Subject: Coming Event in downtown Lancaster, Pa. From: Trishherr@aol.com Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2011 14:49:51 EST X-Message-Number: 1

The Lancaster Heritage Center and Quilt and Textile Museum is holding an event April 1st and 2nd with the theme of Civil War Quilts, Textiles and the Home Front. Featured speakers will be Lynn Bassett and Kyra E. Hicks. To learn more about this event check the link: _http://mim.io/616ce_ (http://mim.io/616ce) . Should be fun, Trish Herr

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Subject: Re: time to discuss quilt washing From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie@stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2011 14:22:40 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

A collector friend of mine starts with soaking in water. Just water. Soak in a children's swimming pool (with the textile atop a white sheet for lifting to keep from straining the fabric in the quilt). She says that it's amazing what 6 or 7 cycles of soak/drain/add clean water/ soak/drain/add clean water can do in the way of lifting out stains. Just water. Nothing added. (with a long long warning about color-testing & no guarantees & risks & etc.). But if they are going to do it come heck or high water ... at least beginning with water is the least harmful I know (as long as the fabrics are color fast cotton).

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Subject: Re: time to discuss quilt washing From: xenia cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2011 15:26:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

A possible difficulty with "just water" is that water treatment facilities in cities add various chemicals to water, home water softeners add various chemicals to water, and well water has its own additives. There still may be reactions between dyes and water caused by these unseen/unrecognized ingredients.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: time to discuss quilt washing From: Sally Ward <sallytatters@fastmail.co.uk> Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2011 20:51:48 +0000 X-Message-Number: 4

I don't know how it would go down in the US, but a UK textile specialist told us she had cultivated the local water company and was able to telephone them before undertaking a wash, so that she knew the condition of the water on any given day. Her washing system consisted of 4 boards to the size of the quilt sides, a large sheet of industrial plastic, a fine but not sunny day, a sloping garden, some assistants (possibly offspring) and a hose. She had a system for clamping the boards, using the plastic laid across them and the ground to make a paddling pool, which was then lined with a sheet. The quilt, laid flat on all this, would be soaked, drained, soaked, drained, releasing the board on the lower end of the slope to drain each time. Another sheet laid on top after the final emptying meant the quilt could lay still and continue draining until she and assistants could take the weight and bring it in to her professional-size table and drying area.

She also had a unique drying bed - a particular kind of thick egg-box type plastic mesh which she had spotted being used in motorway construction and managed to source in a sufficiently small quantity (the usual purchase was measured in kilometres, not yards). A quilt laid on this (protected by a sheet, of course0 was fully supported but had perfect airflow beneath and between. Clever.

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: time to discuss quilt washing From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooney@moonware.net> Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2011 13:11:56 -0800 X-Message-Number: 5

Good afternoon, QHLers - Anyone can locate a quilt/textile conservator in their area or region at the following site, the free online referral service offered by the American Institute for Conservation (AIC):

http://tinyurl.com/AICreferrals

If the first conservator/restorer you contact can't help you, move on to the next one on the list. Most conservators I know are happy to provide advice and guidance even if they themselves will not be taking on the quilt cleaning. If you can't seem to find a conservator/restorer, please do not hesitate to contact me directly.

The purpose of the washing/cleaning is to remove any contamination without causing additional damage and without leaving something else behind in the quilt. Which means that 'stain removers' or anything else that is then not washed/rinsed out of the quilts themselves will cause problems later. Sometimes 99% rubbing alcohol (isopropyl alcohol) gently rubbed on a stain with a cotton swab is useful for removing some stains - the rubbing alcohol then completely evaporates (usual caveats about fastness of the dyes/pigments of the fabrics, embroidery threads, signatures, etc.).

There are other cautions that should be passed along to folks who are thinking about 'doing it themselves' whether using a top-loading washing machine, a bathtub or a kiddie swimming pool. The quality of the water MUST be good to excellent!! You can ask for the yearly report (required by the EPA) from your municipal water supplier. If you aren't drinking your tap water because of the smell or the staining of the sink/toilet fixtures, do NOT use it to wash/rinse your quilt. Also, this washing/rinsing process takes a LOT of water if you are dealing with at least a twin-size quilt. If you are on a well system with limited output or if your region is on water rationing, be aware. The water temperature should be warm. If you have to use the outside hose with no hot water possible to make warm water, wait until the water is not icy cold.

