Subject: Columbia-Williamette Quilt Study Group-Portland Oregon
From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt/rockisland.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2010 13:26:10 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Karen in the Islands posting on behalf of the CWQSG

Advance Reservations are appreciated.
RSVP to mspark/frii.com
Sat. Nov 20, 2010
9:30am-2:30pm, Room 130
Portland's First United Methodist Church, 1838 SW Jefferson
Bring Brown Bag lunch. Soda and bottled water provided.
Tea and goodies provided.
$10 for members; $15 for non-members
Show & Tell (please limit to 2 quilts per person)


<Solving the Mystery of an Oregon Heritage Signature Quilt>

<<I was asked to study an 1895-1897 historic quilt given to the
Wasco County, Oregon Historical Society. The challenge was
to identify the women, their relationships, and the commonality
among them. Spending hours studying the quilt and using
Ancestry.com, I was able to identify 24 of the 25 names and
initials and their relationships. I will have the quilt for viewing. >>

Come learn more fascinating information about the never-ending world of
Signature Quilts and their importance to our cultural and social heritage.
The meeting flyer is attached with the updated information.

There is still plenty of room for those who have not yet decided to come!!
There will even be some fun auction items of historic textiles to benefit
the Oregon Quilt Project -- so don't forget to bring your wallet!!

If you think you will be attending and have yet to send in your
registration, kindly RSVP to mspark/frii.com so that I can get an
approximate count of how many will be coming. This will assist in planning
the morning goodies:-)

Looking forward to seeing you on November 20th,

Martha Spark
facilitator, CWQSG 2010-2011




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star
From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate"

Does anyone know of a book that has a Lone Star/Star of Bethlehem that /
has a picture of one made in Texas? I am trying to do a block history /
program for my guild and focusing on the Star of Bethlehem as it was in /
Texas. I have requested through inter library loan a native American /
quilt book in hopes that there is a Morning Star made by them. I am /
hoping to find pictures of antique quilts and not modern made quilts.

Brenda Applegate


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lone Star
From: <quiltnsharron/charter.net>
Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2010 17:29:09 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

When you think of Texas quilts, you have to think of Marcia Kaylakie's, "Texas Quilts and Quilters, A Lone Star Legacy". Good luck!

Best regards,
Sharron Evans
Spring, TX...............where it's rainy and cold, ok cold for us (52 deg.)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Lone Star Quilt
From: "Leah Zieber"

Hi - Texas quilts. well there is

Lone Stars (volume 1) A Legacy of Texas Quilts, 1836-1936 by Bresenhan and
Puentes

This wonderful book has quite a bit of Texas history and some really
beautiful antique quilts (great pictures).



I'm guessing there is a second volume out there somewhere - - this volume
doesn't have any images of "lone star" quilts - sorry



Happy hunting..

Leah Zieber

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Texas Lone Star Quilts
From: Edwaquilt/aol.com
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2010 01:21:

There was a booth/exhibit at QuiltMarket/Festival about a new Texas Quilt
Museum. You can contact Quilt's Inc for information about it. They may
have some information about such a quilt.

Holice Turnbow


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilter/epix.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2010 09:36:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Interesting question. Is it possible 'Lone Star' is a name from the 20th
century colonial revival period? I believe Mountain Mist batting wrappers
featured a 'Lone Star' pattern in the 1930's. Was there a reference for
that name before then? Earlier quilts I've seen of similar pattern are
usually identified most often as either 'Bethlehem Star' or 'Mathematical
Star'.

Greta VanDenBerg
'a star block by any other name . . .'
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lone Star
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow/comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:04:53 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Yes, interesting Greta. I've just run into that naming cunundrum in helping
to put together a quilt exhibition at the Bourman-Stickney House of the
Readington Museum. (Mid-Atlantic Quilt Study Group will be going to the
exhibition tomorrow, Tuesday).

The curator, interested mainly in costume when it comes to textiles, had
called a quilt with a single large star with vine applique and stuffed
berries a "Lone Star." It just sounded wrong and I corrected her. I
suggested that possibly 25 year increments could be used when naming those
particular single star quilts.

First two quarters of the 19th century -- Mathematical Star
Second two quarters of the 19th century -- Bethlehem Star
First quarter of the 20th century -- Bethlehem Star
Second quarter of the 20th century and beyond -- Lone Star

What do you all think? In the absense of other information.

Judy Grow



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Lone Star
From: "Candace Perry" <candace/schwenkfelder.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:05:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Our local PA Dutch ladies used the Lone Star name specifically for that
pattern. I'm not sure when it began to be used though -- I have one from
the 1870s and many more after that.
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Stars
From: Gaye Ingram <gingram/suddenlink.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2010 9:46:34 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

Re Judy's suggestion:

I've do not believe the name "Mathematical Star" was ever used in the South.

