Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 30, 2010
From: Gwendolyn Magee <gmageemindspring.com>


> *"I'm past the nazi connotations. When I see this design I
>> see good fortune and hope for a better future."*
>
>
I hope to never be past the Nazi connotations. In my mind, this is the same
kind of thinking that has the new textbooks being written to show that
slavery wasn't a bad thing.

Gwen
http://gwenmagee.com
http://creativityjourney.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Mom's 96th Birthday
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 10:44:10 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Julie, my mother was born 1913. Happy birthday to Merry Silber!

Steph Whitson
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Article, "Angry About Image of Museum Swastika Quilt"
From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 11:04:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I call this 'Fly Foot' pattern.
Lonnie


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: swirling swastikas
From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 11:07:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

BlankRe Candace's suggestion: "Here's a good topic for an exhibit, "Symbols
that People Misconstrue or
Stereotype." That would be great fun!!!! I can see really raising the
collective ire of the masses by gathering these non-Third Reich
representations of the swastika and attempting to show from whence the
symbol came. I agree -- a horrendous thought, but interesting nonetheless.
Candace Perry"

I like the idea, Candace. It would certainly serve to inform the public
about the pre-Nazi history of this design and could lead to productive and
positive discussions within and without the academic world. That's a
positive thing in my book!!!

Hope to see it sometime soon.

Best wishes,

Kathy Moore
Lincoln, NE



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Mom's 96th Birthday
From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <pnhahn01comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 16:50:46 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 5

Julie,

It was great to see that picture of your Mom and her Birthday Quilt. Has it been another year? I bet, if you would share her address with us again, many of us would send her cards and notes for her special day. I know you gave it to us last year, but since my computer had died, the address is somewhere in cyberspace.

We mustn't forget those who forged this glorious road of antique quilt passion for us!

Nancy Hahn, Bowie, Maryland


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: the smell of controversy
From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com>


A'hem friends--if swastika quilts, klan quilts, black power quilts, latin
liberation quilts, and quilts of all political persuasions can't be
discussed on our list in the interest of scholarship, we are becoming way
too thin-skinned. Or as Gaye puts it, "delicate." Linda, the
swastika-offended writer, was responding to the picture in her newspaper
there in Colorado and then her letter got dragged into our conversation as a
quotation. Dear Linda has no idea what QHL is! This is not what was said on
our list. Let's get on with our discussion please. A request: let's try to
not hit 'reply' so much and thus repeat the string of the old conversation
complete with goofy spelling and punctuation. I love this list but I'm kinda
sorry I posted the link to the story. Nuffink more from me...today.
Pepper


--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: the smell of controversy
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 16:48:43 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

I'm so confused -- honestly. And I apologize to all if I said something
wrong.
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: mathematics & women's education
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 19:04:14 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Okay, PepCory, I'll change the subject---and will not copy "goofy spellings"<g>, though I cannot swear I won't commit some new ones.

I found the information Margaret provided re the solid geometry teaching aids interesting. That such instruction was offered suggests a population in which women were involved in the daily operations of the farm and possibly also that they were expected to teach the rising generation of children.

Any branch of mathematics beyond arithmetic was generally seen as either unnecessary or too taxing for the female mind until late in the 19th century, even in the New England and Atlantic seaboard colonies/states. Lots was written about this general subject. When women said they needed to study math so that they might teach their children, they met the objection that they would only be teaching the girls after the most basic levels and that girls did not "need" higher math. Old Euclid became fruit forbidden to the "delicate" sex.

In fact, mathematics for women became a wedge issue in the women's movement early on, with people like Harriet Martineau arguing for its addition to the English curriculum for women.

The study of Euclidian geometry had long been a staple in the education of boys. It was regarded as important to moral instruction because it trained the mind, taught logic as well as mathematics, and it was often taught as a branch of moral philosophy.

In NY Frances Willard taught herself geometry and told her brother that even without formal instruction, she was breezing through the basic theorems and propositions and was constructing proofs without any difficulties. The study excited her and mathematics instruction for women became a critical part of her educational work, supported in her work as president of the women's college that eventually became part of Northwestern University.

So at one time, as hard as it is for this English Major to believe, women had to fight for the right to study mathematics. And without it, they could not master chemistry, could not study medicine, could not become engineers or any branch of architecture (including landscape architecture) or in some schools even study painting.

I'm familiar with the English system of education, and I've wondered whether the German model differed in this regard.

When it came to needing math to draft patterns, I've been surprised at how the real old hands I've known could simply take a rectangle of paper and fold and cut to create patterns, at how accurate those can be and how comfortable they were at using that method.

Gaye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mathematics & Women's Education
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 06:37:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Gaye wrote: "I'm familiar with the English system of education, and I've
wondered whether the German model differed in this regard."


We seem to focus on women's education in this country. What about other
countries? Were the restrictions for education women universal or were
women allowed to pursue higher education elsewhere earlier than here? As
this country was growing immigrants from around the world were bringing
their families, belongings and educations with them. This is something I
will look for more diligently as I research my own family heritage.