If you are using a washing machine or bathtub, it must be squeaky clean and free of detergent/soap residue and fabric softener residues. Otherwise, those residues get deposited on to the quilt. Rinse, rinse, rinse. You shouldn't use a washing machine that has had fabric softener used in it as it is nigh impossible to remove that residue. Time for a new washer? <g>

You must also think about the drying process. It is not safe to use a dryer as the tumbling action will cause extreme physical stress on the wet fibres (natural fibres are physically weaker when wet). Keep in mind the relative humidity of the day(s) you are considering doing the washing/drying. The quilt must be completely dry throughout before being stored or else the mould/mildew spores that live on everything will have a chance to activate. It may take a couple of days for a quilt to dry. The quilt needs to be laid out flat carefully (no tugging on corners!) on a waterproof surface (take care of your back!! usually takes more than one person) and gently blotted with fabric with no residue (i.e. sheeting, towels). Blotted/not rubbed. Cover with more clean residue-free fabric. Obviously, this can take up a bit of space. Turn on the overhead fan or a box fan in the space to get the air circulating. If you have air conditioning, the dehumidifier component of the system will remove a lot of water from the house environment. If you are drying the quilt outside, make sure you turn off that sprinkler system and lock up the dogs/cats/kids. If drying outside, you have to choose a day/days when the relative humidity will be below 50%. Don't do this process if there will be thunderstorms in the afternoon. Depending on your location, you might be limited to a few weeks during the year because of the climatic humidity being too high. Don't do this process outside if you have air pollution/poor air quality in your neighborhood.

Please feel free to contact me off-line if further clarification is needed. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator & Collections Management Consultant Professional Associate - AIC 707-763-8694 mgmooney@moonware.net

...starts with soaking in water. Just water. Soak in a children's swimming pool (with the textile atop a white sheet for lifting to keep from straining the fabric in the quilt). She says that it's amazing what 6 or 7 cycles of soak/drain/add clean water/ soak/drain/add clean water can do in the way of lifting out stains. Just water. Nothing added. (with a long long warning about color-testing & no guarantees & risks & etc.). But if they are going to do it come heck or high water ... at least beginning with water is the least harmful I know (as long as the fabrics are color fast cotton). ...

...so, what to do, realistically? ...So, what are the the recommended and least dangerous products to gently cleanse an antique quilt with? Are there any non toxic stain removers that can handle those long time spots - without eroding fabric or removing color - which can be used judiciously? ......to restorers who laundered, but they are not interested any longer in handling every day materials, only museum-y special pieces, so, what to advise clients to do? ...

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Subject: Re: Tribute to Cinda From: Hiranya <nomad0101@gmail.com> Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 14:37:47 +1100 X-Message-Number: 6

Though we are so far away distance wise here in Australia, we quilters here in Oz too feel the loss of Cinda's passing. Cinda's essence will be sorely missed far and wide. I for one am so blessed that I had the privilege of sharing her daily joys through the medium of vintage quilts.

We truly are family here non? Thanks Kris-Mama Bear for making this all possible. I wonder.....did you realise what you made possible all those years ago when you fist started QHL?

With my very best wishes

Hiranya from Sydney, Australia

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Subject: Re: time to discuss quilt washing From: "Kim Baird" <kbaird@cableone.net> Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2011 22:27:05 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

That's why you need de-ionized water.

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: March 09, 2011 From: Merry May <twotonsofbuttons@gmail.com> Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 11:09:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I'm guessing that everyone has heard that Jean Ray Laury passed away recently, right? Another great loss to anyone who has been involved with quilting in the past 40+ years.

