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Subject: RE: Robert Shaw's last book From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2010 23:16:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I liked it a lot. I was able to get it from my local library and renewed it until I could no longer do so. I read it cover to cover and took notes - and do plan to own it eventually. I can't tell you about the source of the quilts since I don't have the copy in front of me but I recall them to be from a wide variety of places. To me, it is a beautiful book- well written and with enough new things/quilts and otherwise, to be to be exciting. I'll be curious to see what others say. Jean

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Subject: Re: Robert Shaw's last book From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 9:39:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

KAREN ALEXANDER wrote: American Quilts: The Democratic Art, 1780-2007 by Robert Shaw Can someone who has this book give me their impression of it. Does it include a lot of repeat quilts that have been published elsewhere? What is  the source of most of the quilts in this book.... one or two museums or private collections?

Hi Karen,  I am glad to have the Shaw book "The Democratic Art."

I think Shaw thesis is sound---that quiltmaking is an art form and perhaps  the quintisential American art form. And I think he makes a solid case for  that thesis through the use of exceptional examples.  "The Democratic Art" does contain a number of quilts found in other books,  but in my view, they are better photographed and displayed in Shaw's, set o ff more fully because of the larger page size and the space allotted them.  I also think his chapter organization and the particular grouping of quilts within chapters give even the tried-and-true quilts greater meaning. I dis covered things I'd not noticed in many previous views.

In general---but not always---the more frequently photographed quilts are g iven quarter-page coverage, with the full-page layouts (they are many!) oft en devoted to the less often seen pieces or those more poorly photographed  in the past. And sometimes, as in a WPA photograph, Shaw will refocus a pho tograph by enlarging a detail that is its heart.  I was especially glad to see the Asylum Quilt of Catonsville, MD (private c ollection), an applique quilt that strikes me as altogether remarkable. I d idn't know it, though I'm sure it is in the MD book, the one state document ation book I don't own. The quilt was made by a young woman who had been c ommitted to the Catonsville insane asylum when she became pregnant out of w edlock (1850). The main body of the quilt is comprised of over 100 applique d blocks, joined without sashing so the figures stand out boldly from the w hite ground. A border featuring larger figures surrounds it. Amid rocking h orses, families with babies, wedded couples, flowers, and similar domestic  images are two disproportionately large black snakes, moving ominously towa rd the center. Two smaller blocks also contain 2 snakes, one larger than th e other. Because much of the symbology seems private, this extraordinary pe ace "tease[s] us out of thought," like the images on John Keats' Grecian ur n. Quite remarkable. This quilt gets a full page.  On the opposite page is the McCord vining "leaves" quilt, 1/4 page, part of the general discussion of the movement toward naturalistic imagery through appl ique. Similarly, four familiar BAQs make up one full page (no text on side) . This will give you an idea of Shaw's general principle of selection.  Many of the pieces given full-page spreads are from private collections. Se veral quilts from the Sarah Dillow collection appear in this chapter, for i nstance. Trish Herr's "Euphemia Kichline Album Quilt," with its interestingly center that is surrounded by finely appliqued and embroidered birds alternating wi th red and white reels, gets the full page it deserves. We had seen this i n "Blanket Statements," but I don't recall seeing it elsewhere, certainly n ot in this focus. 

A stunning "Mariner's Compass"(1890) done in Lancaster blue and sun-glow or ange that just glows is from collection of Julie Silber and is currently of fered for sale on Julie's website. A real stunner, and I don't think I've s een it in print before.  A fine, complex sampler (using hanging diamonds) from Lancaster County (187 0) and Stella Rubin's collection follows this simple Compass. I noted other pi eces from these two collections as well as from a variety of other private  collections.  The huge Hancock Wedding Album Quilt(1842-3), from the Philadelphia Museum  of Art also appears here, given as much space as one can give it in a book  this size (It is 97x126 inches). I don't think I knew this quilt. It has interes ted me particularly because it seems almost a compendium of certain early desig ns I think influenced the Ulster Scots as they moved through Philly and southeastern PA on way to your Valley and the Carolinas, Tennessee, and Geo rgia. Well, there are just some wonderful albums in this book

