Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 22, 2010 From: nevahartverizon.net Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 08:33:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Cinda - sooo good to hear a Cinda-gram again!

Your description of the quilts near Saratoga sound very, very NY. Brown-blue-orange smacks of many NY quilts I have seen. Not sure about the fugitive orange in the seams, though.

I have seen several chrome orange-pink-green (think of a green that has lots of gold in it) applique from that end of the state, and albums are common. Wonder if that is why Arch imports went over so big in that area???? NY's version of "dutchy" if you think about it....lots of compact designs, moderate in scale.

The album you described sounds similar to several which have been brought to auction this season.

Keep up the good work at spreading this info!

Neva Hart AQS Appraiser in Va. Quilt HIstorian by nature

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Subject: Re: Quilting Lessons From: lfrihartcox.net Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 15:03:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

The gentleman/lady needs to invest in grammar lessons before deveoping what might be a scam. Sounds like a scam or a fun time teaching quilting.

Have a great one!

Hugs and quilts, Linda]

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Subject: Welsh quilts From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2010 16:18:45 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

I have just stumbled on this sales site and wondered what listmembers might think of the prices being asked for Welsh quilts. http://www.blodwen.com/category.php?s_cat=15

Sally Ward

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Subject: post of quilt history issues From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2010 13:08:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Marietta Womak asked what are "...the major debates right now in our field (quilt history)."

I think the age-old question of whether quilting is art or craft should qualify as a relevant and very much discussed question. It comes and goes but never seems to get answered satisfactorily, but if you ask people they do seem to have an opinion.

Food for thought: The adoption (by graphic artists in the last couple of decades) of fiber as their "medium" has certainly taken the question to a higher level and refocused the issue; not to mention that it has enlightened many of us to new possibilities and explorations. The development of professional or promotional organizations for art quilters and the popularity of print media to promote artistic quilting in many forms and formats, as well as to inform and persuade us, certainly speaks to the current level of interest in the artistic aspects of quilting. It doesn't feel like it is a transitory movement to me. How about you all?

Just thinking out loud,

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Medal of Honor winners in the National HOTB Fallen Heroes Quilt From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2010 16:26:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

As many of you know, I am in the process of starting a National Home of theBrave Fallen Heroes Quilt for those who have died in the service of our country in the Iraqi or Aghanistan Conflicts.Each quilt will be a potholder quilt done in the style of the U.S. Civil War Sanitary Commission quiltsand will have either 68 or 77 eight inch blocks, each honoring a differentfallen hero with a story by the block maker on the back. The first quilt is almost done, with 9 of its 11 rows completed. TODAY, I RECEIVED A BLOCK IN THE MAIL HONORING P02 MICHAEL MONSOOR, USN, WHO RECEIVED THE MEDAL OF HONOR for his bravery and actions on the day of hisdeath September 19, 2006. It got me to thinking and I checked to see how many Medals of Honor have been awarded in these two conflicts and there are only six--all for fallen heroes. I would like to place all their blocks in the same row in the quilt--but there are SEVEN blocks in each row. So I am seeking ideas of what to do with the seventh block--a special design--perhaps ones that just says in the center square "Medal of Honor Recipients" or some type of appliqued design; or another fallen hero OR should I just interspere these brave soldiers in with the other fallen heroes and not single them out for a special row???? Ideas, please. Best, Don --0-832864097-1272324412=:17046--

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Subject: Re: Medal of Honor winners in the National HOTB Fallen Heroes Quilt From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2010 16:42:21 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

well, I thought of that; but there are currently three different Medals of Honor designs--based upon the branch of service, where before there was only one.--so it might be a bit crowded on the small block.If anyone can design a block like that with the understanding it must be eight inches finished (including binding); I would be honored to include it in the quilt. By the way, anyone can contribute a block.If you would like info on howto do that, please contact me.best, Don

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Subject: Quilting and rehabilitation From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2010 19:25:15 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Can any of you help this graduate student with some information? She gave me permission to forward her note and e-mail address. Here is what she sent me: "I ran across your website when trying to find information on the use of quilting for rehabilitation.Currently I am a graduate studentworking on a practicum for physical therapy. While I have found a lot of information about quilts for disabled/disadvantaged, there appears to be little about the use of quilting to restore function in the arm. Any information you may be able to share about this aspect of quilting will be much appreciated. Maureen RPT" Contact her off-list:BaileyMauraol.com Thanks -- Sue in Illinois   --0-107002721-1272335116=:85955--

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Subject: RE: English Paper Piecing From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2010 20:41:27 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi to all quilter and quilt historian-extraordinaire. I am reaching out to all hand-piecing quilters 

 

My question tonight comes after several frustrating hours of trying to work in miniature and pertains to technique with regard to English Paper Piecing of hexagons, diamonds, and equilateral triangles that are VERY small.

