Subject: Subject: Re: Hawaiian Quilts From: Laurie Woodard <Lwoodardhawaii.edu> Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 20:41:17 -1000 X-Message-Number: 1

> Polly Mello wrote: Is there a traditional spacing of the echo > quilting on Hawaiian quilts ( 1/4 inch, 1/2 inch)? Is there a > traditional size of a Hawaiian quilt? I have bought two unfinished > tops and they are huge.

Hi Polly and all,

Traditional twentieth-century Hawaiian quilters preferred a loftier batt than was fashionable in American "best quilts" or is popular with contemporary American quilters today. With greater loft the number of stitches tend to be fewer, most commonly 7-8 or 8-10 stitches/inch, and the contour quilting rows are generally 5/8" to 3/4" apart. The goal was/is to capture the play of light and shadow across the surface of the quilt, something that is lacking with thin batts and closely worked quilting rows.

As Jean suggested quilters space the contour quilting as they go; I learned to use my little finger as the rule.

As to quilt size, they follow the general trends seen in American quilts over time. It sounds as though your tops, Polly, are from the late twentieth-century and the era of the king-sized bed.

Aloha, Laurie

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Subject: re: polyester feed sacks From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net> Date: Sat, 1 May 2010 07:34:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I don't know about the feed sacks, but I have 2 flour sacks--in polyester. I got them when I bought 25 pound sacks of flour in Nebraska. I would think they would also produce the feed sacks.

Jean

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Subject: Speaking of WWII quilts... From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2010 11:20:05 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

This is an interesting article I just ran across, about a group of women who made a quilt while they were POWs

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1259522/My-Tenko-Quilt-The-78-year-old-reunited-quilt-secretly-Japanese-camp.html

Kris

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Subject: Joan Kiplinger/Kentucky Derby From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 1 May 2010 15:12:48 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

This is for Joan, I am really missing her today, we used to bet on the Kentucky Derby every year, and banter back and forth about our favorite horse. SO thinking of Joan today I am betting on Stately Victor and hoping he wins. Anyone else share Derby stories with Joan???

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Subject: quilt insurance From: QUILTMOOREaol.com Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 12:43:38 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

Does anyone know anything about quilt insurance-a separate policy from home owners, in particular a Chris Johnston and "Society of Quilters" in Arizona. Thanks, Nan in FL www.mooreandmoorequilts.com

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Subject: Colonial Williamsburg From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 20:05:47 +0100 X-Message-Number: 2

I'm looking for information about coarse velvet or perhaps plush (I'm not sure of my definitions) from Colonial Williamsburg which appears to include goat hair in its makeup. It may be cut velvet, or perhaps pressed. Anyone know anything about this type of fabric?

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: Colonial Williamsburg From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 15:37:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

According to Florence Montgomery, Textiles in America 1650-1870, p. 170, under "velvet":

"Utrecht velvet is a stout velvet which, according to Roland de la Plati=E8re, was made of linen warp and weft with pile of goat's hair in =20

solid colors or striped, embossed with patterns or printed. It was used for upholstery and coach linings.

In the Moccasi manuscript of about 1760 are swatches of Veluto d'Utrech in gold with a cut-pile pattern and Mocchetta Goffrata with a stamped pattern made at Lille (see Pl. D-62). Twenty swatches of flowered and plain wool velvets of Spitalfields manufacture in gold, scarlet, tan, black, green, and raspberry have cut or uncut pile as well as voided areas (see Pl. D-19)."

Does this help?

Xenia

--Apple-Mail-1-316602875--

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Subject: Re: Colonial Williamsburg From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 20:49:35 +0100 X-Message-Number: 4

Sounds very like the fragment I was looking at, and 'embossed' could be right. But I was curious about a specific connection with Colonial =20

Williamsburg, and what it might have been used for. Would it have been clothing or upholstery of some sort?