Still, I suspect many women without formal education had a natural talent
for drawing and design. Considering many of the unique quilting designs
I've seen in quilts, replicating images from botanical prints and other
sources that were popular wouldn't be beyond most quilters' abilities.
Tracing wouldn't have been impossible either.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle
Enjoying a few days of what summer should be like in PA - warm, sunny and
less humid!






----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mom's Birthday - address!
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 21:43:17 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Nancy Hahn,

Aren't you wonderful? Receiving birthday cards will make her so, so happy
-- again!

For those of you who want to send my Mom a card for her 96th birthday, July
10:

Merry Silber, #2039
c/o Fleischman Residence
6710 W. Maple Rd.
W. Bloomfield, MI 48322

Again thanks to Nancy and all,
Julie Silber

-------------------------------

Julie,

It was great to see that picture of your Mom and her Birthday Quilt. Has it
been another year? I bet, if you would share her address with us again,
many of us would send her cards and notes for her special day. I know you
gave it to us last year, but since my computer had died, the address is
somewhere in cyberspace.

We mustn't forget those who forged this glorious road of antique quilt
passion for us!

Nancy Hahn, Bowie, Maryland



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Math in Quilts
From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net>


Gaye,
I have also been amazed at the precise measurement of antique quilts when women had so little instruction in math. I wonder if men were ever called upon to provide some mathematical assistance. My Home Economics Degree was from the College of Engineering (at the time I graduated) much to my electrical engineer husband's delight. However, after a bit of a ribbing he would still provide mathematical consultations on my quilt projects if I asked! I can not have been the first quilter to ask for help!
Judy Knorr



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Mathematics & Women's Education (long answer)
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 09:36:54 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

All, among the sectarian PA Germans -- those I know best, which for these
purposes would encompass the Mennonites and Schwenkfelders in SE PA -- girls
were taught the same arithmetic as boys in the late 18th and early 19th
centuries. There is ample evidence in existing manuscript ciphering books
from the period. Kids went to school to approximately the age of 14 -- that
is, if someone was footing the bill, prior to the Free Public School Act in
PA in 1834. (as a side note, the Moravians were marvelous at educating girls
at the same time, but I am unsure about their arithmetic instruction)
Anyway, the schoolmasters would "set" the pages in the ciphering books using
published arithmetic books that had examples of problems -- so sometimes the
problems are sort of weird or exotic -- such as find the cost to ship
whatever tonnage of pitch from Plymouth England, to Madrid -- that's made
up, but some of them are quite like that! Girls did the same problems,
which seemingly relate specifically to interest, cargo and shipping (tare
weight), and the "rule of 3" which relates to proportion, I guess. It's
practical math, but only practical if you are going to own a fleet of ships!
Because German girls in SE PA were not taught much English at that time --
English was the language of commerce and government, and it was unnecessary
for girls to have those language skills -- the ciphering books for girls
tend to be in German. They, do, however, mirror the books of the boys from
the same period.
Geometry, actually, does not seem to surface in any meaningful way until
after the basic schooling was completed, and therefore, it's doubtful that
any girls really had that opportunity, at least among the crowd I know. I
have an extraordinary late 18th century geometry manuscript workbook in the
collection at the Schwenkfelder that was used by a young fellow who was
completed his basic schooling and had moved on to higher education (though
don't read this as college, necessarily). HOWEVER...as an afterthought I am
thinking that somewhere along the line some girls must have learned to use a
compass, as we have at least a few examples of female-made fraktur decorated
PA Dutch manuscripts) that have "compass designs" (otherwise known as hex
signs...).
I should note that among these Germans there was a powerful emphasis on
education that may or may not have been typical at the time. Literacy and
education from that period is one of my favorite topics as it is little
understood and has ample opportunities for research.
Candace Perry
Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center
Pennsburg, PA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Math in Quilts
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>


Hello all,I remember a Quaker quilt, I thinkfrom one of the Heart of
Pennsylvania Symposium books, that was a sampler. It indicated an edu
cation in math. I recall that it was made at a school? I'll have t
o dig out my paper from my graduate days to find this out for sure.Ju
dy Schwender


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 01, 2010
From: "M. Chapple" <mem914yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 05:47:20 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6



> 9. mathematics & women's education

As a reenactor who focuses on living history, the more I read about women's roles during the period preceeding the civil war the more I am amazed at the "Scarlet O'Hara"ing of history. Women often assisted with the planning, particularly on small and medium farms where it wasn't economical to have an overseer run the farm. And for clarification, overseer was the term applied to anyone who managed a farm not just someone who supervised slaves. From diaries and books written before the war it was expected that the women would assist in planning and running the farm, and that they be educated accordingly. After the war writings restricted a woman's role to the household only. It almost seems that this was a reaction to the war itself, and it's repercussions - a desire to return to a simpler time perhaps.

