Subject: phrase question From: Laurel Horton <laurel@kalmiaresearch.net> Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2011 09:01:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Jan,

I checked the *Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore*, specifically the two (of seven) volumes of "popular beliefs." (A paper on references to quilts in this collection appeared in *Uncoverings 1987.) *The various items related to naming corners (or bedposts)*, *collected in NC the early 20th century, all seem to point toward identifying a future husband. Comparative references to published sources cite collections from SC, KY, TN, MS, NY, IL, TX, NE, ID, New England, and the Ozarks.

One variant (#4353) includes a citation for this item: "If you are the first one to sleep under a new quilt, name the corners of the room, etc.," collected in southeastern Illinois by Lelah Allison, and published in 1950.

Laurel Horton

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Subject: RE: One step forward and two steps backward - UGRR strikes again From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011 10:11:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Wow that's about ten steps backward. I'm appalled. She is speaking on behalf of the North Carolina Humanities Council apparently -- the PA Humanities Council would NEVER allow that. Plus she is saying that people are saying the UGRR is a myth...she's a bit confused. And lastly, oh dear lord, she is perpetuating the Jocko myth. It's a crying shame. Very very sad.

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Subject: RE: One step forward and two steps backward - UGRR strikes again From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011 10:17:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I wanted to add this link:

http://www.nchumanities.org/programs/road-scholars

http://www.nchumanities.org/programs/road-scholars/stories-underground-railr oad

and stress that these programs are frequently supported by the NEH thru these councils (I am a Commonwealth speaker for the PA Humanities Council). State funding is also a part of it, but less so these days. Those of us who do this are compensated for our time through the councils -- we don't do it for free. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: phrase question From: textique@aol.com Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011 11:06:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Thank you Laurel. I'll post this information to the Victorian List.

Jan

...related to naming corners (or bedposts)*, *collected in NC the early 20= th

century, all seem to point toward identifying a future husband.

One variant (#4353) includes a citation for this item: "If you are the fir= st

one to sleep under a new quilt, name the corners of the room, etc.,"

collected in southeastern Illinois by Lelah Allison, and published in 1950= .

Laurel Horton

 

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Subject: RE: One step forward and two steps backward - UGRR strikes again From: quiltnsharron@charter.net Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011 11:43:39 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 5

I may be just as upset by the fact that it appeared on the AQS Facebook page. It never ends.

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Thu, Feb 10, 2011 at 10:48 PM, suereich@charter.net wrote:

> It's February and people just don't want to give up the myth.=C2=A0 The bel= ow link was presented on the AQS Facebook page and titled with "Excellent piece on the historical significance of quilt designs."

 http://www2.morganton.com/news/2011/feb/10/wpcc-speaker-relates-slave-journ= eys-freedom-ar-769408/ <http://www2.morganton.com/news/2011/feb/10/wpcc-speaker-relates-slave-jour= neys-freedom-ar-769408/> =C2=A0 <http://www2.morganton.com/news/2011/feb/10/wpcc-speaker-relates-slave-jour= neys-freedom-ar-769408/>

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut

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Subject: One step forward, two steps back - important message from AQS From: suereich@charter.net Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011 15:12:43 -0500

Just received a post from AQS "A non-quilter on staff posted that link and wrote the caption about the UGGR article. It=E2=80=99s been pulled, and we=E2=80=99re working on a retr= action statement and a process to ensure it doesn=E2=80=99t happen again."

Thank you, AQS, for your conscientious and immediate attention to this misstep. It is inevitable during the month of February we are called upon once again to address this issue. The story is charming and people just do not THINK beyond the story and question it. If we could be ever given one shred of evidence......but when presenting history, a charming myth can so easily win the day.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

------=_Part_978507_782884617.1297455163546--

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Subject: RE: One step forward, two steps back - important message from AQS From: quiltnsharron@charter.net Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011

Now that makes sense! I couldn't imagine how AQS could have knowingly posted that article. Thank you for letting us know. Now if you could make the myth go away.

Warm regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Fri, Feb 11, 2011 at 2:12 PM, suereich@charter.net wrote:

> Just received a post from AQS "A non-quilter on staff posted that link and wrote the caption about the UGGR article. It=E2=80=99s been pulled, and we=E2=80=99re working on a retr= action statement and a process to ensure it doesn=E2=80=99t happen again."

