Subject: pickle dish or wine glass or goblet
From: palampore/aol.com


When in England this summer I saw the scalloped quilting pattern that is/
often called a clam shell. It were larger with sort of a stem (See Karen'/
s blog for an example). It was called "goblet" for the pattern name. The/
scalloped portion was the size of a goblet mouth. But I bet the base was/
also used at times. Pickle dishes, drinking glasses, coins, dinner plate/
s........think of how often utilitarian pieces were used to draw out a pat/
tern. They were their templates. I bet a teacup with a broken handle would/
often be saved to use to draw circles./

The quilting pattern used in Eastern NC that Pepper Cory has labeled the/
Core Sound Cross was probably measured with a piece of wall slat that wou/
ld be about 1 or 2 inches wide. They used a string and flour as the plum/
line for the center, but I bet that a slat was also used to draw off the/
additional lines./

Karen........great blog! Sure we will all enjoy finding out all sorts of/
things from you./

Going to the Winterthur quilt exhibit in Richmond, VA tomorrow. I can hard/
ly wait!!!/

Oh, a note. I backlit the white on white counterpane to photograph. That/
was the best choice to get details of the design. Thanks for all of your/
help earlier. The side light helped as well./

Lynn in New Bern, NC/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: pickle dish or wine glass or goblet
From: "Candace Perry" <candace/schwenkfelder.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2010 09:23:06 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Actually, I said the same thing with that discussion of the goblet quilt not
long ago. You know they loved and treasured their pattern glass. One never
knows, do one?
Candace Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: pickle dish or wine glass or goblet
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow/comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2010 10:55:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Har! Har! Jim, me boy!

Judy


> One never
> knows, do one?
> Candace Perry
>
> When in England this summer I saw the scalloped quilting pattern that is
> often called a clam shell. It were larger with sort of a stem


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: article in America Art Review
From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciark/earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2010 10:59:14 -0600


I do not know if anyone had already mentioned the Quilts from the /
Winterthur article (p.70) in American Art Review, Dec 2010 yet. Very /
nice article!Marcia Kaylakie, austin, TX.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Need the input of this list, please.
From: Pepper Cory <pepcory/mail.clis.com>


Hello all,
I'm working with the local library to set up a good quilting section.They
have almost nothing right now. I thought there were at least four factors
that would determine which titles to stock. They are: quilt history, art
quilts, wearables, and accurate timeless how-to books. Other things to
consider: color photography, appeal to general crafters ( those folks who
might want to do a small quilt project), and titles slanted toward a
particular style (such as crazy quilts) or use (the A-Z of baby quilts).
I already have a start with the following books which I will be donating:

Old Patchwork Quilts by Ruth E. Finley
The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America-Hall and Kretsinger,
America's Glorious Quilts
Quilts! Quilts!! Quilts!!! by McClun and Nownes
Colourwash Quilts by Deirdre Amsden

In the above grouping, the first three are quilt history, Quilts! is
excellent how-to, and Colourwash is instruction in a particular style.

As I regard the folks on this list as super quilt-knowledgeable, I'd really
appreciate your take on your favorite quilting titles. If you had the
opportunity to set up a library's quilting section, which books would you
choose?

In responding to this inquiry, please don't just hit 'reply' to my post on
QHL since the string of emails get totally repetitious except for the last
comment. So, how about putting "essential quilters library" in the subject
of the email and have at.Thanking you all ahead of time. If you want to
email me privately, please send to pepcory/gmail.com .

Have a great day-
Pepper Cory
on the coast of North Carolina where the weather is gorgeous



Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: essential quilters library
From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow/comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Nov 2010 12:40:42 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

You must include something by Carol Doak on foundation paper piecing!

Judy Grow


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: essential quilters library
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton/comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Nov 2010 12:23:14 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

A few essentials in my own personal library are:

All available state documentation books.
All available Uncoverings./
Books featuring specific styles and histories....ie. Amish, Hawaiian, /
British,/

The American Quilt - Kiracofe
Abstract Design in American Quilts - Holstein

Quilter's Complete Guide - Fons and Porter
Happy Endings - Mimi Dietrich
Quilting with Style - Marston/

I'll stop there knowing others will chime in.
This will not be a small collection!

jean



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: essential quilters library
From: Kittencat3/aol.com
Date: Sun, 21 Nov 2010 22:35:39 -0500 (EST)
X-Message-Number: 4
You must include something by Carol Doak on foundation paper piecing!