Mary in pleasant Virginia





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Subject: mathematics & women's education
From: "Pat L. Nickols" <patlnickolsyahoo.com>

The recent discussion about the math and drafting skill of quiltmakers in the early 1800s brought to mind the excellent research in the Lynne Z. Bassett book, NORTHERN COMFORT: New England's Early Quilts 1780 - 1850 where, on page 99 Plate 65 we see the complex geometry of Elizabeth P. Jewett, Pepperell, Massachusetts, 1830. Author comment, "she would have been able to construct the patterns for difficult pieced designs, such as the Mariner's Compass..."

Pat L. Nickols





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mathematics and quilts?
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 18:00:51 +0100
X-Message-Number: 8

I'm maths illiterate, almost maths phobic, but from childhood loved
making patterns with rulers, compasses, dividers - never measuring the
angles or counting the inches. Many an exercise book cover was covered
with complicated Mariners Compass designs. When I got maths phobes in
quilting class I gave them till rolls to measure any long lengths then
fold and divide, effectively creating their own units with no regard to
inches or centimetres.

I recently watched a programme about the mediaeval stonemasons who
build England's Cathedrals, drawing the designs for arches etc. in the a
prepared plaster floor for the craftsmen to work from, using just
straight edge, set square, and dividers (as in the Freemason's symbols).

You don't always need maths. Indeed knowledge of maths can make
quiltmaking more complicated, not less.

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "World War II Quilts" book
From: <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 12:15:04 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9

Thank you Kris, our list mom, for allowing me the opportunity to announce the availability of the "World War II Quilts" book. How fitting that it should coincide with my son's favorite holiday, the 4th of July, and the celebration of our country's independence and freedom!
In 2004, my family and I attended the dedication of the WWII Memorial in Washington D.C. to honor my father who served in the U.S. Navy on the USS Saratoga in the Pacific theater. After this amazingly patriotic experience, I embarked on a 6 year study of World War II quiltmaking. Over those years, life frequently interrupted my research. The loss of my son (A WWII history buff and my greatest supporter in this venture.), a bout with Lymphoma, the glorious additions of three more grandchildren, six years of service on the AQSG Board of Directors, continued full-time employment and all of the regular demands of life-in- general occurred along the way.
Many people on this list contributed to the success of this project, which was a true labor of love.
- To Cuesta Benberry who passed on to me her own WWII research and challenged me to take the next steps, thank you.
- To those of you who were always on the look-out for WWII quilts and ephemera, and promptly alerted me, thank you.
- To the American Quilt Study Group for giving me the first opportunity to present my research in the form of a Study Center in 2004, thank you.
- To Schiffer Publishing, Ltd. for believing in this project and publishing it.
- To members of this list who bravely sent their quilts across the country for photography for the book, thank you.
- To all who invited me to present "Quiltmaking that Saw US through the War Years" to raise money to publish, thank you.
- To the guilds and museums who hosted exhibits of the World War II quilts, thank you.
- To the men and women who served and continue to serve our country on the battlefront and at home, thank you.
Through quiltmaking on the home front from 1940 - 1945, I have been able to tell part of the story of the WWII years. The book is available through me, Schiffer, on Amazon, and hopefully at your nearest quilt store.
Once again, thank you, and Happy Birthday America!

Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut
www.suereichquilts.com
http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/
http://www.majorreichaward.com/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "World War II Quilts" book
From: Mitzioakesaol.com

Sue - was great meeting you at the VQF - I have been reading your WW2 book
that I purchased - boy do some of those pages bring back my memories of
the war years - thank you for writing and publishing it.....
Mitzi Oakes from VT

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: English vs American -- language differences
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 16:40:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

It took me 2 readings, Sally, but I was finally able to translate and insert
the words I would have used..........

till rolls  cash register tapes (I like yours better)

Maths  math

dividers  compass (I think)

Judy Grow



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: English vs American -- language differences
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 22:13:25 +0100
X-Message-Number: 12

Ah, I see the problem Judy. If you'd written it your way I'd have been
confused <G>. (Thinking surely if you put tape (twill or sticky?) in a
cash machine you'd end up in a mess??)

Dividers aren't strictly compasses because instead of having a holder on
one side for a pencil or other marker they have points on both sides,
but as we say 'same difference'.

Sally Ward

> It took me 2 readings, Sally, but I was finally able to translate and
insert the words I would have used..........



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Subject: mathematics & women's education
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 16:20:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

Thanks for that reference, Pat. I was able to put my finger on my book and
take a look!
Jean

NORTHERN COMFORT: New England's Early Quilts 1780 - 1850 where, on page 99
Plate 65 we see the complex geometry of Elizabeth P. Jewett, Pepperell,
Massachusetts, 1830. Author comment, "she would have been able to construct
the patterns for difficult pieced designs, such as the Mariner's Compass..."

