quilting teacher/instructor a reliable one with a good teaching
>> experience.i have been contracted to book for 10 persons that will
>> be coming from Turkey, they would like to book for 2 weeks lesson
>> for 3 hours each day, Monday to Saturday (morning hours) for a
>> group of 10.


Laura Syler
Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles
Teacher, Lecturer, Judge
Richardson, TX
972-345-2787
hi-spiritairmail.net


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Scam
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>

Hello all-That same email and variations has been making the rounds of
professional teachers this week. Delete and think no more about it.
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

W
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re:quilting lessons
From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2010 08:14:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Interesting to read about the quilt lesson scam. Just last week our
guild had a traveling teacher who mentioned she'd been asked to teach
a Japanese group who wanted to come and stay in the US and have daily
lessons for several weeks. She was treating it as legitimate, but now
reading the recent posts on the subject, I suspect it was a scam.
Pat Kyser in stormy north Alabama


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilting Lessons
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2010 07:58:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Linda,

They are phishing! I have received similar requests to teach quilting and I
don't have a website. I suspect another source since the inquiries for all
sorts of things started when I let my info on that site be viewed by
'everyone'.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Fwd: Quilting Lessons
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2010 12:29:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Xenia wrote:
I got curious and actually called the embassy in London (toll free)
and the Navy man whose name was being used (a real person) assured me
that he would track down whoever was using his name and see him
punished. Of course the original request was a Nigerian scam, and I
don't know if he was successful, because the Nigerians change internet
locations rapidly.

Oh Xenia, I'm proud of you: curiosity and doggedness still abounds.

But this is what puzzles me about this whole thing: what does the scammer gain from the scammee? It can't be quilting lessons.

Dumb in Louisiana (but not tornadoed, merci beaucoups),
Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: socks quilt on eboard
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

Hi - OK, so I finally succeeded in posting a pictureand a description of
a quilt pieced of argyle-y jersey knit socks, and now (I hope not as a c
onsequence) i have not received anyQHL postings for DAYS! Is thatsome
sort of penalty for finally getting over the hump of technology?! How do I
receive those mailings again?I maynever post again if it means losin
g access to these very informative postings! Help!
Laura

Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com0A0A0A
--0-1190920059-1272131412:83498--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Fwd: Quilting Lessons
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Apr 2010 21:44:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Well, they did ask if the teacher accepts credit cards. So my guess is
there's some banking dishonesty afoot and a plan to glean information. I
imagine there are a few steps to the process once a person "bites" the bait,
so to speak.
Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Teaching Scam
From: Edwaquiltaol.com
 


I think someone should answer this. A figure of around $30,000 comes to
mind breaking it down into
teaching time, rental of facility, rental of sewing machines, supplies, bus
to take students around for quilting field trips, attorney fee to deal
with liability, etc etc etc.......and of course the total fee to clear before
any contracts are signed........All this from a web site special for the
correspondence and contact thru the attorney.
I guess this money is from the estate of a deposed dictator who left a will
that his money should be used for the betterment of his countrymen/women.
I wonder if anyone really takes this kind of bate.

Holice



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: FW: info on leather suit
From: "Newbie Richardson" <pastcraftsverizon.net>

Thanks to those of you who responded to my querry. Thought you would like
"the rest of the story"!

Newbie Richardson

_____




I have seen suits that are somewhat similar to this one, all from the 19th
century. They are not common. The National Cowboy and Western Heritage
Museum has three jackets and two pairs of pants-all collected by an artist
named Grandee who used them as subjects for his western paintings. The
Buffalo Bill Historical Center has a pair of pants that are somewhat similar
and, of course, the leather coats that belonged to Buffalo Bill. They also
have a suit that resembles this one but worn by Calamity Jane. The
University of Rhode Island has a similar leather suit that Margaret Ordonez
could tell you about. I am sure that there are others scattered around the
country but this is a rare example. I am guessing without seeing details
that it could be from the 1880s if not earlier.



Laurel




From: COLLEEN CALLAHAN [mailto:jette_2msn.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2010 12:53 PM
To: Wilson, Laurel E.
Subject: A question from Colleen Callahan



Hi Laurel,



So sorry I will miss your presentation at the meeting in Kansas City--it
just didn't work out for me to go this year.



I am hoping you can help with an inquiry from this small museum in Ohio
called the Spirit of '76 Museum (the guy that painted that famous picture,
"The Spirit of '76" was from this town, so that is what they named the local
historical society). Anyway, I consulted with them 2 years ago about their
clothing collection and discovered they had this leather suit that belonged
to an eccentric town resident (Wellington, OH) who lived in the late
19th/early 20th centuries (don't have exact birth and death dates but could
get them). This man's name was Alex Justice and he lived half the year in
Wellington and half the year in the Florida Everglades, doing various plant
and animal nature studies there. So after seeing this suit and hearing this
story, I told them that I thought the suit was a remarkable survival and
that they should have it conserved (it had been shown on a 1960s male
mannequin for years and was in very fragile condition). So they had it
conserved by a man named Paul Storch who is experienced in leather
conservation. Now they have it back and they are putting it on display in
the case as you see below and they want to include more information about
how rare and special such a suit is and I am hoping you can help me with
this based on your studies of dress of the Old West. Even though Alex
didn't wear it out West, he obviously derived the idea for the suit from
some this type of clothing.



By the way the difference in the way the leather looks in the jacket and
pants was do to a waterproofing process that was done to the pants according
to Paul Storch.



Hope to see you at a CSA event in the not too distant future.



Colleen