Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 20, 2010
From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net>
Date: Thu, 21 Oct 2010 06:37:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Sue, I print labels on my computer, but I use the prepared fabric-on-
paper rather than doing my own. I use Muttonhead Photofabric, but I
imagine there are other brands available. I've put photos as well as
dedications and/or histories on labels for quilts that will not be
washed.
Pat Kyser
----------------------------------------------------------------------

See: How to make a quilt label to identify your quilt

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: labels
From: barb.whiteheadroadrunner.com
Date: Thu, 21 Oct 2010 09:16:56 -0400

Sue, I have not tried this with labels myself but I know of some people that
iron their fabric to freezer paper and then run the label through the computer. You can buy freezer paper sheets that are 8 1/2 X 11 from C & T
publishing. I have done pictures on the fabric sheets by June Tailor that I
get from Joann's. They have instructions for heat setting the ink and then
color setting the colors. They are a little pricey but if you have a coupon
they are not too bad. There are three sheets in a package and they come incream and white. Barb in Maine.

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Subject: Printing fabric
From: JAN MASENTHIN <quiltsrmesbcglobal.net>
Date: Thu, 21 Oct 2010 08:59:21 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

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Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
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Sue, your method sounds interesting. I have used freezer paper to back t=
hefabric before printing on it but have printed only labels so far. O=
ne warning -- Ihad a bad experience when printing a label on paper, t=
hen pinning it to the quilt border as aguide for machine stitching. The=
sewing machine needlepushed some of the ink from the paperdown int=
o the fabric sowhen I removed the paper Icould seeblack around som=
e of the stitching. If I ever use that method again, I will print in the co=
lor of the thread I will be using.

Minnesota -- exhausting but wonderful. I wasn't at thethe eagle quilt ro=
undtable, but attended a Barbara Brackman lecture on them at the National A=
rchives in Kansas City a few months ago and can see why you're hooked.=


Jan Masenthin
Topeka, Kansas
--0-1525587360-1287676761=:60352--



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: printing on fabric
From: carylschuetzcomcast.net

Sue,
If you buy the treated fabric that you put into the printer, be sure to read the package to see that you get one that is washable, even if the quilt will never be laundered.
Caryl

--
Caryl Schuetz
Woodhaven Studio
Professional Association of Appraisers -

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Printing Labels on Fabric
From: "Carrie Quinn" <quiltmakerpiecefulgathering.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Oct 2010 12:05:34 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi - I hope I am answering this correctly - I usually just lurk.
We use a product called Printed Treasures. Once you press it to set the
ink, it is fairly permanent. I have washed quilts with labels using this
product and it is barely faded. It is available at many quilt shops.

Carrie Quinn
Pieceful Gathering Quilt Shop
106 Northwest Hwy (Rt. 14)
Fox River Grove, IL 60021
(847) 516-7911
quiltmakerpiecefulgathering.com
www.piecefulgathering.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Memorial Quilt
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Oct 2010 06:14:53 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

Here's an interesting article on the AIDS Memorial Quilt. I wish it had pictures!

http://thecollegianur.com/2010/10/21/aids-memorial-quilt-activist-encourages-compassion/14905/

Those of you who study these things, what it the earliest memorial quilt? I know many crazy quilts were memorial types, and Elizabeth Roseberry Mitchell's Graveyard Quilt - http://tinyurl.com/22tdrjt - predates the civil war (I think.)

Kris


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Memorial Quilt
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Sat, 23 Oct 2010 18:57:42 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 2

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Kris,

=C2 As part of my "Quilts That Go Bump in the Night" trunk show, I inclu=
de a circa 1850 New York album quilt with an appliqued block that features =
a weeping willow tree and a tombstone that reads "In Memory of the Dead", a=
circa 1840 signature album quilt that has a block that reads "All in Heave=
n", and a coverlet piece made in 1853 St. Paris, Champagne County, Ohio for=
Mercy Hill" that has a border of weeping willows and urns.



=C2=C2=C2=C2 Silk morning samplers were very fashionable from 1=
799 with the death of George Washington through the 1840's They were often =
part of American school girl curriculum, so, it is not so strange that thes=
e images crossed over on to quilts.

Polly Mello

Beautiful fall day in Maryland


I am remaking the famous or infamous Kentucky Graveyard quilt that you link=
ed to in your email
------=_Part_135834_183901658.1287860262642--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Questions and more questions
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Sat, 23 Oct 2010 19:16:50 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 3

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=C2 The AQSG seminar in Minnesota was great! The weather was perfect.=C2=


=C2=C2 I was not able to go on a tour because I went to two of the st=
udy centers that I had a particular interest in "Potholder quilts" with Pam=
Weeks was excellent.

