Subject: math in quilts
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net>
Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2010 07:46:42 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Judy Grow wrote: " Kezih Lee Fisher Welsh, make 15 compass stars in Turkey
red as the central portion of her masterpiece quilt, every one of those
stars consisting of 7 (seven) points, and every dad-blamed one of them
laying flat as a pancake? Those are 51.429 degree angles. Where does that
come from? How do you figure that out?"


Trace the design, make templates, add seam allowances and piece. You can
replicate just about anything and make it flat that way. Just watch out for
edges that are not on the straight of grain to avoid stretching.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle
Not-so-patiently waiting for cooler weather in Lancaster County, PA



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Have yall seen this?
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2010 08:38:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

That is amazing - and I agree, Teddy, I naively thought I must have seen
every possible setting. Before I read the text on the left I was analyzing
how it was done. I saw the usual rosette - three rounds with the last one
being white or cream. Then the other one where the 3rd round was
interrupted.
When I read the rules for those participating I swa that they had the 2nd
version made with just two rounds. Whoever worked on the final assembly of
blocks must have planned to use that same green at 12, 3 6 and 9 (clock
position) around the 3rd row.
I love studying settings and trying to figure out how it was done.
Thanks for sending the link.
Jean



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: math in quilts
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2010 09:20:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

as to the 7-point compass star. . . . maybe there really are quilt angels. .
. and one stood next to Kezih and showed her how. . .

Steph Whitson (only half kidding)
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Tithing Quilt
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2010 09:23:19 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I could see how a quilt that required 10 cents to sign would easily become a
"tithing quilt" in the vernacular because of the 10% being in the minds of
those who practice tithing. Easy mental transition IMHO. Inaccurate as can
be, but then that's what oral history does. . . to the frustration of
historians!

Steph Whitson
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: A Not-Funny Thing Happened to me on the way to email.....
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2010 11:02:41 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Dear Members of quilt lists,

Since late spring, my Suddenlink email account has been in one of its abberant cycles, and despite my many and best efforts in working with the company technicians, I've been unable to resolve the problems.

The only mailings I have received at that account for months have been from qhl, BQHL, AQSG forums, plus a Rice genealogy forum. In turn, it appears those addresses have been the only ones that my "sent" mail reached from the Suddenlink account.

For a long time I was not aware of the problem, then three times before I've believed it was corrected when it was not. I've just had a conversation that gives me some hope the issue might be resolved, though no one can explain the suddenness with which the unaccountable problems happened in the first place. I guess that's why the firm has that oxymoronic name, Suddenlink. Routine service could change in a snap to no service. One just never knows.

In any case, I recently learned that during this period several members on these lists have written me personally regarding quilts and related subjects. I did not receive those messages. If anyone else wrote me asking questions or responding to a personal email during this time, please be aware of my situation and resend the messages.

I apologize for taking up list space for a purely private matter, but I knew of no other way to address the issue and was told others, besides the members I've discovered, have written me and did not appreciate my failure to reply. Nobody---not my bank, not Clinique, not Amazon, not Ms. Woo who always writes offering me the opportunity to lend her $10,000, not a single individual---thwarted whatever barrier had been mysteriously set. Except the quilter groups and the Rice group! Not many people can frustrate the many baffles this firm erects. I'm proud to be part of groups that bested them.

So if you wrote me personally and did not receive a reply in, say, the past three months, please try again. And please accept my apologies for any inconvenience I've caused you.

Apologies,
Gaye Ingram
gingramsuddenlink.net
gingram40gmail.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: math in quilts
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 8 Jul 2010 18:54:23 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Personally, I think it was a mistake. When she got to the 8th point she saw
it wouldn't lay flat, and hey! it was flat with 7! Somehow her template
grew, or the bias stretched.

Judy


> as to the 7-point compass star. . . . maybe there really are quilt angels.
> . . and one stood next to Kezih and showed her how. . .
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: tithing quilts
From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 08 Jul 2010 18:02:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Two of the three Keota quilts were made in the period in question and
were church-related. A newspaper article described the beginning of the
Redwork quilt (1890s). I haven't looked at my research for several years
now, but I'm certain that "tithe" or "tithing" were not used in the
article. The only documentation for the 1913 quilt was stitched on it;
it referred to the Sunday School group, "The Gleaners." "Glean" could
refer to things spiritual or monetary or both, so it's not much of a
stretch to get to "tithe", and the other was identified as a fundraising
effort. Maybe "tithe" is a word used more in some denominations than
others? The redwork quilt was for a Methodist church. "The Gleaners"
were Presbyterian.