Sally Ward

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Subject: Quilting News - Calico Ball in Iowa From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 17:53:37 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Davenport Daily Gazette Davenport, Iowa January 3, 1857 Page 3 Calico Ball.--A ball of the above char- acter will come off this evening at the Ger- man Theatre. The prominent feature of the occasion will be that the dresses worn by the ladies shall consist of calico, with the intention of being afterwards distributed among the poor. This novel mode of at- tempting to be benevolent, originated among the codfish fashionables of New York, and has been unwisely imitated in many of our large towns. We must confess the proceeding strikes us, as not calculated to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, or very materially to diminish the wants of the suf- fering and needy. A few dozen garments of thin cotton fabric and of uniform size, are poor apologies for warm clothing. They certainly are not woolen stockings or stout shoes, bushels of coal or sacks of flour; neither are they the equivalent of these.-- Many a fair one may think she is engaged in promoting an act of charity, when enjoy- ing the dance but we conceive a more mer- itorious way would be to seek earnestly for individual cases of extreme poverty, minister to their real necessities abundant- ly, and rest satisfied, in connection with a light conscience that God rewardeth a cheerful giver. While wishing for our young friends an evening of rational enjoy- ment, we would not have them indulge the idea that by this erratic movement they are dipping very deep at the fountain of true benevolence.

-- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

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Subject: Re: question about a book From: <lrcawleytwcny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 3 May 2010 6:52:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Candace,

I just read your intriguing email. I'll be glad to help you if I can. Most of my PA books are unpacked after out move to Central NY. My new contact inof is: 117 Cleveland Blvd. Fayetteville, NY 13066 315-632-4144 lrcawleytwcny.rr.com

Of course, I'm consumed by curiosity.

Cinda

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 01, 2010 From: Annette Gero <a.gerounsw.edu.au> Date: Mon, 3 May 2010 14:41:47 +1000 X-

Kris,

You probabaly all know the story of the 3 other quilts made iin Changi by the Australian and English women prisoners. Two are in the Australian war memorial and one is in London, with the Red Cross, I think.

Here is is:-

Perhaps the most famous WW11 quilts made by women are a series of three made from scrap material by the Australian and English civilian women and nurses who were interned in Changi prison (Singapore) from 1942 to 1944. In order to inform the outside world and in particular their relatives in both countries that they were alive, each woman made several signed blocks which were incorporated into three quilts of sixty six blocks each. In an attempt to ensure two quilts would reach the Australian and English Red Cross Societies respectively, the third quilt was made and presented to the Japanese Red Cross.

An embroidered message was placed on the back of each quilt. The one intended to reach the Australian Red Cross stated the following:

Presented by the women of Changi Internment Camp 1942 to the wounded Australian soldiers with our sympathy for their suffering. It is our wish that on the cessation of hostilities that this quilt be presented to the Australian Red Cross Society. It is advisable to dry clean this quilt.

The quilt destined for the Japanese Red Cross and the British Red Cross hadsimilar messages except substitution with the words "Japanese" and "British" and the inclusion of the camp number 2602. It was hoped that if one quilt was given to the Japanese, the other two would have a greater chance of survival. The quilts provided a short list of those women who were still alive in Changi. The blocks on the quilt intended for the Japanese were mainlyflowers and pleasant scenes with some oriental flavour. However the quiltsdesignated for "home" depicted more of the true conditions in the prison and the women's patriotism to their countries. There is a block with a map of Australia with a kangaroo in the centre, surrounded by a ship and an airplane; the Changi prison walls; several Changi cells; and a "V" for victory.As well there are blocks showing memories from home-flowers in the garden and in vases, birds, real food, fishing by a river, frisking lambs, and thecottages of home. Many of the women who made these squares did not survive. But the quilts did reach their destinations.

Annette Gero in sunny Australia

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Subject: Insurance for quilts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Mon, 3 May 2010 05:31:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Hi.

I have no affiliation, but just went out there looking to see what I could find.

http://www.chicagoartistsresource.org/visual-arts/node/9689

This seems like a likely place to start. Please let us know if you find out anything, what rates exists, as many of us would like to do such things. I'm an artist and quilters and many of pieces sit around here. My art is for sale but when it is not in a gallery or show, it just stays on a special shelf. It would be a great loss. I should look into it. My quilts are from the heart and often cannot have a dollar value placed on them, but I ought to get them appraised and consider a special policy. Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 02, 2010 From: "Catherine Litwinow" <litwinow62msn.com> Date: Mon, 3 May 2010 10:14:14 -0500 

Thank you Sue for the wonderful note about the German's in Davenport. There were several German newspapers and 2 Turner Halls (for gymnastics health and fitness) + wonderful singing groups.All that ended at the start of WWI, when speaking German was no longer permitted. Our German Heritage Museum is very good. They have one of the largest Zither ensembles in the States.