And Susan Miller had=C2 a great one that included Hubert Ver Mehren that=
I have been interested in because I have been collecting his quilts in rec=
ent years.

=C2 Pat Cox had a wonderful display of her antique quilt collection in t=
hree venues that she took me to see.=C2 She has an impressive diverse co=
llection.

The star study quilts this year were awe inspiring. I hope that they will t=
ravel to a venue near you. and Helen Kelly's family brought some of her fab=
ulous quilts to share.

The vender room just keeps getting better. Not many=C2museum tours that =
I have ever been to could out do the vender's this year. Chintz quilts, whi=
tework quilts, blue resist quilts, album quilts, broderie perse. A museum l=
evel cretonne with cut out applique and sampler pieced blocks. Anything tha=
t your little quilted heart could desire was there to be had or just seen.=


Friends that you only see once a year.

The AQSG seminars are "not to be missed" events. Next year is New Jersey! M=
y neighborhood.

Polly Mello


------=_Part_136337_2005117083.1287861410081--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Baltimore at Thanksgiving
From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Oct 2010 23:02:44 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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boundary="----=_NextPart_001_002A_01CB7306.66E1C060"

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BlankI hope those of you on the list can advise me on textile-related =
events or activities in the Baltimore area during the week of =
Thanksgiving, particularly the few days before Thanksgiving. Any =
Baltimore Album quilts on exhibit anywhere?

Thanks,

Kathy Moore
Lincoln, NE

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: photos of qhite on white & hanging quilt
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sun, 24 Oct 2010 16:34:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1


----------MB_8CD41D1EDAAFE79_AF8_4AB68_Webmail-m114.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


1) I am pretty sure that a while back there was a discussion about how to=
photograph an item that is white on white. I need that info, please. Any=
idea how I might dig it up?

2) A church contacted me asking how to display a quilt made by the women=
of the church. They can't hang it up high. It would be where people are=
walking by and could touch. Glass is very expensive and could also be hit=
and therefore break..........spell ---- dangerous. Then we talked about=
plexi-glass and it apparently only comes in sheets 8 ft. X 4 ft. accordin=
g to the framer I use.
That explains why there is a wonderful quilt deteriorating day by day in=
a museum that will remain unnamed. (I talked with them and they didn't li=
sten to me when I expressed my concern about the continued deterioration.)=
The plexi-glass has a seam that runs down the middle. That tiny crack/sea=
m in the plexi-glass has allowed air/dirt, etc. to come in contact with th=
is item. I saw it in 1995'ish and it was superb. I saw it last year and it=
has a major yellow stain down the center of the quilt (early 1800's brode=
rie perse). I don't think that the damage is reversible, but it could be=
slowed down. IT would benefit from glass because it is hung high in a sta=
irwell.
Anyway............any suggestions as to how this church might enjoy the fr=
uits of their labor? They don't have any ceilings over 9 ft. high. I told=
the lady I would ask my friends all over the US for advice and she was mo=
st appreciative.

Thanks for any help you can give me!
Lynn Lancaster Gorges in New Bern, NC





----------MB_8CD41D1EDAAFE79_AF8_4AB68_Webmail-m114.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Floor Quilts
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Sun, 24 Oct 2010 19:43:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2


----------MB_8CD41EC553F40F2_23E0_B72A_webmail-d031.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


I saw info about a book on how to make floor quilts. Has anyone made one=
of these? I think it is an interesting idea. Just curious if ModPodge rea=
lly does make the raw edges "behave". I have always wanted to paint floor=
cloths. Just wondering if this would be more fun. Have the floor quilts=
ever been done in the past??? Tiles, floor cloths, and now floor quilts..=
........interesting. Could be an interesting way to "play" with new design=
s.
Lynn in New Bern, NC




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Inspiration for a Redwork quilt
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Oct 2010 22:36:26 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Another interesting find today. This is not a Redwork quilt, but it surely
could have inspired a future one!

http://coraginsburg.com/catalogues/2007/cat2007pg2-3.htm

What is the earliest known Redwork counterpane/cover or quilt?