Andi in Paducah


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Tithing Quilt, hexagons quilt
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>



OMG I DID IT!! I finally, loaded photos on eboard of two quilts -- a tithin
g 'quilt' and a wild English hexagons quilt top. I have broken through the
learning curve I think. Hooray.

The TITHING one is a sort of quilt; it shows a Log Cabin, in which a name i
s inscribed in graphite (how's that?!) on each strip, along with the amount
of money donated by that person. In some 'blocks' there is a central circl
e noting the total amount raised by that signer The amounts range from 5
cents to several dollars. The date 1917 is written along the outside borde
r, along with Woman's Christian Ladies Aid. Only problem--there is no town
or state indicated. I call it 'quilt' in quotation marks because actually i
t is linen - either a tablecloth or sheet - on which the log cabin pattern
was achieved by sewing red embroidery floss to outline the edges of all the
'strips', there is no piecing! The configuration is similar to 'show' quil
ts made with cigar silk ribbons; this pattern is a log cabin on point, very
graphic, but subtly so because it is thin red lines from the stitches on l
inen.

The MOSAIC is an English quilt top, never finished because it is sooooo cat
tywampus, forms a parallelogram, and cannot be folded evenly. It contains h
undreds of clusters of hexagons like a granny's garden, but between each gr
oup are TWO white hexagons where only one should have been used, so it grew
and grew and grew sideways. It has the original paper templates in the bac
k, and actually looks fabulous hung on a wall for a great room or loft beca
use it is in the spirit of a contemporary shaped canvas painting. It has re
ally beautiful one-inch cotton print hexagons, lovely colors, is mint, a
nd unique I think. I posted several photos

Laura

Laura Fisher at
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Tithing quilts -- responses
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2010 06:40:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Good Morning All -

I want to thank everyone (on all 3 lists --AQSG, QHL, and BQTHL) for
their thoughts, information, and replies. I've compiled the responses,
and my responses to what was written, in this one email, and will be
sending it to all 3 lists. So far, nobody has confirmed hearing the
phrase "tithing quilt" used in either "period" church literature, or
contemporary quilt history writings.

Stephanie wrote -
I could see how a quilt that required 10 cents to sign would easily
become a "tithing quilt" in the vernacular because of the 10% being in
the minds of those who practice tithing. Easy mental transition IMHO.
Inaccurate as can be, but then that's what oral history does. . . to the
frustration of historians!

Hi Stephanie --
I love your thinking -- it is similar to what I thought might have happened.

Dee wrote -
Since it means "one tenth", are there ten segments to those circles of
signatures? Dee

Hi Dee -
The actual quilt the person was talking about was a rolling stone with
stamped inscriptions, and she segwayed into something like "signature
quilts were done by churches to raise money and so are called tithing
quilts." That's not a direct quote -- but she was referencing a
group or type of quilt, not a specific quilt.

Sandra wrote -
By any chance can you inquire of the speaker of his/her source? I
have never heard that term used in New England.

Hi Sandra -
The format of the talk didn't allow for that type of question, but I am
hopeful I will have another opportunity to speak with this person and
ask her privately about her statement.

Laurel wrote -
Growing up, I always heard that tithing meant giving 10 percent of your
income to the church. I just checked a dictionary, and found the
derivtion from an Anglo Saxon word meaning a tenth portion of something.
I've never heard the term applied to a fundraising quilt. I think of
tithing to a church as a voluntary act, not an assessment, so I would
question the idea of a church specifying that members tithe to have
their names on a quilt.

Hi Laurel -
I too think of tithing and fund raising quilts as two different activities.

Rosalind of N. Ireland wrote -
There are tithe books in the public record office, when the established
church owned land ,for those who rented land from the church they paid
tithing usually according to the state of the land and what it produced
, which helped to decide the amount of tithing to be collected . The
tithing was a tax which was unpopular. These tithe books are a good
source for tracing families , so I take it the fact that the signature
quilts were raising money for the church tithing in this case is ferred
to in the same context.

Hi Rosalind -
I can see how the connection might have been made, and it appears you
haven't heard the phrase before, is that correct?