Merry

-- Merry May You can find me at www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com OR at www.MerryMayhem.com Co-Author of "Insider's Guide to Quilting Careers"

 

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Subject: Re: time to discuss quilt washing From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie@stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 10:16:38 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Xenia mentioned the possible problems with "just water" and of course she is right. It's never "just water" anymore. But I'd rather take my chances with "just water" than put soap or some other detergent in. And of course we're talking about someone who is going to wash their quilt no matter the cautionary tales we all know. . . so ... "just water" would be my starting point. Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: time to discuss quilt washing From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 11:33:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Subject: time to discuss washing - fabulous discussions - thanks From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2011 10:22:37 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

Wow what an abundance of guidance you all offered about washing quilts. There is so much helpful informationto convey. Having an open business, people come in who want their own familly quilts washed, or if they arebuying an antique want a spotless product. So, while the theory of not washing a quilt unless it's handled by a knowledgeable conservator is laudable, it's just not realisticin real, non historic nonmuseum-y life.  Iam holdingnow three quilts in bags (paper!) brought in by people who want their quilt washed, all really grimy, and whenI tell them a price and the precautions, they are not happy to hear the news.  And people call all the time asking foradvice on how to wash, and of course I am reluctant to say anything,especailly withoutexamining the quilt in person. So, for this purpose I will summarizethe great guidance into something simple and cautionaryto distribute.  Same thing used to happenin the hooked rug world. A former restorer (she's now a holistic health practioner) who wrotethe bookon antique American rugs, would lecture all around,and the takeaway was....you really can't useold hooked rugs in the waythey wereintended, nor canthey be restored!-- not a good message to have floating around if one is trying to make a business of selling rugs for use.  So too with quilts, I felt there has to be some mid range of handling and care that would not offend the textile historians, but would allow someone interested in antique textiles to have them in their home without thinking they were grimy or full of someone else's dirt.  Thanks again all.  p.s. just came down Park Avenue in the sunlight, and the huge metal pinkroses sculptures on the median outside the Armory look delightful, so charge up your camera batteries. There was an article on the sculptor and the process in a recent NYTimes, if someone is interested I can find and email it. There are also banners about Infinite Variety hanging from the lamppostson Park, very appealing.  Laura

 Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street,5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage@yahoo.com --0-924191225-1299867757=:55454--

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Subject: Rare Hawaiian Flag Quilt on eBay From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2011 14:57:27 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

These rarely come to market.

http://tinyurl.com/4tv7jhy

No affiliation.

Karen in the Islands (click on the picture thumbnail below)

Hawaiian Quilt

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Subject: Re: Rare Hawaiian Flag Quilt on eBay From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2011 08:43:37 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

I just came across a similar Hawaiian flag quilt pictured in "Homage to Amanda" on page 65.

Mary Anne

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Subject: movie quilt alert From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2011 21:22:10 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

 

It was on screen ever so briefly,but.it looked to be absolutely the orrect period and authentically antique in JANE EYRE. See if you can spot it, 3/4 ofthe way into the film Also, the textiles, dress shapes and details, hair, everything seemed so spot on, as they say in England, that I commend the list of what-looked-like 30 people connected to the costuming portion of the film. Actors looked like they stepped down from paintings of the late 1840s. I know the paisley shawls were real antiques, some of the clothing looked like real period attire, the fabrics seemed quite accurate, after reading Barbara Brackman's wonderful newsletters, but I don't think sources loan or rent such antique garments for films (I know period 20th century clothing is often rentedfor films). You'll enjoy seeing this version of the classic, and the landscapes, architecture and every detail including extensive use of crewel work and laces, mmmm.  Laura  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street,5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage@yahoo.com --0-1775811456-1300076530=:27158--

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Subject: Re: movie quilt alert From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 00:39:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I too saw a quilt in a movie this weekend. It was a Comcast OnDemand, 1970 movie, called "Age of Consent." Artist James Mason retires to a hut on an island on the Australian Barrier Reef for refreshment from civilization and the hope of new inspiration for his work. On his cot in the hut is a wool squares "quilt."

He finds his inspiration from a young, blonde, local "sprite" who spends a lot of the movie nekkid, both on the beach and underwater. Said sprite is played by the 25 year old, gloriously young and fresh, Helen Mirren!

