ubject: Re: Patroiotic Collection From: Quilltraol.com Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2011 23:02:50 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

Do you mean one exhibiting currently, or one available for travel? The IQSC has a patriotic and political quilt exhibit available for traveling.

Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Patroiotic Collection From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Sun, 1 May 2011 10:14:36 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

Sue Reich (_suereichcharter.net_ (mailto:suereichcharter.net) ) has a great collection of patriotic quilts - she might be able to help you out... Mitzi from sunny, but still in flood stage, Vermont

In a message dated 5/1/2011 9:57:49 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, Quilltraol.com writes:

Do you mean one exhibiting currently, or one available for travel? The IQSC has a patriotic and political quilt exhibit available for traveling.

Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/) --- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mitzioakesaol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1714905Ilyris.quiltropolis.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Wednesdays From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Sun, 01 May 2011 17:08:49 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Hi all -

If I were to come early to AQSG Seminar this year (in New Jersey/Pennsylvania) what would you recommend I do during the day (Wednesday) in the area?

I was thinking of flying in on Tuesday eve and having all day Wed to play but I'm not really sure what to see or do.

Quilts and other textile related things are key to my type of fun - as is antique shopping.

I will have a car and GPS :-)

Please make your suggestions privately so as not to clog up the airways.

Sincerely

Leah Zieber

Temecula CA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: membership From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Tue, 3 May 2011 08:38:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I haven't received any QHL Digest since May 1. Is everything okay?

Linda Laird in AZ where the wildfires are smoky and the wind terrible.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: membership From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 3 May 2011 14:52:16 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

I'm still here - we have rain and Lake Champlain has never been this high - we have a camp on its shores and luckily it is high enough not to get flood damage - WE HOPE!!! But the grass is green and the tulips are blooming so guess things are ok - at least here in Vermont Mitzi and her high boots!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt aficionado shares a stitch in time with Civil War buffs From: Dale Drake <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Tue, 03 May 2011 10:54:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

A link sent by an Iowa friend .. and not a single mention of "that topic." Heartening!

Dale Drake in Indiana

"I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library." Jorge Luis Borges

//

Quilt aficionado shares a stitch in time with Civil War buffs

NEW LONDON - Mount Pleasant resident Becky Wright walked up to the podium and arranged her notes. Dressed in period clothing, Wright spoke to a large crowd gathered Sunday at the Dover Museum about a topic close to her heart - Civil war-era textile ...

See it for yourself at http://www.thehawkeye.com/story/Dover-Museum-050211

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 03, 2011 From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Wed, 4 May 2011 08:07:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I'm back home after evacuating to Arkansas when tornados hit my area of Alabama and left us all without power for five-to-six days. Terrible devastation and loss of life, but gratefully, I and my family and our homes are fine. My sweet son cleaned out my fridge and freezer and rinsed all the plastic storage dishes, sparing me a stinky mess upon my return home yesterday. There was flooding in Arkansas, and the Mississippi was so high at Memphis that the service roads on each side of I 55 were under water. Pat Kyser in Huntsville

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 03, 2011 From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 4 May 2011 10:19:09 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

GOD love you that you are safe - Vermont does not have many tornatos, but we have flooding - some of our state is cut off from the mainland of VT - including our summer camp that might be gone by now (and it is 15'+ above the lake).....very strange year for weather, but you are alive and everything else will come in time. So Far and So Good - hopefully tomorrow will be better Mitzi from flooded Vermont..... Our daughter from New Orleans who survived Katrina offered to send us her hip boots - we may take her up on that.....

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Setting color in fabric From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 4 May 2011 15:52:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

The American Frugal Housewife 1835. 

"When a carpet is faded, I have been told that it may bo restored, in a great measure, (provided there be no grease in it,) by being dipped into strong salt and water. 1 never tried this; but 1 know that silk pocket handkerchiefs, and deep blue factory cotton will not fade, if dipped "in salt and water while new.