"Star of Bethlehem" seems to have been the early/earliest name for the pattern, whereas in last part of 19th century, it became "Lone Star."

However, this is something that I've wondered about for a while: WHICH Bethlehem---the one in what is now Israel, earlier Palestine? or the one in Pennsylvania?

The question arose while trying to determine the origin or earliest use of the color combination "teal"/oxblood/cheddar. Having reread Anita Schorsch's book on Pennsylvania German quilts and taken a little too uncritically some of the author's points about the specific religious symbolism in the quilts of the Moravians, I lurched off into a study of that group's history in America and Europe.

This star pattern is found often in that group, both in PA and in NC and GA, where they planted missions. Its American headquarters are located in Bethlehem, PA and Allentown, PA.

So I've wondered which Bethlehem was referred to originally. Like "Richmond Beauty," "Georgia Beauty," "New York Beauty," it might simply have been a star that took its name from the place where it either was extremely popular or originated.

Curious in wet, chilly North Louisiana,
Gaye Ingram


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Stars
From: <bearspaw/cox.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2010 11:34:20 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

There are several Lone Star quilts pictured in the book Texas Quilts Texas Treasures by the Texas Quilt Heritage Society, publlished by AQS in 1986. The first is called a Lone Star Burial Quilt, c 1860 on page 37. There is another one on page 77 dated 1898. See also pages 128 and 146 for later versions. Good Luck!

Donna Skvarla
AQS Certified Appraiser



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: qhl digest: November 14, 2010
From: "Karey Bresenhan" <kareyb/quilts.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2010 11:55:46 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

In response to Brenda's question re Lone Star quilts made in Texas: Please
check the second volume of Nancy's and my book as I can remember at least
one Lone Star quilt in there, definitely made in Texas. There may have been
a couple more, but I am not where my library is so I can't check for you.
The book's name is: Lone Stars II: A Legacy of Texas Quilts, 1936-1986. If I
am remembering correctly after 25 years, there was at least one made in the
1950's. Our new Lone Stars book, covering 1986-2011, should be out next
October/November in time for the opening of our new Texas Quilt Museum in La
Grange and for the Texas-theme International Quilt Festival celebrating 175
years of Texas Independence. All three of the books in the trilogy are
University of Texas Press publications.
Karey Bresenhan



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star-Bethlehem Star?
From: "Rose Marie Werner" <rwerner/deskmedia.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:42:09 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8

I just finished documenting the pieced quilt kits and the Lone Star name was
predominant in the 1930s. There were still a couple Bethlehem Stars so I
think that Judy is correct about the 20th Century.
It's been interesting working with the pieced kits. There are far more of
them than I imagined. Sorting them out came down to the color choices
offered by each company and the border treatments - all documented and soon
to be found on my website.
Rosie Werner
www.quiltkitid.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star - Texas Quilts
From: "Pat L. Nickols" <patlnickols/yahoo.com>


Brenda Applegate
/////////////
Does anyone know of a book that has a Lone Star/Star of Bethlehem that has a
picture of one made in Texas? I am trying to do a block history program for my
guild and focusing on the Star of Bethlehem as it was in Texas. I have
requested through inter library loan a native American quilt book in hopes that
there is a Morning Star made by them. I am hoping to find pictures of antique
quilts and not modern made quilts.
______________________________________________________________________________________________


Brenda,

The following are suggestions to add to your reading, including some wonderful
illustrations of Texas quilts.

Texas Quilts, Texas Women, Suzanne Yabsley 1984

Lone Stars Volume II, A Legacy of Texas Quilts, 1936-1986, Karoline Patterson
Bresenhan and Nancy O'Bryant Puentes 1990

Texas Quilts: Texas Treasures, Texas Heritage Quilt Society 1986

A clear, sunny, fall day in San Diego

Pat L. Nickols




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star
From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate"

Sorry quilters. I had to work late this evening and just getting caught /
up in the e-mails - which were very interesting. From what I have /
quickly read - The Lone Star quilt really had nothing to do with the /
settlement of Texas or referring to anything related to Texas. This is /
another myth that has been passed along.

I have an upper GI tomorrow morning, so please don't think I don't /
appreciate your comments when I don't respond.

Brenda Applegate


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star PS
From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate"

When I first started to do research on the Lone Star or Mathematical /
Star, can you imagine trying to draft this in the early part of the 19th /
century?

Brenda

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lone Star
From: Gaye Ingram <gingram/suddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 5:47:23 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

Brenda A wrote: From what I have quickly read - The Lone Star quilt really had nothing to do with the settlement of Texas or referring to anything related to Texas... another myth that has been passed along.

I think this deserves further investigation.