Check them out! http://gahc.org/<http://gahc.org/> One of the big difference between the Amish and those from Amana-both very religious groups. In the case of the Amana Community new ideas were accepted such as Amana refrigerators (my uncle patented the magnetic seal) and microwaves. http://www.amanacolonies.com/history.htmessage<http://www.amanacolonies.com/history.htmessage> Catherine Litwinow Bettendorf, next door to Davenport ----- Original M

From: Quilt History List digest<mailto:qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>To: qhl digest recipients<mailto:qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>Sent: Sunday, May 02, 2010 11:01 PM Subject: qhl digest: May 02, 2010

QHL Digest for Sunday, May 02, 2010.

1. quilt insurance 2. Colonial Williamsburg 3. Re: Colonial Williamsburg 4. Re: Colonial Williamsburg 5. Quilting News - Calico Ball in Iowa

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Subject: quilt insurance From: QUILTMOOREaol.com<mailto:QUILTMOOREaol.com> Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 12:43:38 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

Does anyone know anything about quilt insurance-a separate policy from homeowners, in particular a Chris Johnston and "Society of Quilters" inArizona.Thanks, Nan in FL www.mooreandmoorequilts.com<http://www.mooreandmoorequilts.com/>

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Subject: Colonial Williamsburg From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk<mailto:sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>> Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 20:05:47 +0100 X-Message-Number: 2

I'm looking for information about coarse velvet or perhaps plush (I'm

not sure of my definitions) from Colonial Williamsburg which appears to include goat hair in its makeup. It may be cut velvet, or perhaps

pressed. Anyone know anything about this type of fabric?

Sally Ward

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Colonial Williamsburg From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net<mailto:xenialegacyquilts.net>> Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 15:37:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

 

According to Florence Montgomery, Textiles in America 1650-1870, p. 170, under "velvet":

"Utrecht velvet is a stout velvet which, according to Roland de la Plati=3DE8re, was made of linen warp and weft with pile of goat's hair in =3D20

solid colors or striped, embossed with patterns or printed. It was used for upholstery and coach linings.

In the Moccasi manuscript of about 1760 are swatches of Veluto d'Utrech in gold with a cut-pile pattern and Mocchetta Goffrata with a stamped pattern made at Lille (see Pl. D-62). Twenty swatches of flowered and plain wool velvets of Spitalfields manufacture in gold, scarlet, tan, black, green, and raspberry have cut or uncut pile as well as voided areas (see Pl. D-19)."

Does this help?

Xenia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Colonial Williamsburg From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk<mailto:sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>> Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 20:49:35 +0100 X-Message-Number: 4

Sounds very like the fragment I was looking at, and 'embossed' could be right. But I was curious about a specific connection with Colonial 

Williamsburg, and what it might have been used for. Would it have been clothing or upholstery of some sort?

Sally Ward

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilting News - Calico Ball in Iowa From: <suereichcharter.net<mailto:suereichcharter.net>> Date: Sun, 2 May 2010 17:53:37 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Davenport Daily GazetteDavenport, IowaJanuary 3, 1857Page 3Calico Ball.--A ball of the above char-acter will come off this evening at the Ger-man Theatre. The prominent feature of theoccasion will be that the dresses worn bythe ladies shall consist of calico, with theintention of being afterwards distributedamong the poor. This novel mode of at-tempting to be benevolent, originatedamong the codfish fashionables of NewYork, and has been unwisely imitated inmany of our large towns. We must confessthe proceeding strikes us, as not calculatedto feed the hungry, clothe the naked, or verymaterially to diminish the wants of the suf-fering and needy. A few dozen garments ofthin cotton fabric and of uniform size, arepoor apologies for warm clothing. Theycertainly are not woolen stockings or stoutshoes, bushels of coal or sacks of flour;neither are they the equivalent of these.--Many a fair one may think she is engagedin promoting an act of charity, when enjoy-ing the dance but we conceive a more mer-itorious way would be to seek earnestlyfor individual cases of extreme poverty,minister to their real necessities abundant-ly, and rest satisfied, in connection with alight conscience that God rewardeth acheerful giver. While wishing for ouryoung friends an evening of rational enjoy-ment, we would not have them indulge theidea that by this erratic movement they aredipping very deep at the fountain of truebenevolence.

-- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com<http://www.suereichquilts.com/>

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Subject: Polyester sacks From: "Pat L. Nickols" <patlnickolsyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 3 May 2010 09:56:42 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Really enjoy when our discussions send us back to sack use again.

Yes, sacks were made of polyester then and are still available in many areas around the United States. Today, as in the 20th century, they would hold staple food items, flour, corn meal, beans, rice, etc. Here in Southern California as you get closer to the Mexican border more items will be available in sacks, in large amounts, ranging in size from ten to twenty-five pounds in patterns that would appeal to the purchaser.

Enjoying our sunny San Diego weather (finally) Pat L. Nickols

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Subject: MAY MEETING REMINDER From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Mon, 03 May 2010 12:33:42 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi to all Repiecers (Southern California Quilt History Group) members, guests and friends.

Reminder that our upcoming meeting is scheduled for next week, WEDNESDAY May 12th at QUILT IN A DAY Quilt Shop located in San Marcos, California.

Topic for discussion is Clues in the Calico Chapter 4 - "Clues in Color and Dyes." Ooh, that is wonderful - it leaves us open for all types of sharing. So, as usual, bring all your items for sharing (on topic or not) - we love to see them all!

Please see our web site for directions to the shop. http://members.cox.net/repiecers/

Linda - Can you please confirm that our meeting room is available and reconfirm the times for our group - I believe the shop opens at 9:30 so perhaps we can get started promptly at 9:45 and end by 2:00 in order to avoid any traffic on the drive home.

Everyone! Please confirm with email that you will be attending so we can get our head count this week. Bring a guest if you like - lots of room for visitors at Quilt In A Day!

Looking forward to our upcoming time together -

Sincerely

Leah Zieber

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Subject: SCQHG (Repiecers) - April Meeting Notes (long) From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Mon, 03 May 2010 12:19:42 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

My Goodness - time flies when you're having kittens -

Those six little buggers keep me so buys I didn't notice how much time has gone by since our meeting. My intention is to give a quick review of our meeting so that action items get addressed between meetings and so that we all stay on the same page with regard to upcoming events, meetings and activities.

Our April 14th meeting was held at the Temecula Quilt Company. Twelve members were in attendance - nice to see so many members coming to the meeting. Our location was accommodating, but if we had many more in attendance we will need to rethink the Temecula location as the room is too small to accommodate more than about twelve. I don't want to discourage growth - quite the opposite - new members add depth and spur on conversation so we definitely want to promote growth. Let's take this one meeting at a time and see if we continue to grow. Perhaps we can keep all meetings at QIAD or perhaps we can find another location in Temecula that has more room. Give it some thought and we will readdress in May.

 

Old Business:

 

Dues were discussed/paid - if you still need to pay your annual dues (20.00), contact Sylvia Galbraith.

 

Julia Zgliniec's Bird lecture was again discussed. We will be going forward with the lecture - Julia agreed and dates for the lecture were discussed as 9/11 9/18 and 9/25. Kris H will address these dates with Julia and Leslie will address them with QIAD - Looking forward to firming up this lecture. We will ask for a head count as soon as the date is firmed. Cost to members who are current in dues will be covered. Action item for LEAH - at next meeting we shall firm up how non-current members/guests will pay for lecture.

 

We shared all sorts of information - new magazines about antique quilts, books, new reproduction fabrics and lots more. If there was something you missed and need more information - email the list and ask about it - There was just too much for me to write down or remember. (Sandy - thanks so much for the Musee Mulouse sud Alsace brochure and lovely postcards from France! Presents are such fun!)

 

Discussion On Topic:

 

Our topic for discussion was Chapter 3 in Clues in the Calico - talking about different weaves and threads. Very interesting discussion - threads and fibers were looked at under hand held lighted magnifying glass. Sylvia - can you post the web site that gives the microscope slides of different fibers under magnification.

 

Marian shared a nice book worth mentioning. "Fabrics & How To Know Them" by Grace Goldena Denny A.M.

 

In keeping with the topic, Pat shared a wonder c1840s pin wheel variation quilt top with different Manchester Goods and Diaper Cloth weaved cottons. It had wonderful glazed blue chintz prints (one with the birds) and the whites were the different weaved cottons. It was interesting to see the many different weaved cottons in a variety of shades of white to light tan. Pat also shared her upcoming Civil War Line of Reproduction fabrics from RJR. Really nice prints and we look forward to working with them. Great Quilt Top and lovely fabric - thanks Pat.

