Subject: RE: Red and white Fabric with the letters G W From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net> Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2011 00:24:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I agree with Alma and have yet to see this one in feedsack. There was no mention of it in the research. Unless it was advertised, like the Disney sacks, proof can be a long time in coming.

Gloria Nixon Feedsack Secrets: Fashion from Hard Times ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: GM From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2011 22:52:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

So, okay, google George Mason and you find that he was an important patriot whose descendants are many and keep a great webpage. Maybe the odd symbol is part of the family arms? This came from my husband saying isn't there a George Mason University. Yes, but don't see any symbols that look right on their store site.

Teddi, most history is the guess of one individual that is accepted or refuted by others.

Linda Laird who bragged to soon about the cactus. The roses are also blooming gloriously in the desert and it's supposed to drop to 33 tomorrow night ces la desierto!

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Subject: MGM vs GW From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 08 Apr 2011 23:18:31 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Ah, shucks, Teddy. There goes my well documented theory about MGM. <tongue in cheeeeck>

Dale, thanks for the link to the Liberty Cap history! Now I am leaning that direction. <tongue in other cheeeeeek>

Guess we will never know for sure until we dig up some more info.

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Civil War News articles From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2011 04:59:25 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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The Norwalk Reflector Norwalk, Ohio April 7, 1863 Page 3

Quarterly Report of the Soldiers' Aid Society of Norwalk, Ohio, from Dec. 1st, 1862, to March 1st, 1863. At the close of the official year of the Society, a business meeting was held Nov. 24th, 1862, at Whittlesey Hall, to re-organize, and appoint new officers; the principal difference in the plan being that the new appointments were exclus- ively ladies, which seemed more proper, as the business was transacted entirely by them...... We look upon the "Alert Club" as the right arm of our strength. And in this connection we would speak of their labors in other respects. They have contributed to the stores of the Soci- ety 67 pairs of slippers, handkerchiefs, towels and one pieced bed quilt, made by them at their meetings, which are held twice a months....... We take pleasure in presenting this Report to our friends who have liberally responded to our calls, and yet we would not have them wea- ry of well doing, for these are their soldiers, their brothers, husbands, sons, to whom they are giv- ing thus; and the necessity increases constantly for renewed exertions. Every one knows that it takes three time the amount of money that it did a year ago to buy our working materials, and the labors of the Society are, of course, bounded by its means, and here we would ac- knowledge the kind offices of the Cleveland S. A.S., which have enabled us to buy many of our goods at great reduction of prices. We would say to our sisters, come and help us, for the work is great, and "the laborers are few." There may be individual reasons that you make to yourselves for not working with us, which you think are sufficient, but still the cause of humanity suffers for the want of your exertions. We look with admiration on the self-denial of the mothers of the Revolutionary War; at the same time scarcely realizing that we also live in historic days; that the trials of self-denying pa- triotism are equally required of us........ We would again urge upon you the claims of the Society. You will find in this work balm for many a sorrowful hour, and in striving to al- leviate the sorrows of others will bring peace to your own souls. To the community generally, we would ask for a continuance of the sympathy and sustain- ing power which has heretofore been granted. There is no time to falter. The work press- es on, and let us follow it out to the triumphant end which we confidently expect. Lizzie H. Farr, President.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Grace L. Bissell From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com> Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2011 07:47:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

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Hi all,

Thanks to Sue's wonderful post about the Civil War quilt-maker and donor, nine-year old Grace L. Bissell, I took a fun, half-hour diversion this morning to see what Ancestry.com could tell me about her. The following information was gleaned from several sources in Ancestry.com, and except for the U.S. Census information, no sources in family trees had documentation.

She was born on November 17, 1854 (the newspaper article had that right) in Windsor, CT, and at the time of the 1860 Census was living with her parents John N. Bissell and Olive D. Bissell in Coventry, CT. I can find no record of her father's service in the Civil War, (but this was a quick and not thorough search.)

The newspaper article that Sue provided stated that Grace didn't have a "papa at home to care for her now," but I don't know what happened to cause his absence. He didn't die until 1886, but in the 1870 Census, his wife is now Susan, a woman 16 years his junior. So I'm going to assume that Grace's mother, Olive, dies between 1860 and 1870.

At the time of the 1870 Census, the family is living in Manchester, CT, and both Grace and her father are working in the silk mills. In 1876, Grace married Charles E. House, and they had two children--she named her daughter Olive, after her mother. Grace died on March 28, 1925, age 70.

Thanks for the fun, Sue Reich!

Pam in NH, where the phoebes just arrived!

--

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 603-661-2245 Quilt Historian, Teacher AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles PO Box 123 Durham, NH 03824

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Subject: More books for sale From: Helene Kusnitz <helenekusnitzgmail.com> Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2011 22:28:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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These are from my smoke free, pet free home and are in excellent condition. They are $20 each plus shipping. I have others still available, if you have a specific book you're looking for please email me.

Kentucky Quilts 1800-1900 West Virginia Quilts and Quiltmakers Lone Stars Vol. 1 A Legacy of Texas Quilts, 1836-1936 Lone Stars Vol. 2 A Legacy of Texas Quilts, 1936-1986 Ho For California Gathered in Time Utah Quilts and their Makers, Settlement to 1950

Thank you, Helene Kusnitz

--0016364577bae5cb4404a0873682--

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Subject: Re: More books for sale From: KARRGRaol.com Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2011 23:56:36 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

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Helene,

If they are still available, I would like to purchase both Ho for California and Gathered in Time Utah Quilts. Let me know and I'll send you a check or however you want to be paid.

Thanks, Kathy Ronsheimer Novato, CA

In a message dated 4/9/2011 7:28:39 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, helenekusnitzgmail.com writes:

These are from my smoke free, pet free home and are in excellent condition. They are $20 each plus shipping. I have others still available, if you have a specific book you're looking for please email me.

Kentucky Quilts 1800-1900 West Virginia Quilts and Quiltmakers Lone Stars Vol. 1 A Legacy of Texas Quilts, 1836-1936 Lone Stars Vol. 2 A Legacy of Texas Quilts, 1936-1986 Ho For California Gathered in Time Utah Quilts and their Makers, Settlement to 1950

Thank you, Helene Kusnitz

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Subject: Civil War News (quilts) From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2011 05:22:13 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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The Agitator Wellsboro, Pennsylvania August 31, 1864 Page 3 Wellsboro, August 22, 1864 The following is a list of articles in box No 24, prepared, packed and sent to the Sanitary Commis- sion by the young girls of our Aid Society. 5 pillows, 6 rolls cotton cloths, 1 roll linen cloths, 1 handkerchief, 7 pillow cases, 1 pair slippers, 1 quart raspberries, 1 quart currants, 2 bags hops, 2 pair flannel drawers, 3 pair woolen socks, 8 arm slings, 12 rolls bandages, 8 pin cushions, 1 bottle rhubarb wine, 1 bottle currant wine, 1 jug black- berry cordial, 6 papers cornstarch, 2 bed quilts, 1 bundle magazines. Since the organization of the Society, these girls have taken an active part in every thing undertaken by the older ones. More than half of the quilts sent by us to the Commission have been pieced and many of them quilted by them. In the blackberry trip of last week these girls were "found ready and not wanting" regardless of soiled hands and sun burnt faces, picked lots of berries for cordial for the sick soldiers and could the soldiers themselves know if all they have done, wouldn't there ??? many a "God bless the girls" from their grateful hearts. Girls come to the Society regularly. We have something more for you to do, come one, come all, and remember the new Album quilt that is to be pieced. The box of cordial is to be sent during the week, and here let us thank those who prepared it, also Mr Chas Sears for the many kindnesses received at his hands during the past months. M Riberolle, Secretary

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

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Subject: Antiques Roadshow From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2011 20:09:22 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

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Oh my goodness -

I currently have on freeze frame on my television an image of a printed handkerchief depicting the War of 1812 with a battle scene center, ships in corners, and many other images on the kerchief I wish I could see up close - Brown monochrome printed on white or off-white ground.