Pat L. Nickols




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Math in Quilts
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 15:36:41 -0700 (PDT)

Hello all,I took the route of Elizabeth Wayland barber, and tried dra
fting something complicated myself. I drafted a Mariner's Compass usi
ng only a ruler and a compass. It's been 42 years since I took geomet
ry, and I have drafted other (more complicated) blocks before. But
I did it in about an hour. Ithink this would have been something a
smart 19th century woman could have done with not too much difficulty.
In this day and age when we don't build our own homes or construct ou
r own household items, I think we underestimate what can be done with si
mple tools like a compass and a ruler. To think that a husband would
have shown his wife what he was doing if he was drafting something- or t
hat she wouldn't inquire- assumes too much, I think. We learn a lot b
y just being around other people who are doing such stuff, and a few que
stions here and there can illuminate a great deal. If a husband owned
a compass, would it have been locked away from his wife, oh she of the
delicate mind? Would a sister not inquire what her brother was learni
ng at school? So much of what we know is gained by informal education
, and maybe more was learned by this method in the 19th century.I hav
e a mental picture of a man shaking his fist at a cowering wife as he sn
atches the dreaded compass from her hands!I posted my Mariner's Compa
ss on the eboard.Judy Schwender
--0-2029261768-1278110201:60004--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Math in Quilts
From: Mitzioakesaol.com
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 19:22:23 EDT
X-Message-Number: 15


--part1_1cff4.7095de73.395fceaf_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

As a reply to all the recent emails about math and quilts, as a volunteer
at the Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vermont, I can attest to the work
that women (maybe some men!) did design quilts by the thousands without the
help of any formal education in math etc.....they did quilts that today
would even make math experts scratch their heads. Come and see them
Mitzi in Vermont


In a message dated 7/2/2010 6:38:04 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
sister3603yahoo.com writes:

Hello all,

I took the route of Elizabeth Wayland barber, and tried drafting something
complicated myself. I drafted a Mariner's Compass using only a ruler and
a
compass. It's been 42 years since I took geometry, and I have drafted
other
(more complicated) blocks before. But I did it in about an hour. I think
this
would have been something a smart 19th century woman could have done with
not
too much difficulty.

In this day and age when we don't build our own homes or construct our own
household items, I think we underestimate what can be done with simple
tools
like a compass and a ruler. To think that a husband would have shown his
wife
what he was doing if he was drafting something- or that she wouldn't
inquire-
assumes too much, I think. We learn a lot by just being around other
people who
are doing such stuff, and a few questions here and there can illuminate a
great
deal. If a husband owned a compass, would it have been locked away from
his
wife, oh she of the delicate mind? Would a sister not inquire what her
brother
was learning at school? So much of what we know is gained by informal
education, and maybe more was learned by this method in the 19th century.

I have a mental picture of a man shaking his fist at a cowering wife as he
snatches the dreaded compass from her hands!

I posted my Mariner's Compass on the eboard.

Judy Schwender
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt math, flags in quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>


HI all - ORIGAMI is a technique flourishing in Japan to create quilt patter
ns without using any tools. It's amazing to see it, it's much much more tha
n a simple fold or two tomake a four-patch.Probably the size of origami
paper is consistent squares; so as one folds, a surprising number of differ
ent geometric quilt patterns can emerge. Kei Kobayashi wrote a book in Japa
nese about the subject, which I think was translated into English and publi
shed here.

Thank you for all the entries about the use of the American flag icon. So e
very quiltmaker of old, who presumably knew better the etiquette of flag re
presentation than today's citizensknow, was flaunting the law a bit to r
epresent the flag in any but the proper manner. The variety of antique/vint
age flag quilts is considerable and more common than we think. Many incorpo
rate actualsmall flags used for parades and celebrations, so that may be
a violation but a loving one.In my art talk I wascomparing Jasper Jo
hns iconic flag painting (horizontal, not hanging as was proper) that just
sold for $24.6 million,with predecessor flag images in quilts; he wasn't
the first to think this visual ideaup..

Laura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE
305 East 61st Street,5th floor
New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596
www.laurafisherquilts.com
fisherheritageyahoo.com
--0-1574227386-1278133024:87456--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sue Reich's book
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>


Sue, I ordered my copy as soon as I saw your post. I know this has been
a work of your lifetime and also know that your son, Maj. Stephen C. Reich,
USA, KIA June 28, 2005 must be looking down on you and smiling. He was
a hero and you are a hero in my eyes.
Best, Don Beld
--0-1939033841-1278169844:56130--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt math, flags in quilts
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Sat, 3 Jul 2010 11:06:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Laura F. wrote
"In my art talk I wascomparing Jasper Johns iconic flag paintin
g (horizontal, not hanging as was proper)...with predecessor flag ima
ges in quilts; he wasn't the first to think this visual ideaup.."
---------
Laura, what do you mean "horizontal, not hanging as was proper"? Johns' Fla
g? Or?