 

Lucky Glorian shared her family Crazy Squares c1960s and a string quilt with pink sashing from Nashville Tennessee (papers dated 1951). I call her Lucky as she had one of those shopping trips we all dream of at the Escondido Swap Meet where she met a lady selling her own c1940s baby quilt of cross stitched alphabet. Then the lady mentions she has her parent's wedding quilt so Glorian was lucky enough to get a smoking deal on the two quilts - the wedding quilt was a wonderful 1935 Red and green 16 block Rosebud Rose of Sharon. Super Deal - Super Quilts!

 

Sandy gave us all a thrill with her Challenge quilt Jacobean Tree of Life with Log Cabin blocks and Rick Rack border. It was super Cute with all the pins. She also shared some of the pieces she picked up on her recent trip to Europe. There were 2 pieces that were Asian Applique in nature (one a door valance and one a medallion table toper) found in Switzerland. She shared a nice Mola as well as a 1790s piece of whole cloth blue copper plate print of pineapples. Nice pieces. I really loved Sandy's Strippy doll quilt that was a "T" quilt with 4 patches - super little quilt that dated c1830-60s. (Looking forward to finding fabrics for that one Sandy!) There was a cute Barn Raising Doll quilt all solids and an Amish one patch c1940s. The final quilt shared by Sandy was her Silk Medallion quilt that hung in the Flying Geese Quilt show. The date on the back reads 1808. The quilt was in superb condition and had interesting quilting as seen on the back. Great sharing!

 

I (Leah) shared next with a variety of quilts - one was a c1830s New York red lapis star with a plate or roller printed toile monochrome backing that I believe is a combination fabric of cotton and silk or cotton and very fine wool - this one I want to look at under a scope and test the fibers. Next was an Ohio star signature quilt dated 1854 from Massachusetts with a very interesting backing of what we have come to believe is a non-weighted silk in really good condition (no breaks or tears or cracking like you might see on older silk.) I also shared a beaten up 16 patch that had a white wool blanket used as the batting. It was interesting to see the old blanket inside the quilt where the lattice was split open.

 

Marian and Dave brought along a Double Nine Patch Turkey red and white quit. (It was actually a double nine patch within a nine patch or what I like to call a "9 in 9 in 9". A really fun quilt. They also shared a log cabin sunshine and shadows c 1880s with red centers and an Old Maids Puzzle with red sashing and white corner stones. Nice quilts - I particularly loved the red 9-patch quilt.

 

Melinda was last to share - she brought a one patch medallion (Boston Commons) c1930s-40s. There was a Ruby McKim Alice in Wonderland quilt that was wonderful to see up close and in person. She shared a super child's quilt with Ships at Sea blocks and a wonderful sailor conversation print for lattice. The blocks were made of a variety of children's prints including a very early Mickey Mouse print. (I loved this piece). There was a c1900 Birds in Air made of shirtings, a 4-patch and half square triangle chain c1900, a c1890s chimney block with alternate block in claret red. And finally an equilateral triangle c1980-1910 that was not a charm quilt but lovely none the less. Another wonderful look at some nice quilts.

 

Linda McKim was going to share but opted to bring her items next time as our meeting was drawing to a close - Thanks for your consideration Linda and we look forward to seeing your items next meeting.

 

Closing:

I really enjoyed this past meeting - it was great to have a topic and learn some interesting facts . Like ONT from Coats means "OUR NEW THREAD." Little bits like this add to our knowledge base and make it worth while getting together and sharing information.

 

Sincerely - Leah Zieber.

PS - Next meeting is May 12th at Quilt In A Day - Hope to see you there.

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Subject: Virginia From: Judy Roche <judyqrocheclan.com> Date: Mon, 03 May 2010 17:23:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

I will be in Virginia , and DC this coming two weeks ... anything particular exhibit going on then, that I should see? Am going to Harrisonburg , and of course the Smithsonian , and DAR too , if I can tear myself away from family ....... Thanks in advance.. Judy

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Subject: Re: quilt insurance From: Getfruitaol.com Date: Mon, 3 May 2010 18:38:59 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

Yes, I do. I have had this insurance for several years. It is affordable, covers your quilts, even while in transit, your sewing machine and your "stash". The insurer affording coverage is Hartford Fire insurance Company. For particulars contact Christine Johnston, CIC,senior Accounting manager at 602 749-4282.