Judy Grow



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: essential quilters library
From: Kittencat3/aol.com

Averil Colby's books, plus Sarah Randles' article on the Tristan quilt in
Medieval Clothing and Textiles 5. Also, Dorothy Osler's book on North
Country quilts.

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Essential Quilters' Library
From: Ady Hirsch <adamroni/netvision.net.il>
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 11:55:26 +0200


A few recommendations:
Kathryn Berenson's Quilts of Provence; Annette Geros' Quilts, Fabric of
Society (on Australian quilts); Quilt Treasures of Great Britain; quilts
1700-2010 - hidden histories untold stories; and Asa Wettre - Old Swedish
Quilts. All the above will give you good coverage of quilting outside the US
An Obvious choice - Nelson and Houcks' Treeasury of American Quilts.
Other excellent sources - Quilts in a Material World (Winterthur
collections)- Linda Eaton; American Quiltsd in the Modern Age - Hanson and
Crewes; and Merikay Waldvogel's Soft Covers for Hard Times: Quiltmaking and
the Great Depression.
Ady in Israel



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: essential quilters library
From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilter/windstream.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 09:56:53 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Pepper, what a terrific opportunity you've been given! As another general
category, I would suggest "living with quilts". Some library patrons might
enjoy decorating advice for using quilts but might not actually have an
interest in making them. I'm thinking of titles such as Country Living
Country Quilts or, I think, one by Jean Wells... one by Ami Simms on
displaying & storing quilts, or Phyllis George's "Living with Quilts".

For the basic "how-to" category, I would suggest "The Quilter's Ultimate
Visual Guide" and Fons & Porters "Quilters Complete Guide".

Keep us posted. What fun.
Nancy Roberts
www.quiltnans.blogspot.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: essential quilters library
From: Mitzioakes/aol.com

I think something(s) that should be in any kind of 'quilting library'
would be some history of quilts and their makings and makers. I know I have
always been interested in this history and have learned a lot from the books
available. (i.e. Underground Railroad for one)...Would love to see your
final decision on filling this project. Good luck (and wish I could be there
to help.)
Mitzi from windy Vermont (but no snow yet!)


In a message dated 11/22/2010 9:56:21 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
aquilter/windstream.net writes:

Pepper, what a terrific opportunity you've been given! As another general
category, I would suggest "living with quilts". Some library patrons might
enjoy decorating advice for using quilts but might not actually have an
interest in making them. I'm thinking of titles such as Country Living
Country Quilts or, I think, one by Jean Wells... one by Ami Simms on
displaying & storing quilts, or Phyllis George's "Living with Quilts".

For the basic "how-to" category, I would suggest "The Quilter's Ultimate
Visual Guide" and Fons & Porters "Quilters Complete Guide".

Keep us posted. What fun.
Nancy Roberts
www.quiltnans.blogspot.com




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: essential quilter's library
From: "Maureen" <maureen/booksandoldlace.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 07:41:51 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

Hi Pepper,

I would consider a quilt reference category, and in that category /
include
Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns and her Encyclopedia of
Applique, Trestain's Dating Fabrics. Probably Hick's Black Threads and /
Fry's
Stitched from the Soul and Benberry's A Piece of My Soul, also Freeman /
and
Wahlman. I'm not aware of any Native American texts that would be local /
to
the eastern tribes.

Probably the quilt doc books from NC and surrounding Atlantic and /
Southern
states, and one on the Baltimore album quilts as they may be known or /
turn
up.

Barnes, Pender and Beyer for color.

Maybe Poster and Hopkins for rotary techniques?

Alex Anderson's hand quilting work and Hinson's too.

I'll let others comment on quick and easy pattern books that help people /
get
started- there's so many. I love books on stripes, bindings, special
techniques.

What a great idea! It's an easy way for the local quilt guild to get /
some
publicity and do a good deed for the community. I would bet that many /
guilds
have a library and could donate from their own collection. Be sure to /
ask
the library in advance if they'll keep the books for the collection as /
many
library friends' groups sell on Amazon and at booksales.

Maureen.
In Ashland, Oregon.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Need the input of this list, please.
From: Pepper Cory <pepcory/mail.clis.com>

Hello all,
I'm working with the local library to set up a good quilting /
section.They
have almost nothing right now. I thought there were at least four /
factors
that would determine which titles to stock. They are: quilt history, art
quilts, wearables, and accurate timeless how-to books. Other things to
consider: color photography, appeal to general crafters ( those folks /
who
might want to do a small quilt project), and titles slanted toward a
particular style (such as crazy quilts) or use (the A-Z of baby quilts). /
I
already have a start with the following books which I will be donating:





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: essential quilter's library
From: "Maureen" <maureen/booksandoldlace.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 07:45:01 -0800
X-Message-Number: 5

Adding in Clues in the Calico how could I forget.../
Also, what how-to videos or dvds are out there or is everything on /
YouTube
and ehow now?