Karen in the Islands





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Framing Quilts
From: OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 01:57:46 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2


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Lynn:

This is in response to your question about framing quilts. I recently saw
a crazy quilt that is privately owned. The owners had it professionally
framed. The cost of the labor and materials for the frame was $960. The frame
was oak and was 2" in depth. The oak was about 1/2" in thickness so it made
a simple frame around the quilt and didn't distract from the quilt. The
framer had 2" x 1/4" slits around the perimeter of the frame so the quilt
could get air and breathe. The quilt had been secured to a heavy piece of
canvas with stitches and then the canvas was wrapped to the back of the backing
board and secured. The frame measured 70" x 70". They used a product called
Lexan instead of glass or plexi glass. It is a clear and strong plastic
and it must come in large sizes because there were no seams in this piece. I
googled Lexan and found quite a few sites that describe it and sell it. The
owner did quite a bit of research on this framing and Lexan before she had
her cabinet maker make the frame. She made sure that there was 1" of air
space between the Lexan and the quilt. She keeps the frame covered with a
sheet to reduce light from fading the quilt. She removes the sheet when she
has company or want to enjoy looking at the quilt. If you need more
information, contact me off list and I'll contact her with your questions. I know
this price sounds like a lot of money but if you consider what we pay for
custom framing for photos and needlework, it's about the same square footage
price.

Kathy Kansier
AQS Certified Appraiser
Ozark, Missouri


In a message dated 10/24/2010 11:15:44 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
qhllyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

A church contacted me asking how to display a quilt made by the women=
of the church. They can't hang it up high. It would be where people are=
walking by and could touch. Glass is very expensive and could also be hit=
and therefore break..........spell ---- dangerous. Then we talked about=
plexi-glass and it apparently only comes in sheets 8 ft. X 4 ft. accordin=
g to the framer

--part1_108070.1d2a23f8.39f6765a_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Query: International Quilt Registry
From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 05:47:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

The Quilt Index staff is seeking information about an International
Quilt Registry (IQR) that was operational in the 1970s and had an
address in Phoeniz, Arizona. According to a participant, the
registry involved paying a fee to register a quilt and then was given
a number and label to put on quilts. Susan Goforth is a name that was
associated with the project. Does anyone have information about the
registry and/or have contact information on Ms. Goforth? Your help
would be appreciated.

Best,

Marsha MacDowell
The Quilt Index


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lexan vs Acrylic for glazing
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 10:55:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Lexan is a poor choice. It yellows over time, and is easily scratched. Of
course, it is usually less expensive than UV screening Acrylic glazing --
Plexiglass is just one trade name for a brand of acrylic.

I'll say it again. Inanimate objects do not breathe. Framed articles
require that there be an even flow of moisture so that they do not dessicate
or grow mold.

Key characteristics/differences, Acrylic compared to Polycarbonate (Lexan):
a.. More likely to chip, less impact resistance then Polycarbonate. (still
10-24 times more resistant than glass)
b.. Less likely to scratch.
c.. More of a consumer (household) level and is easier to find at hardware
stores.
d.. Does NOT yellow after time.
e.. Better clarity and can be restored to optical clarity.
Key characteristics/differences, Polycarbonate (Lexan) compared to Acrylic:

a.. Impact/chip resistance is much higher with Polycarbonate. (about 30
times more resistant than glass)
b.. More likely to scratch.
c.. Substantially more expensive. (roughly 2 to 3 times)
d.. Used for more industry applications
e.. Bulletproof when thick enough.
f.. More bendable.
g.. More formable.
h.. Yellows over time due to ultraviolet rays
i.. Easier to work with (cut, less likely to break)
j.. Poorer clarity, diffuses light, can lighten (could be positive).


Hope this helps.

Judy Grow




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: On the subject of framing .... and Hawaiian tapa
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 10:18:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Does anyone know who could appraise a large 60-year-old Hawaiian tapa and
give advice about how to display it in my home?

Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Inspiration for a Redwork quilt
From: Mitzioakesaol.com
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 13:35:11 EDT
X-Message-Number: 6


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Count me in if this pattern ever comes available in redwork form - wow, it
would be fun to do.
Mitzi - the Redneck Redwork Fan from Vermont


In a message dated 10/25/2010 1:45:45 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
karenquiltrockisland.com writes:

http://coraginsburg.com/catalogues/2007/cat2007pg2-3.htm

--part1_186ae6.1408041e.39f719cf_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Lexan vs Acrylic for glazing
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 12:03:55 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

Good day, QHLers - Thank you, Judy Grow, for a great summary of the two
glazing options.

Let me reiterate also that quilts like other inanimate objects do NOT
'breathe'. The natural fibres that quilts are made from do absorb and desorb
moisture from the environment around them. This swelling and shrinking due
to moisture content can cause physical stress on the fibres, especially as
the fibres age due to basic physics and chemistry and hurried along the path
to destruction by contamination and light exposure (ALL wave lengths of
light and not just the UV portion).