 

It was part of an unbelievable collection of things that have been kept in an early child's desk (circa mid 1700s) that a family has been adding to over the years with papers, deeds, letters, any lots more interesting stuff.

 

I was most interested in the printed handkerchief and had never heard of one from the war of 1812 - wonder if anyone else has seen one in a book or museum? I would love to see it up close to see all the images. 

 

Any help out there? Has anyone else seen this item someplace other than Antiques Roadshow?

 

The item was shown on an Antiques Roadshow from Dallas Texas Part 2 - The desk and it's contents valued at 100,000 dollars. Here is a link so you can see it, too. (It's toward the end of the show.)

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/video/1305.html

 

Still flabbergasted!

Leah Zieber

Temecula, Ca.

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Subject: Sue Reich's list From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2011 08:24:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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The list that was part of the Civil War post from Sue included "6 papers cornstarch". I'm curious about what this was! Did cornstarch come in paper thin sheets? Why did soldiers need cornstarch? I realize that this isn't really quilt related, but Sue did post it on our site and curious minds tend to wander! Judy Knorr

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Subject: Civil War news - 150 years ago today. From: suereichcharter.net Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2011 10:38:07 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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On the front page of our local paper, The Waterbury Republican, the following headline reads "150 YEARS AGO TODAY, STATE WENT TO WAR." This article about quilting seems appropriate today.

Published in the "Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee from the Battle of Shiloh to the End of the War: with Sketches of life and Character, and brief notices of Current Events During that Period" by Kate Cumming, John P. Morton & CO., Louisville, KY, 1866. Page175:

"Dr. Bemiss is here, having rode all the way from Columbus of horseback. He is a good deal worried about his books, as they were on the Macon train, which it is said the enemy burned. He is very low-spirited, and says he feels like the man who was chased by a snake, who, after run- ning till he was exhausted, laid down to let the snake do its worst, and found he had been running from a piece of rope hung to the tail of his coat. Columbus is now in the hands of the enemy. After capturing Montgomery, they marched on to Columbus. Dr. B. says the militia fought manfully in its defense; they had at least ten to one to contend with. He describes the scenes along the road as distressing, but at the same time ludi- crous. There was a perfect panic at the cry that "the Yankees are coming!" At one place the women and children were running through the streets like people de- ranged, and men, with mules and wagons, driving in every direction. At that time the enemy was not within miles of the place. Dr. Stout has gone to North Carolina, and Dr. B. intends following in the morn- ing. He advises us to keep quiet, as, from all he can learn, the enemy are not hurting private property. We are to make believe that our house is a private one, although our rooms are filled with government prop- perty. All the valuables are committed to our care, and we are to be very busy quilt- ing if the enemy should honor us with a visit.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: More patriotic handkerchiefs From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2011 20:03:27 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

Hi again -

 

While I was poking around I found this lovely piece possibly printed by the same C. Gray that did the War of 1812 Battle of New Orleans piece.

 

http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/77853?search_id=3D1

 

I was looking for more information about Charles Gray and where he was working and what other textiles he was printing but have not been able to find much. Will continue to poke around on the uk search engines. Any help from England would be welcome -

 

It's just more a curiosity for me as I think these handkerchiefs interesting but the historical significance for us in America is notable.

 

Also - noticed that Pook and Pook auction house sold one of the War of 1812 Battle of New Orleans pieces back in 2005 - price was not shown. 

 

Another interesting (and likely well known) handkerchief I found on line (Wish I had one of these!)

http://teh.salemstate.edu/educatorsguide/pages/expansion-pdfs/Handkerchief.p df

 

And here is another handkerchief that denotes Gray and Ladd as engravers (were they engravers or printers?)

http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/00401/609458D3C91CF8B2E6BD5C96C63619C3 271629E1.html

 

I'm falling down the rabbit hole and hope someone grabs me so I can stop before it's too late.. 

 

Enjoy the images - perhaps you can post any you know about! 

Leah Zieber

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Subject: Amazing Civil War poem From: suereichcharter.net Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 00:50:38 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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There is nothing about a quilt in this poem but I think you will agree it is very touching. It is a Civil War remembrance.

Delta Herald and Times Delta, Pennsylvania June 13, 1890 Page 1

TWO SOLDIERS AT GETTYSBURG. The armies they had ceased to fight, The night was still and dark, And many thousands on the field, Were laying stiff and stark. A hundred surgeons worked that night Behind the clump of wood.

They flashed the lanterns in my face. As they were hurrying by: The sergeant looked and said, "He's dead." And I made no reply. The bullet had gone through my breast No wonder I was still: But once will I be nearer death Than when upon that hill.

A gray-clad picket came along Upon his midnight beat: He came so near me that I tried To move and touch his feet. Instant he bent and felt my breast Where life still fought at bay: No one who loved me could have done More than this man in gray.

Chilled with damp of blood and dew, His blanket o'er me spread: A crimson sheaf of wheat he brought, A pillow for my head. Then knelt beside me for an hour And bathed my lips and brow; But for the man who was my foe I'd not be living now.

Then as the coming daylight show, He bent his lips to say; "God spare you, brother, though you wear The blue, and I the gray."

The sounds of war are silent now; We call no man our foe, But soldier hearts cannot forget The scenes of long ago. Dear are the ones who stood with us, To struggle of to die: No one can oftener breathe their names, Or love them more than I.

But from my life I'd give a year That gray-clad man to see; To clasp in love the foeman's hand Who saved that live to me. --Isaac F. Euton.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Red-White Exhibition pamphlets, free From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2011 21:56:18 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

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Hello Friends,

I brought home some of the simple pamphlet/hand-outs from the recent New York City red-n-white exhibit, "Infinite Variety."

Happy to send them out to you (while they last J).

Just send your conventional mailing address to me at:

quiltcomplexhughes.net

Julie Silber

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Subject: Re: Red-White Exhibition pamphlets, free From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 01:12:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

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Thanks Julie. And please include a tracing of your dominant hand for me,signed and dated. :-) More in a few days. Jean's hand too!

Jan Thomas 3207 Apogee View Colorado Springs, CO 80906

 

 

 

 

-----Original Message----- From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplexhughes.net> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Mon, Apr 11, 2011 10:56 pm Subject: [qhl] Red-White Exhibition pamphlets, free

Hello Friends,

 

I brought home some of the simple pamphlet/hand-outs from

the recent New York City red-n-white exhibit, "Infinite Variety."

 

Happy to send them out to you (while they last J).

 

Just send your conventional mailing address to me at:

 

quiltcomplexhughes.net

 

Julie Silber

 

 

---

You are currently subscribed to qhl as: textiqueaol.com.

To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1857751Blyris.quiltropolis.com

 

----------MB_8CDC6E7636E3F60_1784_E313_webmail-m048.sysops.aol.com--

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Subject: Historic handkerchiefs From: Linda Eaton <LEatonwinterthur.org> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 09:04:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

I am so glad to know that there is interest in these printed handkerchiefs,many of which survive in collections such as the New York Historical Society, the National Museum of American History, and at Winterthur. Sadly Winterthur does not have our collection on line yet (we are working on it), butif anyone wants further information about what we might have feel free to contact me directly. 

For further information about these exciting pieces, see Mary Schoeser's booklet "Printed Textiles" published by the Museum of London in 1988, and Herbert Ridgeway Collins' book "Threads of History" published by the Smithsonian in 1977. 

A few examples of these handkerchiefs used in quilts can by found in my book "Quilts in a Material World." I will be including more examples in the forthcoming revised edition of Florence Montgomery's book "Printed Textiles"(we are re-shooting all the photos in color) but that won't be out for a few years.

Linda Eaton http://www.winterthur.org/

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Subject: Re: Red-White Exhibition pamphlets, free From: Karen Musgrave <karenmusgravesbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 06:51:20 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

--0-1241967759-1302616280=:86731 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Julie,

I would love one!

Hugs, Karen 1226 Whitingham Cir Naperville, IL 60540-6928

________________________________ From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplexhughes.net> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, April 11, 2011 11:56 PM Subject: Re: [qhl] Red-White Exhibition pamphlets, free

Hello Friends,

I brought home some of the simple pamphlet/hand-outs from the recent New York City red-n-white exhibit, "Infinite Variety."