The Lone Star design might not have arisen in Texas, but the name suggests at some point, it became identified with Texas in the minds of many, including a lot of Texans.

Patterns names and symbolism evolve. It would be interesting to know just when the name "Lone Star" and the Texas identification with the pattern became popular. And maybe how, as well.

I'm still wondering which Bethlehem is meant in "Star of Bethlehem."

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lone Star
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen/yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 04:37:45 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 2

How did Texas get the name the Lone Star state?

Kris


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Lone Star State
From: Laura Syler

I did a quick google search and this is one of the explinations that /
popped up.
As a native Texan, I was always told (in our 4th grade Texas History /
class) That it went back to one of the original flags of the Austin /
Colony.
Here is the quote...from How States Got their Nick Names.....

"A single star was part of the Long Expedition (1819), Austin Colony /
(1821) and several flags of the early Republic of Texas. Some say /
that the star represented the wish of many Texans to achieve /
statehood in the United States. Others say it originally represented /
Texas as the lone state of Mexico which was attempting to uphold its /
rights under the Mexican Constitution of 1824. At least one "lone /
star" flag was flown during the Battle of Concepcion and the Siege of //

Bexar (1835). Joanna Troutman's flag with a single blue star was /
raised over Velasco on January 8, 1836. Another flag with a single /
star was raised at the Alamo (1836) according to a journal entry by /
David Crockett. One carried by General Sam Houston's Texian army /
(which defeated Mexican General Santa Anna at the Battle of San /
Jacinto ) may have been captured and taken to Mexico. Another "lone /
star" flag, similar to the current one but with the red stripe above /
the white, was also captured the following year (1837) and returned /
to Mexico. The "David G. Burnet" flag, of "an azure ground" (blue /
background) "with a large golden star central" was adopted by the /
Congress of the Republic of Texas in December of 1836. It continued /
in use as a battle flag after being superseded in January of 1839. /
The 1839 design has been used to symbolize the Republic and the /Lone //

Star State/94 ever since. "

Laura Syler
Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles
Teacher, Lecturer, Judge
Richardson, TX
972-345-2787
hi-spirit/airmail.net


--Apple-Mail-24-221508619--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilter/epix.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 08:25:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

But when was the name applied to the quilt? Who named the quilt? Was it
named before or after the 1930's?

It isn't uncommon for most of us to see a quilt and name it according to
what is most familiar based on our individual experiences. When I first
started learning about quilt history via books by Ruth Finley, Marie
Webster, Carrie Hall and Rose Kretsinger because that was what was available
at my local library, I initially recognized what we are all thinking of in
this instance as a 'Lone Star.' As I kept reading I realized how many names
have been applied to quilt designs throughout history. That was when I
realized the more I learn the less I know.

If I'm thinking correctly, and a quick glance at block identification
sources indicate I might be, several star blocks that look nothing like what
we think of as a 'Lone Star' have also been identified by that name. The
earliest date I can confirm the most recognized 'Lone Star' block being
identified as such in a published source is 1915 (Brackman #3776). The
Colonial Revival period began in the late 19th Century with the Arts and
Crafts movement as the Victorian era was fading out; however, it didn't
significantly impact quilt making until the early 20th Century which fits
with the 1915 newspaper clipping.

While they provide essential information, state documentation projects often
apply a name for identification if there isn't one that comes in with the
quilt and that name would then be reflected in the books. Which brings us
back to the three questions listed above.

In my humblest opinion, unless the name is reflected on the quilt by the
maker or there is a conclusive evidence that a maker referred to her quilt
as a 'Lone Star' or a 'Bethlehem Star' or a 'Mathematical Star' there is no
way to be sure. I'm not sure a time periods rule would work because
something will always come along to break the rules.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle
Waiting for spring to arrive in PA. . .


"There are several Lone Star quilts pictured in the book Texas Quilts Texas
Treasures by the Texas Quilt Heritage Society, published by AQS in 1986.
The first is called a Lone Star Burial Quilt, c 1860 on page 37. There is
another one on page 77 dated 1898. See also pages 128 and 146 for later
versions. Good Luck!" Donna Skvarla, AQS Certified Appraiser




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star name
From: Laura Syler <texasquiltco/airmail.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 07:31:45 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5


--Apple-Mail-25-221976576
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset/US-ASCII;
delsp/yes;
format/flowed

You know... If you think about it... it makes sense to morph from
"Star of Bethlehem" to "Lone Star"... as it is a single star, despite
how many kagillian pieces are used to comprise the final design.
Especially when the "Lone Star" label was becoming so prominent in
American History from 1830 on.....

Just the ramblings of a proud (and seemingly, one of the few left
around these parts) Native Texan!