 

I wonder if someone can tell me if there is a special technique used when working with very small pieces (less than 1=94 and the triangles are about =BC=94 to =BD=94 depending upon the piece) (I know   I m nuts, but I am trying to recreate a slightly smaller version of an antique quilt I own and that is how big the pieces work out mathematically.)

 

SO   how did the ladies of yesteryear work with those small pieces? I have seen antique quilts with really tiny hexagons or diamonds and I wonder if they did something that I am currently not doing.

 

My current technique (that works for the jewel pieces and the hexagon) is to pin on the top of the fabric to the paper template, hand baste the edges down, remove the pin, and whip stitch the pieces together   then remove templates once all edges are finished. This works great with the larger pieces and even the 5/8=94 hexagons.

 

My problem comes in with the very small pieces- my appliqu=E9 pins (which are the smallest I could find and are =BD=94 long) are just too big to use. I am reluctant to use glue as I want the piece to stand the test of time  so I am looking for help from the world of experts.

 

Any advice you can offer   a web page that perhaps I haven t found yet (for I have searched) that shows how to hold the pieces so my fat fingers don t get in the way  any advice is greatly welcomed and can be mailed off list or on -

 

Sincerest thanks in advance from one frustrated hand-piecing Californian.

Leah Zieber

Leah.zieberverizon.net

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Subject: RE: English Paper Piecing From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 00:52:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

How about freezer paper, two pieces in the shape, held together on the dull side by glue stick. Put larger pieces together first, shiny sides out, then cut out your shapes. The double thickness is sturdier for folding uner the tiny edges. No pins needed. Just a tiny tacking iron. And a pusher -- don't get your finger near the edge.

You can even print out your shapes on the freezer paper. Even though the print out will wind up on the inside it will still show through for cutting.

Judy Grow

.I wonder if someone can tell me if there is a special technique used when >working with very small pieces (less than 1" and the triangles are about ź" >to ˝" depending upon the piece) (I know - I'm nuts, but I am trying to >recreate a slightly smaller version of an antique quilt I own and that is >how big the pieces work out mathematically.)

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Subject: RE: English Paper Piecing From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 09:40:37 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

What about tacking the paper to the fabric instead of pinning or gluing it? A couple of stitches which you can then remove. And instead of tacking the seam allowance to the paper, run a running stitch round it and draw it up tight over the paper.

Sally Ward/Tatters

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Subject: Piecing in Miniature From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 04:09:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Leah Zieber wrote: I wonder if someone can tell me if there is a special technique used when working with very small pieces ... I know =E2=80=93 I=E2=80=99m nuts, but I am trying to recreate a slightly smaller version of an antique quilt I own ...

Leah, I'm not sure if this might help you: When piecing miniatures, keep the seam allowance larger that necessary. Trim the seams down smaller after sewing, as needed, like before seams cross. I've done this sort of thing with tiny miniature dolls, sewing the outline of the doll onto 2 small squaresof fabric, then cutting it out for turning inside out. For their tiny dollclothes, a similar technique, sewing first, then trimming seams, makes them much easier to handle. Barbara

  

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Subject: RE: English Paper Piecing From: LAHudlowaol.com Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 07:22:00 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

Remember most of the time the paper was left in those old paper pieced quilts.

Lori Hudlow

Antietam Controls, Inc. 5404 Porterstown Road Keedysville, MD 21756 301-432-3930 301-432-3931 fax

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 26, 2010 From: LinusDonnaaol.com Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 07:28:11 EDT X-Message-Number: 6

Subject: Quilting and rehabilitation From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2010 19:25:15 -0700 (PDT) Can any of you help this graduate student with some information? She gave me permission to forward her note and e-mail address. Here is what she sent me: "I ran across your website when trying to find information on the use of quilting for rehabilitation. Currently I am a graduate student working on a practicum for physical therapy. While I have found a lot of information about quilts for disabled/disadvantaged, there appears to be little about the use of quilting to restore function in the arm.

Wow, Sue, your inquiry really tweaked my brain. I think of quilting as a reason for NEEDING physical therapy.