Joan wrote -
i visited a tithing barn in England, where one tenth of each year's farm
production was stored after farmers of the area paid it as tribute (read
"tax"?) to the ruler of that region.

Hi Joan -
A tithing barn for storage of the 10% makes very logical sense to me.

Sally wrote -

I have not heard of tithing used in connection to quilts or paying to
add a name to a fund raising quilt.
I have heard of tithing. Like you, my experience with tithing was to
pay a tenth or some other part as a voluntary contribution to support a
religious establishment. Why a tenth? My dictionary defines tithing as
a small administrative division preserved in parts of England (12 c.)
that originally consisted of ten men with their families. Is the rest
history?

Hi Sally -
I haven't researched the origin of the word/concept "tithe" or "tithing"
-- I just have "always" heard of the 10%. I was more concerned about
the word being used in conjunction with the word quilt as a description
of a type of quilt -- that was new to me.

Andi wrote -
Two of the three Keota quilts were made in the period in question and
were church-related. A newspaper article described the beginning of the
Redwork quilt (1890s). I haven't looked at my research for several years
now, but I'm certain that "tithe" or "tithing" were not used in the
article. The only documentation for the 1913 quilt was stitched on it;
it referred to the Sunday School group, "The Gleaners." "Glean" could
refer to things spiritual or monetary or both, so it's not much of a
stretch to get to "tithe", and the other was identified as a fundraising
effort. Maybe "tithe" is a word used more in some denominations than
others? The redwork quilt was for a Methodist church. "The Gleaners"
were Presbyterian.

Hi Andi -
Thank you for confirming the "non-use" of the phrase. My thoughts on
the "Gleaners" name for the Sunday School Class -- it was possibly
referring to them "gleaning souls for Christ." The "old people's
class" at my church has been called the "Helping Hands" class "forever"
-- similar concept in that the older people help/teach the younger
people in their walk. There is a Reformed/UCC church near me that has
a Dorcas class -- and it consists only of "older" women -- and the
signature quilt they made in the 1930s has that class name on it. When
I see Sunday School class names on a quilt -- I think of those as being
"long standing" names, not names used just in this quilt.

Also, several people (Joan, Michelle, Donna, Tracy, etc) stated that a
tithe was 10% or 1/10th, and none of them mentioned hearing the 2 words
in one phrase -- tithing quilt.

Thank you everyone for your input. I will share any other thoughts
that come my way, or if I'm able to learn the speaker's source of
information. She was not a quilter or quilt historian.

Barb in southeastern PA
where the corn leaves have curled into spikes
and we are hoping for gentle rains, not storms



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 7 pointed star quilt
From: Tracy Jamar <tjamaroptonline.net>
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2010 08:06:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Judy I think your last assessment was right, "When she got to the 8th
point she saw
it wouldn't lay flat, and hey! it was flat with 7!"

That's exactly what happened to me on the first quilt (Lone Star) I
ever made in the 70s. I copied a template from a quilting magazine,
then traced around it on the fabric. What I was unaware of until I
started piecing it together was that tracing around the template made
the markings on the fabric slightly larger than they should have been.

Unknowingly, I made several stars with only 7 points, as they were
flat It didn't occur to me that I was missing a point until I made
one with 8 points and discovered my mistake. So I just made it a 7
pointed Lone Star and thanked the quilting angel Steph mentioned for
making my increase exactly enough to make 7 points lie flat.

I still have the quilt, never used it. I was engaged to a Hollywood
stunt man and thought I'd be moving to CA in the early 80s and
extended the quilt to fit a CA king size bed. It never happened and
I've never had a bed large enough for it. Also the colors are not at
all what I'd use today anyway. However, it did make me realize the
importance of details and observation, that quilting is not something
I enjoy, but designing, problem solving and detail work is.... so I
consider it to have been a very valuable learning experience.

Tracy Jamar enjoying the cooler air of eastern Long Island.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NQR -- looking for information on museum visitation
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2010 11:15:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear all - I am looking for some input about museum visitation by women, age
45+ (though the low end of this age could be higher), for a possible
discussion at a conference.

It's been my theory for a long time that this is our best audience at my
organization, and may in fact be true of many smaller museums (I don't think
it holds true for large museums, for example). I feel so strongly about
this that I am considering providing even more programming targeted at this
group - I may be biased as I fall into the same category!