Shaw's text deals particularly well with this second quarter of 19th centur y in my view. It makes sense of all that is happening during this period of expansion in which Americans redefined themselves as citizens of the U.S.  rather than trans-Atlantic British.  As I have grown older and crazier, I've developed a certain appreciation fo r the crazy quilt, and Shaw's section on crazies is good. It builds on and amplif ies his chapter on early applique and is well illustrated. The photographs  of the Centennial Exposition are used to particular advantage: they emphasize the importance  of that event in the construction of national taste in general and particu larly in quiltimaking.  The section called "Diversity: 1870-1940" does a superb job of illustratin g that theme. "Lady's Shoe Quilt" from Cuesta's collection (from KY Project) gets half-page, which is really all it could bear, though I personally want to  see how the maker pieced those blocks. Harriett Powers gets 1/3 page while the  well-known 1937 Rothstein photograph of "Jennie Pettway and another Girl wi th the Quilter Jorena Pettway" (of Gee's Bend. AL) gets 2/3 page, a good allot ment of space, in my opinion. In the well focused image of an African-American w oman at a sewing machine and the girls posed holding the bulk of the Dresden Pla te quilt, one is required to look at the world in which these people lived. That roo m, its walls literally papered with newspaper pages, printed photographs, i nsurance calendar pictures on which are surmounted antlers, crochet-covere d shelves, and strings of what appear to be Chinaberries, does more to expl ain Gee's Bend quilts, personal pride, and cross-cultural influences than a ny text could do. Too bad the recent exhibition didn't let the photo talk t o museum-goers. Wonderful that Shaw lets it talk to readers. The woman seat ed at the treadle machine wears a fresh home-sewn print dress with a back neck zipper (remember those ?) and a perfectly ironed and starched white apron. the girls wear good dre sses with pearl necklaces. And they are holding the Dresden Plate quilt top as their mother runs the last section through the machine. I know this pho tograph, have a copy of it. Yet Shaw's placement and sizing of it forces on e to see at the details. That tidy, oh-so-white and perfectly pieced Dresden Plate (Dresden! no less, the  whitest and most uptight of the generally white and uptight) and those pearl-wearing children speak loudly about who sets the "rules"in their worl d and suggest how good it must have felt to have said, "To hell with them,  I'm going to do something I myself love, something that pleases ME!" In my  personal view, that's the real story of the more interesting quilts from Ge e's Bend and all the other little communities like it at the time. Their en ergy is the energy of conflict, juxtaposition.  Another treatment of this same tension takes up the opposite page---the well-known "Lazy Man" quilt from the TVA era, which as well as I know it, s till draws my mind to Elvis Presley. As, I think, it should. That Shaw mi sses this seems to derive from a certain ignorance of the diversity and his tory of the South. He seems not to understand that the energy of the Presle ys, like that of the Pettways, is also largely the energy of conflict and j uxtaposition. In fact, I think I could make a good case for the claim that  one cannot fully appreciate the Gee's Bend quilts without understanding the quilts made by the great range of Southern women. Gee's Bend is far less d istinctive than is generally recognized by those who sweep down into Alabam a to look at it alone, out of context. It comes in many colors. Too often t hose who lament black stereotypes are the first to rely on them.  Nevertheless, you turn the page after "Lazy Man" and there is a 1935 "Birds of a Feather" quilt made by African-American Blanche Ransome Parker from C arroll County, TN. I'd not paid attention to that quilt in the past if I'd even seen it, but coming where it comes in this book, it drew me in. I abs olutely fell in love with it. I'm sure the birds are meant to be standing o n solid ground (the black semi-mound), but intentions to the contrary, they soar. I have laughed at this quilt many times since I purchased this book. Its birds are a little goofy looking and appear to be on surfboards or ski s---just having a grand and glorious time sailing around! I wish I were wit h them. Along with some of the earlier Gee's Bend quilts, they remind me of the title of an exhibition of Judy Roche's quilts---"For the Joy of It!"

In this chapter one sees a full-page view of that "Rattlesnake Quilt" in t he NC Museum of High Art and made in NC. Its Dutchy bars and calicoes are c ompletely conventional and unremarkable except for what appear to be combin ations of Rattlers and Coral Snakes---"Red on yellow, kill the fellow"---th at slither right happily up and down the bars . Yellow, green, red---and BL ACK! Looking at it here, I realized it might be titled "Southeastern Pennsy lvania Meets the Deep South." A little surprised, but still happy.

In contrast is a "Snail's Trail" (1940, Arkansas, from Stella Rubin collect ion) in red, black and yellow that is ominous, dark. It is made by a native of the South, someone too familiar with the ways of serpents (Who's ever s een black-black snails?) to find them charming. Bishop says the shaky prove nance assigns it to an African-American man.