If the immediate environment around a framed quilt (or other works made from
natural fibres) has a high moisture content (relative humidity) greater than
about 55% for days or weeks on end, the mould/mildew spores that are on (and
in) the quilt will start going thru their growth cycle: digesting the fibres
they are residing on and excreting what they don't need. When the
mould/mildew colony gets big enough, we are also able to see it with the
naked eye. Usually a 'musty' smell precedes the visual awareness. If the
quilt is framed, you usually can't smell it anyway as the smell is contained
in the framing. Mould/mildew species are in a wide variety of colours, not
just grey/black. The species is also consuming the parts of the framing
package as well - matboard, backing board, etc.. Because of the possibility
of dust infiltration and insect infiltration, I do not recommend that any
additional holes or slots be made in the framing package. You should place
the framed quilt in an environment where the temperature (and therefore the
moisture content/relative humidity) is stable over time and moderate (65 -
75 degrees F).

Acrylic glazing is available in sizes larger than 4' x 8'. Usually you have
to go to non-framer sources, such as a fabricator or thru the manufacturer
to find a local distributor. And it will be very expensive of course. Lexan
is a trademarked name for polycarbonate glazing, like Plexiglas (only 1 's')
is a trademarked name for acrylic glazing.

Feel free to contact me off-list if you have any questions.
Regards,
Meg
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________
Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator &
Collections Management Consultant
Professional Associate - AIC
707-763-8694
megtextileconservator.com

-----Original Message-----
...
Lexan is a poor choice. It yellows over time, and is easily scratched. Of
course, it is usually less expensive than UV screening Acrylic glazing --
Plexiglass is just one trade name for a brand of acrylic.

I'll say it again. Inanimate objects do not breathe. Framed articles
require that there be an even flow of moisture so that they do not dessicate

or grow mold.

Key characteristics/differences, Acrylic compared to Polycarbonate (Lexan):

a.. More likely to chip, less impact resistance then Polycarbonate. (still

10-24 times more resistant than glass)
b.. Less likely to scratch.
c.. More of a consumer (household) level and is easier to find at hardware

stores.
d.. Does NOT yellow after time.
e.. Better clarity and can be restored to optical clarity.


Key characteristics/differences, Polycarbonate (Lexan) compared to Acrylic:

a.. Impact/chip resistance is much higher with Polycarbonate. (about 30
times more resistant than glass)
b.. More likely to scratch.
c.. Substantially more expensive. (roughly 2 to 3 times)
d.. Used for more industry applications
e.. Bulletproof when thick enough.
f.. More bendable.
g.. More formable.
h.. Yellows over time due to ultraviolet rays
i.. Easier to work with (cut, less likely to break)
j.. Poorer clarity, diffuses light, can lighten (could be positive).
...




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: photos of qhite on white & hanging quilt
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 15:58:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

I know this is hard to hear but I simply don't think they should do it. If
it's a 200 year old quilt, there is no way it should be on permanent
display. Could they get it out now and then for special events, and
advertise that? After re reading this post I think I'm confused...is it in a
museum or in a church?
I hate to have to sound mean spirited, but it's irresponsible to exhibit it
under those circumstances. Even framed I think it's a bad idea. Do they
want to always have the quilt, or not? I think it would hasten its
deterioration over the long term.
Candace Perry


-----Original Message-----
From: palamporeaol.com [mailto:palamporeaol.com]
Sent: Sunday, October 24, 2010 4:34 PM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] photos of qhite on white & hanging quilt


1) I am pretty sure that a while back there was a discussion about how to
photograph an item that is white on white. I need that info, please. Any
idea how I might dig it up?

2) A church contacted me asking how to display a quilt made by the women of
the church. They can't hang it up high. It would be where people are walking
by and could touch. Glass is very expensive and could also be hit and
therefore break..........spell ---- dangerous. Then we talked about
plexi-glass and it apparently only comes in sheets 8 ft. X 4 ft. according
to the framer I use.
That explains why there is a wonderful quilt deteriorating day by day in a
museum that will remain unnamed. (I talked with them and they didn't listen
to me when I expressed my concern about the continued deterioration.) The
plexi-glass has a seam that runs down the middle. That tiny crack/seam in
the plexi-glass has allowed air/dirt, etc. to come in contact with this
item. I saw it in 1995'ish and it was superb. I saw it last year and it has
a major yellow stain down the center of the quilt (early 1800's broderie
perse). I don't think that the damage is reversible, but it could be slowed
down. IT would benefit from glass because it is hung high in a stairwell.
Anyway............any suggestions as to how this church might enjoy the
fruits of their labor? They don't have any ceilings over 9 ft. high. I told
the lady I would ask my friends all over the US for advice and she was most
appreciative.

