Subject: Lynn's calico From: C St Lawrence <castle99centurylink.net> Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2011 08:58:58 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Lynn. It's a drive for you, but Mary Jo's in Gastonia has gingham in 100% calico. But I also have a fair number of scraps from the late 19th in navy and white gingham that I keep for restoring. Please let me know if you would like me to send some over the mountain. I just want you to kno9w that I often think about your presentation on palampores. So thanks for that. Candy St. Lawrence, castle99centurylink.net .

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Subject: Out of Print Uncoverings Articles From: "Louise" <ltiemannstny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2011 08:10:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello, I am searching for some articles from some OOP Uncoverings - I have checked the AQSG site - no luck, even tried ebay - still out of luck. Please let me know if anyone can help out. Cheers, Louise

Virginia Gunn, Crazy Quilts and Outline Quilts: Popular Responses to the Decorative Art/Art Needlework Movement, 1876-1893, Uncoverings, Vol. 5

Virginia Gunn, Victorian Silk Template Patchwork in American Periodicals, 1850-1875, Uncoverings, Vol. 4

Virginia Gunn, Yo-Yo or Bed-of-Roses Quilts: Nineteenth Century Origins, Uncoverings, Vol. 8

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Subject: coverlets and quilts From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2011 11:04:22 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

There was a discussion some time ago about woven coverlet patterns and their possible influence on quilting. I can't find hide nor hair of it now. :) :) Does anyone remember that discussion and what the concensus was? Didwoven coverletsinfluence quilt patterns or did theyevolve simultaneously? Thanks for any comments you can offer. Mary Anne

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 23, 2011 From: palamporeaol.com Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2011 15:41:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

----------MB_8CD8A1E2863C4BD_9C8_9E311_Webmail-m104.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Candy, you are a dear. I am fine. I think I am going to use a pink linen/cotton gingham. But I am glad to know that 100% cotton gingham does exist. This is a fun little quilt that would probably date to about 1850. I bought it several years ago on the advice of Barbara Brackman. It is a yellow,blue, red and white star pattern with a green border on the front. It wasprobably a signature quilt. Then the back of the quilt is a multitude offabrics in an irregular 9 patch. It has several checks and plaids, but only one gingham. That is a butterscotch color that frames 4 - 4patch. It isvery quirky. I think it is a compiled quilt done by a group. Barbara saidthat it reminded her of Abolishionist Fund Raiser quilts. Didn't say itWAS one, but reminded her of them. Anyway...........I am using this as anexample of "how" people can re-create an 1850's/ Pre-CW quilt using present day fabrics. That is why I wanted a gingham that is still being produced. I am glad you found my palampore presentation interesting. I just love theIndian influenced textiles. It was great fun going to France, the Netherlands and England since that lecture and seeing even MORE palampores. I went on the Deb Roberts Tours. Thanks again for your sweet offer! I can get to G-Street in DC as quickly as I can get to Jo-Ann's outside ofCharlotte. My son lives in the DC area so when I visit him I usually takeswatches and go crazy! Take care............ Lynn

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Subject: Re: Out of Print Uncoverings Articles From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2011 15:18:43 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

Please don't forget you can request individual articles through the Interlibrary Loan department at your local library, usually for no cost. Libraries have taken to sending the articles by email right to your own box. My local library has the three volumes you are looking for. Your library is hooked up the gigantic database in the sky: Worldcat.org. where they can find holdings of your title nearby. Most periodicals don't circulate but the articles can be copied and sent.

(Ms) Arden Shelton, (retired librarian) Multnomah County Library Portland, OR

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From: Louise <ltiemannstny.rr.com> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Mon, January 24, 2011 5:10:11 AM Subject: [qhl] Out of Print Uncoverings Articles

Hello, I am searching for some articles from some OOP Uncoverings - I have checked the AQSG site - no luck, even tried ebay - still out of luck. Please let me know if anyone can help out. Cheers, Louise

Virginia Gunn, Crazy Quilts and Outline Quilts: Popular Responses to the Decorative Art/Art Needlework Movement, 1876-1893, Uncoverings, Vol. 5

Virginia Gunn, Victorian Silk Template Patchwork in American Periodicals, 1850-1875, Uncoverings, Vol. 4

Virginia Gunn, Yo-Yo or Bed-of-Roses Quilts: Nineteenth Century Origins, Uncoverings, Vol. 8 --- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: junkoramacomcast.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1813068Slyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: coverlets and quilts From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2011 23:39:05 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 5

Mary Anne,

 I was part of a recent discussion on QHL about quilts and coverlets.I think that it went back and forth. I have a coverlet piece with an oak leaf pattern and the words "oak leaf". And I saved pictures of an early quilt, pre 1850, that was a perfect copy of an overshot coverlet. So I think early and even today, the jaguar and monkey quilt,imitation crossed both ways.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: coverlets and quilts From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2011 8:28:06 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

I recently acquired a very old Marseilles spread, sold as a "white quilt" for a song. When I spread it out, I was amazed at the patterns it incorporates, both quilting and top design patterns.