Shaw treats the Depression-era quilts that were my own first love in a chap ter called "Nostalgia, Social Causes, and Hard Times: 1910-40," which opens with a close-up of a Wowser of a quilt---"The Spectrum," made by Edith Mor row Matthews of Nevada (1933) for the Century of Progress Contest. What a q uilt! For me, it alone justifies the price of the book. It reminds me of ho w one feels at 15 or 16, when lines of things are clear and the sun is comi ng up and you just know you're going to have a wonderful time, both today a nd in the future.  More recent, well-selected contemporary quilts also get good photography. I think of a color photo of the AIDS quilt that gives the best sense of the  enormity of that project I have seen, for instance, though my library is thin when it comes  to the modern era. Gee's Bend is there in one of the most representative a nd meaningful quilts. dThe earlier Rainbow Monogram quilt from the Shelburne, the Stenge "Quilting Party," a striking "Therese Quilt" by There se May of San Jose (private collection) made in 1969 and comprised of blocks s et on point and featuring collage portraits---same image, different effects---set  against dark ground----all these get full page pics, for example. A quilt  from the late Martha Skelton of Vicksburg is given a full page (her Chips & Whetstones that is at Paducah). Her quilts are not always covered, possibl y because she used traditional designs, though in new ways or because of taste for the starkly abstract. This section was particularly valuable to me, for I had not seen many of the quilts featured. Nancy Crowe's "March Study" is shown to parti cular advantage.  I'd say the photographs are drawn from a good variety of sources, both priv ate collections, public museums. Thumbing through it again just now, I realized  there really are a lot of quilts that either have not been seen in previous  books or have not been shown well. More of the former  More to the point, however, is the number, organization, size, and clarity  of the images.This is a beautiful book. It is a book in which photographs woul d tell the writer's story even if text were not present. The text that is p resent, however, is clean, sharp prose and filled with what I consider to b e fresh insights.  Karen, I had pre-ordered the book, and when it arrived, I confess I was not overwhelmed. I guess my eye was drawn to the familiar, the things I 'd seen so often.  That impression was short-lived, however, for every time I sit down with it , I find more that interests me, that makes me think. It gives a strong sen se of the vastness of our nation, its enlivening diversity and, surprisingl y in this belligerant era, its underlying strong unity and sense of continu ity. Of course,quilts are a traditional medium, where repetition is valued  more than innovation, so perhaps one should expect such.  This book has decided areas of weakness, and in my view, among of them are  notable absences of the Quaker quilts of the Shenandoah Valley and Ohio (Oh io quilts in general), the quilts made by white Southerners. The fine Georg ia Documentation book in particular shows these to such advantage but they  were also available to the author from all the Southern documentation books as well as in books like the Bresenhan-Puentes' "Lone Stars." So far as I  recall, Alaska is also unrepresented along with most of the northern plains states, and I have to believe folks there are making quilts.

A historian of folk life, Shaw is drawn to the quirkier, the different, an d that taste shows up in these omissions. Of course, as you know, we've got more quirky than we know what to do with in the South (back to the Georgia Documentation book!), and Shaw should not have treated the South as if the only thing notable to come from it in the way of quilts was Gee's Bend. On e way or another, he should have considered the region.

Nonetheless, I like the book and it is a happy addition to my library. I th ink you would enjoy it and turn to it often.

Hope life is good out there in your islands. It's high hurricane season dow n here, and all of us are edgy down South.  Gaye

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Subject: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 11:38:00 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

I just notices an Indiana Amish Quilt on Ebay and the Buy It Now price is $300,000.

This is the link address: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item180555017838&_rdc1

Now, I'm certain it won't sell but it started me thinking about quilt prices and now I'm wondering what the all time record price is for an antique quilt. Does anyone know the world record price?

Regards,

Darwin

"To the world, you are nothing but to a rescued dog or cat, you are the world"

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Subject: RE: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 12:12:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

I am amused by "Amish lady wishes to sell her quilt witch." Taken out of context it's really funny. Do any of you lovely quilters have a quilt witch? Oh, the delights of the homophone challenged! Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 11:36:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Yes. There's at least one in every quilting guild.

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Subject: Re: Robert Shaw's last book From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 11:36:34 -

The most expensive quilt ever sold at auction is a Civil War-era quilt  known as the Reconciliation Quilt, which the Jameses bought for $264,000  at Sotheby's in 1991, and which is now at the IQSC.