Laura Syler
Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles
Teacher, Lecturer, Judge
Richardson, TX
972-345-2787
hi-spirit/airmail.net





--Apple-Mail-25-221976576--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star
From: Laurel Horton <laurel/kalmiaresearch.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 08:16:56 -0500

Check with Wilene Smith. As I remember, from many years ago, she determined
that an early name for the pieced, single, large, eight-pointed star was
Rising Sun.

Laurel Horton

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lone Star
From: "Barb" <barb.whitehead/roadrunner.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 08:23:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

Quote from Wikepedia. "Texas is nicknamed the Lone Star State to signify
Texas as an independent republic and as a reminder of the state's struggle
for independence from Mexico." Barb in Maine



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Lone Star
From: "Candace Perry" <candace/schwenkfelder.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 09:03:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

What's odd is the PA Dutch ladies hereabouts used Rising Sun for the star
with satellite stars.
Candace Perry


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Star Block by any other name
From: "Munsey" <sgmunsey/comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 09:37:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Here is some other names for the Lone Star/Star of Bethlehem that appear
from time to time. I own a family quilt from circa 1850 that the family had
always called a Sunrise quilt, but it is definitely the same pattern as Star
of Bethlehem. Ruth McKelvey's 1979 book "Traditional Quilts and
Bedcoverings" discusses Canadian quilts and patterns pictures several of
these quilts with names such as Harvest Star, Blazing Sun, Sunburst. I
recall seeing similar "sun" names used with other eastern Canada quilts.
The color layout may be influencing the choice of names with quilts with
brighter colors in the centers being called suns instead of stars. Or may
not.

Sandra on Cape Cod



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lone Star
From: Gaye Ingram <gingram/suddenlink.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 9:13:49 -0600
X-Message-Number: 10

> Quote from Wikepedia. "Texas is nicknamed the Lone Star State to signify
> Texas as an independent republic and as a reminder of the state's struggle
for independence from Mexico." Barb in Maine

Yes, when Texas declared itself a republic, its official flag bore a single white star. (The founders fully intended to add that star to the American flag) And there are a number of lone stars found on quilts in the 1840s and early 1850s. They are among the more certain indications of political declarations in a quilt of that period. See,e.g., "All Flags Flying" for examples. Sometimes these are small single stars added to a commemorative handkerchief or scarf or to another principal design. I think the early ones were often white.

But in time, I think the Star of Bethlehem or Rising Sun pattern also was linked with Texas and called The Lone Star in some parts of the country. I suspect it was in 20th century or late 19th century, possibly the way the Richmond Beauty became New York Beauty. Kretsinger & Hall show two examples of "Lone Star" quilts, one from 1910 and another from 1924.

I first encountered the name "Star of Bethlehem" in Rose Wilder Lane's book "American Needlework." It was news to me and I'd looked at a lot of quilts in this pattern by then, all of them called "The Lone Star" by owners and makers. Lane uses "Rising Sun" ito identify a smaller, Mariner's Compass-type design, repeated in blocks set off with sashing. I assume the name derives from the rays of the rising sun.

Pattern names are symbolic and while they are fairly traditional, they also are often changed to represent new interests or locales. The evolution from religious to botanic to political is seen in floral designs, for instance. One woman's "Rose of Sharon" might be her daughter's "Whig Rose." And its counterpart, "Whig's Defeat," started life with a botanic name. In the early examples of "Rocky Mountain Road," "rocky" was an adjective, not part of a proper noun. Names change with interest and need.

And that is why, Candace and Trish and all you folks who know PA, I ask whether it is possible that the Star of Bethlehem might originally have referred to Bethlehem, PA. Trish, you're the Moravian authority, aren't you?

Gaye


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: qhl digest: November 14, 2010
From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8/comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 09:19:58 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11

BTW, Karey,
Festival was great this year!! as usual!!
I simply loved the Baltimore Album display.
Lonnie Schlough
Woodlands, Tx
www.fixquilts.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bethlehem Star vs Lone Star
From: Pepper Cory <pepcory/mail.clis.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 11:24:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

--90e6ba61506aea2be704952dfd80
Content-Type: text/plain; charset/UTF-8

The designation of Lone Star and its association with Texas starts before
Texas was a state but the connection is established by 1839 when a single
star flag was adopted as the state's symbol. On the other hand, Bethlehem
goes back a l-o-n-g way. I either read or heard from someone I respected
that Star of Bethlehem refers to the star visible on the night Jesus was
born. It does not say in the Bible however that there was only one star on
that night but refers to angels, a shining light, then the star of the East
over Bethlehem. I was told that a true Star of Bethlehem quilt pattern shows
smaller stars in the corners and half-blocks. Quite a crowded composition!
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: OT - Burlington County Hist Soc Auctioning Samplers Saturday
From: "Patricia J. Keller" <patriciajkeller/gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 15:28:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

I hope this OT post will be permitted, since historic needlework
samplers are an interest of some list members.