Maureen

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Need the input of this list, please.
From: Pepper Cory <pepcory/mail.clis.com>


Hello all,
I'm working with the local library to set up a good quilting /
section.They
have almost nothing right now. I thought there were at least four /
factors
that would determine which titles to stock. They are: quilt history, art
quilts, wearables, and accurate timeless how-to books. Other things to
consider: color photography, appeal to general crafters ( those folks /
who
might want to do a small quilt project), and titles slanted toward a
particular style (such as crazy quilts) or use (the A-Z of baby quilts). /
I
already have a start with the following books which I will be donating:





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: essential quilters library
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeo/sbcglobal.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 09:47:55 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

I would nominate:
Jane Hall/ /The Experts/92 Guide to Foundation Piecing/94 --- /
because it has
how-to chapters, with small projects, by 14 different artists (including
Carol Doak) explaining their methods, and they do vary!

Jinny Beyer/ new book, /The Quilter/ Album of Patchwork /
Patterns/94 /96 a
great reference book for drafting and categorizing and identifying or /
just
shopping for over 4000 blocks

Jinny Beyer/ book about hand piecing

Sally Collins/92 book about precision machine piecing

All of Harriet Hargraves/92 books, including those about machine /
quilting,
/From Fiber to Fabric,/94 machine appliqu/E9, her new series /
(co-authored by her
daughter, Carrie) on quiltmaking instruction

Barbara Brackman/ /Clues in the Calico/94

Any of Barbara Brackman/ quilt history books

All of Judy Martin/ books, especially the one on Pieced Borders /
co-authored
by Marsha McCloskey

Nancy Johnson-Srebro/ books about rotary cutting

These are many of the reference books I dive for most frequently.

Barb

Barb Vlack
barb/barbvlack.com
I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research /
and
am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at:/A0 /
www.AlzQuilts.org/
For lectures and workshops, see www.findaquiltteacher.com/vlackb.html /




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Essential Quilters Library and Thanksgiving Wish
From: Wildemuth Susan <wildemuthsew/gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 06:18:23 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

This is a bit of a test -- I have switched posting to QHL with my
gmail address even though the yahoo address is still good (my yahoo
gave the digest folks the extra gook when the digest is posted). Let
me know offlist - if the digest still gets the extra gook when I use
my gmail address and I will reevaluate.

Clues in the Calico - BB
Encyclopedia Pieced Patterns - BB
Encyclopedia Applique Patterns - BB
Quilters Hall of Fame Book - QHF
History From the Heart: Quilt Paths Across Illinois - Elbert
Trestain's two Dating Fabrics books
Patchwork Souvenirs - Merikay and BB
Blanket Statements - AQSG
Pieces of Time - IIQSG
WW2 Quilts Sue Reich
Fons and Porter Book about the "how to" side of quilt - the name of
which escapes me right now - sorryarie Webster's book

I also want to wish everyone on the list a Happy Thanksgiving - be
safe out there if you have to be on the road or in the air.

Sue in Illinois


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Essential quilters' library
From: Margaret Keirstead <pkeirstead/mac.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 10:05:34 -0600
X-Message-Number: 8

I think you need Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt
Patterns and Encyclopedia of Applique. Both are available on Amazon.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Essential Quilter's library
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltn/comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 17:21:13 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------/_NextPart_000_0144_01CB8A69.AA45C750
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset/"iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Pepper,
Without a doubt, I would recommend Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia of /
Pieced Quilt patterns.
Also, I'm a huge fan of Judy Hopkins, "Around the Block"

I think a basic pattern book such as hers would be great to have.

I agree with Jean, as well:
The American Quilt - Kiracofe
(one of my all-time favorites)

Linda Heminway
NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: essential quilt library
From: Jan Drechsler <quiltdoc/gmail.com>


In my beginning quilt classes, the biggest first hurdle is choosing
fabric and the colors. So I suggest Joen Wolfrom's Color Magic, for
beginners and experienced quilter's.

I am drawing a blank...who wrote 'Your First Quilt book...or so it
should be?' Was it Carol Doak, or...?
I bought a copy and donated it to my library. It is also a great how
to for beginners book.