And looking through some old and reproduction molds for springerle cookies before Christmas, I had the same feeling. We who live in an age when patterns are a lively business and where communication makes pattern exchanges simple often forget that originally, patterns were created from the encountered world and were everywhere. For ante-bellum Americans, that tended to bethe worlds of the nature, church, and courthouse or public civil forum. (Has anyone else ever sat in church and paid more attention to the rose window than to the sermon?)

It was still a fairly cohesive society, familiar through church, reading, or listening to stories of the great myths of European civilization and the symbols that attached to them. In a world of illiteracy, symbols acquired powerful meanings (and I'm not talking about the sentimentalized versions preserved by the Victorians). And given the nature of symbols, the work of abstraction had already been done. These proved useful in many media and turned up in even the most meagre pantry or sewing box.

All of this is simply to say, tracing patterns is a far more complicated process than one thinks when she enters upon it, for there are so many possible sources. Without records, even hearsay records, or without an intact body of community textiles and other wares, we skate on thin ice, to coin a phrase :). Believe me, l could tell you stories about that!

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Fans pattern From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2011 15:13:00 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Hiall- NYC calmer now that all the antique shows and auctions and eventsare over, except for the Winter Show, where million dollar price tags are scattered around the floor. Other showshad somewhatless price-y material. The quilt world got a shot in the arm (what DOES that expression mean,anyway?!) from the exciting sale of a unique and fascinating quiltof stars and inked, stuffed figural drawings at $60,000 plus. I will post a couple of snaps on eboard. It has a solid provenance about the painter who did the drawings on it, and of course the stars were pieced of yummy early fabrics. Also sold was a compelling flag-like graphic where large a star-filled blue square was centered, not in the corner, of a red and white stripedfield, quite arrestring.. Don't know how much it sold for.

I am wondering if anyone can me when the pieced FAN quilt block may have first appeared? I have 19th and 20th c examples, most of mine seem to be fromthe second half of the 19th c, not earlier.  Also, when dpo you think the star pattern first came into use in the U.S.? i see so many early quilts pieced in a star variation it's almost like there was no other pattern done in the late 18th-early 19th c. (except for maybe a chain or square patch variation) And, has anyone calculated how many different star variations there might be (before computer designing changed everything)? I would sure appreciate any guidance and facts; All my reference books are in the shop, and I am home watching big fat snowflakes descend,which are supposed to transform into sleet tomorrow.  thanks    Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street,5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com --0-2004426114-1295997180=:75466--

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Subject: RE: Fans pattern From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2011 15:24:47 +1100 X-Message-Number: 3

 Laura Fisher asked: when do you think the star pattern first came into use in the U.S.?

This is a question that is burning a hole in my brain at the moment - the next quilt study group meeting here in Melbourne on 27 February is on this very subject and I am preparing notes for my presentation. During my research on the symbolism of stars in general I have found that there are certain stars, especially tattooed stars, that have some very odd connotations.

So please I would like to be included in any information about the star pattern.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: tattooed stars? From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2011 10:24:13 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

My interest was piqued when I saw the term tattooed stars. have not heard of it before and would like to know more??? Thanks, Marcia Kaylakie, chilly, clear Austin, TX

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Subject: cotton ginghams From: palamporeaol.com Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2011 11:41:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Pilar who owns THE quilt shop in Chile was very sweet to write and say that Robert Kaufman has 100% cotton ginghams. Here is their site.

http://www.robertkaufman.com/fabrics/carolina_gingham/

I could never find the "butterscotch" color gingham so I used a pink linen/cotton gingham. I think it will be just fine. I am reproducing an 1850'scrib quilt using fabrics that can be found TODAY. That is a trick. I havefound that many of the reproduction fabrics are biege/yellowed to represent "age". I want to represent NEW. Also many of the fabrics are BROWN. Iknow that brown was an often used color due to availablity of dyes and the nature of natural dyes, but there were also some fabulous BRIGHT colorsbeing used. This little quilt is full of orange, red, pink, blue, green,yellow and some brown. It has been a fun "study" for me. I hope to turnit into a class.