An ox's gall will set any color,-silk, cotton, or woollen. I have seen the colors of calico, which faded at one washing, fixed by it. Where one lives near a slaughterhouse, it is worth while to buy cheap, fading goods, and set them in this way. The gall can be bought for a few cents. Get out all the liquid, and cork it up in a large phial. One large spoonful of this in a gallon of warm water is sufficient. This is likewise excellent for takfng out spots from bombazine, bombazet, &jc. After being washed in this, they look about as well' as when new. It must be thoroughly stirred into the water, and not put upon the cloth* It is used without soap. After being washed in this, cloth which you want to clean should be washed in warm suds, without using soap. ------=_NextPart_000_0007_01CC0A73.50FE9480--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Norwalk (Connecticut) Quilt Trail press release. From: suereichcharter.net Date: Thu, 5 May 2011 01:03:22 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

NORWALK QUILT TRAIL OPENS WITH EXHIBITS, QUILT AIRING, LECTURE, RECEPTIONS In addition to viewing diverse quilt displays at four venues, attendees at opening weekend activities for the Norwalk Quilt Trail (NQT) can join in a public quilt airing, attend a lecture and enjoy two receptions. The NQT is a six-month collaborative event by local cultural organizations spotlighting more than 100 beautifully crafted, handmade quilts made and collected in Norwalk. For information, call 203-246-3740.

Saturday, May 14 1:00-4:00 p.m. -- Quilt Airing (free) 1:00-4:00 p.m. -- Exhibit: A Common Thread: Family History Told through Quilting (admission $5.00 for adults) 5:00-8:00 p.m. -- Reception (free) Rowayton Historical Society Pinkney Park, 177 Rowayton Avenue, Rowayton, CT 06853 >> Display Opening: Trains, Planes and Automobiles: Interest Starts Early (donation) 12:00-5:00 p.m. SoNo Switch Tower Museum, 77 Washington Street, South Norwalk 06854

Exhibit Opening: The Craze of Crazy Quilts ($6.00-$10.00) Tours: 12 noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m. Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum, Mathews Park, 295 West Avenue, Norwalk 06850 >> Sunday, May 15 3:00 p.m. -- Lecture: Quilts & Quiltmakers Covering Connecticut -- Sue Reich (admission $5.00 for adults) 5:00-7:00 p.m. -- Reception and Exhibit: Collected & Cherished: Quilts made and collected in Norwalk (free) Norwalk Historical Society Mill Hill Historic Park - Town House, 2 East Wall Street, Norwalk, CT 06851 >>

From 1:00-4:00 p.m. on Saturday, May 14, residents are invited to bring personal quilts to Rowayton=E2=80=99s Pinkney Park for display plus documentation by members of the Rowayton Historical Society. The Historical Society=E2=80=99s display in Pinkney House illustrates important milestones and events in family life through the medium of quilts and admission is $5.00 for adults. A reception from 5:00-6:00 p.m. is free and open to the public.

On Sunday, May 15, activities shift to the Town House at Mill Hill Historic Park, 2 East Wall Street in Norwalk, where the Norwalk Historical Society=E2=80=99s quilt display features a selection of Norwalk-made and Norwalk-collected quilts. At 3:00 p.m., Sue Reich will present =E2=80=9CQuilts & Quiltmakers Covering Connecticut: a Chronology of Connecticut Quilts from 1759-1950.=E2=80=9D The $5.00 lecture fee for adults includes a reception that follows from 5:00-7:30 p.m. The reception begins with the presentation of a Norwalk Quilt Trail Proclamation by Norwalk Mayor Richard Moccia.

In addition to the two historical societies, Norwalk Quilt Trail displays at the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum and Switch Tower Museum will be open on May 14 and 15. Additional quilt displays at the Norwalk Museum, Norwalk Seaport Association=E2=80=99s Sheffield Island Lighthouse, Stepping Stones Museum for Children, 22 Haviland Street Gallery and other venues will open later in the summer. Also, a display of blocks from the AIDS Memorial Quilt is scheduled at City Hall in September. Extensive public programming at sites throughout the city augments the exhibits. This includes lectures by quilt scholars, quilting workshops and opportunities for residents to display their personal quilts. One of the project highlights will be a Norwalk Has Heart quilt created by residents from throughout the community.

Support for the Norwalk Quilt Trail has been provided by the Connecticut Humanities Council, Coby Foundation, Norwalk Arts Commission, Connecticut Commission on Culture & Tourism, The Triangle Community Center and Gail Wall. Media sponsors include Connecticut=E2=80=99s Cottages& Gardens, The Hour Newspapers and WSTC-WNLK.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rolling quilts From: "J Perkins" <qltrstoreharlannet.com> Date: Thu, 5 May 2011 10:24:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Someone had written in about how to roll quilts last week when I was in Paducah, and by chance Gerald Roy talked about that in a class I was taking. He gave me permission to share this with you. He says that rolling quilts is the worst way to store them. Because a quilt has three layers, they pull against each other when rolled, and will distort over time. He talked about a rolled quilt he was consulted about that was quite distorted and they tried to rescue it by putting it into a rehydrating chamber, but it was just too far gone to get back to its original shape. He said that quilts like to be flat best, but if that is not possible, then stored in acid free boxes with padded folds is the next best way. Single-layer textiles like woven coverlets are fine to roll. Also, if a textile must be rolled, the larger the diameter of the roller the better.