This is from a 2007 article. Perhaps someone has fresher information.

Stephanie Whitson www.stephaniegracewhitson.com www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com ------

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Subject: RE: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 11:37:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I would sell my quilt witch for far less than $300,000. Contact me privately. :-).

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Shaw's Book From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 11:41:20 -

Barnes & Noble online has the book for $25.20. Seems like a bargain.

Stephanie Whitson www.stephaniegracewhitson.com

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Subject: RE: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 11:42:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I should clarify that my quilt witch is NOT Amish. I suppose that will make her less valuable on the open market.

Stephanie Whitson www.stephaniegracewhitson.com www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com

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Subject: RE: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 13:49:20 EDT X-Message-Number: 10

 

Only ONE 'quilt witch' her Guild?????? Beg to differ.... Mitzi from Vermont

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Subject: RE: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 13:09:34 -0500 X-

Mitzi--

Yes, we are pretty lucky. Most of us don't make any waves. And the bad apples (usually) eventually give up on making trouble, and leave.

Kim in ND. . .where MN has no corner on "nice"

-

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Subject: book photos From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 22:15:36 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Bob Shaw's book is currently at the top of a stack of quilt books in my hom e, because it is a thoughtful presentation of the subject which I consult f rom time to time, and..........my velvet FANS variation quilt is on the cov er! (thank you Bob, it stands out from across the room in a bookstore, a pe rspective no longer possible now that so many books are bought via the web) .

For future quilt publications, if you want an antique quilt or your own cre ation to be in a book, it important for you to have a professional, high re solution photo made to provide to the publisher. No book contract ever come s with enough (or sometimes any) photography budget. So, if sources can pro vide reproduceable images, for no or little cost, that's a plus. Just to ar range shipping a quilt out to photograph is problematic and costly, so phot os done locally where the quilt is are best.

If the quilt has been sold and you want it back to photo for a project, tha t's another headache. This is the case I just had with a Civil War-era flag quilt - a single large flag in which the stars are arranged in the shape o f an anchor. I have a color transparency of the flag side, and it was publi shed in one of the later 1990s Quilt Engagement Calendars. But it's the bac k that needs to be photo'd now, because it is appliqued all over with 5 poi nt stars on which are written various Civil War slogans! The new owners, wh o bought it because it was just right for the wall niche in their entryway  (don't ask-they had no feeling for the historicity) won't allow it out for  photography, so this information is unavailable to history in the form of t he forthcoming book on civil war quilts and the related museum show.

and p.s. How do photo books translate on kindle - how do you flip back and  forth, and compare and mark the pages you want to browse again?!

and p.p.s - I have a photo file of color transparencies, some of which are  10 to 20 years old. Does any one know if there is a shelf life for these ki nds of images? And what about digital images --how long does digital last?  What can be done to preserve either for reproduction if it might occur  a decade later?

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street,5th floor New York, NY 10065  212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com --0-397187440-1283404536:29518--

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Subject: RE: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: QUILTMOOREaol.com Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 14:58:15 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

-Dear list, I asked the seller if she had an appraisal and she doesn't. Surprise, surprise.

Nan in FL www.mooreandmoorequilts.com

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Subject: Black backgrounds in applique quilts From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net> Date: Thu, 2 Sep 2010 07:06:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

 

Pat Campbell pretty much revived the black/dark background with her Jacobean Applique quilt in the late 80's/early 90's, and the subsequent books and patterns. BTW, I spoke with her and John a few days ago...she's holding her own.

O

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Subject: Search for quilt pattern book From: joysbeesyahoo.com Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 22:09:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

 

Please forgive the cross-posting.

A friend is desparately seeking Nos. 1 and 3 of "Samples from the Past", by Alma Allen of Blackbird Designs. Even the author no longer has a copy.

If anyone has one or both and available for sale, please let me know privately. Thank you.

Jackie in Reno

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Subject: RE: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 2 Sep 2010 08:55:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

If you go to look at that quilt, look along the bottom row of photographs to see the indigo and white princess feather. The odd thing is that there is no quilting through the feathers. The piece is STUNNINGLY quilted with feathers & etc. all over the white background....but nothing in the feathers. The seller notes that there used to be quilting (shows on the back?). Odd. Could someone have painstakingly appliqued newer indigo over old feathers? I suppose anything is possible.....I just found it interesting that the seller says the quilt is 1860s.....how would they know?