Thanks for any help you can give me!
Lynn Lancaster Gorges in New Bern, NC






---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: candaceschwenkfelder.com.
To unsubscribe send a blank email to
leave-qhl-1770637Clyris.quiltropolis.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kauai Museum Hawaiian Quilt Exhibit
From: Laurie Woodard <Lwoodardhawaii.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 10:06:26 -1000
X-Message-Number: 9

Kauai Museum has scheduled their annual series of quilt exhibits,
titled: Kauai Museum 50th Anniversary Textile Festival, October 7
through December 31, 2010. There are three consecutive exhibits with
different themes ranging from historic to contemporary as well as
classes and other programming. For details, see:

http://www.kauaimuseum.org/cgi-bin/kauai_museum.pl?action=exhibits

Laurie Woodard


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: hanging a quilt in a church
From: "Kathy Moore" <kathymooreneb.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 18:46:41 -0500
X-Message-Number: 10

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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BlankHi Lynn, I've been there and done that in a former church. I found =
it was a problem getting people to take me seriously.It was a "You can =
lead a horse to water..." kind of experience!

I saw some interesting and very effective textile mounts done in =
Washington at one of the Smithsonian museums a few years ago. They =
mounted old rugs and caftans, etc. on acid free boards with insect =
mounting pins (I think), then mounted the boards on the walls or, when =
possible, they hung the textiles on rods suspended by clear fishing line =
from the ceiling.

Then, they mounted plexiglass sheets in front of the textiles by using =
very thick plastic "washers" or tubes to separate and provide about an =
inch to and inch and a half of space between the plexiglass and the =
wall. Screws were driven through the plexiglass, the "washers" (which =
could have been very narrow-diameter PVC tubing) and into the wall. The =
screw/washer (tubing) mounts seemed to be well supported and they =
provided space for the textile to breathe but to still be protected from =
wayward hands. Of course, if the mounting is too available to wayward =
hands, there may be no way to keep people from touching the textile! In =
the museum, the guards were very watchful! But, the textiles were very =
visible (and quite beautiful) and it was an unobtrusive way to display =
them.

Hope this helps.

Kathy Moore
Lincoln, NE




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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: hanging a quilt in a church
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 21:01:43 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11


>Then, they mounted plexiglass sheets in front of the textiles by using very
>thick plastic "washers" or tubes to separate >and provide about an inch to
>and inch and a half of space between the plexiglass and the wall. Screws
>were driven >through the plexiglass, the "washers" (which could have been
>very narrow-diameter PVC tubing) and into the wall.

Kathy and all,

The small but wonderful Princeton University Museum has Chinese silk scrolls
mounted that same way. The plexi is probably a full quarter inch thick, the
edges smoothed and rounded into a bullnose, and the rods at least 3" deep to
the wall -- as I remember, it has been a while. The plexi is also a good 3"
bigger/wider than the art overall. It is an effective deterrent to wayward
hands.

Judy
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: On the subject of framing .... and Hawaiian tapa
From: Laurie Woodard <Lwoodardhawaii.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 21:41:50 -1000
X-Message-Number: 1

Stephaie,

Bishop Museum Conservation Lab, in Honolulu, Hawaii, has information
online at:
http://www.bishopmuseum.org/research/conservation.html

Laurie Woodard

> Does anyone know who could appraise a large 60-year-old Hawaiian
> tapa and
> give advice about how to display it in my home?
>
> Stephanie Whitson


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: display of quilt - mix up - sort of
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:33:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2


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Dear List Friends,
I really appreciate all of the interest in the hanging of the quilt in th=
e church. It is a quilt that was made by the ladies of the church within=
the past few years. It is NOT the 200 year old coverlet I asked about pho=
tographing. (The white on white photography is still not great. Might try=
to back light it tomorrow since it is just one layer.)

Back to the church quilt..........They have curtains over the windows that=
keep the light out so it will only get light a few hours each week. My pe=
rsonal opinion is that they should find a way to enjoy it, but HOW? You ha=
ve given me tons of great advice..........especially Judy Grow. Now to see=
what works best to their needs. I have worked a great deal with hanging=
textiles and framing textiles as a conservator, but I had never faced "Ho=
w to Hang a Quilt in an Area Where People Can Touch". That is the tough pa=
rt! Dirty fingers, safety, light, etc.

It is a rendition of scenes/buildings in their town, I think. Many of thes=
e have been made over the years and are often found high on a wall in a to=
wn hall or behind a reception area.

I will talk with them and give them several suggestions. I will let you kn=
ow when it is finished and give you the address of the church so you can=
see what they decide to do if you are ever in their area.