Some QHL list members may already know what I learned today: The
Burlington County Historical Society is selling a significant number
(29, I believe) of the samplers from their permanent collection at
Freeman's Auction, Philadelphia, on November 20th. That's this week.

The first news about this reported that BCHS was planning to use the
income from the sale of the samplers from their collections for an
interactive exhibit. That objective was later modified to
"acquisitions" for the collections.

A link to the blog post where this is discussed in detail:
http://bit.ly/bLvJTM


Patricia Keller


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: OT - Burlington County Hist Soc Auctioning Samplers Saturday
From: "Candace Perry" <candace/schwenkfelder.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 15:39:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 14

I didn't post it here earlier when I found out two weeks ago (and also about
the theft of the Bowker sampler) because some people on the museum list were
so unpleasant about it! IMO the blurb about exhibits is already out there
-- backpedaling isn't going to help much.
Another opinion -- I think much of this is due to lack of adequate
curatorial defense!
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star
From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hill/shaw.ca>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 15:32:07 -0700
X-Message-Number: 15

>First two quarters of the 19th century -- Mathematical Star
>Second two quarters of the 19th century -- Bethlehem Star
>First quarter of the 20th century -- Bethlehem Star
>Second quarter of the 20th century and beyond -- Lone Star
>
>What do you all think? In the absense of other information.

Sounds about right. I've made several Lone Stars, but according to
my mom, Grandma always made Stars of Bethlehem. Hers were probably
mostly made 2nd qtr 20th Century, but in our family, we tend to
usually be a generation out of fashion....

Jennifer Hill
Calgary, AB


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lone Star name
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie/stephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2010 17:51:32 -0600
X-Message-Number: 16

The Star of Bethlehem as in the Christmas story would refer to a single
star, wouldn't it? The one the wise men followed? so that would be a "lone"
star ... as in one.

I have no idea if that played ANY part in any of the name, but that's my
contribution.

Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: assigning names and dates on the Lone Star
From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciark/earthlink.net>


I am hestiant to assign dates with specific names on the Lone /
Star/Bethlehem Star/ Mathematical Star without a lot more research into /
quilt hisory annals and that includes corespondance, diaries, etc. Once /
something goes into common usage, it is quite diffecult to make a /
correction if it is required, even for accuracy sake. Just my 44 cents /
worth.....Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, and a proud adopted daughter of Texas /
(I WAS baptized in the river with a can of Lone Star beer, but that is /
another story for another day.....)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lone Star
From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixon/oct.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2010 04:18:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

In case it can be of help, here are a few thoughts about the Lone Star
from Brackman's digital newsletters:

"The Rising Sun is a rather common name in nineteenth century fiction,
sometimes described as a masterpiece quilt, yet it's a name most of us do
not recognize because we tend to call the design Lone Star, a name
traceable to 1873, or Star of Bethlehem, published in the twentieth
century." Barbara Brackman, The Quilt Detective: Clues in Pattern, 2007,
digital newsletter. (Pattern #1)

"In an 1873 description of the workrooms at the Methodist Episcopal Home
for women in Philadelphia, reporter Susan M. D. Fry described the quilts
being made there as "nine patches, lone stars, rake's teeth and double
T's." (Her description is also the first I have now found to the Lone Star
pattern and the only one to rake's teeth---perhaps a sawtooth variation.)"
Barbara Brackman, The Quilt Detective: Clues in Pattern, 2007, digital
newsletter. (Pattern #26)

This last quote is taken from Quilt Detective, Style #28, October 8, 2006,
on Style in Various Native or Non-European Communities. "The design that
mainstream quilters today call Star of Bethlehem or Lone Star is called by
the Lakota "Morning Star" to represent the separation of the darkness of
the night and the light of the new day." Barbara Brackman, The Quilt
Detective: Clues in Style 2006, digital newsletter.

See this website for additional information on the symbolism of the
morning star quilt: http://www.aktalakota.org/index.cfm?cat/1&artid/128

The book Border to Border: Historic Quilts and Quiltmakers of Montana
shares a similar thought. Buffalo robes were often painted with a morning
star design, and when quilts took their place, the pattern followed.

It's not much but it's all this ole bird has to offer at such a late hour.

Best wishes with the research, Brenda,

Gloria Nixon

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star - Digest
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilter/epix.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2010 07:21:39 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I agree with Marcia. Unless the assigned dates can be supported making up a
rule could only add to the confusion when the quilt with clear
identification comes along to break it. Besides, the
Mathematical/Bethlehem/Lone Star isn't the only quilt block with the 'Lone
Star' name. It seems names are applied according to the maker's/owner's
choice which may, or may not be, influenced by among other things time
period, location, pattern availability and identification sources. It's the
diversity that keeps quilt history so interesting.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle
A native CA living in PA.