Stephanie Whitson www.stephaniegracewhitson.com www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com

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Subject: quilt on ebay From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>

A quilt is posted for $300,000 and one wonders whether or how they know any thing? I think the question answers itself.

MY question is, WHY? Actually, it is 2 questions. WHY, if you had an  item so valuable, would you use that forum for a sale? And WHY, if you h ad that much money, would you be shopping on ebay for it?

It seems to me that these kind of ebay posts are really meant to prove that an item is NOT worth the posted value; that is, no offers, no sale, no pro of of value. So again, WHY would someone do that?

It reminds me of certain help wanted ads in the newspapers, years ago (and  maybe, still) that were used to provide documentation that x job could n ot be filled at x wages. If no one called about the job, it showed that  a willing immigrant could fill a niche.

Curiouser and curiouser. Susan

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Subject: RE: quilt on ebay From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 2 Sep 2010 10:36:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Ignorance? Don't discount ignorance. Really. Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: quilt on ebay From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 2 Sep 2010 07:43:46 -0700 (PDT)

LOL! After years in health care, I should have remembered that! Maybe I just hated to generalize...

--- On Thu, 9/2/10, Candace Perry <candaceschwenkfelder.com> wrote: ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Search for quilt pattern book From: Quilltraol.com Date: Thu, 2 Sep 2010 08:10:53 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

--part1_10a9fa.4c961ed3.39b0ee4d_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

A friend is desparately seeking Nos. 1 and 3 of "Samples from the Past", by Alma Allen of Blackbird Designs. Even the author no longer has a copy.

Good luck to her. I have literally looking for this for years. It's the only one I can't find. Lisa

--part1_10a9fa.4c961ed3.39b0ee4d_boundary--

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Subject: Rooted In Traditions Exhibit in PA for the last showing From: Jan Thomas <textiqueaol.com> Date: Thu, 02 Sep 2010 11:16:13 -0600 X-Message-Number: 10

This is a link to an article on the 'Rooted In Traditions' exhibit from the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum, currently at the Westmoreland Museum of Art in Greensburg, PA for its final showing.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10244/1084018-437.stm

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Subject: Re: Search for quilt pattern book From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Thu, 2 Sep 2010 11:19:13 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 11

 

Here's a nice photo of the finished quilt: http://www.factsfacts.com/quilts/SamplesFromThePast%20.htm

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

________________________________ From: "Quilltraol.com" <Quilltraol.com> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Thu, September 2, 2010 5:10:53 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: Search for quilt pattern book

A friend is desparately seeking Nos. 1 and 3 of "Samples from the Past", by Alma Allen of Blackbird Designs. Even the author no longer has a copy.

Good luck to her. I have literally looking for this for years. It's the only one I can't find. Lisa

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Subject: good issues From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Fri, 03 Sep 2010 03:59:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Laura brought up some good issues. She wrote:

For future quilt publications, if you want an antique quilt or your own cre ation to be in a book, it important for you to have a professional, high re solution photo made to provide to the publisher. No book contract ever come s with enough (or sometimes any) photography budget. So, if sources can pro vide reproduceable images, for no or little cost, that's a plus. Just to ar range shipping a quilt out to photograph is problematic and costly, so phot os done locally where the quilt is are best.

Different publishers have different policies. It's always a good idea to ask questions about your responsibilities as an author or contributor and the services the publisher provides. AQS has information to help on photography, shipping, insurance and quilt appraisals to help authors and contributors. There's no reason for those who help publishers be publishers to operate in the dark.

If the quilt has been sold and you want it back to photo for a project, tha t's another headache. This is the case I just had with a Civil War-era flag quilt - a single large flag in which the stars are arranged in the shape o f an anchor. I have a color transparency of the flag side, and it was publi shed in one of the later 1990s Quilt Engagement Calendars. But it's the bac k that needs to be photo'd now, because it is appliqued all over with 5 poi nt stars on which are written various Civil War slogans! The new owners, wh o bought it because it was just right for the wall niche in their entryway  (don't ask-they had no feeling for the historicity) won't allow it out for  photography, so this information is unavailable to history in the form of t he forthcoming book on civil war quilts and the related museum show.