I know of two quilt museums in Iowa which roll quilts, and at least one in MN I saw this summer, so it seems this would be a good area of research for someone to publish!

Jennifer Perkins

NQACJ and Appraiser

Harlan, Iowa

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Rolling quilts From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Thu, 05 May 2011 11:31:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

We had this discussion a couple of years ago, and I also spoke against the practice of rolling quilts. It is especially bad for silk quilts, which will split along the creases caused by the inner layer being squished on a roll. Plus, rolled quilts are difficult for one person to handle and they take a lot of storage space, and so it's not practical for most small museums to roll their quilts.

All best, Lynne

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Norwalk Quilt Trail - an amazing collaborative effort! Check out the "Quilt" Trail Map. From: suereichcharter.net Date: Thu, 5 May 2011 13:22:47 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks for all of your positive comments. For the past year, I have been working as a consultant for this event. It began spending an entire day at three of the sites viewing quilts, and making suggestions for display, restoration and conservation. This group in Norwalk did it right under the direction of Laura Macaluso of the Norwalk Historical Society. In April, we had a Quilt Discovery Day. Members of the community shared the antique quilts from their families. Rarely seen quilts came in including an incredible c.1830 Prussian Blue pieced quilt with strong Connecticut provenance to an 1847 Sampler Floral Applique Signature Quilt from Savannah and Charleston. In the midst of this planning, Laura and her committee took a day off to go to NYC to view the exhibits at the American Folk Art Museums and the Red and White show.

Please take time to view the web site for further details. DON"T MISS! clicking on the map (found directly under the logo) designed especially for this 6 month event. It features a map with each of the sites, and is a real "Quilt" Trail of Norwalk! Also, don't miss the last two links about the Community Quilt Project.

http://www.norwalkquilttrail.org/

http://norwalk.patch.com/articles/local-museums-rich-with-quilts-start-a-quilt-trail

http://norwalkhistoricalsociety.org/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cemeteryrodeo/5617613835/

http://www.shorelineplus.com/shplus/information/news/News_1/Quilts-in-windows-paper-quilt-workshop127591275912759.shtml

http://www.norwalkcommunityquiltproject.org/norwalkcommunityquiltproject/Blog/Blog.html

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

------=_Part_323013_265629454.1304616167096--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Rolling quilts From: textiqueaol.com Date: Thu, 05 May 2011 14:44:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

To add to Jennifer's comments: please be sure the woven coverlets actually are a single layer if they are are rolled. Many people don't know that some compoundweaves, double weave and 'true' beiderwand, are not one layer of fabric but two with areas where the top and back are not attached to each other. Depending on the design element,that area could be as large as the palm of your hand. I witnessed one true beiderwand come off a storage roll and was thoroughly dismayed at how scrunched all the free areas were.When I turned it over, the corresponding back areas were just as bad. Two months of laying flat and four months of hanging in an exhibit lessened the problem but most of the wrinkling was still there upon deinstallation. Had it not been a rare form and color it wouldn't have been shown.

I've also seen damage done to appliques which I'm attributing to unrolling. It involved a 6" diameter tube, wrapped in batting and cotton and the quilt was interleavedwith cotton sheeting.  Each time I saw it unrolled over a few years, it seemed some damage happened. First, I noticed a loose thread pop as it unrolled, then a tip of a leaf loose and then awhole flower flopped over.  It all seemed to be happening right at the points where the unrolling wasoccurring. My conclusion was that there had to be some degree of 'pulling' between the two fabrics,that of the quilt and that of the interleaved cotton as they were enrolled. If there is prior unknown damage, such as weakening of applique threads, any degree of pulling could cause them to break andrepeated unrolling would lead to further damage. 

By extension, this could be applied to any threads used on any piece, evenif it is a single layer - made as a single piece with joining threads or embellishment of any kind. By extension, I think this could be applied to layered quilts in bed-turnings that don't have acid-free tissue between them.