"I am hesitant to assign dates with specific names on the Lone
Star/Bethlehem Star/ Mathematical Star without a lot more research into
quilt history annals and that includes correspondence, diaries, etc. Once
something goes into common usage, it is quite difficult to make a correction
if it is required, even for accuracy sake. Just my 44 cents worth....."
Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, and a proud adopted daughter of Texas



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Subject: Lone Star & Star of Bethlehem names
From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv/yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2010 05:35:29 -0800 (PST)

Before 2000, an Old Order Amish friend in Ohio explained to me that her fav/
orite quilt pattern was the Star of Bethlehem./A0 She said I probably knew /
it as Lone Star, but she went on to explain the differences to me......the /
Star of Bethlehem had patterns appliqued or pieced into the setting triangl/
es and squares./A0 She said that ever since she was a little girl and her m/
other made her a Star of Bethlehem quilt she has loved the pattern (early 1/
900's)./A0 She even knew of several examples in books she had in her librar/
y (and also available in her quilt shop)./A0 We dug the books out and looke/
d at the photos./A0 Some patterns with the appliqued / pieced setting trian/
gles and squares were referred to as both the Lone Star & the Star of Bethl/
ehem (sorry, but I cannot remember which books they were).
/A0
The Old Order Amish friend was Mrs. Amanda Miller who owned and operated th/
e Miller's Dry Goods Store in Charm, Ohio./A0 She and I both concluded that/
English folks called both/A0the Star of Bethelehem quilts (with the appliq/
ued/pieced setting squares & triangles) and/A0the Lone Star quilts by the "/
Lone Star" name./A0 Amish quilters made the distinction in the pattern name/
s./A0 She was in business for most of her life and knew Amish quilters from/
all over the Holmes County and surrounding areas./A0 In addition, through /
her quilt shop business she knew English quilters from all over Ohio and th/
e U.S./A0 I have also heard/A0non-Amish quilts/A0talk about both versions o/
f the pattern and referred to it as "Lone Star".
/A0
Perhaps the naming for the Amish community is based on traditional names ha/
nded down over generations./A0 It could just be an ethnic or geographic dif/
ference./A0 I seem to recall seeing "Star of Bethelhem" quilts in Lancaster/
County, Pennsylvania./A0 However, many Amish quilters from Ohio send quilt/
s to shops there./A0 Rachel Pellman might be a contact to ask about the dif/
fferentiation in the naming in the Pennsylvania Amish community./A0 Patrici/
a Herr might be a contact to ask in the Indiana Amish community.
/A0
Just my 2-cents worth!/A0 Connie Ark, Urbana, Ohio/0A/0A/0A


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: another Amish quilt historian from Ohio
From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv/yahoo.com>

Darwin D. Bearley is another quilt historian with experience about Ohio's A/
mish community and might had additional information on the naming different/
iation for the "Lone Star" and "Star of Bethlehem" quilts./A0 At one time h/
e was a member of the QHL./A0 His web site is:/A0 http://iantiqueonline.nin/
g.com/profile/DARWINDBEARLEY
C. Ark


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Naming Quilt Patterns
From: TOTOCO/aol.com
Reading the posts about confusion over quilt names almost makes one wish
that Linnaeus had been a quilter, hmm? A nice orderly system of binomial
nomenclature to overcome the regional names.

Just kidding - I know it wouldn't really solve the problem. Now, back to
my usual lurking position.....

janet white


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer/hotmail.com>

I think most folks - myself included - associate the Lone Star name with Te/
xas. SPecifically. Has anyone done research to ascertain when/how the Lone/
Star state got it's nickname?
Research ain't being done by me// I can tell ya. I'm doing good to shower/
every day! (Or every other day......)

Teddy Pruett/
www.teddypruett.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star
From: "Janet" <kaerose/comcast.net>

What is the name of the quilt that has the one large "Lone Star" center /
and/
4 smaller in each corner? Obviously it is not alone anymore...

Janet


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lone Star
From: bchutchian/hotmail.com
Good Morning from Texas!

I wanted to share the following with all of you.....

Lizzie Carpenter// my great-great grandmother// wrote in one of her journals on January 7// 1881..."made about 3 articles this week- I have also finished a quilt- The Lone Star."
On April 2nd// she wrote// "this week I have been quilting- put in my Lone Star on last Tuesday- have not got much done on it yet."/
On April 19th// Lizzie wrote// "sister Smith came down and we got out th quilt I had in- I will set down the things I got in Plano Saturday the 16th// Calico 20 yds $1.40// 20 yds cotton check $1.40// 5 yds cottonade $1.25// 2 yds slate colored shambra $.50// 5yds Jack edging $1.75// 1 hat for Eddie $.75."