It is sad that this particular quilt is no longer available for photography. Too bad the owners can't be persuaded to allow the quilt to be photographed in their home.

and p.s. How do photo books translate on kindle - how do you flip back and  forth, and compare and mark the pages you want to browse again?!

AQS is waiting for technology to even out before we send our books to eReaders. We have no doubt that there will come a day when Laura's questions are addressed, and the visual properties are worthy of the quilts we all want to see.

and p.p.s - I have a photo file of color transparencies, some of which are  10 to 20 years old. Does any one know if there is a shelf life for these ki nds of images? And what about digital images --how long does digital last?  What can be done to preserve either for reproduction if it might occur  a decade later?

There are services that will take older media and translate them into newer formats (vinyl records into CDs, slides, home movies, etc.). This will be a never-ending challenge.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: $300,000 Amish Quilt on Ebay From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmvyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 3 Sep 2010 05:35:25 -0700 (PDT) X-

 

I looked at the photos of this quilt on Ebay and after looking at many auth entic Amish quilts in Ohio and also looking at the so called "Amish" quilts that are imports, I thought the piecing looked authentic, but the quilt st itching seemed similar to what I have seen on imported quilts. If the fa brics are polyester cotton blends it might be an authentic Amish quilt made in the 1980's or afterand if the binding is 1/2" to 3/4" wide and is no t filled to the fold with quilt fabric/batting, then it might also be an authentic Amish quilt. Sometimes the quilting stitch patterns indicate  a piece is Amish, but you cannot tell by the photos. The pictures and th e sellers description just don't really answer those questions, so there is really no way to tell for sure if this is authentic or a copy of an Amish  quilt or an import. If I were a buyer, I don't see enough information to convince me it's worth $300,000. Just my opinion.......Connie Ark in Urbana, Ohio --0-1509770800-1283517325:83100--

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Subject: swans & poppies quilt mystery From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Fri, 3 Sep 2010 15:54:35 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Hello List,

I have posted some photos on the e-Board of an oddball Youth-size quilt  we recently got. 1940-ish.

It has appliquE9d (and blanket-stitched) Swans and Poppies.

I have not seen the Swans before, though the poppies are typical. It's  an odd combination of images, though, and I wonder if this might be an original.

Thanks, Julie Silber

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Subject: RE: quilt on ebay From: "pines" <pinesearthlink.net> Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 05:19:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Why was asked? Why not? Put a quilt up for sale and see if anyone will actually buy it?

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Subject: RE: quilt on ebay From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 05:19:48 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I am not familiar with Ebay's fees, but wouldn't even a non selling $300,00 0 object generate a huge fee? Since this is a new seller, I wonder if they realize that.Kris> Why was asked? Why not?> Put a qui lt up for sale and see if anyone will> actually buy it?

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Subject: Re: swans & poppies quilt mystery From: "Rose Marie Werner" <rwernerdeskmedia.com> Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 10:15:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Julie and List Members, Your swans and poppies quilt could certainly be an original design. But the applique motifs look very much like those sold by Warren Textiles of Boston. The flower looks very much like their die-cut No. 101 kit, which they called pansy. They also sold a number of animal applique patches, but I haven't seen a swan. (I only have a few pages of their advertising.) The flower will be pictured on my website soon, as the pansy file is still not active. However, 100 rose designs have been added in the past week. Rosie Werner www.quiltkitid.com

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Subject: Re: swans & poppies quilt mystery From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 10:49:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

And to anyone who has not yet subscribed to Rosie's site it is amazing. She has a wealth of information and continues to add more. The subscription is very reasonable. Take a look! www.quiltkitid.com

Jean

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Subject: RE: quilt on ebay From: Quilltraol.com Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 12:28:25 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

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Kris, I was recently in contact with an eBay seller who had an object I have up for bid for $850. I emailed him and he had me send him pics and he said it was worth about $300. He said his wasn't worth $850, and wouldn't get any bids, but as eBay was letting you list for free, he thought "why not." You never know if someone will bid, but at least they will be talking about it, and looking at your other items for sale, and the quilt certainly did get people talking!

Lisa _http://quilltr.blogspot.com/_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/) _http://www.flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays/_ (http://www.flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays/)

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Subject: eBay Amish quilt From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 10:06:26 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

I have looked at the photos of the Amish quilt on eBay, priced at $300,000, and here is my two cents worth:

While one can not be sure from photos, and these photos are not particularly helpful -- it appears to me to be a 1930 - 1950 Amish quilt, probably Midwest. The fabrics look cotton to me.