Thank you, AQS, for your conscientious and immediate attention to this misstep.=C2=A0 It is inevitable during the month of February we are called=  upon once again to address this issue.=C2=A0 The story is charming and peop= le just do not THINK beyond the story and question it.=C2=A0 If we could be ev= er given one shred of evidence......but when presenting history, a charming myth can so easily win the day.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut

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Subject: Book Sighting From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011 19:15:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Just wanted to let everyone know that I saw Kathryn Berenson's GORGEOUS book, "Quilts of Provence, The Art and Craft of French Quiltmaking," a $45.00 book, for $5.99 at my local Borders. Hardcover with dust jacket, primo condition.

I bought it -- again. How could I not?

Judy Grow

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Subject: AQS snafu From: Andi <areynolds220@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2011 03:54:57 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Thanks to Sue Reich for helping get the word out about the slip-up here at AQS. It not only takes a village, but also special individuals, and she's one.

As for dispelling the UGRR myth, well, there is now one more educated person in the world, and that's the guy whose ears I pinned back about this snafu.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: naming corners From: Laurel Horton <laurel@kalmiaresearch.net> Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011 10:44:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Jan,

I checked the *Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore*, specifically the two (of seven) volumes of "popular beliefs." (A paper on references to quilts in this collection appeared in *Uncoverings 1987.) *The various items related to naming corners (or bedposts)*, *collected in NC the early 20th century, all seem to point toward identifying a future husband. Comparative references to published sources cite collections from SC, KY, TN, MS, NY, IL, TX, NE, ID, New England, and the Ozarks.

One variant (#4353) includes a citation for this item: "If you are the first one to sleep under a new quilt, name the corners of the room, etc.," collected in southeastern Illinois by Lelah Allison, and published in 1950.

Laurel Horton

--0016e659ffa29393c8049c0392af--

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Subject: Re Humanities Councils and their affiliation with perpetuation of the HIPV myth From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowel@msu.edu> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2011 08:21:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Sorry - Pennsylvania Humanities Council helped underwrite Safe Harbors aired on Public Broadcasting. http://www.wqln.org/main/television/original%20productions/Safe%20Harbor/Film/Credits.htm

Raymond Dobard was a consultant to the film, excerpts of an interview are included.

See also one of the educational activities for youth: http://www.wqln.org/main/television/original%20productions/Safe%20Harbor/Teachers/Activities/MakeTrunk.htm

Not only was the show aired but the materials live on through their online presence.

Thus, unwittingly, PA Humanities Council has helped perpetuate the myth through their sponsorship; Public Broadcasting did the same when it aired the program.

Marsha MacDowell (who has been also documenting the witting or unwitting authoritative endorsers of the myth ever since the myth suddenly was generated)

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Subject: MYTH From: marlobs@bellsouth.net Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2011 14:33:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I am not denying the need to debunk UGRR or any other quilt related myths. The unfortunate side effect of the ongoing discussions is the growing number of persons I've encountered who do not understand that it is the claim re: the use of quilt patterns that is being challenged. They've translated them into the belief that the existence of the "Underground Railroad" is a myth. Many doubt that some of the escapes were even possible and, because the law of the land prohibited teaching the enslaved to read and write, documentation is sparse.

While it is an admitted stretch, I'm justifying this posting as "quilt related" because in the mid-1990s, I made a wearable quilt (coat), "Celebration of Womanhood" , which includes transferred photos and quotes of admired women. Ellen Craft is one of them.

She and her husband, William, - both enslaved - escaped from a Macon, GA plantation in 1848 and went to Philadelphia, PA via steamship and first class trains. With funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, The University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill) has released an electronic version of the entire book detailing their escape, "Running a Thousand Miles to Freedom", which was written by William Craft in 1860. I want to share this remarkable story of ingenuity, courage, and intrigue. I invite you to print it out to read as you have time. Start at page 27 for the details of the plan and its amazing execution. The Crafts even spent a night in the "best hotel, which John C. Calhoun, and all the other great southern fire-eating statesmen, made their head-quarters while in Charleston" before leaving for Wilmington, NC the next day. http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/craft/craft.html