Happy to send them out to you (while they last J).

Just send your conventional mailing address to me at:

quiltcomplexhughes.net

Julie Silber

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: karenmusgravesbcglobal.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1618966Plyris.quiltropolis.com --0-1241967759-1302616280=:86731--

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Subject: RE: More patriotic handkerchiefs From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 10:01:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

This one's at pook and pook right now!

http://www.pookandpook.com/cat/2011-04-16/543 Candace Perry -----Original Message----- From: Leah Zieber [mailto:leah.zieberverizon.net] Sent: Monday, April 11, 2011 11:03 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] More patriotic handkerchiefs

Hi again -

While I was poking around I found this lovely piece possibly printed by the same C. Gray that did the War of 1812 Battle of New Orleans piece.

http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/77853?search_id=1

I was looking for more information about Charles Gray and where he was working and what other textiles he was printing but have not been able to find much. Will continue to poke around on the uk search engines. Any help from England would be welcome -

It's just more a curiosity for me as I think these handkerchiefs interesting but the historical significance for us in America is notable.

Also - noticed that Pook and Pook auction house sold one of the War of 1812 Battle of New Orleans pieces back in 2005 - price was not shown.

Another interesting (and likely well known) handkerchief I found on line (Wish I had one of these!)

http://teh.salemstate.edu/educatorsguide/pages/expansion-pdfs/Handkerchief.p df

And here is another handkerchief that denotes Gray and Ladd as engravers (were they engravers or printers?)

http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/00401/609458D3C91CF8B2E6BD5C96C63619C3 271629E1.html

I'm falling down the rabbit hole and hope someone grabs me so I can stop before it's too late..

Enjoy the images - perhaps you can post any you know about!

Leah Zieber

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: candaceschwenkfelder.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1770637Clyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 11, 2011 From: LinusDonnaaol.com Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 13:26:37 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

The list that was part of the Civil War post from Sue included "6 papers cornstarch". I'm curious about what this was!

Judy Knorr asked about cornstarch. It had many uses. It was often used as a thickener and a sweetener for food, and also to cut down on chafing, much as we use talcum powder.

Cornstarch is mentioned in many letters and articles of that era. Here's one from a captured Union soldier in Libby Prison, Richmond VA. Libby Prison regulations allowed only 6 lines for the soldiers' correspondence.

"My Dear Wife. - Yours received - no hopes of exchange - send corn starch - want socks - no money - rheumatism in left shoulder - pickles very good - send sausages - God bless you - kiss the baby - Hail Columbia! - Your devoted husband."

(Quoted in The Christian Recorder, February 11, 1865, Philadelphia, PA)

Bright blessings! ~Donna Laing _www.northstarqualityquilting.com_ (http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)

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Subject: Cornstarch papers From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 10:34:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

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I didn't quite get the reference for "papers of cornstarch" either, until it sat with me a bit. What comes to mind are the packets in which all sorts of dried materials might be wrapped for storage or moving about. I'm thinking that cornstarch might have come in a kind of paper envelope or bag, much as flour and cornmeal do today. I wonder if there would be a picture of such an old-timey thing? Susan

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Subject: Re: Cornstarch papers From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 20:10:17 +0100 X-Message-Number: 9

I don't know about an 'old timey' thing? When I was young the standard treatment for colds was Beechams Powders, dissolved in water. Each measure of the powder (probably just aspirin?) was in a folded white paper packet which looked very similar to the black paper packets you used to buy needles or pins in. Unwrapping it to flat, then forming it into a funnel to shake the powder into the glass was an art in itself.

Sally Ward

> I wonder if there would be a picture of such an old-timey thing? Susan >

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Subject: Re: Cornstarch papers From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 15:42:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Agree with Sally. I think many things came in little paper packets like that! Candace Perry

-----Original Message----- From: Sally Ward [mailto:sallytattersfastmail.co.uk] Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 3:10 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: Cornstarch papers

I don't know about an 'old timey' thing? When I was young the standard treatment for colds was Beechams Powders, dissolved in water. Each measure of the powder (probably just aspirin?) was in a folded white paper packet which looked very similar to the black paper packets you used to buy needles or pins in. Unwrapping it to flat, then forming it into a funnel to shake the powder into the glass was an art in itself.

Sally Ward

> I wonder if there would be a picture of such an old-timey thing? Susan >

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: candaceschwenkfelder.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1770637Clyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: Historic handkerchiefs From: Crm793aol.com Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 16:30:19 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 11

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I remembered seeing a quilt at Winterthur in which the original handkerchief had been removed and a piece of flowered fabric had replaced it. Linda stated that these handkerchiefs had been more valuable than the quilts in the early 20th century and thus removed. The conservation lab had removed the fabric and replaced it with another handkerchief. Very interesting. The article can be seen on page 150 of Eaton's book 'Quilts in a Material World'.

Carolyn Miller

In a message dated 4/12/2011 8:05:14 A.M. Central Daylight Time, LEatonwinterthur.org writes:

I am so glad to know that there is interest in these printed handkerchiefs, many of which survive in collections such as the New York Historical Society, the National Museum of American History, and at Winterthur. Sadly Winterthur does not have our collection on line yet (we are working on it), but if anyone wants further information about what we might have feel free to contact me directly.

For further information about these exciting pieces, see Mary Schoeser's booklet "Printed Textiles" published by the Museum of London in 1988, and Herbert Ridgeway Collins' book "Threads of History" published by the Smithsonian in 1977.

A few examples of these handkerchiefs used in quilts can by found in my book "Quilts in a Material World." I will be including more examples in the forthcoming revised edition of Florence Montgomery's book "Printed Textiles" (we are re-shooting all the photos in color) but that won't be out for a few years.

Linda Eaton http://www.winterthur.org/

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Subject: Re: Cornstarch papers From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 15:57:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

Ooh Candace and Sally, I'm so glad there are folks like you on this list---old folks with good memories. Such a help. I'm thinking Sally's medicinal papers were something like BC Headache Powders. I personally never saw this item in the real, but I remember their being advertised on radio. The advertisement caught my attention because "headache powders" sounded so strange (I thought of powder as something one applied). I gathered from the advertisement, one dumped the packet into a glass of water and then swallowed the water. That was in the sixties.

Gaye Ingram

---- Candace Perry <candaceschwenkfelder.com> wrote: > Agree with Sally. I think many things came in little paper packets like > that!

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Subject: Powders (thoroughly off-topic now!) From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 22:25:52 +0100 X-Message-Number: 13

Lawks a mercy Gaye, you know how to make a girl feel her age!

Thanks to the wonder of YouTube I have evidence that I am only a slip of a gel, because Beechams Powders were still sold in papers in 1981. Someone has uploaded an entire ad break from a closing-down TV station in December of that year. If you pause at around 1.47, just after he lifts the glass, you will see the neat little pile of folded papers in the packet. Note also the technique of swift swishing of the powder to try and keep it in suspension while you swallowed it. God bless the man who invented Beechams capsules.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DyI1Tg5htJPM

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: Cornstarch papers From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 16:51:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

Headache powders can still be purchased. Goody's is one brand. I think BC powders are still marketed as well. Steph Whitson

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Subject: Can someone help this person From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 17:03:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15

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I received this inquiry at work and immediately thought of you all. Can someone help this fellow? Please reply to the list; I'll share your suggestions with the inquirer.

Andi in Paducah

Hello,

My name is Wagner Campelo and I'm a Brazilian surface designer who lives in Rio. I need help. Could you please indicate to me some book about the history or origin of the coordinates (coordinated patterns)? I'm researching the subject, but I'm having difficulty finding information about [it]. I think that the Americans "invented" the coordinates, but I'm not sure.

To explain what I mean by coordinates I will use the definition by Richard Fisher (Textile Print Design, 1987):

"Two or more designs created to be used together are called coordinates. Some coordinates may be very simple allover textures lifted from a section of the original. Or the coordinate may be a secondary flower that is repeated in a set layout. These other designs that relate to the main design are often added to help individual customers as well as interior designers and decorators to integrate the room."