I saw but once the one that recently sold----well, about 20 times in a long
weekend: I kept coming back to look again---and have seen Johns' "Three Fl
ags" several times because it is/was at the Whitney and accessible. It is s
o much more than a simple flag, isn't it? I cannot imagine that anyone woul
d find that flag "unpatriotic," though I know all the critical stuff about
its supposed "ambiguity." I see "complexity" in those paintings. I don't th
ink Johns had used encaustics before the first flag, had he? Wasn't he exp
erimenting with the technique then? That technique permitted the use of wor
ds within the image (in the white stripes), something that I've never seen
captured well in prints of the piece. Incidentally, who was the buyer in th
at auction?

I doubt all the 19th-century quiltmakers who included the flag in their qui
lt knew much more than we seemed to know about the propriety of flag displa
y. Probably less. Quiltmaking was their art form, their medium for creativ
ity, and I suspect they did what JJ did in a different mediium E28093 us
e it to represent a complex of feelings and experiences.

I bet they didn't expect anybody to sit on their quilts, but not because of
the flags used whole or represented thereon. Rather, as Jean shrewdly obs
erved, because they were a "good quilts." They were personal works of art,
the products of both imagination and effort. Everyone understood such quilt
s were for looking, not for sitting. In the vernacular architecture that ev
olved from the dogtrot log houses of the South, the "good" bedroom was one
of the two front rooms off the central hallway. The bed in that room always
displayed the "best" quilt(s). People viewed them as they entered the hous
e. Nobody slept under those quilts. They were made for display and for pass
ing along family memories and values.

Re math and pattern making. One of the lessons of historical study in the p
ast quarter century is that it is virtually impossible to generalize accura
tely about any usage or practice in 18th- and 19th-century America. Regiona
l differences were simply too great. Sophisticated versions of Scarlett O'H
ara did live and live well in places like Charleston, Mobile, Baltimore, an
d along the great Tidewater rivers of Virginia long before they found thei
r way to Middle Georgia or the rest of the Old Southwest. Yet co-existing w
ith them were backcountry and piedmont women who worked alongside other fam
ily members to clear land and make a garden and an acre of cotton or indigo
or several acres of wheat. The experiences of their prim counterparts in N
ew England differed dramatically from either. And five miles down the pike,
in a palatinate or Quaker community, experiences differed from both.

English, Scots-Irish, Swiss, German, Finns, Swedes; Anglicans, Presbyterian
s, Baptists, Quakers, Methodists, Catholics, and a variety of Protestants--
-people brought with them ideas and experiences that shaped all sorts of pr
actices and they borrowed as freely as their ancestors in Europe had borrow
ed, maybe more freely. So we really need to be specific when we talk about
any practice, including those involved in quiltmaking.

Laura, would love to see your presentation!

Gaye Ingram


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: WWII Quilts
From: cberryelite.net
Date: Sat, 3 Jul 2010 06:46:52 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4

Sue, congratulations on the publication of your book! I just now ordered
mine from Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0764334514/quiltweb/) and look forward to receiving it. On behalf of my
father, who served with the 83rd and was at the Battle of the Bulge, thank
you for this labor of love. By the way, I was born while my father was
fighting the Battle of the Bulge; my mother always said she was fighting her
own Battle of the Bulge at the same time.

Happy 4th to all.

Carol Berry
Merced, CA (Gateway to Yosemite)



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Math and women's education
From: "Munsey" <sgmunseycomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 3 Jul 2010 13:06:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

It seems to me that 19th C educational opportunities are being confused with
17th C and 18th C ones. Take a look at the textbooks of the time. Many of
them make 21st C texts for grades 1 to 8 look very pale by comparison. In
the 19th C the textbooks provided enough math and reading to allow children
to be able to work in commerce by the time they were 12 or 13 years old.
After all, farming IS commerce, not just food for the family table. And,
women had businesses as dress, hat makers (and teachers) early in the 18th
and 19th C. Consider, too, the engineering knowledge of the rural farmers,
blacksmiths, and carpenters, without the benefit of an MIT, when the
buildings and bridges they built have lasted over one or two centuries, and
think of the females who lived in the same houses with these fathers,
husbands, and brothers from whom knowledge and books were shared.

Eight or nine years of education were the norm for most people in the US,
Canada, and Great Britain into the 20th C. "Primary" school was just that,
the primary education that everyone received. By about 1830 "secondary"
schools began to appear in even small towns. The teenagers of the time,
boys and girls, attended as much or as little as the family could afford
until eventually the towns began to hire teachers. My great-grandmother,
born in 1824, attended "higher school" held in the church whenever a teacher
could be found, sometimes the local doctor. My Canadian educated
grandmother, born 1872, who attended only a primary school in a Nova Scotia
mining town, read Shakespeare in 7th and 8th grade, learned English history
forward and backward, and could make hooked rugs, quilts, and run the NH
farm after she was widowed early in order to support herself, two sons, and
occasional Nova Scotian cousins. She knew how to use geometry and
bookkeeping. She was not unique among her women peers. Yes, mostly the
privileged young men went to "academies" or to Harvard (fill in the name of
your favorite early college in the 19th C East or Mid West). However, when
only one child in a family could be sent to a higher school, sisters also
learned from their brothers' lessons. More women were able to read, write,
and cypher that we seem to credit. Look at those Lowell (and Lawrence,
Dover, Manchester, and Pawtucket, et al) mill girls and women for evidence.