After their great-grandson, Herbert A. DeCosta, Jr. - a Charleston (SC) architect/historic preservation contractor and friend for more than five decades - died in December 2008, his widow donated his family papers to the College of Charleston's Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture. http://blogs.cofc.edu/averyarchives/?p=3D134

Marlene

Marlene L. O'Bryant-Seabrook, Ph.D. Educator, Lecturer, Fiber Artist E-Mail: marlobs@bellsouth.net URL: www.MarleneOBryantSeabrook.com

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Subject: Monterey airport From: Alice Kinsler <alicekinsler@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2011 17:45:43 -0800 X-Message-Number: 5

I am remiss in not responding to this sooner...our Monterey "International" airport does have exhibit space and in fact I have been a curator for an exhibition of "Against The Odds: Monterey County Women" that is now a permanent exhibition. A signature quilt was part of that exhibition, but for obvious reasons, could not be included as a permanent part of the exhibit. The primary curator, Ilene Tuttle, is an extraordinary woman with her breadth and scope of experience and connections for incredibly creative exhibits in small spaces in the mezzanine and upper floors of this regional airport. If you happen to breeze through our locale, it will be delightful, no matter the topic. Alice in Carmel Valley CA

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Subject: Fwd: MYTH From: textique@aol.com Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2011 21:41:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Marlene,

Thank you for posting this wonderful record. I never fail to see the amaz= ing courage involved in any of the accounts I've read of slaves escaping to freedom.

You must be aware that the existence of the UGRR was questioned by many -= wrongly, of course - well before the arrival of the quilt code controvery.

Jan Thomas

I am not denying the need to debunk UGRR or any other quilt related myths.= The

unfortunate side effect of the ongoing discussions is the growing number= of

persons I've encountered who do not understand that it is the claim re: th= e use

of quilt patterns that is being challenged. They've translated them into= the

belief that the existence of the "Underground Railroad" is a myth. Many= doubt

that some of the escapes were even possible and, because the law of the la= nd

prohibited teaching the enslaved to read and write, documentation is spars= e.

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Subject: The Underground Railroad in Connecticut and related quilts From: suereich@charter.net Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 00:36:30 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

In Connecticut, we did document quilts made by families known to be part of the Connecticut's UGRR. You can view them for yourself on the Quilt Index. The families involved were all Quakers living in New Milford and Sherman, CT and the Quaker Hill section of Pawling, NY. Many members of the family are buried in the Quaker cemetery on Rt. 7 in New Milford. On the Quilt Index, check under Connecticut, numbers 2659, 2689-2708. Quite a few of them are also published in "Quilts and Quiltmakers."

In 1997, I was asked to participate in the project featured on the web site of Museum of Connecticut History. We were challenged design a quilt block to represent an authenticated UGRR site in Connecticut. My assignment was the Francis Gillette House, Bloomfield, CT. (See the links below) The result was a four panel quilt now hanging in the Museum. Each panel has its own case. If you want to present quilts and the UGRR, something like this is based on legitimate historical data.

Excerpt from the web site: "In 1995, the Connecticut General Assembly authorized the designation of some forty public and private historic properties to form a network which would convey the dramatic and important story of Connecticut's African-American experience - the Connecticut Freedom Trail. Included are historic properties which have been deemed worthy for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places, National Register of Historic Landmarks and the Connecticut State Register of Historic Places. Among the gravesites, monuments, homes and other structures included are sites associated with the Underground Railroad, the Amistad Case, and such notable persons as Paul Robeson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Prudence Crandall.

In 1997, a grass roots citizens group of interested volunteers from every corner of the State came together to form the Freedom Trail Planning Committee. They dedicated their time and efforts to creating a lasting tribute to the Connecticut Freedom Trail through one of the most traditional of American art forms - quilting. Four quilts, representing each region of Connecticut, were completed in 1998."

http://www.museumofcthistory.org/freedom.asp

http://www.museumofcthistory.org/fqNC.asp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Francis_Gillette_House.JPG

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Yarn Bombing From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2011 22:09:31 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

Just back from our first Jazz Cruise where I learned about YARN BOMBING from a British gentleman on the cruise. He told me about it after he saw me sitting there and stitching on the small quilt I took along to work on.

Or read their blog-- http://yarnbombing.com/. Some call it "stitching graffiti". Take a look at the marvelous photos here http://tinyurl.com/5wff3d5. It's a hoot and is spreading around the world!!