I'm surrounded by quilters on a daily basis (quilting is my occupation as well as my passion and avocation). And dozens of quilters I know, including me. need physical therapy to recover from repetitive motion injuries caused by sewing and quilting. These injuries include carpal tunnel, tendonitis in wrist or elbow, trigger finger, even rotator cuff injuries to the shoulder.

Currently, a hospital in South Africa is using sewing as therapy for their TB patients. They need to spend months in seclusion while taking their drugs and recuperating, and therapists has them sew "bedding". >>www.manguzihospital.org/Manguzi_Hospital_therapy.htm

Several institutions for mental health used sewing as therapy. I know that it soothes my mind.

Bright blessings! ~Donna Laing _www.northstarqualityquilting.com_ (http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)

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Subject: paper piecing From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net> Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 09:05:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

We have paper pieced a quilt using newspapers as our template. We had to switch to a white paper because the ink was rubbing off on the fabrics.

Question about smaller piecing. I am working on the Jane Stickle quilt and pressing my seams to one side and trimming them if necessary. A friend of mine pressed all of hers open. Historically what did people do?

Brenda Applegate -

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Subject: Re: Welsh quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 09:11:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Lovely quilts! I'm here in the US - do I figure right that 1500 pounds would be about $2300 in US dollars? If so that seems high to me. I know we discussed before the 'front' and 'back' terminology with regard to Welsh quilts but I need a refresher. I see the descriptions say 'one side' and the 'other side'. I assume the marking would be done on the side where it would most easily be seen (solid or strippy) and thus the quilting done from that side too. Would both sides be considered equal as to use? Would one side or the other be considered 'best'? jean Minnesota ------=_NextPart_000_007D_01CAE5E9.9D4843E0--

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Subject: Re: Medal of Honor winners in the National HOTB Fallen Heroes Quilt From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>

My two cents....I like the idea of interspersing. All were heroic even if they didn't get specific formal recognition. You could come up with a symbol to designate that and add it to the corner or somewhere on the block of those known to have received this specific medal and make note of that on the back label. Otherwise, future quilt historians will ponder the meaning of that symbol in some, but not all, blocks! Or how about an asterik with an explanation on the back label. jean

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Subject: RE: paper piecing From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 09:22:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Historically, to one side.

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Subject: Quilting News - Calico and a warning to young men. From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 8:03:36 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

The Mountain Democrat Placerville, California September 13, 1856 Page 1 Warning to Young Men.--Young men, keep your eyes peeled when you are after the women! Is the pretty dress or form attractive? Or even a pretty face?-- Flounces, boy, are of no consequence. A pretty face will grow old. Paint will wash off. The sweet smile will give way to the scowl of the termagant. The neat form will be pitched into calico. Another and far different being will take the place of the lovely goddess who smiles sweet and eats sour candy. Keep your eye peeled, boy, when you are after the wo- men. If the little dear is cross and scolds at her mother in the back room, you may be sure that you will get particular fits all around the house. If she apologizes for washing dishes, you will need a girl to fan her. If she blushes when found at the wash tub with her sleeves rolled up, be sure, sir, that she is of the codfish aristocracy, little breeding and little sense. If you marry a girl who knows nothing but to commit woman slaughter at the piano, you have got the poorest piece of music ever got up. Find one whose mind is right, then pitch in. Don't be hanging about like a sheep thief, as though you were ashamed to be seen in the day time, but walk up like a chicken to the dough, and ask for the article like a man.

-- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: RE: paper piecing From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 09:23:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Seams to one side, Oh, I meant in regular patchwork, obviously, not when using papers. Kim

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Subject: Re: [HomeOfTheBraveQuiltProject] Medal of Honor winners in the National HOTB Fallen Heroes Quilt From: Donald Beld

There are three different modern Medals of Honor; but you idea is interesting. I have attached the photo of the block found in the Hingham, MassSanitary Commission quilt--perhaps doing this in blue and an outer circle in blue could work. And, as you said, add the words, Medal of Honor Recipients. What do you think? best, Don --- On Tue, 4/27/10, Dawn Kucera <dawn.kucerayahoo.com> wrote:

From: Dawn Kucera <dawn.kucerayahoo.com> Subject: Re: [HomeOfTheBraveQuiltProject] Medal of Honor winners in the National HOTB Fallen Heroes Quilt

 

The Medal of Honor award itself is a medium blue with 13 tiny gold stars.    I think you could make a block using that.  Lets say,   Have the background the blue of the medal. Then applique one representative star in the center.  Then put something like   Medal of Honor Row on the front, and some info on the back, like the fact that there are 6 from these wars and so on.   