Thanks a million times! And the ladies of the church appreciate your help.
Lynn in New Bern, NC


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: CD of MAQSG's last Regional Study Day
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Oct 2010 01:32:50 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

On September 25th the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Study Group hosted its 4th annual
Regional Quilt study day at the Burlington County Historic Society in
Burlington NJ. Cinda Cawley dubbed our days Burlington Bliss, so this was
Burlington Bliss IV!

We missed Cinda this year, and I know that you miss reading her accounts of
all the Quilt Bliss events she visits. I hope she will be up and about soon
and be able to enjoy her trips again soon, and that we will again read
about and see the quilts though her eyes.

Most of you know that the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Study Group is hosting the
American Quilt Study Group Seminar 2011 in Cherry Hill NJ next September.
We have been running these study days for 4 years as fundraisers so that we
can make sure your New Jersey experience will be the best Seminar ever.

As in the past we are selling a CD of the photo images of the quilts seen at
RQSD. I've spent the past month going through all the photos, arranging
them, editing out the stuff around the quilts. I've finally gotten them
all together and have spent the past couple of days burning CDs for the
attendees who pre-ordered them. Now I am offering them to the general
antique quilt-loving public at large.

We saw 115 quilts between 10AM and 3:30 PM, and all of them were
photographed, most of them straight-on and in full, most with 2-3 closeups.
There is NO accompanying information -- this CD is just 395 photographs, in
quality images, most over 1000 KB.

This includes, a 12-block simple Baltimore Album Quilt placed and dated
1843, that had never been seen in public before. The week before I had been
in a used-book store in Lambertville NJ and of course the conversation with
the owner turned to quilts. He brought two quilts out from the back to show
me, (this was a BOOK store) and 1/2 hour later I had the BAQ in a shopping
bag to bring for my Show and Tell. This man had never seen me before, had
no idea what a study day was, but with just my name and address on a slip
of paper allowed me to take his quilt with me. You'll see it in the Show
and Tell Folder, in full and in many closeups.

The Burlington County Historic Society showed 30 quilts, 14 of them in the
permanent exhibition, the rest from storage.
The Hunterdon County Historic Society brought 11 quilts.
The Medford Township NJ Historic Society brought 12 quilts.
The Red Mill Museum in Clinton NJ brought 11 quilts.
And in Show and Tell we saw 18 quilts.

You can share our day for $18.00. The price includes the postage to get the
CD to you.
Please make sure your check reaches me by November 15th. I won't take
orders after that date
Please make your check out to

Judy Grow-MAQSG
76 Old Clinton Road
Flemington NJ 08822



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: More about the CD
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Oct 2010 01:42:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

How could I forget!!!

Donna Stickovich brought 13 fabulous quilts from her collection, and Pat and
Arlan Christ brought 18 quilts! Oh, those red and green, and those
Pennsylvania Quilts! Color, Color, COLOR!

You'll have the pleasure of seeing quilts from these fabulous personal
collections, as well as quilts from other Historic Society Collections at
the AQSG Seminar 2011!

Judy



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Queen Mary's Doll House
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Oct 2010 10:53:52 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3

http://www.queenmarysdollshouse.org/

Here is an article about the doll house.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/interiorsandshopping/8072968/Lutyenss-fa
bulous-dolls-house-for-Queen-Mary.html

Or a shorter url: http://tinyurl.com/2ax2h3n

If you explore a bit you can find the quilt on the bed in Queen Mary's room.
First you have to find Queen Mary's room! Unfortunately, it does not show
the full bed, only the end of it. Created 1921-1925, the workmanship in this
project is amazing. This website has sharp clear zoom capability. Have fun!

Karen in the Islands


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilty floorcloth
From: <aquilterwindstream.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Oct 2010 23:18:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Tried to send this message earlier this week, but it was returned for an as-yet unknown reason. Will try again-

At the recent quilt show in Jacksonville, the vendor of "Quilt-in-a-Cup" had
a terrific quilty floor cloth in her booth. I believe she said she is
planning to offer a pattern/instructions and the stable material for making
thiese soon. Check her website... she has some interesting products:
http://www.quiltinacup.com/

Best regards. Nancy

www.quiltnans.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 26, 2010
From: Annette Gero <a.gerounsw.edu.au>
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 2010 21:26:07 +1100
X-Message-Number: 2

--_000_C8EF9AEF6C5Cagerounsweduau_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Qare you around tomorrow. ??? (Friday) Maybe I should get a look at my qui=
lts???

Annette


On 27/10/10 3:00 PM, "Quilt History List digest" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.co=
m> wrote:

QHL Digest for Tuesday, October 26, 2010.