Thanks for the offers of fabrics from all over the place. What a group!!!

Lynn in New Bern, NC where it is in the 50's after a weekend of snow

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Subject: Re: cotton ginghams From: Pat <parsnips1verizon.net> Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2011 11:37:18 -0600 (CST) X-Message-Number: 3

Lynn, Check out www.farmhousefabrics.com She caters mostly to heirloom and really nice children's fabrics, most of which are natural fiber. She has a great selection of ginghams. HTH, Pat Roth

Jan 26, 2011 11:42:58 AM, qhllyris.quiltropolis.com wrote:

Pilar who owns THE quilt shop in Chile was very sweet to write and say that Robert Kaufman has 100% cotton ginghams. Here is their site.

http://www.robertkaufman.com/fabrics/carolina_gingham/

I could never find the "butterscotch" color gingham so I used a pink linen/cotton gingham. I think it will be just fine. I am reproducing an 1850's crib quilt using fabrics that can be found TODAY. That is a trick. I have found that many of the reproduction fabrics are biege/yellowed to represent "age". I want to represent NEW. Also many of the fabrics are BROWN. I know that brown was an often used color due to availablity of dyes and the nature of natural dyes, but there were also some fabulous BRIGHT colors being used. This little quilt is full of orange, red, pink, blue, green, yellow and some brown. It has been a fun "study" for me. I hope to turn it into a class.

Thanks for the offers of fabrics from all over the place. What a group!!!

Lynn in New Bern, NC where it is in the 50's after a weekend of snow

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Subject: Re: coverlets and quilts From: textiqueaol.com Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2011 13:09:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I agree that quilts were made to replicate coverlet patterns and vice versa. The technology to weave float-patterns, overshots, has been with us for centuries. The earliest known dated-in-the-weave overshot recorded currently in the U. S. was made in 1771 and is in the collection National Museum of the AmericanCoverlet in Bedford, PA. I haven't seen it yet so I don't know if it was woven in the U. S. Without looking, I think Ican say there are several that can be dated earlier than 1771 by provenance, but I'll stick with the woven-in date. 

Overshots are comprised of repeating groups of the same or alternating geometric patterns. The patterns can repeat within the same line or alternate with another pattern within the same line. Some of them, with very little stretch of the imagination, look much like a 'Robbing Peter to Pay Paul' quilt pattern. I have oftenwondered if the idea for the repeating pattern in American quilts, overall stars as an example, came from this basic idea on overshots. Well, it is much easier to carry a sewing bag of fabric rather than a whole loom :-) See examples at Trish Herr's website:http://www.theherrsantiques.com/  Barbara Woodford's site: http://www.historic-american.com/WovenCoverlets.html  or Laura Fisher's site but she still seems to be having problems with it.

The most interesting example of cross-over patterning I've seen recentlyis pictured at Bill Volkening's blog. The 1842 Hexagon is featured under the titles "Excavation Underway" and "Worth Rescuing". http://www.billvolckening.com Bill also posted pictures on the AQSG2 list under photos. It is the 1stone. I would not get terribly excited about the 8-pointed stars in each corner, if they were alone. However, when used in the sameborder as that specific eagle on a curved stem, the crested bird on a stem and the two crows in opposing attitudes, I am convinced this maker saw a woven fancy Jacquard and copied the design elements. Even the use of block letters (in context) for theinitials and the date are in line with this conclusion. It speaks PA tome. I sent examples of the design elements from the coverlets to Bill and he posted those to AQSG2 as well. I can post to the e-board if y'all are interested. To Bill: very good rescue, my friend. What a good eye youhave!

Barbara Woodford has a woven coverlet that looks like a quilt. I hope she'll post a picture on the e-board. It is a great fractal that sent my weaving friends right to their looms.

These, along with the ones Polly mentioned will have to be in my dream exhibit of coverlets that look like quilts and quilts that look like coverlets - with a much better title of course. I've been given a venue - but Blosser quilts come first. Health issues prevent me from traveling too much.

Will I see any of you at the IQSC Conference coming up?