QHL will run up an imaginary bill of thousands for your library, Pepper!

Jan

Jan Drechsler
Guilford, VT


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Essential Quilter's library
From: "Barb" <barb.whitehead/roadrunner.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 18:11:09 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

And how about American Quilts by Robert Shaw? Barb in Maine
---



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: essential quilt library
From: LinusDonna/aol.com
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2010 07:21:25 EST
X-Message-Number: 2


--part1_1911dd.10c0f728.3a1d0bc5_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset/"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Re: essential quilt library

Thanks to all who donated suggestions to Pepper Cory for her library list.
I'm taking notes.

I'd also add
Linda V. Taylor's Ultimate Guide to Longarm Machine Quilting,
Karen McTavish's Art of McTavishing
and Diane Gaudynski's Quilt Savvy.

Happy Thanksgiving and bright blessings!

~Donna Laing
in sunny warm Bucks County PA
_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_
(http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)

--part1_1911dd.10c0f728.3a1d0bc5_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilting Books for the Public Library
From: Judy Knorr <jknorr/optonline.net>

Pepper,
I would definitely add Harriet Hargraves's Machine Quilting Book and a book on Hand quilting as most beginners look for information on those techniques. I would also consider a book or two on different borders for quilts.
Definitely add Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia of Quilt Blocks and her Encyclopedia of Applique Blocks.
Judy Knorr



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Essential Quilter's library
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltn/comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2010 08:44:12 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

How could I also have forgotten:

The book: Dating Fabrics.

It's in my town library and also on my shelves, so important.
Linda Heminway


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: A big Thank You for library advice and why it's important
From: Pepper Cory <pepcory/gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2010 09:02:34 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

--90e6ba61539c140cd10495b8d3bf
Content-Type: text/plain; charset/UTF-8

Hello all-I have cut-n-pasted-n-saved all of your thoughtful emails
regarding the quilters essential library and after meeting with the head
librarian after Christmas, we'll go over the list. Then compare it to what I
can donate and get donated (my local quilt guild doesn't know it yet but
they're in for a "donation" request) and proceed from there. I hadn't
thought of the 'living with quilts' category (from a decorating point of
view) but think that's a great idea. I re-discovered Living With Quilts by
Phyllis George at a second-hand book store and snatched it up last year.
Then promptly re-drafted one of the quilts and have it on my "to be made one
day" list.
I think I'll make this project my private charity. I love my local library.
My little town of Beaufort NC (4000 people) opened a new library last year.
It moved from a crowded yet cozy brick building in the historic district
downtown by the waterfront to a strip shopping center location 1 1/2 miles
inland. Although you'd think the move would have destroyed the ambiance,
instead, the new location (inside an old grocery store) has been wonderful.
Imagine ceilings 20 feet tall, with enormous quiet fans, the inside walls
painted a calming shade of light greyed aqua. Now there's lots of parking,
more computers, meeting rooms, a whole carpeted kids' area with a boat (a
real wooden boat!) "docked" so kids can crawl in and out. Plus the height of
the space can accommodate art like the display of mobiles now in place. And
there's animal programs too. Here's a link to the reading dogs program
http://carteret.cpclib.org/READ_dogs.htm .
Thank you for your advice and encouragement. Now to get crackin' on that
list of books!
Am feeling super-thankful this year. Today is my 25th wedding anniversary
and my husband will get an unprecedented three days off this year for
Thanksgiving beginning today at 1 PM. True to our nature, I ordered a book
for him on how to build 25 variations on a plywood boat to mark the
occasion. He hasn't done anything yet but then again, it's only 9 AM...
I am smiling as I write this
Cheers from the beautiful coast of North Carolina
Pepper


--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Thank you and more info on the library project
From: Pepper Cory <pepcory/mail.clis.com>