I would like to know the origin of such patterns. Which designer (or company) initially had the idea to create patterns to be used together? Was it an economic issue (print the same set of colors on different fabrics)? Or was it a matter of aesthetics? I suspect that the quilts must have had some influence in this case, but I have no clue or evidence about that.

So, I wonder if you could indicate to me some book about this subject (if it exists, of course).

Thank you for your help.

Wagner Campelo

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Subject: RE: Can someone help this person From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 19:42:22 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 16

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That IS an interesting question. I'll be curious to hear the answer.

Best regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Tue, Apr 12, 2011 at 5:03 PM, Andi wrote:

> I received this inquiry at work and immediately thought of you all. Can someone help this fellow? Please reply to the list; I'll share your suggestions with the inquirer.

Andi in Paducah

Hello,

My name is Wagner Campelo and I'm a Brazilian surface designer who lives in Rio. I need help. Could you please indicate to me some book about the history or origin of the coordinates (coordinated patterns)? I'm researching the subject, but I'm having difficulty finding information about [it]. I think that the Americans "invented" the coordinates, but I'm not sure.

To explain what I mean by coordinates I will use the definition by Richard Fisher (Textile Print Design, 1987):

"Two or more designs created to be used together are called coordinates. Some coordinates may be very simple allover textures lifted from a section of the original. Or the coordinate may be a secondary flower that is repeated in a set layout. These other designs that relate to the main design are often added to help individual customers as well as interior designers and decorators to integrate the room."

I would like to know the origin of such patterns. Which designer (or company) initially had the idea to create patterns to be used together? Was it an economic issue (print the same set of colors on different=C2 fabrics)? Or was it a matter of aesthetics? I suspect that the quilts must have had some influence in this case, but I have no clue or evidence about that.

So, I wonder if you could indicate to me some book about this subject (if it exists, of course).

Thank you for your help.

Wagner Campelo

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Subject: Civil War - "Woman's Sympathy for our Soldiers." From: suereichcharter.net Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2011 07:47:11 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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This article is most touching and tugs on my heart strings every time I read it. A similar one was found in the Janesville Weekly Gazette, Janesville, Wisconsin, April 1, 1864.

Coshocton Age Coshocton, Ohio March 11, 1865

Woman's Sympathy for our Soldiers. There is a touching pathos in some of the markers attached to the blankets, shirts, handkerchiefs, and the like, sent to the San- itary Commission for the soldiers in camp and hospital. Thus on a bed quilt was pinned a card having this tender inscription: "My son is in the army; whoever is made warm by this quilt, which I have worked on for six days and most all of six nights, let him remember his own mother's love!" Who can doubt that these simple words have made some weak one strong again, fill- ed some sad heart with joy and hope? On a pillow sent to the commission was writ ten: "This pillow belonged to my little boy, who died resting on it; it is a precious treas- ure to me, but I give it to the soldiers!" On a box of beautiful lint was this in- scription:"Made in a sick room, where the sunlight has not entered for nine years, but where God has entered, and where two sons have bid their mother good-bye, as they have gone to war," What a spirit of sacrifice and saintly heroism shines through this little sentence; sunshine, joy, sympathy, coming out of the shadow, the camp fire and the hospital. But the tenderest of all in- scriptions we have seen is this, written on some eye-shades; "Made by one who is blind. Oh! how I long to see the dear old flag you are all fighting under!"

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: feedsacks From: Carole G Crandall <carolecrcgmail.com> Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2011 07:54:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Dear List Friends- A few weeks back I posted regarding selling my feedsack collection. Many of you contacted me and I had planned to get back to each of you with a price/inventory. "Life can change in a minute"...as you know. My husband has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and I have been in a whirl of hospitals and enough medical terminology to last a lifetime. I will be spending the coming weeks in Baltimore at Johns Hopkins and obviously not working on Feedsacks. I have saved all your emails and will let you know when I am ready to sell. Thank you for your patience. Carole in Charlottesville Prayers are welcome...many of them.

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Subject: Re: Papers & Cornstarch From: "Sheri Lesh" <sleshfmtcswb.com> Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2011 07:48:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

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The list that was part of the Civil War post from Sue included "6 papers cornstarch". I'm curious about what this was!

Just a thought.......what a about a simple typo-mistake of no comma between the two items to read......

6 papers, cornstarch......

Sheri R. Lesh sleshfmtcswb.com http://4andfifteen.blogspot.com/ ------=_NextPart_000_001E_01CBF9AF.2C86B5D0--

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Subject: Re: feedsacks From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2011 10:05:17 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

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Our prayers are with you also - my DH had (has) cancer so you understand......hopefully things will get better for you...don't worry about those feedsacks, they have been there for many years already so they won't go bad and they don't mate to make more baby feedsacks (tho my DH thinks all fabrics mate and have offspring thus that is why 'my' room is always piled high with fabrics - I don't tell him differently). Luv and stuf - Mitzi from rainy Vermont

In a message dated 4/13/2011 7:54:26 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, carolecrcgmail.com writes:

Dear List Friends- A few weeks back I posted regarding selling my feedsack collection. Many of you contacted me and I had planned to get back to each of you with a price/inventory. "Life can change in a minute"...as you know. My husband has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and I have been in a whirl of hospitals and enough medical terminology to last a lifetime. I will be spending the coming weeks in Baltimore at Johns Hopkins and obviously not working on Feedsacks. I have saved all your emails and will let you know when I am ready to sell. Thank you for your patience. Carole in Charlottesville Prayers are welcome...many of them.

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mitzioakesaol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1714905Ilyris.quiltropolis.com

--part1_ba45.420480a1.3ad7079d_boundary--

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Subject: Re: Civil War - "Woman's Sympathy for our Soldiers." From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2011 10:08:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Sue, those are the kinds of words that end up becoming one of my historical novels. Indulge me as I share a newspaper article from 1902 Gordon, Nebraska:

ATTRACTIVE WIDOWS

Another cargo of war widows arrived in Gordon last Tuesday morning, sixteen in number, and filed upon claim adjacent to town. This was decidedly the best lot of wisdos that has arrived thus far.

That just had to lead to a novel. Of course I am schiziphrenic. As a historian, I am suppose to be willing to live with the unknown (although I learned a great deal of real history researching that newspaper article). As a novelist, I enjoy what historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich calls "educated supposition" ... and end up writing an historical novel.

As a quilt historian, I can dress the beds correctly. It's truly a wonderful life.

Thanks for sharing those articles, Sue. I don't do the Civil War (I'm strictly 19th Century Great Plains in the foreseeable future), but those articles are wonderful.

Steph Whitson

Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: Papers & Cornstarch From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2011 10:19:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Good eye, Sheri! Maybe he wanted 6 sheets of writing paper ... and some conrstarch.

Eats, Shoots, and Leaves ..... hhhhmmm.... Steph Whitson (who is headed to her civil war medical books to look for cornstarch right now!)

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Subject: Re: Papers & Cornstarch From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2011 10:39:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

This is from PubMed published by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

"In the Edo era, paper was useful as the most suitable packaging materials for carrying medicines. It was considered that the wrapping paper protected medicines from an imaginary gaseous medium "ki", which meant atmospheric moisture in this case. Also brand name and indications of medicines were printed on the wrapping paper for taking a medicine correctly. In the 18th century, wrapping paper for medicine was produced. It was specially processed for wrapping medicines only, and it was called "yakutaishi" in Japanese."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11623306

-- Mary G. Persyn mary.persynvalpo.edu Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917

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Subject: Back to the red and white quilts... From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 00:24:35 +0100 X-Message-Number: 8

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Today I found a great article which considers 'Infinite Variety' from the point of the view of the design of the exhibit, not just the content.

http://www.metropolismag.com/pov/20110329/exhibition-design-in-the-app-age

There are so very many pictures of the exhibition all over the internet, and yet I haven't seen a bad one. Reading this article I realise that this is evidence of the excellent use of the exhibition space because wherever you stood the view was amazing. I love description quoted at the end of the article:

<......a transcendent example of the art of exhibition design. As Tom Hennes put it, =93It=92s a great case of seeing the forest and the trees at the same time.=94>

Sally Ward/Tatters www.Textilehunter.co.uk

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Subject: Doll Beds and Doll Quilts From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2011 21:29:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I just discovered this new competition when I went to Selvedge Magazines website http://www.selvedge.org/ to explore. If you have never seen this magazine before, you are in for a real treat.