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Minnesota quilt history book From: Wildemuth Susan <wildemuthsewgmail.com> Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2011 09:31:25 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

I need the e-mail of the person(s) or the name of the people to contact about the Minnesota quilt history book.

Please e-mail me off-list if you know who that would be.

Thanking you in advance,

Sue Wildemuth in Illinois

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Subject: coverlets, website, etc From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2011 10:28:25 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Hi all- 19" of snow here in Central Park, 1/2 block from my apt, so I have got to find my knee high boots and venture out with a camera.  About my website, my new web host assures me something will be up andaccessible within the next 24 hours, same address www.laurafisherquilts.com, new home page and expanded info, samecategories,Once that happensI will have to upload all the new things I want viewers to see and remove thesold ones. It's been more than a month of inaccessibility, and of course sincepractically all my inventorydata is nowfiled on the site back office function, instread of on paper like in olden days where you can justopen a drawer and find stuff,retrieving info has of course been almost impossible since the site could not open. Am I too old fashioned?. Do you think it'shad somany problems because -- likeamazon or google's that tracks your thoughts,or Halthe computer in2001 -- it senses my less- than-enthusiastic embrace of technology?!I feel like I have been living in a modern horror movie, fighting and not winning against technology. Let'ssee what happens, Apologies in advance if info and images may not match (new guy claimsproblems withold guy'sdata base, and old guy is acollege professor of computers yet- oy, oy, oy)  Re coverlets, I have had some great tricky looking quilts that look justlike overshot or double cloth geometric coverlets -they arewhite squares on an indigo or red background.I even have two huge crocheted bedspreads in inventory right now in indigo and white that copy coverlet patterns- one is stars like a multi harness loom, the other geometric like an overshot or a nine patch or chain variation quilt; I can't imagine making them -both are really precise, all hand work, no looms or draw boys to help out.I can email photos to anyone interested if they are not on my site yet, or- I'll put them on eboard! (p.s. my recent eboard postings are messed up technologically also! - a little X appears in a box, but there really arephotos, if you click on the title).  Though overshots and somedouble cloths aregeometric weaves,there is an optical illusion effect withmany designs (and quilt patterns too)so that from a distance they look curvalinear. I havealso had some less common pictorial quiltspieced all in squares thatlooked like a replication of a lion or an eagle corner block. I think there is an Orr pattern of pieced squares as full blown roses that to me resembles the 4- blossomfloral motifs seen in PA biederwand coverlets.  Laura   Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street,5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com --0-751653208-1296152905=:99512--

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Subject: Central Park and website From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2011 22:18:08 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

Well the park was glorious, nothing quilt related, just beautiful beautifulbroad expanses of fresh clean great snow, people cross country skiing, sledding, playing. Interestingly all the kids seemed to be with their hispanicor carribean nannies, not their momsor dads - even though it was an announced'snow' day on the news with the suggestion that everyone take the day off in NYC.  My website is partially started but with a host of problems, so I'll let you know whenall is corrected and I can start an on line lifeagain.Call or email if you need me. Going to the gift show over the weekend to seewhat's new in reproduction mass produced quilts and hooked rugs.  Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street,5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com --0-1408164329-1296195488=:50135--

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Subject: Blue quilting lines that won't wash out From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 18:34:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I got the following e-mail from a friend. Does anyone have a positive answer I can send to her? Judy Grow

> Dear Judy, > I have a friend who just completed one of the old kit applique quilts. > She washed the blocks to get rid of the blue stamped quilting lines, and > they didn't go away... any suggestions?

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Subject: Re: Blue quilting lines that won't wash out From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 18:38:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Maybe the only encouraging thing you can say to the woman is that the blue lines are indicative of the history of the piece, showing that it is a kit. Since kits have an important place in the first quilt revival of the 20th century, she should try to preserve the marks, as well as the kit name, number, and manufacturer on a back label.

And no...the blue marks probably won't wash out.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Blue quilting lines that won't wash out From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 18:41:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks Xenia. I've sent your answer on.

Judy

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Subject: how to get back on eboard From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 14:15:08 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

It has been so long since I have so very easily posted photos on e- board and now it seems to be beyond me. The years that I was taking care of my husband and followed his disease to his death just took every bit of my time so that I could not do or think of any thing else. It is like I am starting all over again as far as technology goes. And I agree with Laura. It only takes a few years for technology to change.

Would someone please email me privately at <haqgalenalink.net> and set me straight on posting to e-board again.Thanks Barbara Woodford