Violet Vaughnes, San Bernardino, CA

In a message dated 5/2/2010 11:45:16 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, QUILTMOOREaol.com writes:

Does anyone know anything about quilt insurance-a separate policy from home owners, in particular a Chris Johnston and "Society of Quilters" in Arizona. Thanks, Nan in FL www.mooreandmoorequilts.com

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Subject: smithsonian quilts made in china From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 4 May 2010 09:44:15 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

is there somewhere online that i can look to see the quilts that were reproduced in china back in the early 90s? i know one is the powers bible quilt and have seen one in person, but don't really know what i'd be looking at for the other three (i believe). patti

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Subject: Quilts on the Oregon Trail From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 4 May 2010 23:20:29 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

Can anyone help this UK quilter? Her request was posted to the UK list. She has several of the relevant books, but would really like to be in touch with someone who might be able to help about surnames.

<Does anyone on the list know how to get in touch with anyone involved with the history of quilts relating to the Oregon Trail? Our family history society is putting on an exhibition about those who left the dale and I know that quite a few finished up on the Oregon Trail. I'm meant to be doing a piece about quilts! Not sure how I get involved with these things. TIA to anyone with any help. Kate in Swaledale>

contact: grpsmarricklodge.com

Sally Ward --Apple-Mail-5-499170166--

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Subject: Re: Quilts on the Oregon Trail From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Tue, 4 May 2010 17:31:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Maybe Mary Bywater Cross! her email is: mbcquilt2web-ster.com

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

________________________________ From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Tue, May 4, 2010 3:20:29 PM Subject: [qhl] Quilts on the Oregon Trail

Can anyone help this UK quilter? Her request was posted to the UK list. She has several of the relevant books, but would really like to be in touch with someone who might be able to help about surnames.

<Does anyone on the list know how to get in touch with anyone involved with the history of quilts relating to the Oregon Trail? Our family history society is putting on an exhibition about those who left the dale and I know that quite a few finished up on the Oregon Trail. I'm meant to be doing a piece about quilts! Not sure how I get involved with these things. TIA to anyone with any help. Kate in Swaledale>

contact: grpsmarricklodge.com

Sally Ward

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Subject: Announcement of the events next week at the Greenwich Historical Society From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Wed, 5 May 2010 8:02:26 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

"Double Feature" Lecture & Lunch Series

Patchwork Memories of World War II: A Special Lecture & Lunch Commemorating the 65h Anniversary of the End of the War

Monday, May 10 11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Join us for a Lecture & Lunch with Historical Society members and staff and take a tour of the exhibition. Lecturer and co-curator of A Stitch in Time, Sue Reich will present Quiltmaking That Saw Us Through the War Years, an exploration of quilts made during World War II. You'll be surprised to learn that women were not only keeping the home fires burning during the war but also making thousands of quilts that are now considered to be the most historically significant of the 20th century.

The program will also include a performance of Dear Folks, by Catherine Ladnier. Performed by four actors reading from original letters, Dear Folks is a patchwork of words, music and images evoking the last days of World War II. The performance will play against a backdrop of images taken from the Historical Society's own collection as well as from the personal mementos of town residents. Music from the era will be woven throughout.

Lecture: $10 members, $15 nonmembers Box lunch: $10. Complimentary lunch for all veterans.

Quilt Discovery and Family Day

Saturday, May 15 Noon - 3:00 p.m.

Bring your family quilts to be examined by quilt historians and conservators, who'll provide insight into the age and style of your family treasures and give suggestions about restoration and preservation. Engaging demonstrations and fun instructor-led quiltmaking activities for all ages will complement the quilt documentation sessions.

Family Day only: $5 for members. $8 for nonmembers Children under the age of three free

Quilt documentation: $20 for members. $30 for nonmembers Fee includes examination of three quilts and Family Day activities Additional quilts $10 each

Reserve now or call 203-869-6899, Ext. 18.