Judy Grow

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Subject: Re: movie quilt alert From: "Lorraine Olsson" <sven@pnc.com.au> Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2011 16:09:52 +1100 X-Message-Number: 3

. On his cot in the hut is a wool > squares "quilt."

Usually called a Wagga in Australia

Lorraine in Oz

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Subject: Wagga movie sighting From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 00:48:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I kept trying to pull that word, Wagga, out of my memory. I knew it was there, but hidden too well. Thanks, Lorraine.

Judy

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Subject: Re: Rare Hawaiian Flag Quilt on eBay From: Crm793@aol.com Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 01:36:41 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I'm trying to see the Hawaiian quilt at this site but can't find it.

In a message dated 3/11/2011 5:57:53 P.M. Central Daylight Time, karenquilt@rockisland.com writes:

These rarely come to market.

http://tinyurl.com/4tv7jhy

No affiliation.

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Re: Rare Hawaiian Flag Quilt on eBay From: Crm793@aol.com Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 01:38:16 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

OOPS! Can you tell me the name of the place where I can see it. Carolyn M.

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Subject: Re: Rare Hawaiian Flag Quilt on eBay From: Dale Drake <ddrake@ccrtc.com> Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2011 09:22:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks, Karen, for posting this. That "cross stitching" that the seller refers to is very interesting - the center red applique motifs appear to be feather stitched down. Another example for my needle turn applique classes of the MANY ways that fabrics were sewn down in the past.

And the penguin guys are just too cute.

Dale Drake in SUNNY (finally!) Indiana

On 3/11/2011 5:57 PM, Karen Alexander wrote: > These rarely come to market. > > http://tinyurl.com/4tv7jhy

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Subject: Blind Quilter interview From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 14:27:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Forgive me for posting this if it has already been around. I've been living with my face in appraisal forms for weeks and haven't seen much else.  http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=3D7lfaSmDxVZQ

Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies but I don't believe I deserved my friends." Walt Whitman  www.teddypruett.com

 

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Subject: Wagga ? From: Sherry Cook <sas.cook@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 09:48:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi, Sorry that last email got sent! I always heard the "wagga" of today originated from the feed sacks made in the Australian mills in the 1930s and evolved to mean the heavy wool quilt! I would love to hear more thoughts or info on the origination of the word! THANKS, Sherry

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Subject: RE: Wagga ? From: "Janet O'Dell" <janet@techinfo.com.au> Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2011 11:31:48 +1100 X-Message-Number: 7

According to the book Patchwork Quilts in Australia by Margaret Rolfe, and the more recent book The Fabric of Society by Annette Gero, this is the origin of the word wagga:

It derives from the town of Wagga Wagga in the state of New South Wales. The Murrumbidgee Milling Company, incorporated in 1890, produced a brand of flour known as Wagga Lily that was sold in flour bags. These bags were sewn together, with or without a blanket inside, with a bag needle and twine to make what was then known as a wagga rug, or 'Murrumbidgee blanket'. Bushmen and shearers used these mainly to keep out the cold when camping outdoors in the bush.

The word is now used to describe any quilt made from second-hand or recycled materials and is part of Australian folklore. I recommend reading both books for more detailed information. There are some great examples shown in Annette's book.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Re: Rare Hawaiian quilt on eBay From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 21:59:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

The rare Hawaiian quilt is on eBay.

Item number: 290544150802

http://tinyurl.com/4tv7jhy

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Worst Case Scenario ( NEED HELP ) From: "Natalie"<NATALIEPM@AOL.COM> Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2011 04:29:14 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

I'm writing this with tears in my eyes,my Family and I came down here to Wales,United Kingdom with the kids,for a short Family vacation unfortunately we were mugged at the park of the hotel where we stayed,all cash,credit card and cell were stolen off us but luckily for us we still have our passports with us.

We've been to the embassy and the Police here but they're not helping issues at all and our flight leaves in less than 3hrs from now but we're having problems settling the hotel bills and the hotel manager won't let us leave until we settle the bills.