1. Re: On the subject of framing .... and Hawaiian tapa
2. display of quilt - mix up - sort of

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: On the subject of framing .... and Hawaiian tapa
From: Laurie Woodard <Lwoodardhawaii.edu>
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 21:41:50 -1000
X-Message-Number: 1

Stephaie,

Bishop Museum Conservation Lab, in Honolulu, Hawaii, has information
online at:
http://www.bishopmuseum.org/research/conservation.html

Laurie Woodard

> Does anyone know who could appraise a large 60-year-old Hawaiian
> tapa and
> give advice about how to display it in my home?
>
> Stephanie Whitson


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: display of quilt - mix up - sort of
From: palamporeaol.com
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:33:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2


----------MB_8CD438E26588B69_1978_BF18_webmail-m069.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"


Dear List Friends,
I really appreciate all of the interest in the hanging of the quilt in th=
=3D
e church. It is a quilt that was made by the ladies of the church within=3D
the past few years. It is NOT the 200 year old coverlet I asked about pho=
=3D
tographing. (The white on white photography is still not great. Might try=
=3D
to back light it tomorrow since it is just one layer.)

Back to the church quilt..........They have curtains over the windows that=
=3D
keep the light out so it will only get light a few hours each week. My pe=
=3D
rsonal opinion is that they should find a way to enjoy it, but HOW? You ha=
=3D
ve given me tons of great advice..........especially Judy Grow. Now to see=
=3D
what works best to their needs. I have worked a great deal with hanging=3D
textiles and framing textiles as a conservator, but I had never faced "Ho=
=3D
w to Hang a Quilt in an Area Where People Can Touch". That is the tough pa=
=3D
rt! Dirty fingers, safety, light, etc.=3D20

It is a rendition of scenes/buildings in their town, I think. Many of thes=
=3D
e have been made over the years and are often found high on a wall in a to=
=3D
wn hall or behind a reception area.=3D20

I will talk with them and give them several suggestions. I will let you kn=
=3D
ow when it is finished and give you the address of the church so you can=3D
see what they decide to do if you are ever in their area.=3D20

Thanks a million times! And the ladies of the church appreciate your help.
Lynn in New Bern, NC




----------MB_8CD438E26588B69_1978_BF18_webmail-m069.sysops.aol.com--




---

END OF DIGEST

---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: A.Gerounsw.edu.au
To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442714Rlyris.quiltropolis.=
com
For more information, articles and archives, visit our home page at http://=
QuiltHistory.com.


--_000_C8EF9AEF6C5Cagerounsweduau_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: eBay 1907 Lodge Ohio redwork Signature quilt ends this afternoon
From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 2010 12:52:54 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 3

Just found this interesting spoked signature redwork quilt dated 1907 from =
a fraternal lodge in Ohio-probably a fundraiser. Opening bid is $199, thou=
ght someone here might be interested in buying it.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3D150509942915&ssPageNam=
e=3DSTRK:MEWAX:IT

If the link won't work type in the item number 150509942915

Center block has "Fidelity Lodge of D. of HAOUW and AOUW organized 1894 Tol=
edo, Ohio" with anchor. Learned a bit looking up that square about the AOU=
W:

from http://www.infomercantile.com/-/Ancient_Order_Of_United_Workmen
'Ancient Order Of United Workmen' (abbreviated AOUW or A.O.U.W.) was the fi=
rst fraternal group to offer death benefit life insurance to its members. =
Much as the Freemasons have the Order of the Eastern Star, the all-m=
ale AOUW offered an alternate membership for women. The Degree of Honor was=
the "ladies auxillary" of the AOUW, working in much the same way and struc=
ture regarding ritual, membership, and insurance.

from http://www.phoenixmasonry.org/masonicmuseum/fraternalism/aouw.htm
The American fraternal benefit network began with the organization the Anci=
ent Order of United Workmen in Meadville, Pennsylvania on October 27, 1868.=
The AOUW was founded by John Jordan Upchurch, a Mason, with the aim of adj=
usting "all differences which may arise between employers and employees, an=
d to labor for the development of a plan of action that may be beneficial t=
o both parties, based on the eternal truth that the interests of labor and =
capitol are equal and should receive equal protection." Each member paid $=
1 into the insurance fund to cover the sum of not less than $500 in benefit=
s paid to a members dependents when he died. Each time a member died, $1 wa=
s due from the surviving members to reestablish the fund. Fraternal benefit=
s societies soon became quite popular as a means of providing financial pro=
tection to working class people at an affordable rate. Additionally, Frater=
nal benefits societies typically maintained a lodge where members could mee=
t together in a spirit of fraternalism and brotherhood.