Kathleen Motes Bennewitz

Director of Exhibitions and Programs

Bush-Holley Historic Site

39 Strickland Road

Cos Cob, CT 06807

kbennewitzhstg.org

t: 203.869.6899 x32; f: 203.861-9720

www.hstg.org

-- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Mary & the Queen's Quilt - Hawaii From: Laurie Woodard <lwoodardhawaii.edu> Date: Wed, 5 May 2010 13:46:04 -1000 X-Message-Number: 5

A short video ran on a local news station Tuesday night about a hitherto unidentified name appearing on the Queen's Quilt --a crazy quilt on exhibit at Iolani Palace in Honolulu. http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/Global/story.asp?S=12426052

The backstory is that the former videographer for one of the now- merged news stations contacted me last year wanting me to meet with his mother to talk about the possibility that the unidentified Mary might be her grandmother, Mary Kilioe Van Burgen McGuire. I couldn't do it at the time, kamehakameha (that's the local version of yada yada <G>).

This time, when he called, I couldn't say no, and reporter Jim Mendoza delivered this mother's day gift to Lita Domingo, Mary's granddaughter.

The next day, son, Sisto Domingo brought his mother, daughter and granddaughter over to my house to meet at last. And, they came as all islanders do, bearing gifts. A lovely guava chiffon cake! Ono (delicious).

Laurie

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Subject: Quilting News- Calico Party at El Dorado. From: <suereichcharter.net> Date: Thu, 6 May 2010 19:16:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

The Mountain Democrat Placerville, California February 13, 1858 Page 2 CALICO PARTY AT EL DORADO--The Ladies of El Dorado will give a Calico party, on Wed nesday evening the 17th. The party will be for the benefit of the school in that place, which should secure it the countenance and patronage of every one who desires the ad- vancement of the cause of education. It will be a splendid affair,--our fair neighbors of El Dorado have too much taste and energy to fail at anything they undertake. It will be given at the Nevada House. Tickets, $5.

-- Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 05, 2010 From: "M. Chapple" <mem914yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 6 May 2010 13:28:51 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I have encountered a problem I have never had before and would love some input from other people who belong to quilting blogs. Today I received a sales email from a quilt store that I have never done business with, with the name of the blog at the bottom of the email as the sender. The blog's privacy policy says they won't release information to 3rd parties. Am I wrong to say "Hey, wait a minute?" I purposely avoid blogs that send sales information, and am one of the people who read the privacy disclaimers to be sure what I am signing up for (rare, I know).

Mary in Virginia

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Subject: kit quilt From: michele mclaughlin <mickiemclaug58yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 05:19:40 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

I'm looking for information on what must be a kit quilt that is listed on Ebay, if anyone knows what company made this quilt, I would be most appreciative! Ebay #: 380227056874 Thanks, Michele McLaughlin Allentown PA

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Subject: blog referrals From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 10:07:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hello all-Checking with the blog mentioned is a good idea before presuming that the blog sold your email address to the sending shop. And checking to make sure the shop is not really the writer of the blog's a good idea. Plus, the shop may have gathered your email from a comment you left on a blog and the blog may not have even realized it. Here's how: if you leave a comment on a blog and when clicking back on your own name on the comment you discover it leads back to your own blog, website, or email address then there you are--your own computer settings left the trail of breadcrumbs. Yeah, I'm getting email from folks I never heard of...delete, delete, delete, spam button etc. We are all connected! Cheers from the suuny and fabulous NC coast Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: Quilts and Charity/Causes From: Sue Wildemuth <quiltingbee73yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 09:40:23 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

I have a question for those of you who collect and/or create quilts.Besides supporting quilt organizations, museums, and groups. Do any of you exhibit your quilts in church or other settings to raise funds for charity or causes -- such as humane society, libraries, scholarship funds, veteran family organizations, church activities, food pantries, health care for single moms-- that sort of thing.  You can share on or off list. Thanks -- Sue in Illinois  --0-1769316463-

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Subject: el dorado calico party From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 10:42:30 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

> Subject: Quilting News- Calico Party at El Dorado. > From:<suereichcharter.net>  > The Mountain Democrat > Placerville, California > February 13, 1858 -- snip-- > It will be given at the Nevada House. Tickets, $5.   oh my, a $5 ticket in 1858! i'm sure there is somewhere online to figure out what exactly that would be in today's dollar, butwithout even checking i know it would be a huge amount. i was very surprised to see this. patti   

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Subject: Re: Quilts and Charity/Causes From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 19:49:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