Am freaked out at the moment

Natalie

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Subject: Re: Blind Quilter interview From: Laura Syler <texasquiltco@airmail.net> Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2011 19:26:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Teddy, Several years ago when I judged and appraised at the Waco show, she was the "Featured Quilter". Her spirit comes through her quilts! It's absolutely amazing to see what she can do with her "heart"! She was an inspiration to meet and talk to!

Laura Syler Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles

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Subject: Vancouver? From: Sally Ward <sallytatters@fastmail.co.uk> Date: Thu, 17 Mar 2011 21:05:18 +0000 X-Message-Number: 1

My daughter will be visiting Vancouver soon, and asks if there are any quilt shops she should visit ? (I hope that is so that she can bring me a souvenir <G>)

Sally Ward=

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Subject: quilt history books 4 sale From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex@hughes.net> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 03:03:57 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

We are making room on our shelves and want to sell some books:

Titles and prices follow. Please e-mail for more details.

quiltcomplex@hughes.net

Thanks, Julie Silber

Plain and Fancy: Vermont's People and Their Quilts Cleveland & Bister, soft cover, unused ... $24 + shipping

19th Century American Patchwork Quilt (exhibition catalogue) Fox, ed., signed, soft cover, in English and Japanese ... $68 + shipping

Quilts in America Orlofsky & Orlofsky, hardcover, First Edition ... $18 + shipping

Historic Quilts Peto, hardcover ... $265 including shipping

Old Patchwork Quilts and The Women Who Made Them Finley, reprinted 1983, soft cover ... $28 + shipping

Old Quilts Dunton, First Edition, hardcover ... $325 including shipping

Quilt Digest (s), Full set of issues 1 - 5, soft cover Kiracofe and Kile, ed., 1983 - 1987 ... all five, $124 + shipping

Quilt Digest (s), also available individually, please inquire

Hearts and Hands, Ferrero, Hedges, Silber, paper , signed by Ferrero & Silber (New, but Out of Print) ... $22 + shipping

The Amish Quilt, Granick, hardcover ... $20 + shipping

Chintz Quilts: Unfading Glory Bullard & Shiell, signed by both authors, paper, FIRST EDITION ... $24 + shipping

Quilts in Community: Ohio's Tradition Clark, Knepper, Ronsheim, ed., hardcover, first edition . $38 + shipping

Wrapped in Glory Fox, hardcover, like new, First Edition . $22 + shipping

Labors of Love Weissman & Lavitt, hardcover, like new ... $19 + shipping

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Subject: Looking for a book From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieber@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 07:42:01 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi again -

In my quest for all things "British Textiles" related for a story I'm working on, I wonder if anyone knows where I can purchase a copy of "The Secret Life of Textiles" by Sykas? I have searched the internet looking for a copy at all the good book places - even out of print places - but to no avail. 

Perhaps someone in England may have seen one in a museum book shop? I am happy to pay for the shipping from England or elsewhere. 

Private responses welcome. 

Leah Zieber

Temecula, CA

PS - Thanks for all the great help finding someone knowledgeable on Welsh Quilt History. I really appreciate your ideas and will be making some contacts this weekend.

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Subject: Request From: Mitzioakes@aol.com Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 10:44:08 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

Could anyone on this list help me in finding any/all info that has been done on Quilts - Art of Craft?. My daughter is heading for her final college degree and has to do an essay on art and she has chosen to do one about the difference between an art and a craft. (course she has finally got to this point after being in the Army, having 3 husbands, one daughter and 2 grand daughters, survived Katrina and now has a significant other who we call ( jokingly) or sin-in-law.) I have a lot of books etc in my library but am short of any info on a comparison of art vs. crafts in the quilting fields. Would appreciate any help I can get from this site - it has never failed me before. Mitzi - from VT where the snow is finally melting and I can see over the snowbanks.

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Subject: Re: Request From: Bonnie Dwyer <bonniedwyer2@mac.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 11:49:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Mitzi wrote: > Could anyone on this list help me in finding any/all info that has been > done on Quilts - Art of Craft?. My daughter is heading for her final college > degree and has to do an essay on art and she has chosen to do one about > the difference between an art and a craft.