Aloha, dawn

 So I am seeking ideas of what to do with the seventh block--a  special design--perhaps ones that just says in the center square "Medal of Honor Recipients" or some type of appliqued design; or another fallen hero   OR should I just interspere these brave soldiers in with the other fallen heroes and not single them out for a special row????    Ideas, please.  Best, Don

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Subject: terms From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 11:09:55 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

? Codfish aristocracy???Now THERE'S an image!!!!

Google says it applied to persons who made their money in business.One wonders if it referred to orincluded Yankees.

Hmmph.

Susan

 

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Subject: Re: Medal of Honor winners in the National HOTB Fallen Heroes Quilt From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 20:27:03 EDT X-Message-Number: 15

Dear Don, Another suggestion. You said that there are 3 different medals for 3 of the services. What if you get an applique block for each. Insert one of the blocks in the middle of your row of medal winners. Insert the other two medal blocks one above and one below the medal block in the above mentioned row. That way each service will be honored as will their members as well as the members of all the services who were lost. You are to be commended for your excellent and respectful rememberance of our lost ones who served with honor. Regards. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth

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Subject: quilting and rehabilitation From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2010 06:41:48 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

You guys come through for the graduate student and I thank each of you who were able to help her. Here is her thank you to all of you who responded to her request for information on-list and privately. "I have longfelt that quilters number the most generous and good hearted people around, and this quest has strengthened that belief. Thanks again, Maureen" It meant a lot to her and her research. Thanks, Sue from Illinois   --0-1427027444-1272462108=:68312--

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Subject: re: paper piecing From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net> Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2010 11:02:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I have a piece of Averil Colby's work. The pieces are hexagonal and each side is about 1/4 inch. The papers are inside and the paper backing is almost completely covered with the folded back fabric edges.

Jean

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Subject: Medal of Honor Recipients row From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2010 09:11:13 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Hi everyone, thanks for the ideas.I have discussed this issue closely with several folks with high up military connections--long family ties, including many generals in the family; and they both said the same basic thing:Although the recipients would not want to be singled out, as this is our Nation's Highest Military Honor, the recipients should be singled out whenever and wherever possible. An interesting fact.Medal of Honor recipients wear their medals on a blue ribbon around their necks and all military personnel--regardless of their rank--are required to salute them when they pass by.Thus even a general salutes a private if he is wearing his medal. We cannot do less.Therefore, in the second quilt, I will have a center 8 inch block as seen in the attached picture and will put the six recipients three in a row vertically on either side; thus forming an H.They willalso be bound in the blue to single them out. Additional recipients will have the same blue sashing as they are added later.And, yes, on the medal, the point of the star goes down. best, Don --0-337164952-1272471074=:53098--

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Subject: Re: terms From: hknight453aol.com Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2010 13:42:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Yes, it does include many old Yankee families. The Peabodies fromnorthern Massachusetts are a good example. Stonington, Nantucket, andNew Bedford among other towns grew very rich on shipping and whaling.Dried codfish was caught and processed locally, and shipped manyplaces. The best quality went to Europe as a delicacy for fast days.Poorer qualities went to the Caribbean to feed slaves.

Heather,an authentic Swamp Yankee

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Subject: RE: Paper Piecing From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2010 17:55:36 -0700 X-Message-

I am overwhelmed with the outpouring of response to my questions. Thank you all - I so appreciate all the suggestions - so many good and new ideas.

Again,

Thank you!

Sincerely

Leah Zieber

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Subject: Hawaii Quilt Guild Annual Show From: Laurie Woodard <Lwoodardhawaii.edu> Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2010 16:02:19 -1000 X-Message-Number: 6

For those of you who will be visiting the islands this coming week, do check out the current quilt exhibit at the Honolulu Art Academy's Art Center April 30-May 9.

There are images of two quilts by Hawaii Textile Artist, Charlene Husghes on the Academy's web site. The quilt on the left is a self- portrait. The one on the right is a portrait of Hawaiian quilter, Gussie Bento.

http://www.honoluluacademy.org/cmshaa/academy/index.aspx?id=750

Laurie Woodard

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Subject: Re: English Paper Piecing From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca> Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2010 20:55:47 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

Today's queries about EPP have induced me to tell the list about Quilt Canada, this country's largest national show, which is currently happening here in my home town. As a member of the Local Organizing Committee, I have put together a special exhibit of Alberta's heritage and antique quilts. I've been pretty loose about what kind of connection these quilts have to Alberta - made by, owned by, used by, collected by an Albertan is close enough.