I thought I was preparing a doll quilt to embroider while on the trip, but when once I started stitching on the ship, I realized it was really meant to be a small signature quilt for the musicians to sign! I even got Freddy Cole --Nat King Cole's brother-- and George Wien --founder of the Newport Jazz Festival-- to sign it, plus all but 2 of the female musicians and/or singers including Janice Siegel who was there with her quartet. She is also still singing with the original Manhattan Transfer group --going on 31 years now, one of my all-time favorites groups. She was intrigued with the idea of a signature quilt.

I also saw and heard Nnenna Freelon perform for the first time. Yes, you read right. It's spelled Nnenna. If you like jazz at all, you may have already heard of her. I haven't kept up with current jazz artists so she was new to me. WOW! Just google her and see some of her performances on YouTube. She is incredible and has been nominated for 6 Grammys. When she signed my little quilt she exclaimed, "Oh, a quilt! Don't some people make quilts out of someone's clothes? My sister and I want to do something with our Mama's clothes and we don't want to just give them to Goodwill. Maybe we could make a quilt!"

I told her I would be happy to connect her with someone who could help her get such a quilt made and that I could also help her document any quilts her mother or grandmother had made. Her eyes lit up and she asked if I had a card. I did!

I also shared with almost a dozen women on the cruise about Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi, the Women of Color Quilt Network, Cuesta Benberry and Kyra Hicks.

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: A few books for sale From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie@stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 11:19:50 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

An elderly war hero I know (spent a couple years in a cage as a German = POW after being shot down over Germany in WWII) who's wife was a quilter = is downsizing and I offered to help a bit.

I have these books for sale for him. All are in excellent condition. a.. Homage to Amanda $12 post paid b.. Ruby McKim 101 Patchwork Patterns the Dover Edition $7 postpaid = media mail c.. The Standard Book of Quilt Making Margaret Ickis the Dover Edition = $7 postpaid media mail d.. America's Quilts and Coverlets by Safford and Bishop Hardcover = 1974 edition (no book jacket, the cover is blue with a red feathered = star) $15 post paid e.. America's Glorious Quilts (the coffee table book) ISBN = 0-517-64604-8 $25 post paid I can take payment via paypal at stephanie@stephaniewhitson.com.

Plan to mail media mail unless otherwise instructed and will need a = little help with more pricey shipping.

Thanks.

Questions just e-mail at the above. Stephanie Whitson Higgins ------=_NextPart_000_0030_01CBCB6F.EDF9CA90--

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Subject: Re: Book Sighting From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie@stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 11:23:49 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

I just drooled my way through the exhibition of some of the pieces in the book at the International Quilts Study Center and Museum. There really are no words.

And they have a fascinating juxtaposition. 2 galleries of ancient whitework and 1 gallery of art quilts. It was great fun.

I bought the new book about Marseilles at the gift shop and can't wait to learn more.

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: North Country Quilts Osler From: JLHfw@aol.com Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 16:11:29 EST X-Message-Number: 5

If you missed out on the Bowles Museum book, there is another copy up for bid on EBay UK. Janet H in Fort Worth where at last the sun is shining and we are back to normal weather at 60+degrees

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Subject: Quilts Telling Stories - MFA, Boston From: kyra hicks <kyra262@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 17:40:06 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 6

Hello - Wanted to share the upcoming Feb 16 event at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston... Quilts Telling Stories. This panel discussion is sponsored by the Textile and Costume Society. The panel will include: Lynne Bassett, Textile and costume historian, MFA curators Pam Parmal and Lauren Whitley. I will also be on the panel speaking about the Powers' Pictorial Quilt. It is a ticketed event.

http://www.mfa.org/programs/lecture/quilts-telling-stories

Best, Kyra Hicks Arlington, VA www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com --0-956997789-1297647606=:11488--

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Subject: Re: Quilts Telling Stories - MFA, Boston From: Judy Roche <judyq@rocheclan.com> Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2011 20:52:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

jeepers , I wish I had known earlier! Judy Roche in Maine On Feb 13, 2011, at 8:40 PM, kyra hicks wrote:

> Hello - Wanted to share the upcoming Feb 16 event at the Museum of = Fine Arts, > Boston... Quilts Telling Stories. This panel discussion is sponsored = by the > Textile and Costume Society. The panel will include: Lynne Bassett, = Textile and > costume historian, MFA curators Pam Parmal and Lauren Whitley. I will = also be on > the panel speaking about the Powers' Pictorial Quilt. It is a = ticketed event.