Even my math-phobic self learned while I was in grade school over 60 years
ago how to read Roman numerals, how many ounces there are in cups, quarts,
and gallons - and how to multiple and divide same, as well as how many
inches are in feet and yards - reinforced by years of sewing and quilting,
and also to do basic bookkeeping. We even learned geometry by surveying the
school yard. And, I use the skills regularly. Can't say the same for the
granddaughter in high school nor even for the one that just graduated with
honors from college. Neither can balance a checkbook! Although the college
grad can run circles around me in modern literature and art, I do admit.

I will get off my soap box now, and enjoy the Cape Cod's near perfect July
Fourth weather. Happy and safe Fourth of July weekend to all.

Sandra on Cape Cod













----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Math in Quilts
From: textiqueaol.com

Judy and all;

"I'd like to be clear that I'm not suggesting that women in the early, mid
-19th century could not have made the calculations for a complicated desig
n. I just think we need to keep in mind that a male family member or hire
d person could have drafted the patterns."

Would a sister not inquire what her brother was learning at school?

I think she would just the same as I think a brother, or father would hav
e taken great interest in what his sister or daughter was doing
and even want to be part of it. He may not have done the sewing but he co
uld have done the designing. I don't see all quilting as strictly a femal
e activity but, in some cases, as a family activity and how wonderful. Th
e Primitive Hall top screams family activity to me, a gracious welcome int
o our family from us all.

There is no romanticized, idealization of what "a" 19th century woman or
women from any other time or that men were stereotypical overbearing asse
s. Women are and were individuals. I think she was equally smart, funny,
lonely, over-worked and as incredibly creative as are the women of today
so I put nothing past them.

Even using the phrase '19th century' encompasses a great deal of change (a
nd approximately 4 or 5 generations) from the beginning to the end: social
ly, legally and educationally. Imagine being generation 4 thinking of 'ho
w did she do it' during generation 1.

The question was "how did she do it". I gave but one reason and one way
she did it.

Jan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt and Textile Study Day - Aug. 14 - Ohio
From: sharonpinkayahoo.com

The Midwest Fabric Study Group is pleased to offer a day-long program (August 14, 2010) of quilt study in Lexington, Ohio, focusing on quilts and coverlets from the 1840-1860 time period. Anchored by two keynote presentations from Dr.Virginia Gunn, the sessions will also include hands-on quilt study featuring examples from the period, the introduction of a local museum collection, and the usual lunch, show & tell, and other fun activities. Proceeds from a scheduled silent auction benefit The Quilters Hall of Fame, and study day proceeds will augment the AQSG Endowment Fund.

For a full description of events, costs, hotel information, and a registrat
ion form, please email Sharon Pinka <sharonpinkayahoo.com>. Registratio
n is limited; please respond by July 12 (motel discount rates expire July 1
3- Hope you can join us! Xenia Cord and Sharon Pinka

Sharon Pinka

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: WWII veterans
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Carol Berry wrote: I was born while my father was
fighting the Battle of the Bulge; my mother always said she was fighting
her own Battle of the Bulge at the same time.

My husband's Uncle Keig, who recently passed away, always said that he
gave the Army "the best years of my wife." His memoir as a trombone
soloist in the Army band in the European theatre provides an interesting
and unique slice of WWII memoir because he wasn't a warrior. He always
said that his trombone probably saved his life. His job during the war
was morale-building for the troops.

I'm reading Dearest Marguerite, letters home from the front written by a
Nebraska soldier during his service in the Pacific, and my admiration
and sense of indebtedness to both the men "over there" and the women
they left at home continues to grow. The author of the letters in
Dearest Marguerite didn't see his first child until she was two years
old.

Steph Whitson
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: WWII veterans
From: Getfruitaol.com

I was an Air Force wife during the Vietnam War. My husband was at home for
the birth of only one of our 3 children. He didn't see the first born until
he was one year old. My husband was told, "If we wanted you to have a
wife, we would have issued you one.".

Violet Vaughnes,
San Bernardino, CA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: WWII Veterans
From: <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2010 20:00:28 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

My father-in-law met my mother-in-law in Japan when he was on R&R. After the war he went back to Japan to marry his wife and bring her and their 4 year old son home to the US. My mother-in-law was the daughter of a town mayor in Japan. I always wondered what she went through being pregnant by an American soldier. She now suffers with Alzheimer's and my father-in-law died in a boating accident in the 60's. The stories get away from us so fast.

Happy Independence!