Anyway, one of the most spectacular pieces in this showing is a silk and velvet EPP UFO (top only), made of 60 degree diamonds that are about an inch long. It is quite large, 86"x89", and there are still papers in most of the outer round. The silks are in extremely good condition. I could count on one hand the number of patches that have shredded or deteriorated. We have tentatively dated this piece to 1850 or earlier, based on its size, fabric quality, and newspaper foundations. Although it was purchased out of a central Alberta farm family estate, is sure wasn't made here! 160 yrs ago there wasn't much here besides buffalo grass, let alone silk!

(My other favourite pieces in this show are a couple of pretty tops my friend picked up at Value Village. Sorry, no provenance!)

Jennifer Hill -- 'Winds of inspiration. . .' Quilt Canada 2010 Telus Convention Centre, Calgary, AB April 26 - May 1 2010 http://www.canadianquilter.com/events/quilt-canada-2010.php


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Subject: QN - Calico, a party.
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2010 22:31:19 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

This next article is interesting. It is the earliest reference to Calico
Parties I have yet to find. There are more articles to come on Calico Parties.
See what you think.

The Mountain Democrat
Placerville, California
March 14, 1857
Page 4
Calico modest, unassuming, econom-
ical calico--is no longer a drug in the
market. It is at last growing into favor,
rising in California--taking the place of
silks and satins in decking the fair forms
of our lovely girls. We are decidedly for
calico, we love it, think of it, dream of it,
shouldn't object to squeezing it, provided
always it covered a young, pure, guileless
heart. Calico is our passion--our weak-
ness, and whenever we hear it rustle past
our office, it causes our heart to thrill
with a strange and queer sensation, com-
pounded of love, admiration and despair.
A calico party is to be given in Shasta on
the 20th. Can't we get up one in Pla-
cerville, just to feel how comfortable and
see how becoming home-spun is?

--
Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/
http://www.majorreichaward.com/


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Subject: quilt laugh
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>


Here's what happened to me this a.m. in my apartment building in NYC.
 
Got out of bed (grudgingly), stumbled across the apt. to the bathroom, showered, then came back in the buff into the bedroom to pull out what =
to wear for the day and,,,,,,,,,,,,,
 
two workmen on a scaffolding descending from the roof were at my bedroom windows painting the outside sashing; they glanced in when I screamed i=
n surprise, and there I was in the altogether!
 
How is this quilt related?!I spotted a quilt on the chair near the doorway that I was able to grab to pull in front of me. I had to scrounge cloth=
es from the hamper to don because I just couldn't go back into the bedroom after that!
 
p.s. I am posting to eboard (hopefully) the other socks quilt on the eboard, it is made of intricately detailed sort of ruffly girls knits, looks like all top cuffs
 
Laura
Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com 


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Subject: Hawaii Quilt Guild's Quilted Forest
From: Laurie Woodard <lwoodardhawaii.edu>
Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2010 10:58:32 -1000
X-Message-Number: 3

Sharon Pinka kindly asked if there were photos of the quilt-wrapped
trees mentioned in the Honolulu Academy of Arts newsletter article on
the upcoming Hawaii Quilt Guild's annual show. So, I've posted a
couple of pics on the eBoard.

Thanks, Sharon.

Laurie Woodard


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Subject: Re: Welsh quilts
From: <lrcawleytwcny.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2010 17:30:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Those Welsh quilts look pricey to me. Great to look at though.
Cinda in Central NY

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Subject: quilty things to do/see in Boston and polyester feed sack From: "jhorsey" <jhorseynumail.org> Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2010 16:29:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi, I am going to be in the Boston area this coming week and I would love any suggestions of quilty things to do while I'm there. Of course, I'll visit the NEQM. If you have any suggestions for me, please email me at jhorseynumail.org

Also, I went to an estate sale yesterday of the old folks who ran the farm/seed store in our little town. I saw what I sure thought were 2 feedsacks in polyester. They were still sewn together in the sack shape, but had no labels or drawstrings. So here's my question for the list, where there ever feedsacks made out of polyester, that you have come across?

Sent my DH back today, but they had gone as part of a big box of yucky fabrics, so I guess I'll never know for sure. thanks so much!

Jo Glass Newnan, Ga

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Subject: Hawaiian Quilts From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 13:58:05 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 2

Is there a traditional spacing of the echo quilting on Hawaiian quilts ( 1/4 inch, 1/2 inch)? Is there a traditional size of a Hawaiian quilt? Ihave bought two unfinished tops and they are huge.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: post of quilt history issues From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 14:17:42 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 3

Kathy,

I think that Julie Siber had one of the best answers to this question. I think what she said is "Not all quilts are art but some quilters achieve art".