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Subject: RE: Re Humanities Councils and their affiliation with perpetuation of the HIPV myth From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2011 09:40:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Sorry to hear that. I hope no one thought that I was implying that the PA Humanities Council was mistake proof. Candace Perry

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Subject: A Valentine Quilt Story From: textique@aol.com Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2011 14:52:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

http://www.saratogian.com/articles/2011/02/13/bspalife/doc4d55678dec0f1638= 257865.txt

or tiny url

http://tinyurl.com/4zpgmhz

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Don't miss this toile on e-bay From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2011 18:49:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=370484574636&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:US:1123

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Subject: Archives From: JLHfw@aol.com Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2011 20:44:32 EST X-Message-Number: 4

An especially good friend just joined this group and asked about accessing old posts and topics. I can't find a way to get access to previous posts and archives. Can someone help???? Regards, Janet Henderson in sunny, warm Fort Worth

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Subject: Re: Archives From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2011 18:38:01 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5

Refer her to the subscribe page at http://quilthistory.com  (which she really should have read when she subscribed.) That will answer her questions:-))

Kris

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Subject: On Pawn Stars last night From: Pepper Cory <pepcory@mail.clis.com> Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2011 09:16:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Anyone see last night's episode of Pawn Stars? A guy came in with a swatch of commemorative fabric with the Marquis de Lafayette's portrait on it. The appraiser said at first it was in such good condition it might be a reproduction....not. Ultimately it sold for $100. Wondering about the price. Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] On Pawn Stars last night From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2011 10:27:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Was the fabric shown on Pawn Stars a 1" head and shoulders of the man, with an eagle above his head, and surrounded by a vine or laurel leaves? Was it a centennial?

If so, this fabric appears in Collins, Threads of History (Smithsonian, 1979) and is misidentified as Lafayette. Thanks to Barbara Brackman, the image has been correctly identified as Andrew Jackson (compare with the toile of the presidents, with Jackson at the center, ca. 1829, and with other images of Jackson in uniform). What's more, the centennial print may be a reproduction of an earlier - and much sharper - identical print, probably from about 1830.

Quilt bibliophiles, please correct your copies of Collins <g>.

Xenia How big was the piece that was valued at $100?

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Subject: query From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2011 12:10:45 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

What is the program to which you are referring, Pepper?

gi

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Subject: Re: On Pawn Stars last night From: Mitzioakes@aol.com Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2011 15:03:13 EST X-Message-Number: 5

--part1_66c31.493ec767.3a8c3601_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I watched this episode and did see that fabric - sorry to say the night caught up with me and I did not watch the end. There usually are repeats of this show quite often so maybe I will catch the end.... Mitzi from Snowy and cold Vermont

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Subject: News From: "Marjorie Farquharson" <Mfarquharson@dedhamcountryday.org> Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2011 15:08:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Many of you are friends of Anita Loscalzo, and I wanted to let you know that her mother passed away on Feb. 14th. Anita had just returned home from Arizona after the death of her father. The well wishes that she has been receiving already have meant a great deal to her. I know that she will continue to be comforted by knowing that she and her family are in your thoughts and prayers.

Marge Farquharson

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Subject: Re: Don't miss this toile on e-bay From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie@stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2011 14:52:58 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

Does anyone recognize the story being told on the toile? Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: NYC quilt exhibits From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <pnhahn01@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2011 00:22:00 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 8

Somehow, my new computer has eaten up all my recently saved QHL emails and I can't seem to access the Archives. If anyone has saved Laura Fisher's recent directions for locating the NYC sites of quilt exhibits this coming March, could they please forward them to me.

Appreciatively, Nancy Hahn, Dataw Island, SC

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Subject: Re: On Pawn Stars last night From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixon@oct.net> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2011 00:30:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

My husband came running to ask me to watch it with him. If I remember correctly, the expert finally said it was worth in the area of $200 to $300. I wanted to know the size. It looked so small. The back half was faded, but, oh, to hold that precious piece of history! I'm still dreaming of it...