The Doll Bed/Doll Quilt competition is co-sponsored by the Houston International Quilt Festival, among others. Love the photos of the doll beds with their little quilts.

http://www.callforentriesiqfselvedge.com/

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Civil War news From: suereichcharter.net Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 06:41:54 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Cedar Falls Gazette Cedar Falls , Iowa January 10, 1862 Page 2

News Items During the past week there has been a very considerable advance in the price of cot- ton goods, as for instance paper muslin has raised from 12 1/2 to 15 1/2 20 cents per yard and calico at 12 1/2 to 1518c. Spool thread, cotton rolls, muslins, &c., have increased in like proportion. A succession lady in Northwestern Missouri offers a premium for enough Yankee scalps to make a bed quilt. Perhaps she would like to take a whole Yankee as a comforter.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 11, 2011 From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 10:54:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

I thought of keeping feet dry when cornstarch was mentioned...this letter has 'want socks' right after asking for cornstarch. jean

> "My Dear Wife. - Yours received - no hopes of exchange - send corn starch - > want socks - no money - rheumatism in left shoulder - pickles very good - > send sausages - God bless you - kiss the baby - Hail Columbia! - > Your devoted husband." >

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: April 11, 2011 From: "Gale Slagle" <glslagcox.net> Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2011 10:09:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Re: the corn starch. I have a Formula Manual (N.H. Stark 1975) that uses corn starch in several items. One that is textile related is Fabric Starch to starch shirts (equal parts corn starch and wheat starch). An officer probably would have had a starched shirt. However, food was probably of more interest to the soldiers who probably used corn starch in cooking to make gravies, just like many of us use it for. I believe biscuits and gravy were a favorite. Foot Powder was probably appreciated after a long day of hiking, too.

Other recipes / formulas are for; Baking Powder, Mouthwash Powder, Foot Powder, Face Powder, Paste, and Modeling Clay.

When I was a kid I was a volunteer model for the Pageant of the Masters. After being coated with a thick layer makeup they would dust us with corn starch or talcum powder to set the make up. I remember feeling crunchy after being dusted w/ corn starch. Not sure if they still use corn starch. We also used Crisco to remove the make up. . If you are ever in So. Calif. in the summer you should see the Pageant of the Masters at the Laguna Beach Festival of Arts, http://www.foapom.com . Art and Costumes are relevant to quilting, right?

> > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: glslagcox.net > To unsubscribe send a blank email to > leave-qhl-1847490Alyris.quiltropolis.com > For more information, articles and archives, visit our home page at > http://QuiltHistory.com.

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Subject: Re: Papers & Cornstarch From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 10:13:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I did check my Civil War history references but the only thing I found was a suggestion to use cornstarch for removing blood stains.

I wonder if it was used for packing wounds to encourage clotting ... it IS absorbant. And perhaps for poultices. But I haven't found a primary source so don't quote that.

Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: Papers & Cornstarch From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 16:45:58 +0100 X-Message-Number: 6

That's inspired Steph! A quick google search produced modern references to using it to help the blood on a cut to clot, and also for skin rash, diaper rash, athlete's foot, bed sores, and even haemmorhoids etc. Also as a paste to use as a base for administering oils and herbs in traditional remedies. It sounds as if it could have been the wonder drug of its day.

Sally Ward

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Subject: Papers and medicine From: sgmunseycomcast.net Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 17:40:17 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 7

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Medicines wrapped in papers are the "newest thing" in emergency medicine according=C2to the local=C2paper=C2today.=C2 Powdered aspirin in paper is quicker to administer and is absorbed more readily than aspirin inpill form in a heart attack situation.=C2 A powdered aspirin and caffeine mixture is also available.=C2 In both cases, the powder can be placedin the victim's mouth and it will begin to be absorbed immediately, no water needed in an emergency.=C2

Everything old is new again - - - one more time.

Sandra on Cape Cod ------=_Part_1130528_853011617.1302802817236--

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Subject: Australian Antique Quilt Registry From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 17:55:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

I am completely changing the subject here:

http://www.collectionsaustralia.net/nqr/about.php

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Subject: movie textiles alert From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 22:43:39 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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HI all- there's an authentic indigo and white double weave geometric coverlet in the just released film of an 1845 emigration to Oregon called Meek's Cutoff,appropriatefor the settlers to carry with them from the East (NY State or Ohio,probably). But,there are also atoo-young blue andwhite quilt, seen nearly at the film's end; wrong-era manufactured blankets, but whatlook like authentic sunbonnets galore.  Just heard the director on NPR talking about how she researched for the film, by reading womens' journals of such expeditions out west, andher movie is presented from the womens' point of view. Quite interesting in addition to the costume and settings, a spare visually compelling distinctive explorationof what it must have been like toemigrate.

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-2006362490-1302846219=:55863--

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Subject: Civil War news - Ladies' Soldiers Aid Society From: suereichcharter.net Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 06:27:08 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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The Agitator Wellsboro, Pennsylvania September 24, 1862 Page 2

Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Society. On Saturday, August 1st, 1862, the ladies of Covington and vicinity, met at Dyer Hall and organized themselves into a society to furnish supplies for the Army Hospitals.... The members of the Society have held ten meetings, and on Tuesday, September 16th, sent, as the result of their labor their first box, containing the following articles: 9 quilts, 11 sheets, 26 pillow cases, 3 feather pillows, 11 cushions, 12 moss rings (two sizes,) 6 double wrappers, 8 shirts, 5 pairs Canton flannel draw- ers, 11 1/2 lbs. of lint in three ounce packages, 400 yards bandages different widths, 40 arm and foot bandages, 18 dove-tail bandages, 25 brown single finger shields, 14 linen towels, 51 handkerchief, 2 large boxes old linen, 2 large boxes old cotton, 4 fine sponges, 6 pin cushions, with pins, 4 papers corn starch, 4 pounds rice, 1 lb. green tea, 6 bags dried fruit, 3 pint bottles spirits camphor, 2 bottles pain killer, jellies, currant wine, Castile soap, 600 pamphlets, and other reading matter. Weight of box, 285 lbs. Valuation, $80. Since our organization, the society has re- ceived $46 cash; $5 in new material, together with liberal contributions of other material, equal- ly valuable in making up such boxes as the needs of our soldiers require. Encouraged by former liberality, the ladies design to prepare a second box as speedily as possible, and hope to be sustained by the will- ing hearts and ready hands of their community in continuing their work of mercy, as long as a flowing wound or suffering body shall offer their affecting appeal for the relief that may be bestowed at so little sacrifice on the part of each. The members of the Society would take this opportunity of tendering their thanks to the young ladies and gentlemen of their village, for the kindness in offering an exhibition, the suc- cess of which, contributed largely to the in- crease of the Treasury. And we hope before we shall again require them, our Nation shall have witnessed the dying struggle of secession, and the conquering heroes, for whose comfort we asked their aid, shall see peace, like an angel from the skies, spreading her broad wings over the long-nursed tree of Liberty, planted yet deeper by their deeds of valor and heroism. Fannie A. Dyer, Corresponding Secretary.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Cornstarch papers From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 07:45:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

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Thanks so much for all tlhe information in response to my question about cornstarch papers. I knew cornstarch was widely used at the time of the Civil War, but had never considered how it was marketed or packaged. Guess I thought it came in a paper lined box the way I have seen it packaged for the last 50+ years! You are all an amazing resource! Judy Knorr

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Subject: Alliance for American Quilts Contest From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 12:24:15 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 5

I'm participating in the Alliance for American Quilts contest: quilt number 117, so please scroll way down the gallery page. I hope that you will consider voting for my quilt. And if you aren't a member yet, I spoke with the director Amy and it isn't too late to join this great organization and get in on the voting. If you join by Tuesday, April 19th, she'll email you a ballot. You can pay by credit card or paypal ($25.00).