Lizzie and her family lived in what is now Plano// Texas. She and her husband Robert moved to Texas in 1852 and began recording her days activities in journals// dating 1857-1882. Excerpts are in my book Gone to Texas Quilts form a Pioneer's Woman Journal. In her journals// Lizzie mentioned sewing and quilting and other textiles constantly./
When writing the chapter on the Lone Star quilt// my editor and I had quite a discussion on the name being associated with Lone Star State nickname. Haven't quilters always named their blocks and quilts for what they saw? The one star design is just that// a lone star. Over time// the design and nickname have been linked on logos everywhere. The star on the Texas flag has 5 points while a Lone Star quilt or Bethlehem Star quilt has 8 points.
Sadly// the Lone Star quilt Lizzie made was her last completed quilt before her death in 1882 and does not exist to my knowledge// nor do any of her quilts. For the book// I choose to make a traditional Lone Star quilt assuming that would have been what Lizzie made.

As I understand our history// (a simplified version) Texas was a colony of Mexico// their lone star. That lone star then became the symbol of independence from Mexico and that spirited image was then adopted as Texas became a Republic and retained when Texas joined the Union.

Great discussion!

Betsy Chutchian// native of the Lone Star State

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: John Hewson and Pickle Dishes
From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt/rockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2010 22:10:41 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

A friend sent me a link tonight to a website containing Kim Wulfert's
article about the early American fabric printer John Hewson. See
http://www.themagazineantiques.com/articles/john-hewson-and-the-french-conne
ction/2/

or http://tinyurl.com/33x3uqs

While on that website, I happened to spy a "pickle dish" that so much
reminded me of a photo of a Pickle Dish quilt pattern that I wound up
writing about it on my blog tonight! And I was supposed to be packing!

http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/2010/11/pickle-dish-pattern.html

Enjoy!

Karen in the Islands




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Subject: Lone Star
From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilter/epix.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2010 07:47:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

It would seem logical that a resident of Texas would refer to the 'Lone
Star' for a single star quilt. The theme of 'a lone star' is the same in
spite of the number of points on the star. Thank Betsy for that wonderful
reference from your Grandmother's diary - it is a superior reference for the
name being applied to a quilt with a conclusive date, however, we can only
assume Lizzie's quilt was the single star quilt that is the subject of this
discussion. Without the actual quilt we cannot be sure she is describing a
quilt with only one star and not a quilt made up of star blocks. One star
per block may have also been considered a lone star on a block-by-block
basis.

Brackman's 'Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns' lists 8 references to
'Lone Star', 1 'The Lone Star', 1 'Lone Star of Paradise' and 1 'Lone Star
of Texas'. Just one of the 'Lone Star' references also is called among
other names Texas Star, Texas, Eastern Star, Eight Point Star, and just
'Star'. Another reference which is called both 'Lone Star' and 'Lone Star
of Texas' is made up of single diamonds surrounded by hexagons made up of
triangles.

My husband lived in Texas as a child for several years and came up with his
version of the Lone Star nickname, so I did a quick Google search to see
what potentially more reliable information I could find.

Texas-on-line.com explains, "Texas is also known as the Lone Star State, in
reference to the state flag. The flag displays a single, five-point white
star on a field of blue with an upper white horizontal stripe and a lower
red horizontal stripe. Texas declared independence from Mexico on March 2,
1836, to become the Republic of Texas."

And the following is from 50states.com that lists the explanations for state
nicknames.

"Texas
A single star was part of the Long Expedition (1819), Austin Colony (1821)
and several flags of the early Republic of Texas. Some say that the star
represented the wish of many Texans to achieve statehood in the United
States. Others say it originally represented Texas as the lone state of
Mexico which was attempting to uphold its rights under the Mexican
Constitution of 1824. At least one "lone star" flag was flown during the
Battle of Concepcion and the Siege of Bexar (1835). Joanna Troutman's flag
with a single blue star was raised over Velasco on January 8, 1836. Another
flag with a single star was raised at the Alamo (1836) according to a
journal entry by David Crockett. One carried by General Sam Houston's Texian
army (which defeated Mexican General Santa Anna at the Battle of San Jacinto
) may have been captured and taken to Mexico. Another "lone star" flag,
similar to the current one but with the red stripe above the white, was also
captured the following year (1837) and returned to Mexico. The "David G.
Burnet" flag, of "an azure ground" (blue background) "with a large golden
star central" was adopted by the Congress of the Republic of Texas in
December of 1836. It continued in use as a battle flag after being
superseded in January of 1839. The 1839 design has been used to symbolize
the Republic and the "Lone Star State" ever since.
source: http://www.main.org/boyscout/texas.htm"

If you can't trust the Boy Scouts in Texas who can you trust?