My local quilt guild makes charity quilts by the hundreds each year and distributes them to needy charities in our area, we also distribute Christmas stockings to nursing homes and childrens home, we make Quilts of Valor for our Veterans, we donate to schools for their use in fund raising, we make quilts for a local single mom homes, etc. etc. In fact most of our efforts (besides quilting and showing them off) are for others. I think most quilt guilds do the same as mine. A Vermont quilter (where it may snow on Mother's Day!) - Mitzi

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Subject: privacy question From: "Steve & Jean Loken" <bravosjloken.com> Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 11:14:44 -0500 X-Message-

Mary, It sure sounds to me like the blog host gave away your private information, but not being technically savvy, it might be that they were able to send in some other way. I'd retain their email in case it seems like you may have to challenge it. Always save and document any claim. Jean Loken

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Subject: Re: El Dorado calico party From: LinusDonnaaol.com Date: Sat, 8 May 2010 07:43:44 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

Re: value of 1858 money

There are several ways to calculate value of money at today's rates. I would probably use the Production Workers Compensation as a base of calculation. If we used that as a basis, the $5 ticket in 1858 would cost $1740 today!

Here is the calculator link. >> _Measuring Worth - Relative Value of US Dollars_ (http://www.measuringworth.com/calculators/compare/) Nothing is simple in the current financial world.

Bright blessings! ~Donna Laing

_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_ (http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)

In a message dated 5/8/2010 12:31:20 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

0Aoh my, a $5 ticket in 1858! i'm sure there is somewhere online to figure out what exactly that would be in today's dollar, butwithout even checking i know it would be a huge amount.

--part1_476e2.13339b43.3916a870_boundary--

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Subject: Quilts and Charity causes From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Sat, 08 May 2010 08:11:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Sue, My guild has been exhibiting our quilts in a month long show at the public library once a year. My town has 9 public libraries and we have exhibited in three different libraries. The exhibits are free so it doesn't raise money for charity, but allows many non quilters to see the beauty of quilts. We also have donated a quilt for fund raising at our local hospital, the local Long Island public TV station for their fund raising auction and one of our guild members is making a quilt to be donated to a museum for fund raising purposes. My quilts have been exhibited at my church although not directly involved with fund raising. In addition, like Mitzi, we make baby quilts for two hospitals to be distributed as needed and have also provided over 1000 quilts for our local vereran's hospital. Judy Knorr

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Subject: re: the calico dance - worth of 1858 $5 today From: sharonpinkayahoo.com Date: Sat, 8 May 2010 07:14:55 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Hello - according to http://www.measuringworth.com/ppowerus/ $5 in the year 1858 has the same "purchase power" as $134.00 in the year 2009 .

Those calico girls were sure worth itSharon Pinka

Sharon Pinka Rainbow Quilt Blocks, Quilt Study & Research 6323 Possum Run Rd. Bellville, OH 44813USA 419.938.8040 sharonpinkayahoo.com   --0-1941883096-1273328095=:92172--

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Subject: RE: eMail marketing | was blog referrals From: "Maureen" <maureenbooksandoldlace.com> Date: Sat, 8 May 2010 19:34:50 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/business/ecommerce/bus61.shtml US business and corporate entities are subject to the CAN-SPAM Act which means that they are not allowed to use your email address without explicit permission; you must opt-in to their email marketing. Often posting to a site, downloading something free or making an online purchase has an explicit opt-in clause that is easy to overlook. US business and corporate entities are subject to big fines for violating the provisions of this act. You can file a complaint with the FTC.

Maureen in Ashland, Oregon Where she manages digital marketing for a fortune 500 company and fits in a stitch or two as she can.

Subject: blog referrals From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 10:07:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hello all-Checking with the blog mentioned is a good idea before presuming that the blog sold your email address to the sending shop. And checking to make sure the shop is not really the writer of the blog's a good idea. Plus, the shop may have gathered your email from a comment you left on a blog and the blog may not have even realized it. Here's how: if you leave a comment on a blog and when clicking back on your own name on the comment you discover it leads back to your own blog, website, or email address then there you are--your own computer settings left the trail of breadcrumbs. Yeah, I'm getting email from folks I never heard of...delete, delete, delete, spam button etc. We are all connected! Cheers from the suuny and fabulous NC coast Pepper

--Pepper Cory