Here is the link for all the quilts: http://www.allianceforamericanquilts.org/projects/galleries/Alliances/gallery/

And to go directly to my quilt #117 http://www.allianceforamericanquilts.org/projects/galleries/Alliances/1-6-1DD/Virginia%20is%20for%20Lovers

My quilt "Virginia is for Lovers" is a reproduction of a charming circa 1845 crib quilt from my collection. The original is quite romantic with lots of hearts and cupid's arrows and is from Virginia - hence the name. It is also very quirky with a cupid's arrow about to hit a bird perched on a branch. Lots of hand applique and hand quilting. You can read more about it on my blogs and see the antique inspiration.

When you are visiting the gallery, please note the new audio feature in which many of the artists read their statements. It is very cool to hear the artist's own voice.

Thanks.

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts and antique reproductions http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: Civil War news - Ladies' Soldiers Aid Society From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 08:48:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Sue,

Thanks for posting these reminders that the home-front has been supporting our fighting men with boxes of "stuff" for a very long time. I, along with a number of other people scattered around the country, have been supporting 3rd Battalion 9th Marines in Afghanistan with boxes of socks, goodies, treats and magazines on a weekly basis for quite some time. My contact is through their chaplain. I've forwarded your recent posts to the chaplain and the rest of our group with very positive response.

We've just gotten notice that the last boxes should be shipped no later than 5/15, so our guys will be home soon!

Our chaplain has a small quilt pinned up. Red, white, and blue, of course.

Judy Grow

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Subject: Civil Wars News from Tennessee From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2011 15:17:18 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Published in the "Journal of Hospital Life in the Confederate Army of Tennessee from the Battle of Shiloh to the End of the War: with Sketches of life and Character, and brief notices of Current Events During that Period" by Kate Cumming, John P. Morton & CO., Louisville, KY, 1866. Page171:

A number of negro women are at work quilting comforts. Dr. de Yampert wished to have the cloth for them dyed; but most of the Confederate dye does not stand. The comforts are made out of unbleached home- spun, and the raw cotton is put in them in lumps, and they are tacked about a foot apart; when washed they are not fit to use. Cotton goods of all kinds are very high; but I am told that the government manu- factories in Georgia, and, I believe, in the other states, sell goods to soldiers' rela- tives for nearly one fourth what they can be bought for in the stores.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Meek's Cut-Off film From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2011 18:43:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Coverlet in film The woven coverlet in this film is mine. I have been waiting for it to appear. I told the renter that the coverlet would be much more appropriate to the time period than a quilt. I have seen the trailer but not the film. What fun.

Barbara Woodford

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Subject: Civil Wars news - Exeter, NH From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2011 12:42:57 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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A Brief Record of Events in Exeter, N.H. during the year 1862; Together with the names of the Soldiers of this Town in the War by Rev. Elias Nason, Exeter: Fogg and Fellows, printed by Samuel Hall, 1863. Page 5 "February 28. It snows all day. Snow is now between three and four feet deep in the forest. The children of the primary School District No. 2, make a quilt of 61 squares each having the name of a contributor for the N.H. 2d regt."

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Seeking trip planning help From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2011 23:01:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi All -

My husband and I will be visiting our daughter in Chicago two consecutive weekends in May, and I'm seeking places in the upper midwest to visit during the week in between.

We will be leaving Chicago Monday morning, May 23, and returning to Chicago Friday evening, May 27.

I'm interested in viewing/studying antique quilts in the Indiana, Illinois, lower Wisconsin, maybe Iowa areas. I'm thinking historical societies, museums, antique quilt dealers. Or other suggestions.

If anyone has knowledge of exhibits, or who to contact to get "behind the scenes", I'd be very grateful to learn about them. I'm not particularly interested in contemporary art quilt exhibits, or fabric stores -- I'm blessed with what I consider "the best" fabric stores here in PA.

Thanks in advance for any help, references, or guidance you can offer.

Sincerely,

Barb Garrett in southeastern PA

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Subject: Capper's Weekly From: patlnickolsyahoo.com Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2011 15:30:44 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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The Joyce Gross Collection, now at the University of Texas, Austin I believe has the complete collection of Capper's Weekly. They seem very interested in seeing this collection used.

Pat L. Nickols Finally sunny and warm San Diego

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Subject: Re: Seeking trip planning help From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2011 07:10:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Barb, if you get that far south between stops in Chicago, don't miss the Frugal and Fancy antique quilt exhibit at the Indiana State Museum (right downtown). The downtown, spiffing up for the Superbowl next winter (we hope!), with spectacular new hotels that have changed the skyline, and the current museum exhibits, is worth a look. The Eiteljorg Museum of Indian Art (shares an underground parking garage with the State Museum) has an interesting exhibit on Black/Red, touching on slavery within Indian cultures, and the Zoo, with its new crop of babies, including a new baby giraffe, is just on the other side of those museums.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Seeking trip planning help From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2011 10:50:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I enjoyed a trip to the Wisconsin Quilt Museum in Cedarburg. It's a real work of the heart ... don't know how far they've progressed since I was there. They have a historic farm site and were exhibiting in the farm house with plans to renovate the massive barn on the property for exhibits.

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Dressing Mr. Lincoln! From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2011 18:08:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

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List friends,

Please excuse the cross-posting but I have to let you all know about thisarticle written by a friend here in Colorado Springs. She is our regional vice-president for the Costume Society of America and my research partner for reform costume dating before 1880. Denise is an wonderful tailor and costume research friend - she's picky, just as I like it. 

The article was written for costumers and reenactors. However, I've beentrying to get her to write the story about the gorgeous quilting insidePresident Lincoln's coat for the quilt history audience and I'll keep atit. The link to her website is in the email from her below.

Thanks, Jan Thomas

Hi all - I have finally got the Dressing Mr. Lincoln article on my website. The article offers a summary of the research I conducted in order to create an accurate reproduction of the clothing in which Lincoln was assassinated, for Lincoln enactor John Voehl, of Abe Lincoln Alive.  Unfortunately, I have just missed the anniversary date of the Lincoln assassination of April 14, 1865.  I think that you might find the research interesting as there are many aspects of Mr. Lincoln's clothing that aren't well known.  And, if you find any problems with the article, please do let me know. Special thanks to John Voehl and Bill See Photography.  http://www.denisenadinedesign.com/Lincoln%20Home.htm  Best Denise Winter Denise Nadine Design Historical Clothing www.denisenadinedesign.com (719) 592-1648 

 

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Subject: voting for Alliance for American Quilts contest From: Sharon Pinka <sharonpinkayahoo.com> Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2011 16:39:21 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hello everyone - if you are a member of the Alliance for American Quilts, you know that we are now voting on the small quilts entered in the current contest. All of these entries will be on display at the Paducah show later this month.

I have entered a quilt #68 which features Lincoln's face in a courthouse steps block, surrounded by flags. The theme was "People, Passion and Patterns." If you are eligible to vote, and have no particular "favorite", I would appreciate your vote for #68. There are some wonderful prizes for the winners. Deadline is Wednesday, April 20 at 9pm Eastern.  Thanks, Sharon Pinka

Sharon Pinka Rainbow Quilt Blocks, Quilt Study & Research 6323 Possum Run Rd. Bellville, OH 44813 USA

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Subject: 1844 quilt sold at auction From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 19 Apr 2011 00:50:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Well, prices on antiques are generally down, but on April 13th Freeman's Auction in Philadelphia sold a gorgeous appliqued, pieced and broderie perse quilt made by Rachel A. Allen of New Egypt NJ for over 5 times its high estimate. It sold for $40,000.00! http://www.freemansauction.com/ecatalogues.asp

The catalog is viewable in Adobe. Item 316 on page 79 of the pdf catalog.

I wish we knew who bought it and that we could show it to you in person at AQSG Seminar in Cherry Hill NJ this coming September. But you will see other quilts of the same sort, period and quality!

Judy Grow

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Subject: mystery pattern From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 19 Apr 2011 13:49:51 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Does anyone out there recognize this pattern? We at MassQuilts are stumped! So far it's Tumbling Blocks meets Trip Around the World.