Um. This step is often overlooked, but you could suggest your daughter talk with a reference librarian at her college library; they are there to guide people in their research. And, they are usually very knowledgable as well as eager to help.

Bonnie Dwyer

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Subject: a quilt project for Japan? From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 09:19:11 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Is there anyone on this listserve who has experience in shipping charity quilts to other places in the world (outside the U.S.)? Is it possible that we, a community of quilters, could organize a gift of quilts for the children of Japan? I don't really know how to go about this, but isthis something the members of the quilt history list could do? Do you know of any other group that is undertaking such a project?  I just can't stand to watch the news any more about the devastation in Japan without weeping. This is such a horrible time. After the immediate needs of food and water and safe shelter are met (and our $donations to charity can help that), would a quilt given to a child offer a special kind ofcomfort?  I put this on the QHL table for discussion. Thanks-Connie Ark, Urbana, Ohio --0-486768488-1300465151=:45315--

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Subject: Fw: a quilt project for Japan? From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 09:23:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com> Subject: a quilt project for Japan? To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Date: Friday, March 18, 2011, 12:19 PM

Is there anyone on this listserve who has experience in shipping charity quilts to other places in the world (outside the U.S.)? Is it possible that we, a community of quilters, could organize a gift of quilts for the children of Japan? I don't really know how to go about this, but isthis something the members of the quilt history list could do? Do you know of any other group that is undertaking such a project?  I just can't stand to watch the news any more about the devastation in Japan without weeping. This is such a horrible time. After the immediate needs of food and water and safe shelter are met (and our $donations to charity can help that), would a quilt given to a child offer a special kind ofcomfort?  I put this on the QHL table for discussion. Thanks-Connie Ark, Urbana, Ohio  --0-1451069795-1300465437=:89707--

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Subject: Re: Looking for a book From: Bonnie Dwyer <bonniedwyer2@mac.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 12:31:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

On Mar 18, 2011, at 10:42 AM, Leah Zieber wrote: > I wonder if anyone knows where I can purchase a copy of "The > Secret Life of Textiles" by Sykas? I have searched the internet looking for > a copy at all the good book places - even out of print places - but to no > avail.

Leah, If you cannot own a copy, perhaps you could try to borrow one through interlibrary loan at your local library. Bonnie Dwyer, still thinking like a librarian although I'm retired...

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Subject: Re: a quilt project for Japan? From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 10:48:58 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Hello all,I have been in communication with Naomi Ichikawa, editor of Patchwork Quilt tsushin, the Japanese quilt magazine. Here is what she has emailed me:  It is still bad situation now in Japan but it is not terrible. We are still nervous about shaking and radiation, but no way to escape.

"I start to announce to the quilters to send us comfort quilts for the people who are suffered.I would like to do it to the world quilters. We will deliver the comfort quilts to the people who are very difficult situation. Could you please help to announce it to the quilters in Paducah?"We accept any size of quilts(baby to adult).new or unused.The deadline would be the end of May or later.=98=85Send the quilts to:until the middle of April Naomi Ichikawa,Editor of Patchwork Quilt tsushin Patchwork Tsushin Co.,Ltd 5-28-3,Hongo,Bunkyo-ku,Tokyo,Japan zip:113-0033after the middle of AprilNaomi IchikawaPatchworkTsushin Co.,Ltd2-21-2,Yushima,Bunkyo-ku,Tokyo,Japan zip:113-0034"I will appreciate if you help me.Naomi"If you wish to send quilts to Naomi and let her distribute them, it would certainly help.Judy SchwenderPaducah, Kentucky

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Subject: Re: a quilt project for Japan? From: "Kim Baird" <kbaird@cableone.net> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 13:18:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Judy--

Thanks for the info. I posted it on my guild's website. Kim in Fargo

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Subject: RE: Request From: "Susan Bleimehl" <bleimehl@tds.net> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 13:21:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

If you Google 'art versus craft', you will find many links that could be helpful. This topic is periodically discussed on many lists and forums.