Anyone that catagorically says that quilts are not art has not been to a large quilt show in the last several decades. Everything that has been done on canvas has been done on quilts: portraits, landscapes, still lifes, modern art, folkart etc. and in some dementional quilts scupture. There is also thread painting. They are art using the medium of fabric thread and other fibers and embellishments. Many of these quilts were never intended to lay on a bed. they were meant to hang on a wall. But even a bed quilt can achieve art. "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder". From the time when women were not included in the classic art forms they expressed their desire to creat art in the forms they were allowed with many stunning results. These quilt artist paint with fabric and thread. 

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: question about a book From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 12:20:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Quilty folk, I have a somewhat sensitive question about a Pennsylvania quilt publication from the 1990s that I would like to pose offline to someone with a good library and acquaintance with PA quilts - I don't have good updated emails for everyone, I'm afraid, or I'd contact individuals directly - I also would like to be able to discuss this today, so if anyone could contact me right away, that would be great.

I know this all sounds mysterious, but I can't risk saying something that might be --- well, difficult!

Thanks so much,

Candace Perry

candaceschwenkfelder.com

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Subject: Compression sacs and quilts? From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 9:40:20 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Does anyone have experience using compression sacs when transporting your antique quilts? Below is a link to one kind. http://www.travelsmith.com/jump.jsp?itemID=11032&itemType=PRODUCT&path=1%2C2%2C292%2C2143%2C2495&iProductID=11032&sortBy=0 Thanks in advance for the advice. sue -- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: Compression sacs and quilts? From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 19:22:02 +0000 X-Message-Number: 6

 

Hi, Sue - I tried to use a similar, but cheaper product. I got mine at the local discount store so I guess, you get what you pay for. They had the one-way valve described in the link to your product to attach to the vacuum  hose. That worked. The trouble was the slide closure at the top of the ba g. The slide tab was loose and the seal broke. I used the bags to get my  quilts into the suitcase, then got the suitcase closed so when the seal rel eased the quilts were all packed up. I decided it was more work than worth - both in time & money. Good luck. Peg

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Subject: Re: Compression sacs and quilts? From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 19:23:38 +0000 X-Message-Number: 7

Hi, Sue - I tried to use a similar, but cheaper product. I got mine at the local discount store so I guess, you get what you pay for. They had the o ne-way valve described in the link to your product to attach to the vacuum  hose. That worked. The trouble was the slide closure at the top of the ba g. The slide tab was loose and the seal broke. I used the bags to get my  quilts into the suitcase, then got the suitcase closed so when the seal rel eased the quilts were all packed up. I decided it was more work than worth - both in time & money. Good luck. Peg -

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Subject: Re: Hawaiian Quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 17:18:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Polly,My friend who lived in HI for a number of years and is a quilter says they use the thumb as a guide. The books I have suggest between 1/2" - 1 "..... Just be consistent. I did a smaller wall piece and felt 1" was too big proportionally for that piece but for a large bed quilt I think it would be great. jean

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Subject: Re: Hawaiian Quilts From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 17:02:26 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

Polly Mello wrote: Is there a traditional spacing of the echo quilting on Hawaiian quilts ( 1/4 inch, 1/2 inch)? Is there a traditional size of a Hawaiian quilt? I have bought two unfinished tops and they are huge.

Dear Polly (who was only one short step ahead of me on those tops yesterday), I'm not sure about traditional spacing, but if you want to do 1/4-inch echo, here is a trick I learned from Virginia Siciliano, using 1/4-inch tape. She tears off a little bit of the tape, and puts it on the end of her thumbnail. Then she uses that as her 1/4-inch guide for echo quilting. Barbara

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Subject: Re: Compression sacs and quilts? From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 22:10:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Trying again - I tried to use a similar, but cheaper product. I got mine at the local discount store so I guess, you get what you pay for. The ones I used had the one-way valve described in the link to Sue's product to attach to the vacuum hose. That worked. The trouble was the slide closure at the top of the bag. The slide tab was loose and the seal (like a zip-loc style bag) broke. I used the bags to get my quilts into the suitcase, then got the suitcase closed so when the seal released the quilts were all packed. The second challenge was having a vacuum with a proper hose attachment when I was ready to make the return trip. I decided these bags were more work than worth - both in time & money. Good luck. Peg