Greta VanDenBerg
An occasional Texas tourist . . .


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ***SPAM*** Re: Lone Star
From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie/stephaniewhitson.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2010 11:21:20 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

Betsy! What a TREASURE you have! Thanks for sharing it.
Stephanie Whitson



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lone Star Name
From: Sherry Cook <sas.cook/gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2010 11:10:35 -0600
I have enjoyed the Lone Star "thread" of discussion. I wrote my friend,
Kate (QUILT CURATOR at the Briscoe Center For American History) to
comment. Her reply is below!

fromKate Adams toSherry Cook <sas.cook/gmail.com>

dateWed, Nov 17, 2010 at 5:36 PM
subjectRe: [qhl] Lone Star
mailed-bygmail.com
signed-bygmail.com

Sherry:

This may help.

The single five-pointed star was used on the Texas flag during the
years of the Texas Republic (1836-1845) and after annexation and
statehood in 1845. The five-pointed star has also been used in the
Republic's and then the state's official seal.

Please read the following, as quoted from the Texas State Historical
Association's online Handbook of Texas, a fabulous encyclopedia of
Texas information.

Re the Five pointed star in our flag: (see especially point 2 in the
second paragraph.

"The Lone Star Flag was adopted by the Texas Congress in 1839: "[T]he
national flag of Texas shall consist of a blue perpendicular stripe of
the width of one third of the whole length of the flag, with a white
star of five points in the centre thereof, and two horizontal stripes
of equal breadth, the upper stripe white, the lower red, of the length
of two thirds of the whole length of the flag." Senator William H.
Wharton introduced a bill on December 28, 1838, containing the flag's
design, and the bill was referred to a committee consisting of Senator
Oliver Jones and two unnamed senators. This committee reported a
substitute bill embodying the flag design introduced by Wharton, and
the substitute bill was passed by the Congress on January 21, 1839 and
approved by President Mirabeau B. Lamar on January 25, 1839. Official
art for the Lone Star Flag was drawn by Peter Krag and approved by
President Lamar. The actual designer of the Lone Star Flag is unknown,
but it could have been Wharton. The Lone Star Flag was the legal
national and state flag from January 25, 1839, to September 1, 1879,
and the de facto state flag from September 1, 1879, to August 31,
1933. The Lone Star Flag was also the legal national ensign from
January 25, 1839, to December 29, 1845. The Sixteenth Legislature
promulgated the Revised Civil Statutes of 1879 and provided that "all
civil statutes, of a general nature, in force when the Revised
Statutes take effect, and which are not included herein, or which are
not hereby expressly continued in force, are hereby repealed." Since
the 1879 revised statutes neither included legislation concerning the
flag nor expressly continued in force the 1839 flag law, the 1839 law
was repealed. Texas therefore had no legal flag from the date of the
repeal, September 1, 1879, to the effective date of the 1933 flag act,
August 31, 1933.

The 1933 description of the flag was extremely detailed and included
precise instructions for the design and location of the Lone Star. The
colors of the stripes, blood red, azure blue, and white, were said to
impart the "lessons of the Flag: bravery, loyalty, and purity."
Despite these specifications, there was no standard reference to
define what constituted "blood red" and "azure blue," and few Texas
flags were manufactured in the official proportions (hoist to fly) of
two to three. In 1993 the legislature revised the description of the
flag: "The state flag consists of a rectangle with a width to length
ratio of two to three containing: (1) a blue vertical stripe one-third
the entire length of the flag wide, and two equal horizontal stripes,
the upper stripe white, the lower red, each two-thirds the entire
length of the flag long; and (2) a white, regular five-pointed star in
the center of the blue stripe, oriented so that one point faces
upward, and of such a size that the diameter of a circle passing
through the five points of the star is equal to three-fourths the
width of the blue stripe." The 1993 law stipulates that the red and
blue colors of the state flag are the same colors used in the United
States flag, the so-called "Old Glory Red" and "Old Glory Blue." The
red and blue colors are specifically defined by the Standard Color
Reference of America, a standard textile-industry reference work. The
1993 law specifies that the finial for the state flag should be a lone
star or a spearhead, and gives the governor the authority to adopt a
governor's flag. The 1993 law also contains a complete revision of the
Texas Flag Code, which was first adopted in 1933.


Info re the official State of Texas Seal, which includes the Lone Star:

When Texas joined the Union, the Constitution of 1845 retained the
seal, changing only the word Republic to State. The constitution
declared, "There shall be a seal of the State, which shall be kept by
the Governor and used by him officially. The said seal shall be a star
of five points, encircled by an olive and live oak branches, and the
words 'the State of Texas.'


Hope this helps.

Kate