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Subject: Signature quilts in MASS. From: Pepper Cory <pepcory@mail.clis.com> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2011 09:27:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

http://www.thelandmark.com/news/2011-02-17/Front_Page/Genealogical_society_to_review_signature_quilts.html A link to an upcoming meeting of the historical society in Gardner MASS where signature quilts will be the topic.

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: Re: On Pawn Stars last night From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2011 09:29:53 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Maybe the dudes still have it in the shop!

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Subject: Zig Zag borders From: "Martha Spark" <mspark@frii.com> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2011 10:40:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Dear QHL members, The Oregon Quilt Project has seen some wonderful quilts this year in our few documentation days so far. One in particular that we'd like to receive some feedback on is a mid 19th century red/green Sunflower with zig zag borders on the 2 long sides. Owner information says that it could have been made by an ancestor in Morgantown,IN. It appears to have been made c1850-60. You can see a picture of the overall here: http://www.oregonquiltproject.org/Oregon_Quilt_Project/OQP_-_Salem_WHS.html#34

My questions are: How pervasive was this style in borders at this time? Was it found in a broad region,or was it peculiar to smaller locales?

I know I've seen a few quilts from NY state that have had similar borders, but not any from IN -- until this one. Xenia and Ginny - I'd appreciate your insights into this in regards to regional characteristics, if any.

Thanks for any information you'd like to share. Feel free to email off list as well.

Martha Spark Co-Coordinator, Oregon Quilt Project www.oregonquiltproject.org

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Subject: Sue Reich to speak in Golden, Longmont and Greeley, CO From: textique@aol.com Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2011 21:07:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi all,

The new exhibit at the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum, "Quilts That Saw U. S.= Through the War", features quilts from the collection of Sue Reich. Sue will be speaking for Sunday at the= Museum on March 6th.

https://rmqm.org/zz/current-exhibits-exhibits-menu-155.html

She will also be speaking to the Greeley Historical Museum on Wed. March= 9th from 6pm to 8pm.

http://www.greeleytribune.com/article/20110216/NEWS/702169967/1002&parentp= rofile=3D1001  The Longmont Quilt Guild will host her on Mon. March 7. We promise to sup= ply her with oxygen for the trip :-)

Come and visit!

Jan Thomas

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Subject: NYC quilt walk; zigzag border, redwork subscription quilt From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 16 Feb

HI all - saw the note about NYC quilt show locations, so here is the trail = again. Main Museum is at 53rd just off Sixth Avenue, satellite museum where= stars are is at 65th and Amsterdam/Broadway, both on the West Side of town= . Easy walk uptown from main Museum to satellite location--walk along Sixth= Avenue to Amsterdam/Broadway, passing Columbus Circle, Museum of Art & Des= ign (great jewelry in their gift shop), Red and white show is at 67th Armor= y on the East Side, directly across town from the satellite museum. Take th= e bus at 65th and Central Park West, get off on East Side on Park Ave right= near armory. Or go in th opposite direction from east to west and down - i= t's all pretty straightforward.easy by cab or bus ($2.25 each way, $1.10 if= you are=A0a senior, or buy=A0a metrocard in a subway station (p.s. the sbw= ay does not directly connect these locations, and is a=A0hike from some of = them, and unconnected=A0lines,may be confusing) Easy to get around midtown,=A0not to worry. Hope the weather is springlike, wait til. you see= all the flowering trees we have. =A0 Concerning the zigzag border on the Compass in the Willamette Heritage Cent= er, I think this one is distinctive for the tiny red squares at the points = of the zigs, I have had zigzag borders on quilts from a variety of locales = so as to not think they are regional, =A0but can't recall ever seeing=A0thi= s construction. Would love to know more. Looks very refined, =A0 Concerning the redwork subscription quilt shown in the nice slide show at t= he head of their site, this looks like another of what I suspect are all fr= om the Methodist Episcopal Church. If someone wants to work with me on=A0a = research project tracing all these red and white tithing quilts=A0back to t= heir source, I would love to talk privately. I seem to be developing a litt= le mental library of these red and white variations, and would love to know= more, but need some researcher's skilled help. =A0 Laura.