If I could see the quilting designs, or the back, I might be able to more accurately comment on its community of origin.

As an appraiser very familiar with antique Amish quilts, I can confidently say that there is no history of comparable examples selling for "anywhere near" their asking price. :)

Julie Silber

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Subject: Black ground applique From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 22:12:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

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I'm a little late putting in my two cents on the subject of dark and/or bla ck background behind applique but I don't remember anyone mentioning thi s particular fact.' "Between the wars" as I prefer to say as opposed to the misnomer "Depres sion Era" there was actually an attempt to promote black grounds. You occa sionally see an old magazine ad showing applique on black - I've seen sever al pillow patterns offered all in traditional quilt patterns. It didn't seem to catch on and it's probably pretty easy to diagnose the problem  in pushing the style. Ladies had dark dark quilts throughout brown period  of the 1870's followed by the Victorian Crazy quilt & silk show quilt pe riod then they had the turn of the century discharge prints in black  blue red and gray. Well helloooooooOOOOOoooo-----here they are in th e midst of a craze for new sweet pastels and light luscious colors.  They weren't about to go dark again so soon.  Think about the avocado green of the 1960's. By the 1980's it was a color  that gagged the majority of the populace. Today it has been reintroduced i n a slightly different shade as sage or any number of variants and we lo ve it again. But it has taken forty to fifty years for us to face it. 

Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com

 

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Subject: Xenia Cord From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date:

Hi all -

Just picked up Quilmania magazine No. 78 and found that Xenia was featured. Such a great article and loved to have a peek inside her basement.

Love that magazine for featuring collectors, historians and other antique quilt related things.

Leah Zieber

Temecula Ca - oh it is HOT here! But at least it is a nice dry heat.

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Subject: BLACK, DARK BACKGROUNDS From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 22:41:56 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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When I return from a too brief few days away, I will upload several picture s related to recent postings, and see what the list has to say. One is a BLACK background, 1930s floral applique of pink roses with a scalloped bor der that has green swag like detail appliqued on top of each curve; very ch ic and a quilt type I have had only a few times before in my quilt life.

Another is a BROWN background 'House on the Hill' pattern in which little h ouses on curvy green foundations are appliqued in parallel rows diagonally  down the quilt.

And if I can find the photo, a third is one hugeg southern belle type lady  with tiered ombre'd salmon color skirt, on a BROWN background (probably fro m the same kit company as the houses) She was published in an old Quilt Eng agement Calendar (of course I never kept a good file of which months and ye ar my quilts appeared, so one day I will look through them all and do so fo r my own provenance)

And, another is a Stearns & Foster pattern applique of pink tulip like flow ers on a NAVY BLUE background, only one I ever saw. It's on my website.

And lastly, the one that got away at Brimfield--a Four Eagles applique, you know the format, on a BLACK background! It has been through many hands and now has a much higher valuation than when I saw it being packed in a shopp ing bag.

Anything on a dark background that is not a crazy quilt is soinfreque ntly seen that it attracts my immediate attention, as do any ofthe flora l appliques on a peach or green background, that I think are more stylish a lternatives than the white background

And, lastly, I still have blocks of a wool Mennonite 1870-80s applique quil t with stuffed work flowers, as well as a leafy vine border, on a black gre en now oxidized greenish. The blocks were from a PA quilt that had some mot h damage, so the picker/seller cut the thing into pieces before selling me  the load. How I wish that had not been done; one really can't put it back t ogether the quilt originally must have been a knockout, certainly uncommon, and probably restorable when intact. If only we knew then what we know now . I will try to scan a block or two so you all can lament with me.......... .

Waiting for laundry to finish, so I am horribly chatty.

A lovely Labor Day to all, the hurricane has passed us by.

Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street,5th floor New York, NY 10065  212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com --0-120910463-1283665316:57032--

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 04, 2010 From: Merry May <twotonsofbuttonsgmail.com> Date: Sun, 5 Sep 2010 12:40:36 -0400

Hello, all -

Just wanted to put in a blurb about a quilt exhibit that I'm guest curating for the Atlantic Heritage Center in Somers Point, NJ (formerly the Atlantic County Historical Society). We're having a low-scale opening reception on Friday, Sept. 10 from 3 to 6 PM (downstairs, away from all the quilts!). Forty-eight of their quilts (including a few tops) will be on display, dating from the early 1800s up to 1999. They have MANY signature quilts from the first half of the 19th century in their collection, as well as a stunning Oak Leaf & Reel quilt that was featured in the "NJ Quilts: 1750-1950" book published by AQS in the 1990s (NJ Heritage Quilt Project).