So here are some questions, if you fall into this age range (let's use 40 as
the low age for sake of argument) - and I'd also like input from other
museum people on the list, and anyone else who'd like to chime in. I
apologize that the list is long, but I'd love your input, as much or as
little as you are willing to provide. Thank you so very much.



1. Do you frequently attend museum EXHIBITIONS? How many times a year?

2. Do you frequently attend special PROGRAMS at museums, including
lectures, workshops, classes, etc.? How many times a year?
3. Do you attend alone, or with girlfriends/female family/female
partner, or with male husband/partner? Please indicate.
4. Do you have children? Are they out of the house?
5. If you have grown children (or at least those that have completed
HS), do you think you visit museums more frequently since they are out of
the house?
6. Does cost of museum activities play a factor in your visit?
7. Do you make purchases in the museum gift shops?
8. Do you incorporate a museum visit with some other activity, for
example lunch, tea, shopping or an overnight? Are having other options near
the museum a factor in whether you will visit?
9. Are museums often destinations for you?
10. How far will you travel for an afternoon museum visit, which, for
example, might incorporate lunch or tea either at the museum or at a nearby
establishment?
11. If you attend with a husband/partner, is he generally as interested
as you are in visiting?
12. Do you attend other types of cultural/educational activities with
women? This includes, but is not limited to, house tours, walking tours,
garden tours, music/theatre events, classes, etc. (I am looking for
specifically planned outings here - can be two or more women; friends,
family, or couples)
13. What type of museum exhibitions/programs holds the most interest for
you?
14. Did you visit museums as a child? As a younger adult?
15. Finally, I'd love to know what would be your idea of the best type
of exhibit/program a museum could offer, if you were to wave a magic wand
and say this is what I'd like to do and see?





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NQR -- looking for information on museum visitation
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2010 10:56:14 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

1. Do you frequently attend museum EXHIBITIONS? How many times a year?

Yes. Ten or more times a year.

2. Do you frequently attend special PROGRAMS at museums, including
lectures, workshops, classes, etc.? How many times a year?

Yes. Six or more times a year.

3. Do you attend alone, or with girlfriends/female family/female
partner, or with male husband/partner? Please indicate.

Usually alone.

4. Do you have children? Are they out of the house?

Five children. All out of the house.
5. If you have grown children (or at least those that have completed
HS), do you think you visit museums more frequently since they are out of
the house?

Yes. I have more time. Although I home schooled so we did a lot of that when
they were in middle school and high school as well, but that's been many
years ago now.
6. Does cost of museum activities play a factor in your visit?

Yes.
7. Do you make purchases in the museum gift shops?

Yes. BOOKS. Not gifts.
8. Do you incorporate a museum visit with some other activity, for
example lunch, tea, shopping or an overnight? Are having other options near
the museum a factor in whether you will visit?

Not really. It's usually about research.
9. Are museums often destinations for you?

Yes. My "day job" is writing historical fiction and I'm also working on my
masters degree in history.
10. How far will you travel for an afternoon museum visit, which, for
example, might incorporate lunch or tea either at the museum or at a nearby
establishment?

A 3 hour drive one way is about my maximum, but I"m a truck-drivers daughter
and I love road trips.
11. If you attend with a husband/partner, is he generally as interested
as you are in visiting?

Yes. My husband is also working on his masters in history, loves to read,
and loves museums as well. I am blessed.
12. Do you attend other types of cultural/educational activities with
women? This includes, but is not limited to, house tours, walking tours,
garden tours, music/theatre events, classes, etc. (I am looking for
specifically planned outings here - can be two or more women; friends,
family, or couples)

I'm not a "women's group" sort of person generally. The exception would be
with other women who are quilters.
13. What type of museum exhibitions/programs holds the most interest for
you?
19th Century history
14. Did you visit museums as a child? As a younger adult?

As a child, no. As a younger adult, yes. My parents also loved museums,
history, and old cemeteries :-).
15. Finally, I'd love to know what would be your idea of the best type
of exhibit/program a museum could offer, if you were to wave a magic wand
and say this is what I'd like to do and see?

Something to do with women's history that makes their experience come alive.
A well done "chautaqua-type" event that gives a sense of "you are there"
could be particularly effective. A re-enactor giving a tour, for example.
But I have to say that many re-enactor's I've seen fall under the category
of "she meant well....but she didn't do her research."