Hello all-I have cut-n-pasted-n-saved all of your thoughtful emails
regarding the quilters essential library and after meeting with the head
librarian after Christmas, we'll go over the list. Then compare it to what I
can donate and get donated (my local quilt guild doesn't know it yet but
they're in for a "donation" request) and proceed from there. I hadn't
thought of the 'living with quilts' category (from a decorating point of
view) but think that's a great idea. I re-discovered Living With Quilts by
Phyllis George at a second-hand book store and snatched it up last year.
Then promptly re-drafted one of the quilts and have it on my "to be made one
day" list.
I think I'll make this project my private charity. I love my local library.
My little town of Beaufort NC (4000 people) opened a new library last year.
It moved from a crowded yet cozy brick building in the historic district
downtown by the waterfront to a strip shopping center location 1 1/2 miles
inland. Although you'd think the move would have destroyed the ambiance,
instead, the new location (inside an old grocery store) has been wonderful.
Imagine ceilings 20 feet tall, with enormous quiet fans, the inside walls
painted a calming shade of light greyed aqua. Now there's lots of parking,
more computers, meeting rooms, a whole carpeted kids' area with a boat (a
real wooden boat!) "docked" so kids can crawl in and out. Plus the height of
the space can accommodate art like the display of mobiles now in place. And
there's animal programs too. Here's a link to the reading dogs program
http://carteret.cpclib.org/READ_dogs.htm .
Thank you all for your advice and encouragement. Now to get crackin' on that
list of books!
Am feeling super-thankful this year. Today is my 25th wedding anniversary
and my husband will get an unprecedented three days off this year for
Thanksgiving beginning today at 1 PM. True to our nature, I ordered a book
for him on how to build 25 variations on a plywood boat to mark the
occasion. He hasn't done anything yet but then again, it's only 9 AM...
I am smiling as I write this
Cheers from the beautiful coast of North Carolina
Pepper


--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--0016364d1e11d6ff9a0495b8d8f3--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Thank you and more info on the library project
F
Happy 25th......hope you can celebrate your 55th (like we just did) and
still be as happy as we are today!!!
Mitzi (and Bill) from Vermont.....
Have enjoyed all the additions to the library of yours (got a bit
surprised when i realized I have most of those recommended sitting right here in my
sewing room!!!!)


In a message dated 11/23/2010 9:04:27 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
pepcory/mail.clis.com writes:

Hello all-I have cut-n-pasted-n-saved all of your thoughtful emails
regarding the quilters essential library and after meeting with the head
librarian after Christmas, we'll go over the list. Then compare it to what
I
can donate and get donated (my local quilt guild doesn't know it yet but
they're in for a "donation" request) and proceed from there. I hadn't
thought of the 'living with quilts' category (from a decorating point of
view) but think that's a great idea. I re-discovered Living With Quilts by
Phyllis George at a second-hand book store and snatched it up last year.
Then promptly re-drafted one of the quilts and have it on my "to be made
one
day" list.
I think I'll make this project my private charity. I love my local library.
My little town of Beaufort NC (4000 people) opened a new library last
year.
It moved from a crowded yet cozy brick building in the historic district
downtown by the waterfront to a strip shopping center location 1 1/2 miles
inland. Although you'd think the move would have destroyed the ambiance,
instead, the new location (inside an old grocery store) has been wonderful.
Imagine ceilings 20 feet tall, with enormous quiet fans, the inside walls
painted a calming shade of light greyed aqua. Now there's lots of parking,
more computers, meeting rooms, a whole carpeted kids' area with a boat (a
real wooden boat!) "docked" so kids can crawl in and out. Plus the height
of
the space can accommodate art like the display of mobiles now in place. And
there's animal programs too. Here's a link to the reading dogs program
http://carteret.cpclib.org/READ_dogs.htm .
Thank you all for your advice and encouragement. Now to get crackin' on
that
list of books!
Am feeling super-thankful this year. Today is my 25th wedding anniversary
and my husband will get an unprecedented three days off this year for
Thanksgiving beginning today at 1 PM. True to our nature, I ordered a book
for him on how to build 25 variations on a plywood boat to mark the
occasion. He hasn't done anything yet but then again, it's only 9 AM...
I am smiling as I write this
Cheers from the beautiful coast of North Carolina
Pepper


--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Websi

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: has anyone been to manhattan shows?
From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex/hughes.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2010 08:11:39 -0800
X-Message-Number: 8

Hi All,

If you have seen either or both of the Quilt Shows in Manhattan, each
organized by the American Folk Art Museum:

MASTERWORKS at the 53rd Street Museum
or
SUPER STARS at the Lincoln Square branch

And are willing to give me your (brief) personal "reviews," please e-mail me
directly at quiltcomplex/hughes.net

Thanks!
Julie Silber




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Pepper's library project
From: JAN MASENTHIN <quiltsrme/sbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2010 14:01:16 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 9

I changed my format to plain text, hoping that keeps out all of the garbage/
. I wanted to share with you that one of the guilds I belong to honors the/
memory of each guild member upon their passing by donating a quilt book to/
the local library. It's even in our by-laws. We try to choose a book that /
somewhat represents the deceased quilter.

Jan Masenthin

/A0