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street,5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage@yahoo.com=0A=0A=0A --0-1814613288-1297923230=:14064--

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Subject: Letter from a Chaplain in Afghanistan From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2011 02:22:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Through my brother-in-law once removed, a retired Marine colonel, I've been corresponding with a USN Chaplain stationed with the 3rd Battalion, Ninth Marine Regiment (3/9) from Camp Lejeune, N.C,. now serving in Afghanistan. These are the guys out in the dirt and face-to-face with the Taliban. I've been soliciting donations, packing cartons and sending them -- so far 30 cartons this month. In my correspondence I mentioned that I was a quilter and had done "Quilts of Valor." His response is below. I hope you enjoy it.

"That is great that you quilt. I love quilts. I still have the ones my Mom collected before passing away two years ago. It is an art form that needs to be passed on. Young wives would not have nearly the troubles that they have if they would get off the dang computer and spend time learning from the seasoned sisterhood. They need to hear from older women that men are all jerks sometimes--but they are like dogs--feed 'em, scratch their backs, give them a few "That's a good boys" at the end of the day--and most will be happy campers. They would get that advice in a community of quilters like in days gone by. Hope there is a resurgence."

If you would like to pack a box and send it, Lt. Perdue told me that you should think of what you would feed a group of hungry teenage boys (and some girls) in your TV room afterschool. Pringles, small candy, jerky sticks, nuts in shells, cookies, etc. things that travel well. They also want guy-type magazines -- Men's Health, Mens Journal, Cars, Weights, and Gun magazines. Pack some of your old Good Housekeeping, and Womans Day type magazines as well. Remember what you put in your carton because you have to list it on a customs form at the Post Office. You pay for postage to New York, or California, not Afghanistan, but my cartons are running between $9.00 and $20.00 for postage. (I have some Angels that are helping) Address it exactly as below. LT. Thomas H. Perdue, USN Chaplain, 3/9 H&S Company Unit 73001 FPO AE 09510-3001

I thank you -- and we thank them!

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Subject: quilt designs in 6 minutes From: Neva Hart <nevahart@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2011 10:45:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

You won't regret looking at this fabulous film clip from National Film = Board of Canadian. A fascinating education tool on quilt designs in = under 7 minutes!

"A tribute to the unique and long-established art form of patchwork = quilting, this abstract animated film uses computer and experimental = techniques to choreograph quilt motifs and designs to music."

http://www.nfb.ca/film/quilt/?ec=3Den20110209 

Neva Hart in awe=

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Subject: Harrison/Lafayette/Jackson fabric video from History.com From: Sharon Pinka <sharonpinka@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2011

Hello all=A0- for those of you who missed the segment on Pawn Stars about t= he swatch of fabric orginally identified as including a portrait of Pres. H= arrison, here is the link:

Pawn Stars: Harrison for President http://www.history.com/shows/pawn-stars/videos/pawn-stars-harrison-for-pres= ident Rick and the guys are presented with some unique memorabilia from the campa= ign trail: a piece of fabric believed to have belonged to William Henry Har= rison's presidential campaign. Will they vote yes on this deal? =A0 Just from watching the video, it appears that the fabric may be a reproduct= ion, but looks, as Xenia suggested, like an 1876 Centennial print.=A0 What = do you all think? =A0 I love this show but wish, when they feature a textile, they would get the = appropriate appraiser or authority to evaluate the fabric. =A0 Sharon Pinka

=0A=0A=0A --0-1321082195-1298049661=:99651--

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Subject: Re: Harrison/Lafayette/Jackson fabric video from History.com From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 12:40:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

The fabric is Andrew Jackson as identified by Barbara Brackman, and the piece on the Pawn Stars show is in the same colorway as some I have in a quilt from the last quarter of the 19th century. Since the owner found it among his grandmother's things, one can suppose that it is a centennial piece and not a current reproduction (I don't think I've seen a current repro of this, anyway).

And this piece is worth more than $10 - but not a lot more! IMHO

Xenia

And thanks to Sharon for the link to the show!

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Subject: needlework quote From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn@rocketmail.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 13:21:44 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

Some time ago, I ran across a quote about doing needlework, that I've not been able to track down again. I thought it might be familiar to one of you. It went something like:

I am never, by my own good will, without my needle in my hand.