Stephanie Whitson
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com
www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NQR -- looking for information on museum visitation
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2010 10:57:26 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

I apologize in advance for sending it to the loop....I just hit "reply" and
didn't have Candace's personal e-mail address and forgot how to reply only
to her. . . . I'm sorry.

Stephanie Whitson
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com
www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NQR -- looking for information on museum visitation
From: kathie holland <kathiehollandoptonline.net>
Date: Fri, 09 Jul 2010 12:00:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Oh don't be sorry it was interesting to read!
Kathie in NJ


On 7/9/10 11:57 AM, "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
wrote:

> I apologize in advance for sending it to the loop....I just hit "reply" and
> didn't have Candace's personal e-mail address and forgot how to reply only
> to her. . . . I'm sorry.
>
> Stephanie Whitson
>




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NQR -- looking for information on museum visitation
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2010 12:26:57 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Stephanie -- thank you so much -- you have an excellent and different
perspective on your museum visitation!
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NQR -- looking for information on museum visitation
From: Mitzioakesaol.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2010 14:05:52 EDT
X-Message-Number: 8


--part1_2ca4e.3e2dde61.3968bf00_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

At 76, I guess I can take your questions! As a volunteer at he Shelburne
Museum in Shelburne, Vermont, I know that place by heart. I volunteer in
the building that houses quilts that are part of the museum's permanent
collection (0ver 600+) and every year has special displays.
Shelburne caters to tours, children and elders (always a shuttle bus that
tours the grounds every 10 minutes - special golf carts for handicapped
individuals, every building has a handicap entrance (well, maybe the
lighthouse is a bit hard for there are many stairs to climb); There is always a
docent in each building that will answer any questions or help with any
special needs. Classrooms are open most always for children to play games and
learn at the same time. The many acres of gardens are all on fairly level
walking paths/roads.
Several times a year, the Museum has concerts that range from classical to
hard rock (so all ages are covered.) There is a store for buying Museum
related collectibles etc. and a cafeteria for a light snack.......
Don't know if I have helped any, but anyone that comes to Vermont must see
the Museum - it cannot be displayed by words - it is a national treasure.
Mitzi from Vermont


In a message dated 7/9/2010 11:17:20 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
candaceschwenkfelder.com writes:

Dear all - I am looking for some input about museum visitation by women,
age
45+ (though the low end of this age could be higher), for a possible
discussion at a conference.

It's been my theory for a long time that this is our best audience at my
organization, and may in fact be true of many smaller museums (I don't
think
it holds true for large museums, for example). I feel so strongly about
this that I am considering providing even more programming targeted at this
group - I may be biased as I fall into the same category!

So here are some questions, if you fall into this age range (let's use 40
as
the low age for sake of argument) - and I'd also like input from other
museum people on the list, and anyone else who'd like to chime in. I
apologize that the list is long, but I'd love your input, as much or as
little as you are willing to provide. Thank you so very much.



1. Do you frequently attend museum EXHIBITIONS? How many times a year?

2. Do you frequently attend special PROGRAMS at museums, including
lectures, workshops, classes, etc.? How many times a year?
3. Do you attend alone, or with girlfriends/female family/female
partner, or with male husband/partner? Please indicate.
4. Do you have children? Are they out of the house?
5. If you have grown children (or at least those that have completed
HS), do you think you visit museums more frequently since they are out of
the house?
6. Does cost of museum activities play a factor in your visit?
7. Do you make purchases in the museum gift shops?
8. Do you incorporate a museum visit with some other activity, for
example lunch, tea, shopping or an overnight? Are having other options
near
the museum a factor in whether you will visit?
9. Are museums often destinations for you?
10. How far will you travel for an afternoon museum visit, which, for
example, might incorporate lunch or tea either at the museum or at a nearby
establishment?
11. If you attend with a husband/partner, is he generally as interested
as you are in visiting?
12. Do you attend other types of cultural/educational activities with
women? This includes, but is not limited to, house tours, walking tours,
garden tours, music/theatre events, classes, etc. (I am looking for
specifically planned outings here - can be two or more women; friends,
family, or couples)
13. What type of museum exhibitions/programs holds the most interest for
you?
14. Did you visit museums as a child? As a younger adult?
15. Finally, I'd love to know what would be your idea of the best type
of exhibit/program a museum could offer, if you were to wave a magic wand
and say this is what I'd like to do and see?