Sandra Starley
AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser
Moab, Utah
my antique and vintage quilts
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts
http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

--
Sandra Starley
AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser
Moab, Utah
my antique and vintage quilts
http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts
http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bets Ramsey and Merikay Waldvogel
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 2010 07:47:08 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 4

--0-1901233636-1288277228=:65458
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I would like Bets Ramsey or Merikay Waldvogel to contact me directly at don=
beldpacbell.net I have a question about your book Southern Quilts=
. thanks, Best, Don
--0-1901233636-1288277228=:65458--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Early 1800's Applique quilt
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 2010 07:55:32 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

--0-250504952-1288277732=:61241
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi everyone, I have added a photo at the end of the quilt section on the e.=
board photo board of an early 1800's appliqued quilt with an unusual patter=
n.The photo is from a show in Paducah in 2004.It probably is a variat=
ion of King Solomon's Crown. I have a family out here in California that=
has a quilt with that same pattern dated 1847. I am interested in findi=
ng out if anyone knows more about the pattern--it's name, the date of the q=
uilt in the show, etc. thanks, Don Beld
--0-250504952-1288277732=:61241--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilty floorcloth
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 2010 08:03:49 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

--0-1774961431-1288278229=:26366
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Hi there:
Beach Garden Quilts company from Bainbridge Island, WA has a whole line of
patterns on how to make quilty floorcloths. They also have a starter kit with
easy to understand instructions. I visited their booth at the NW Quilters' Expo
in Portland and bought patterns while listening and watching their spiel on how
to do it. They have cute quilt patterns too.
http://www.beachgardenquilts.com/


Here is their blog entry about teaching floor mats at the Schoolhouse in Houston
and a photo of their booth in Portland:
http://beachgardenquilts.danemcoweb.com/blog/

I'm sold!.....arden


(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR
--0-1774961431-1288278229=:26366--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Early 1800's Applique quilt
From: pollymellocomcast.net
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 2010 18:22:38 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 7

------=_Part_440541_1759468563.1288290158797
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable



Don,

=C2 I believe that is my quilt. Debby Cooney and I did the Rotary show t=
hat year. It has names and dates 1842-1844. Van Ardsdale and Krewsen. Lots =
of place names: Bucks County, North Hampton. There is another quilt=C2fr=
om a museum show catalog "Quilted For Friends" I believe is the name of the=
book. I have also found a star quilt, same family, I think it is in Trento=
n, N.J. "Crown of Thorns" is the block name, I believe. I am not at home at=
the moment.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

=C2
------=_Part_440541_1759468563.1288290158797--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Harriet Powers lecture - VA Museum of Fine Arts, Nov 4
From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 2010 18:21:02 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8

--0-921572547-1288315262=:10018
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hello -

May I share that the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Book Club will hosts=
a lecture on quilter Harriet Powers (1837 - 1910). I will be thesp=
eaker. The topic is Harriet Powers - Following the Bible Quilt'sTrail fr=
om Athens, GA to Washington, DC. The event will be November 4,2010, 6=
- 8pm in Richmond, VA. It is a ticketed event.http://bit.ly/aB0L7=
c

The event is sponsored by the Friends of African and African American Ar=
t.

Thank you for sharing -

Kyra E. Hicks
Arlington, VA
--0-921572547-1288315262=:10018--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: luncheon and quilt presentation in Worcester Township, Montgomery County, PA
From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Oct 2010 12:12:59 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0133_01CB7762.A120C1D0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I am presenting quilts from the Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center at a
special program on Tuesday November 16 at the Meadowood community in
Worcester, PA (3205 Skippack Pike - route 73 - Worcester PA 19460). It's a
luncheon and the program for $25, which benefits the community. The
facilities are lovely and the lunch sounds great - apple cider butternut
squash bisque, Scuppernong Chicken with Virginia Ham and red grape sauce,
green beans, biscuits and apple brown betty (I think they're going
southern!!). I'll be showing an interesting group of quilts including some
new additions to our collection in the 45 minute program (I've received
about 10 quilts in the last 3 months). For more info, call 610-584-1000 and
inquire about the quilt luncheon.

Candace Perry

Curator

Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilted rug
From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2010 04:20:04 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

I just came across an article in the Jan/Feb 2010 issue of McCall's Quilting
magazine, pg 75, about making a wool quilted throw rug (33"x51"). It is pieced
with appliqued circles on top and has a cotton duck backing.


Mary Anne



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt name
From: <quiltnsharroncharter.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Oct 2010 12:17:01 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

I've put pictures on evintage board of a folk art bird, berries and tulips applique. My friend thought she found the pattern in a McCall's magazine in 1955ish. Does anyone know the name or if she remembers correctly?

Warm regards,
Sharron Evans
Spring, TX