Does it sound familiar to anyone?

Jocelyn

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Subject: NYC quilt exhibits From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <pnhahn01@comcast.net> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 22:01:59 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks, Laura, for repeating the routes. I've made numerous hard copies this time! What will your shop hours be during this quilt extravaganza? I would like to stop in a visit.

Also, for other travelers, Cyndi Black directed me to a map put out by The City Quilter that shows the bus and subway lines. Google The City Quilter and you shall easily find it.

Nancy Hahn, still on Dataw Island, SC, where today is finally spring!

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Subject: Unusual dating on quilt From: Sandra Starley <gingham@frontiernet.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2011 06:17:59 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

Fellow quilt historian GB-Best (Donna Vitale from PA) just had a very interesting quilt for sale on ebay. The auction has ended but you can still look at it (just click on link and then see full details.. There are a lot of pictures. It is a dated (1869) signature album presentation quilt. One of the most unusual aspects is the block with the date done in stylized applique 'tree branches' rather than regular numerals. Please let me know if you have seen any other dates done in figural type motifs.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130485653793&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

From the listing: This is a piece of American history and a presentation album quilt given to Daniel Charles Mccoy, Reverend and Civil War Veteran on August 20, 1869. Reverend McCoy was a well respected pastor for The First Presbyterian Church of Clayton, Illinios. In Adams County.

If there are problems with the link, it is item # 130485653793

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: needlework quote From: mose2@unlnotes.unl.edu Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 16:23:20 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multipart message in MIME format. --=_alternative 007AFC828625783B_= Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

It is from an old Spectator, published in London in 1836,. NO. 609, pp 686, in a section quoting "British Essayists" printed Wednesday, October 13, 1714: "For my part, I have plied my needle these fifty years, and by my good-will would never have it out of my hand." It is in the context of a well-behaved lady (possibly a Miss Fanny Fickle) complaining about the idle and flirtatious activities of her young nieces who "often run gadding abroad". I found this in a free Google book by searching the quote.

No gadding ladies!

.

Maureen Ose, Communications Coordinator International Quilt Study Center & Museum Department of Textiles, Clothing and Design PO Box 830838 1523 N. 33rd Street Lincoln, NE 68583-0838

www.quiltstudy.org 402-472-7232 FAX 402-472-2008 mose2@unl.edu

Located at: Quilt House, Intersection of 33rd & Holdrege Streets

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Subject: Re: Unusual dating on quilt From: textique@aol.com Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2011 11:19:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

----------MB_8CD9E67EBDFF172_1B24_8EFAC_Webmail-d120.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Sandra,

My kind of quilt! Just a guess, but I would want to research any possible= connections to the Woodmen of the World. I love the 'thistle' and the representation= of a 'woven plaid'.

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Re: Unusual dating on quilt From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie@stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2011 10:27:45 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

I hope we get to learn more about this quilt and its makers someday ... hope the new owner researches it.

I couldn't help but wonder if the ladies were using applique blocks they already had in their stash because of the wide variety of styles. For some reason it looks like a rather hastily assembled project to me.

Has anyone ever seen the one that looks like criss-crossed tongue depressors?

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: needlework quote From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn@rocketmail.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2011 21:14:05 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5

Thanks very much, Maureen!

________________________________

From: Maureen A Ose <mose2@unlnotes.unl.edu> To: Quilt History List <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Fri, February 18, 2011 4:23:20 PM Subject: [qhl] Re: needlework quote

It is from an old Spectator, published in London in 1836,. NO. 609, pp 686, in a section quoting "British Essayists" printed Wednesday, October 13, 1714: "For my part, I have plied my needle these fifty years, and by my good-will would never have it out of my hand." It is in the context of a well-behaved lady (possibly a Miss Fanny Fickle) complaining about the idle and flirtatious activities of her young nieces who "often run gadding abroad". I found this in a free Google book by searching the quote.

No gadding ladies!

.

Maureen Ose, Communications Coordinator International Quilt Study Center & Museum Department of Textiles, Clothing and Design PO Box 830838 1523 N. 33rd Street Lincoln, NE 68583-0838

www.quiltstudy.org 402-472-7232 FAX 402-472-2008 mose2@unl.edu

Located at: Quilt House, Intersection of 33rd & Holdrege Streets