Sharron Evans............................in hot and humid Spring, TX

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: WWII
From: mopalka <mopalkaalaska.net>
Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2010 00:56:36 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

My Maternal Grandmother, Mattie, went to work at the McDonald Douglas
or Boeing plant in Tulsa during the war. She was required to wear
pants and came under criticism from some of the "older" ladies in her
small town of Skiatook. Her reply was, "If my boys can go to sea and
fight for our precious country, then I can certainly put on pants and
do my small part for our Freedom and Country". She was quite the
lady! I should add that she had a homestead in Colorado prior to her
marriage, taught school, "birthed" babies, quilted for 25 cents a
spool, was an excellent dressmaker and quilter, plus raised six
children and took in anyone who needed a meal! I am so proud to be
her granddaughter! She also gave me all the quilt blocks her Mother,
Hannah, hand pieced in the early 1920's. These included all the
patterns Hannah had made and enough blocks for a dozen quilts.

Susan(in Alaska with 50 degrees and lots of mosquitoes and sunlight!)



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Date of a Quilt in a book
From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net>

Hi to both sides of the Atlantic -



I was flipping through a new purchase of mine (found at a funky little
book
store here in Temecula, CA) called Patchwork - 25 classic step-by-step
projects by Diana Lodge and found some pretty English quilts. It's a
nice
little book - from Thunder Bay Press 1994 - with pictures of English and
American antique quilts.



I wonder if any of you have the book and can tell me if the dating on
the
image on page 105 is "Turn-of-the-century" meaning turning 19th to 20th
century. The fabrics sort of threw me, I guess because the quilt is
English
- but I thought they were earlier than late 19th early 20th century. I
was
just wondering the approximate date? The writing in the book on this
quilt
doesn't give insight into the meaning of the term used -
"Turn-of-the-century" - and on an earlier entry the author uses the term
"Turn of the 20th Century," so I felt like I needed to ask some experts.




Thanks so much

Leah Zieber

Temecula California

Where the summer is turning out to be wonderfully cool so far! (Sorry
you
East Coasters)



PS - the book is available at Amazon for a good price.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: reminder about Ohio Quilt Study Day sign-up
From: Sharon Pinka <sharonpinkayahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2010 14:25:38 -0700 (PDT)

Just a reminder that if you are interested in attending the Midwest Fabric
Study Group's quilt study day on August 14, you have just a few days to sig
n up for one of the remaining places. Hotel reservation availability has
been extended to July 27, butparticipant spots are filling fast. For
more info, email sharonpinkayahoo.com


Sharon Pinka
Rainbow Quilt Blocks, Quilt Study & Research
6323 Possum Run Rd.
Bellville, OH 44813 USA
419.938.8040
sharonpinkayahoo.com
--0-195596696-1278451538:26123--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Math in Quilts
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 6 Jul 2010 14:45:41 -0700 (PDT)

Hi all,That's it! The Primitive Hall top! It was made by Qua
kers asI recall. I still have to dig out that paper...
I like this discussion. Everyone has good points. I, too, hesit
ate about making sweeping generalities. Just last week I had an in
quiry as so why a black person would have made a particularpattern
antique quiltand whythat patternwould appeal to someo
ne who is black. In my reply I included that thepattern was
probably made by the maker because she liked it, thatI would be ve
ry cautious in trying to expand one black personE28099s pattern choice o
nto the whole of an entire race and thatI would also be cautious a
s to speculating why this pattern was chosen by one particular person be
cause thatE28099s what it would be: pure speculation. I don't t
hinkmy answer was very appreciated.At this point in the m
ath, 19th century quilts, and women's education discussion it is like a
discussion at a coffee shop. No research has been done, but we are
seeing what doors might open.Judy Schwender
--0-1337785688-1278452741:85478--




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: swirling swastikas
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2010 10:44:12 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Am I the only one who thinks that most "swastika" quilts aren't really
swastikas? Swastikas didn't "swirl." And they pointed a certain way.

I'm just sayin'. . . . . . quilt date aside, some reactions are
overreactions to something that isn't even the symbol causing the reaction.

Steph Whitson
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Math in Quilts
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2010 10:54:37 -0500

It makes me smile to read the discussions about "how did she figure that
out?" because I've wondered the same thing for all the years I've been
gazing on antique quilt masterpieces. One thing is obvious. . . when
"she" wanted to figure it out. . . she found a way. We may never know
the answer to "how", but looking at the evidence that she did just makes
me once more admire and sing the praises of my foremothers, who proved
over and over and over again, that "where there's a will. . . there's a
way."

It would be fun to think up a few cameo scenes in a life of a
quiltmaker, illustrating our various ideas of ways she might have
suceeded. Hired man. . . husband. . . clerk at her hsuband's store. . .
natural personal gift. . . . folded paper. . . and so on. My guess is
that "all of the above" would be true in one or more cases, because a
woman WILL do what a woman wills.