I made up a full color booklet with photos of every quilt, and detail shots of many of them. The group is charging only $5 each for the 52-page booklet. If you would like to order one, you can call them during their regular hours: Wed. through Sat., 10 AM to 3:30 PM. Their phone number is: 609-927-5218, and their web site is at www.AtlanticHeritageCenterNJ.org I'm pretty sure they can't take credit cards, but you can send them a check!

They will also be open next weekend from 10 to 5 both Sat. & Sun. (Sept. 11 & 12). I will be there both days.

Unfortunately we were unable to secure a tent (actually, it was the insurance!) to have demonstrators and appraisal services for the weekend. The Somers Mansion, which dates to the 1700s will be open for tours both days, and is directly adjacent to the Museum. The museum is located at 907 Shore Road, Somers Point, NJ 08244.

The show will only be up from Sept. 10 to Oct. 10, so don't miss it!

I hope I'm not overstepping my bounds by letting you all know about this. Thanks for lending an ear (or an eye!).

Best regards, Merry May twotonsofbuttonsgmail.com

-- Merry May You can find me at www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com OR at www.MerryMayhem.com Co-Author of "Insider's Guide to Quilting Careers"

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Subject: Re: Black ground applique From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Sun, 5 Sep 2010 11:46:47 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Teddy....you are sooooo funny! I'm still blown away by thenew, sweet pastels and light, luscious colors after all these years. Can't get enough of them, and still can't face avocado. My mom had it and orange everywhere including carpet.

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

I'm a little late putting in my two cents on the subject of dark and/or black background behind applique, but I don't remember anyone mentioning this particular fact.'

"Between the wars" as I prefer to say, as opposed to the misnomer "Depression Era" there was actually an attempt to promote black grounds. You occasionally see an old magazine ad showing applique on black - I've seen several pillow patterns offered, all in traditional quilt patterns. It didn't seem to catch on, and it's probably pretty easy to diagnose the problem in pushing the style. Ladies had dark dark quilts throughout brown period of the 1870's, followed by the Victorian Crazy quilt & silk show quilt period, then they had the turn of the century discharge prints in black, blue, red and gray. Well, helloooooooOOOOOoooo-----here they are in the midst of a craze for new, sweet pastels and light, luscious colors. They weren't about to go dark again so soon.

Think about the avocado green of the 1960's. By the 1980's it was a color that gagged the majority of the populace. Today it has been reintroduced in a slightly different shade as sage or any number of variants, and we love it again. But it has taken forty to fifty years for us to face it.

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Subject: Bonnie Leman From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 5 Sep 2010 16:22:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4 This was sent to me by Karey Bresenhan for the list; she is having trouble posting for some reason:

I heard this morning from Mary Leman Austin that Bonnie died last night, quietly, peacefully, in her sleep and surrounded by her children and grandchildren. She had broken a hip several weeks ago, been through rehab, went home to her eldest daughter Megan's home to recuperate, then somehow had an undetected heart attack in the last few weeks, and was put into in-hospital hospice care a few days ago. Evidently the decline came very quickly. The services are not yet set but will probably be late this week or early next week.

I am so sad. I loved Bonnie dearly, and it doesn't seem possible that she's gone. It's truly the end of an era.

Karey Bresenhan

All of us who cut our quilting teeth on the most welcome issues of Quilters Newsletter, when consistent news of our newest enthusiasm was available mostly from Bonnie, will be saddened at her passing. We owe her a great deal for her vigorous and constant support of quilting news and instruction.

Xenia --

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Subject: More on Bonnie From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 5 Sep 2010 17:03:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Karey has sent a further message about the passing of Bonnie Leman:

... we will be collecting tributes to Bonnie to send to the family. People can send their email memories, kind words, whatever to teresadquilts.com , with Tribute to Bonnie Leman in the subject line. Teresa is my assistant and will compile them, then we'll print them into a nice booklet for the Leman family. I just cannot let this incredible lady pass out of our world without some significant notice from the world she created. Karey B

Xenia

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Subject: Black background applique From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sun, 05 Sep 2010 14:08:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Thanks, Teddy. I found your insights on this subject very helpful!

Karen in the Islands