Anita

===========================Anita B. Loscalzo 16 Ledgewood Drive Dover, MA 02030-1812 -------- email: aloscalzyahoo.com telephone: 508-785-1407 FAX: 508-785-1429 --0-38866433-1303246191=:33562--

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Subject: Quilt Index International Collections Survey From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Tue, 19 Apr 2011 17:08:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

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Dear QHL list members:

The Quilt Index (<http://www.quiltindex.org/>http://www.quiltindex.org) is seeking to develop international partnerships with organizations that hold quilt collections.

To gather information, we have launched a survey to gather descriptions of quilt collections across the globe. The survey is part of a collaborative planning process to expand the Index, funded by the U.S. Institute for Museum and Library Services. The Quilt Index is a partnership of MATRIX, Michigan State University Museum and The Alliance for American Quilts. The planning process is a collaboration with the International Quilt Study Center & Museum.

If you know about, own, or serve as custodian for quilt documentation, individual quilts, or quilt collections located outside the United States, we would love to hear from you.

Click here to participate in this survey about International collections: <http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/QuiltIndexInternationalSurvey>http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/QuiltIndexInternationalSurvey

The survey will help us to create international partnerships, as well as build on a public listing of international collections of quilts and quilt documentation.

Results will be added to a resource listing quilt collections on the Quilt Index Wiki.

Note: The Quilt Index is also conducting a User Feedback Survey. To participate in the QI User Feedback Survey 2011, click here: <http://goo.gl/E3E1z>http://goo.gl/E3E1z

Sincerely,

Marsha MacDowell, Michigan State University Museum

On behalf of The Quilt Index International Collaborative Planning Team at the Alliance for American Quilts, Michigan State University Museum, MATRIX: Center for Humane Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences Online and International Quilt Study Center & Museum.

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Subject: Quilt Index User Feedback Survey 2011 From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Tue, 19 Apr 2011 17:08:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

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Dear QHL list subscribers:

Please help improve the Quilt Index by participating in the Quilt Index User Feedback Survey 2011.

<http://survey.constantcontact.com/survey/a07e367q0prgh54rneq/start>http://survey.constantcontact.com/survey/a07e367q0prgh54rneq/start (or shortened link: <http://goo.gl/E3E1z>http://goo.gl/E3E1z)

The Quilt Index project directors are seeking a few minutes of your time to help as we evaluate the value and usability of the Index. Many user suggestions in the past have been critical to how the Quilt Index and its user tools have been constructed and have resulted in direct improvements and additions.

We want to continue to guide the development of the Index in a way that addresses your needs as scholars, artists, and educators. Therefore, would you take a few moments and go to our user survey and share your views, experiences, critiques and desires for this Index? If you filled out this form last year, we would love to have information on new uses and recommendations.

Note: The Quilt Index is also conducting a survey of International quilt collections to begin to develop international partnerships. If you own or know about quilt collections in countries outside the U.S. Please consider submitting those collections to the Quilt Index International Collections Survey: <http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/QuiltIndexInternationalSurvey>http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/QuiltIndexInternationalSurvey

Sincerely,

Marsha MacDowell, Michigan State University Museum

--- On behalf of The Quilt Index team at the Alliance for American Quilts, Michigan State University Museum, and MSU's MATRIX: Center for Humane Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences Online

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Subject: repeating the question From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Tue, 19 Apr 2011 17:50:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

The only person I've heard from was Sharron and I agree with her -- this is an interesting question. Any help from anyone?

I received this inquiry at work and immediately thought of you all. Can someone help this fellow? Please reply to the list; I'll share your suggestions with the inquirer.

Andi in Paducah

Hello,

My name is Wagner Campelo and I'm a Brazilian surface designer who lives in Rio. I need help. Could you please indicate to me some book about the history or origin of the coordinates (coordinated patterns)? I'm researching the subject, but I'm having difficulty finding information about [it]. I think that the Americans "invented" the coordinates, but I'm not sure.

To explain what I mean by coordinates I will use the definition by Richard Fisher (Textile Print Design, 1987):

"Two or more designs created to be used together are called coordinates. Some coordinates may be very simple allover textures lifted from a section of the original. Or the coordinate may be a secondary flower that is repeated in a set layout. These other designs that relate to the main design are often added to help individual customers as well as interior designers and decorators to integrate the room."

I would like to know the origin of such patterns. Which designer (or company) initially had the idea to create patterns to be used together? Was it an economic issue (print the same set of colors on different fabrics)? Or was it a matter of aesthetics? I suspect that the quilts must have had some influence in this case, but I have no clue or evidence about that.

So, I wonder if you could indicate to me some book about this subject (if it exists, of course).

Thank you for your help.

Wagner Campelo

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Subject: RE: Can someone help this person From:quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 19:42:22 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 16

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That IS an interesting question. I'll be curious to hear the answer.

Best regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: Civil War News - Placerville, CA From: suereichcharter.net Date: Tue, 19 Apr 2011 20:59:34 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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The Mountain Democrat Placerville, CA May 19, 1866 Page 4

Festival--We are pleased to learn that the festival given by the ladies of the Presbyterian congregation on Wednesday and Thursday evenings last was generally attended and lib- erally patronized. The manner in which it was gotten up was a credit to the sound judgment and correct taste of the fair donors. The pavilion was tastefully and beautifully decorated, with a profusion of evergreens and flowers blended together with artistic skill and an eye to con- trast and effect that would have done honor in a painter. The good cheer in the way of ice cream, strawberries, etc., supported by confec- tionery of various kinds and delicious qualities was unexceptionable. And to give liveliness and animation in the occasion the comic was happily introduced in the shape of an impro- vised representation of a New England Quilt- ing party, the characters of which were admi- rably and laughably sustained. Music, vocal and instrumental, skillfully and eloquently dis- couraged, delighted the ear, and all who attend- ed unite in awarding due praise to the fair par- ties immediately interested, and pronouncing the festival a decided success.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut

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Subject: Question about an old paper label From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2011 09:19:42 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

I've pictured on Eboards an old paper label that is glued to an old homemade book.

It says, "Jewell Quilt, 508"

Is it from some type of fabric?

Does it actually have something to do with quilting?

Can anyone identify it?

Regards,

Darwin

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Subject: Civil Wars News - Recollections of Army Nurses From: suereichcharter.net Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2011 03:59:40 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Our Army Nurses: Interesting Sketches and Photographs of Over One Hundred of the Noble Women Who Served in Hospitals and one Battle Fields during Our Late Civil War, 1861-1865. Compiled by Mary A. Gradner Holland, Boston, Press of Lounsbery, Nichols & Worth, 1897 Page 369 My other Henry was from Kentucky, and was sixteen years old. He had a widowed mother and one sister, and both were loyal to our flag. Henry obtained his mother's consent to volunteer in his country's service, promising never to desert, and that he would prove true to the last. He was in one battle and was wounded in the lung and brought to our camp with consumption; was sick a long time. I had a quilt sent to me made of a flag, with the request that it be given to the sickest loyal soldier. Henry was that one. I spread it on his cot when he was asleep. On awakening he was so delighted! He could not express his joy in the thought of dying under the stars and stripes, saying: "Pain will be less now, and, Mrs. Brown, when I am placed in my coffin will you promise that I shall have the quilt placed over me? Cover my face and body with it. I want my precious mother to know I remained firm to the last. Mother said if I died in the North, my body was to be brought home. When the casket is opened, she will see her boy was true to the flag!" The dear fellow's request was granted, and the mother was proud of her son.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com

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Subject: Video link - RSN From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 22 Apr 2011 01:02:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7363008n&tag=related;photovideo

Lovely 6 minute video about the Royal School of Needlework.

Judy Grow

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Subject: RE: Video link - RSN From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Fri, 22 Apr 2011 10:39:27 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Absolutely awesome! I so envy those that do that type of restoration. Just touching those pieces of history. Thank you for sharing, Judy.

Best regards, Sharron .............. where Spring is beautiful but we desperately need rain......just not the storms........