Steph Whitson
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Math in Quilts
From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2010 11:53:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

If a women could bake a pie and cut it into equal parts, she certainly could
draw a circle, cut it into equal parts, cut those into designs, add a seam
allowance, etc. and "Bob's Your Uncle" she has a complicated pattern!!

We are smarter than we think!! and men don't have to do it for us......



Lonnie
Schlough (a female math wiz with very little formal training)
in rainy Woodlands, Tx
www.fixquilts.com

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: swirling swastikas
From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2010 11:55:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I still think it's a 'fly's foot'............
Lonnie Schlough

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: math in quilts
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2010 16:22:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

So, if folding, etc. is so easy, how did (or more to the point, why did)
Kezih Lee Fisher Welsh, make 15 compass stars in Turkey red as the central
portion of her masterpiece quilt, every one of those stars consisting of 7
(seven) points, and every dad-blamed one of them laying flat as a pancake?
Those are 51.429 degree angles. Where does that come from? How do you
figure that out?

And why didn't she make them as blocks, but instead set them 3 x 5, into 2
long strips of white background. And then surround the whole thing with a
wide undulating vine and flower border on 3 sides with no two flowers alike.
And then add more flowers and vines everywhere in the quilting. c. 1850,
Fairmount, Tewksbury, Hunterdon County NJ.

This is one of the quilts I've been working with at the Hunterdon County
Historic Society. No one has yet figured out how or why she did the
7-pointed thingy. Or how to replicate it.

Judy Grow
Flemington NJ



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: math in quilts
From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>
Date: Wed, 7 Jul 2010 22:39:29 +0100
X-Message-Number: 6

Hi Judy

Myabe here's an answer to part i. I found this site on folding a
heptagon. The instructions aren't terribly clear, but I did manage to
fold a heptagon, and it very kindly also gives the intermediate folds
which you can use to mark the inner angles of the compass rose.
Tomorrow when I'm a bit more alert I'll try to do it more neatly and
construct an example, but it did work.

http://home.comcast.net/~JamesMClark5/Origami/HEPTAGON.pdf

Sally Ward

On 7 Jul 2010, at 21:22, Judy Grow wrote:

> So, if folding, etc. is so easy, how did (or more to the point, why
did)
> Kezih Lee Fisher Welsh, make 15 compass stars in Turkey red as the
central
> portion of her masterpiece quilt, every one of those stars consisting
of 7
> (seven) points,


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Tithing Quilt
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 07 Jul 2010 17:47:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Good Afternoon All -

I just returned home from attending a talk on antique quilts and the
speaker used a term I haven't heard before -- "tithing quilt". She
used it while describing those 1880 to 1920 church signature quilts
where people paid to have their name on a quilt -- thus raising money
for the church.

While I have never heard or seen the phrase "tithing quilt", I wondered
if anyone else has seen it, either in church papers, or other quilt
history publications. While I'm very familiar with the type quilt she
was describing, I'm not familiar with that phrase, or name for that type
of quilt. I think it was usually a specified amount of money (five
cents, ten cents, etc) to be "on" the quilt -- which isn't tithing,
which is defined as a percentage.

So, if you know that phrase -- please share.

Thanks for your help,
Barb in very hot southeastern PA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Have yall seen this?
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>


http://worldsbiggesthexagonquilt.blogspot.com/



As amazing as the entire project was I am more interested in the setting
. I've appraised umptyjillion quilts made of hexagons and darned if thi
s isn't a new layout. Whod'a thunk that possible?



The usual floweret is there as well as the elongated form known as Diamo
nd Fields. The Diamond Fields pieces are joined to create the illusion of
a long horizontal line. Pretty cool if I say so myself.

Teddy Pruett
www.teddypruett.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Elderhostel quilt program
From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net>
Date: Wed, 07 Jul 2010 23:26:08 -0400

I signed up for an Elderhostel (The newest name is Road Scholar) program
at the Allentown Art Museum on Quilts featuring their current exhibit
It was a one day seminar next Wed. but unfortunately, there weren't
enough people signed up and I just received word it was cancelled. A
second one day seminar is scheduled in Lancaster County two different
dates in August. I am attending on Aug.31st, but am holding my breath
that it won't be cancelled. I am afraid that if these seminars need to
be cancelled the Elderhostel program will think that quilters are not
interested. Thought I would let you all know about the August program.
It's called "Quilts: The Patchwork of Lancaster County" and is being
held at the Black Rock Retreat Center in Quarryville, PA. A quilt
presentation "A Patch of Tradition, Community and Service" will be from
9:00 to 11:00, followed by a buffet lunch. At 12:15 a motor coach will
go to the Heritage Center Museum, Lancaster Quilt and Textile Museum and
the Central Market and then a stop at Amish quilt shops before returning
to the Retreat Center at 5:00. If any of you are interested the
toll-free number is 877-426-8056, Monday-Friday, 9a.m. to 6 p.m. ET.
Hope to see some of you there.
Judy Knorr