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New catalog
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 2010 16:59:28 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

My museum recently received a lovely new catalog by Pat and Arlen Christ of
quilts in their collection, titled America's Appliqued Quilts: A Treasured
Pennsylvania Tradition. It has absolutely terrific color photographs. I
believe it will be available when the Christs mount an exhibit called Four
Blocks featuring quilts of said design from their collection at the Quilt
Odyssey at Hershey, PA July 22-25.

It is a must-add to your collection, from charming and generous collectors.

Candace Perry


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 7 pointed star/math
From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au>
Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2010 08:19:22 +1000
X-Message-Number: 10

The star on the Australian flag (first flown in 1901 when the Australian
States joined to form a Federation) has 7 points and here is a link:
http://flagspot.net/flags/au.html

The math involved is explained here:
'All the stars have an inner diameter (circle on which the inner corners
rest) of 4/9 the outer diameter (circle of outer corners), even the 5-point
star'. The inner and outer circles of 360degrees are then divided into 7
equal segments using a protractor.

A local quilt guild made quilts using the star (with permission from the
Australian Government) to mark the Centenary of Federation.

Here is a link for the 5-point star:
http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/flagstar.html

This is probably more than you wished to know about stars with 7 points!

Janet O'Dell
Melbourne Australia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt history in university courses
From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu>
Date: Sat, 10 Jul 2010 07:02:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

The Quilt Index team seeks to gather information on university
courses that are entirely devoted to quilt history or courses in
which quilt history is substantively included. We will use the
information in the grants that the staff of the MSU Museum and
MATRIX: Center for Humane Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences are
writing to support the maintenance and expansion of the Index.

We know of, of course, of the ones at University of Nebraska-Lincoln
and one at University of North Carolina but would appreciate
information about others. We are also interested in receiving copies
of course syllabi which can be sent as an email attachment to Marsha
MacDowell<macdowelmsu.edu> or by mail to Marsha MacDowell, Michigan
State University Museum, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824.

With appreciation for you help on behalf of the QI team,

Marsha
Marsha MacDowell, Ph.D.
Curator, Michigan State University Museum
Professor, Art and Art History
Co-Director, The Quilt Index
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Subject: Re: NQR -- looking for information on museum visitation
From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Jul 2010 21:24:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Candace,

Female age 60

1. About 5 x a year I attend a museum exhibition, always 3, sometimes 8-12.
2. I attend a lecture at a museum about once a year.
3. About half the time alone, one quarter with husband, one quarter with a
female friend.
4. Two grown children have lived far away for over ten years.
5. Yes, more often because I travel more often. I visit local museums about the
same as when they were home.
6. Yes, go more to free and low cost ones because I'm more willing to take a
chance on being interested. More likely to go alone if expensive.
7. Yes, I look for postcards if there is no photography.
8. No, no.
9. Yes, regularly, museums are destinations.
10. Alone or with friend, one and a half hours. With husband, two hours.
11. Not always.
12. Yes.
13. Art, textiles, history, historical house, archaeology, ethnic culture,
crafts. [My husband and I very much enjoyed your museum about 2003]
14. Yes, yes.
15. Exhibit with good written information, demonstrations or movie overview, and
someone live to pose questions to.

Susan Seater, Raleigh NC

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Subject: Mabel and Porkbarrel
From: "J Perkins" <qltrstoreharlannet.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jul 2010 19:49:11 -0500

I saw a Crazy Quilt this weekend that had a pair of characters embroidered
on it and I'm trying to ID them, but not finding anything.

Mabel is wearing a pretty bonnet, and Porkbarrel has a close-to-the-head
smooth cap and a ruffle around his neck, looking a little clownish.

There is an 1884 dated ribbon on the quilt, so can't be earlier than that.
The only Mabel I can find is in "Pirates of Penzance", but no Porkbarrel in
that.

Any ideas?

Jennifer Perkins

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Subject: Vintage embroidery designs
From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jul 2010 20:15:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7
Thought some of you might enjoy the nostalgia available here:
http://www.patternbee.com/redwork1.html

Stephanie Whitson
www.stephaniegracewhitson.com
www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com
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Subject: Re: Mabel and Porkbarrel
From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 12 Jul 2010 20:15:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

May i ask if the characters are together in a single embroidery or are they
done on separate patches? I am looking to see if there might be another
reference than just Mabel. Marcia Kaylakie