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: Re: Video link - RSN From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 22 Apr 2011 18:27:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

So sorry. Yes, the link is to the Jewish Museum video. I always wander from links. On the right side of the page, scroll down under "Recommended" and you will come to the link for the Royal School of Needlework. Very interesting video -- about the Jewish Museum in Phila -- not needlework. Barb http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=3D7363008n&tag=3Drelated;photovideo

Judy Grow ------

<

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Subject: Contact Info - Susan Green From: Ronda McAllen <quiltdesignmsn.com> Date: Fri, 22 Apr 2011 20:36:38 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

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I am looking for contact information for Susan Green who has the antique clothing collection in New York. If anyone knows how to contact her please send it to quiltdesignmsn.com.  Thanks Ronda =

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Subject: Alliance for American Quilts Contest- Finalist Voting From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Sat, 23 Apr 2011 06:09:16 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

I'm thrilled to announce that I'm one of 4 finalists in the Alliance for American Quilts contest. I want to thank everyone who voted for me in the first round of voting and I want to ask for your vote in the final round.

The grand prize is a Handi Quilter Quilting Machine which would be amazing. If you are an Alliance member you should have received a ballot Friday a.m., please contact Amy if you didn't get one. *Alliance membership is required for voting(don't know if you can still join as voting ends Monday evening.)

To see my quilt: http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com/2011/04/alliance-for-american-quilts-voting-now.html

BTW, My quilt "Virginia is for Lovers" is a reproduction of a charming circa 1845 crib quilt from my collection. The original is quite romantic with lots of hearts and cupid's arrows and is from Virginia - hence the name. It is also very quirky with a cupid's arrow about to hit a bird perched on a branch. Lots of hand applique and hand quilting. You can read more about it on my blogs and see the antique inspiration.

Thanks again your support is greatly appreciated.

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts and antique reproductions http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: "Jewel Quilt 508" From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Sat, 23 Apr 2011 08:11:39 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Hello Again;

Once again, I'm asking if anyone can ID this paper label?

I've loaded a picture of it to the Eboards under "General"

It reads, "Jewell Quilt 508"

I'm wondering if it actually has anything to do with quilting, or fabric etc.???

Thanks

Darwin

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Subject: Movie textiles alert From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2011 16:12:04 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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The Conspirator, about the woman triedfor abetting John Wilkes Booth inthe Abraham Lincoln assassination, has almost nothing to recommend it textile-wise because everyone is garbed in black and most action takes place in a prison or courtroom.  The set andcostumepeople had many engravings and even photos of the era to inform them, so theclothing looked right, BUT, how comein the brief deathbed scene it looks like they placed Lincoln on a 1920sEuropeanjacquard pattern bedspread (if anyone sees the film,see if you can figure it out) and (horrors) the judgewho the young lawyergoes tofor awrit is wearingthe sameRalph Lauren paisley bathrobe in cottonfrom about10years ago that I have too, instead of the real thing! (paisleysmade into coats and jackets are around in the antiques marketplace or fromrental houses surely)  The only otherbedding I sawis a raised motif crochet bedspread, whichwould gave been in usethen. Sadly,recalling all the discussions on Civil War quilts and the forthcoming book and exhibit, here was amissed opportunity for sure, Mr. Redford.  Laura  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com

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Subject: 18th Century Texts online From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 15:17:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

A new database of books from the 18th century has been made available online for free at http://www.18thconnect.org/

These books have been typed, rather than scanned, into the database which means that quirky typesetting (such as the funny SS) doesn't mess up the words you are searching.

The database was developed for language scholars, but searching the work "quilt" brings up 716 results. The first few seem to be transcripts of court cases.

I thought some of you might like to see this database.

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn mary.persynvalpo.edu Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383

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Subject: Water Noodles for Wallhanging Quilt Storage From: Wildemuth Susan <wildemuthsewgmail.com> Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2011 09:59:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Any negatives about this idea for long term storage of smaller wallhangings:

Purchase a water noodle from the local discount store. Cut it to be slightly larger than your small wallhanging. Wrap the noodle in aluminum foil (these tubes "might" be made of something that off-gasses like the plastic tubs with the lids) and then wrap it in a thin layer of cotton batting secure that with rubber bands. Wrap the wallhanging around the noodle, design out - not design against the noodle so when you do hang it in a show - it hangs right. Hold the wallhanging in place with two scrap strips of 100% cotton fabric. Then put the "roll" in a loose 100% cotton tube-shaped bag - tie the top of the bag with a cotton strip. Store.

I did not come up with this idea; it is borrowed from an art quilter. I liked it, but I thought I would put it to the conservation test with you all.

Thoughts?

Sue in Illinois

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Subject: RE: Water Noodles for Wallhanging Quilt Storage From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2011 19:43:43 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Good evening, QHLers - I've been recommending pool noodles for years now. The pool noodles are made from melted polyethylene 'blown' in to a foam consistency using different kinds of gases. Any color is a pigment that is mixed in to the melted polyethylene (and so won't 'bleed'). The gases will dissipate over a year or so at normal room temps (meaning that by the time the pool noodles arrive at the dollar store or at the pool supply aisle of your local department store, the gases are long gone).

Specifically, there is no need for the use of cotton batting - just wrap the aluminum-covered pool noodle with a clean piece of cotton muslin/sheeting (rinsed first). If your relative humidity is not controlled, definitely don't use cotton batting for padding as the cotton batting will act like a sponge and will encourage mould/mildew growth. If you need to pad out (i.e. the quilt has embellishments), use a heat bonded polyester batting instead. Definitely don't use rubber bands to hold the batting/muslin/sheeting in place (the rubber off gasses sulfur and gets sticky pretty quickly). The two scraps used as ties should be bow-tied on loose enough that you can stick your pinky finger under the tie (no cinching down).

Ideally, your storage tube is long enough so you can prop up both ends enough that you can scoot that pinky finger underneath the covered rolled quilt. This keeps the bottom layers on the roll from being squashed by gravity and the weight of the upper layers. You don't want to place the props where the rolled quilt is. With very small quilts, the weight might be light enough that you don't need to prop up the ends.

I have found that once you get longer than 12 inches, the pool noodles sag/bend over time. I just insert an acrylic (i.e. PlexiglasT, AcryliteT) tube that fits in the center hole to stiffen up the pool noodle. If you make the acrylic tube a couple of inches longer, you can use the extended ends of the acrylic tube where to place the props. Props can be as simple as rolled up washcloths, or another piece of pool noodle with one side cut off to provide a non-rolling/flat side and a notch cut on the other side. Pool noodles are easily cut/carved with a serrated knife.

Please store the rolled quilts where the temperature (and relative humidity) is stable and doesn't fluctuate over a 24 hour period. So no unheated basements, attics, garages, car trunks, outside storage units. Under the guest bed is a definite possibility.

Please feel free to contact me off-list if you have further questions. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator & Collections Management Consultant Professional Associate - AIC 707-763-8694 mgmooneymoonware.net

...Any negatives about this idea for long term storage of smaller wallhangings:

Purchase a water noodle from the local discount store. Cut it to be slightly larger than your small wallhanging. Wrap the noodle in aluminum foil (these tubes "might" be made of something that off-gasses like the plastic tubs with the lids) and then wrap it in a thin layer of cotton batting secure that with rubber bands. Wrap the wallhanging around the noodle, design out - not design against the noodle so when you do hang it in a show - it hangs right. Hold the wallhanging in place with two scrap strips of 100% cotton fabric. Then put the "roll" in a loose 100% cotton tube-shaped bag - tie the top of the bag with a cotton strip. Store.

I did not come up with this idea; it is borrowed from an art quilter. I liked it, but I thought I would put it to the conservation test with you all. ....

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Subject: Possible resource From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2011 12:08:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I went to this site because they have digitized the 19th century editions of Harpers Bazaar magazine. However, as I've browed about, it occurs to me that many textile historians might find this a great resource. Perhaps you all all ready know about it, but in case you don't.....

http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/about_HEARTH.html

Entering "patchwork" to search the Harpers Bazaar magazines turned up some interesting stuff like a "Persian Quilt" for example.

Stephanie Whitson