Susan

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Subject: Fwd: Re: qhl digest: March 13, 2011 From: collections@nequiltmuseum.org Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 09:41:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

The similar Hawaiian flag quilt which is pictured in "Homage to Amanda" is now in the collection of the New England Quilt Museum. It is #1999.12 and is pictured on the quilt index at http://www.quiltindex.org/fulldisplay.php?kid=21-41-51

Laura Lane Acting Curator New England Quilt Museum

> I just came across a similar Hawaiian flag quilt pictured in "Homage to Amanda" > on page 65.

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Subject: RE: Request From: Lynne Bassett <lynne@lynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 14:48:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

 

On the debate of art vs. craft, I would check to see what resources are available at the library of the American Folk Art Museum. This is a discussion that comes up frequently within the topic of folk art. Also, see that articles are available in their magazine, /Folk Art/, indexed here: http://www.folkartmuseum.org/magazine

All best, Lynne

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Subject: RE: Request From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 15:37:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

I'd be interested in a dialogue that included art-craft-or none of the above! Now that opens up a can of worms! Candace Perry

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Subject: Tributes to Cinda continue From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 13:11:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 15

Tributes to and photos of Cinda Cawley continue to trickle in. Please feel free to pass your tribute or photos on to me at any time if you would like to have it added to Cinda's blog tribute. Someone just reminded me of Teddy Pruett's November 2008 QHL post about Cinda and Teddy gave me permission to add it. It's near the end of the post and it's a corker.

http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/2011/03/star-quilt-reporter-passes.html

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: quilt project for Japan From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 14:44:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 16

I posted this on my facebook and someone said that Quilters Newsletter is accepting donations. I don't know if this is true or not, but the address she gave was: Dana JonesQuilters Newsletter741 Corporate Circle, Suite AGolden, CO 80401 Markyour box: Quilts for Japan. Send quilts as soon as possible and no later than April 30, 2011. Enclose your name, address, phone number, and email address with the quilts.I would check with Quilters Newsletter before mailing anything. Kris-----

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Subject: Beds at Colonial Williamsburg From: Sally Ward <sallytatters@fastmail.co.uk> Date: Sat, 19 Mar 2011 00:11:51 +0000 X-Message-Number: 19

Can anyone give me a contact who would be familiar with the construction of beds at Colonial Williamsburg, or library references? I need to find out about the type of fabric used for the rope and fabric mattress supports of the period.

Thanks

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: quilt history books 4 sale From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ss@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 18:59:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 21

Julie, I am interested in Plain and Fancy, if it hasn't already been taken. If it is available, please let me know total for s/h and address to send check. Thank you! Susan Schreurs

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Subject: Re: Beds at Colonial Williamsburg From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net> Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 23:43:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Sally, Not sure about Colonial Williamsburg, but I can recommend a source for the same period in America----<http://www.countrybed.com/ancillary_pages/reference/Rope.shtml>. Alan Pease, who has spent a lifetime reproducing early beds could direct you to the appropriate resource in VA, though his shop is in Massachusetts.

In the American South of the period, most rope for beds was made of hemp roping.

The "sacking" that was sometimes used in place of rope was generally linen. This was used on the bed frames that have little knobs on sides instead of holes, as I'm sure you know.

I think stuffings were made the same way they were made in England at the time---of everything from eiderdown to cornshucks and straw, depending on the means of the owner.

Just thinking of this construction makes the thought of my nice fat 21st-century mattress seem the height of luxury.

gaye ----

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Subject: Re: Beds at Colonial Williamsburg From: Sally Ward <sallytatters@fastmail.co.uk> Date: Sat, 19 Mar 2011 09:48:34 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

Thank you, Gaye and others privately. As ever, QHL is the fount of all knowledge!

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: a quilt project for Japan? From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 19 Mar 2011 15:08:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Judy, She should get in touch with 'Lutheran World Relief" for a large volume of quilts.

I think every Lutheran lady in America makes quilts through their churches for LWR to distribute to countries in crisis. I know the LWR missionaries are in Japan now.

Lonnie Schlough (Lutheran Lady who makes lots of them!) www.fixquilts.com