 If you follow best practices for rolling, it ends up requiring too many people and too much space for most museums anyway. In the end, I think common sense and keen observation are invaluable in how you care for textiles.

Jan Thomas 

Single-layer textiles like woven coverlets are fine to roll. Also, if a textile must be rolled, the larger the diameter of the roller the better.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt aficionado shares a stitch in time with Civil War buffs From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 05 May 2011 13:22:25 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

> Quilt aficionado shares a stitch in time with Civil War buffs > > NEW LONDON - Mount Pleasant resident Becky Wright walked up to the > podium and arranged her notes. Dressed in period clothing, Wright spoke > to a large crowd gathered Sunday at the Dover Museum about a topic close > to her heart - Civil war-era textile ... > > See it for yourself at http://www.thehawkeye.com/story/Dover-Museum-050211

Dale, here is a link I found yesterday to a lecture another woman is giving --also in Civil War period costume-- about quilts, but it apparently has to do with the Code.

This is what the press wrote about her presentation:

http://redbank.patch.com/articles/the-road-to-freedom-is-lined-with-quilts

This is the link to her business website. I believe she is located in New Jersey.

http://trishchambersproductions.com/

Karen Alexander

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt aficionado shares a stitch in time with Civil War buffs From: hknight453aol.com Date: Thu, 5 May 2011 16:58:17 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

It's also worth noticing that Trish's dress is less authentic as well. No one has produced a antebellum quilt with all the supposed symbols. Primary sources matter.

Heather 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: CW talks From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Fri, 6 May 2011 14:05:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

A few years back I was asked to do a program for a large group of civil war reenactors. I was to teach them which quilts would be appropriate forthe time period so that they wouldn't show up in camp with a pink double wedding ring. I wore full dress as well - not a "costume." Reenactors hate it when you refer to their clothing as 'costumes'. ( Just a bit of etiquette for you there.) I had to dress before I left home as there were no facilities at the battlefield. I stopped at a Burger King for coffee- can you imagine 1860's full dress and hoops hair parted in the middleand held in a snood - piling out of a Caddy at Burger King. I dont think a smaller car would have held me! Too much fun. But I couldnt fit into therestroom - had to "hold it" until the next I-75 rest area where I used a handicap stall - took the whole thing to hold my clothes. SUch an adventure. But I digress.  The audience all of whom were in full dress (which was way cool by the way) seemed fascinated by what they were learning asked great questions and a good time was had by all. So I thought I might have developed an entirely new audience for my lecture. Well - sorta kinda. I find that the historical museums battle units reenactors etc - are all broke. They require gratis speakers. So sorry - as Bob Dylan says That ain't me babe it ain't me you're lookin' for Babe. 

Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies but I don't believe I deserved my friends." Walt Whitman  www.teddypruett.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Pam Weeks From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Fri, 6 May 2011 16:51:13 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I hope any of you in the New England area or visiting there in the next several month will have time to stop by the New England Quilt Museum and see the fantastic exhibit of Potholder quilts curated by Pam Weeks. Included in the exhibit is quilt #1 of my new prject: The National Iraq/Afghanistan Memorial Quilt. It is quilt 1 of 5 completed so far--only about 60 more to go; as well as some historically fasinating potholder quilts from the era 1835 on.  Also, we should all congratulate Pam on her recent appointment as curator at the New England Quilt Museum. An appointment well deserved. You go,Pam!  best, Don Beld --0-727189831-1304725873=:97943--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question about Tyvek From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Sat, 7 May 2011 01:05:05 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

Can anyone tell me what the difference is between Tyvek sold as 'archival' quality by conservation supplies firms and the Tyvek you can buy from builders' merchants? I am guessing that weight, flexibility and possibly additional coatings such as anti-static might be involved, but can't seem to find definitive information.

Thanks

Sally Ward=

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bird and bird house pattern From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 06 May 2011 21:42:22 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

http://cgi.ebay.com/270744933924

This looks like a pretty standard applique pattern one might expect to see anywhere from 1930-1950, but I personally have never seen one before. Anyone familiar with the pattern's origins?

Karen in the Islands

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 05, 2011 From: <gebelearthlink.net> Date: Fri, 6 May 2011 20:06:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

In regard to the comments about rolling and folding quilts for storage: particularly about creases.

In a group of slides about the hanging of the red and white quilt show in New York, there was an image of an assistant from the Museum using a hand held steamer to remove creases in a quilt that had been hung for this treatment.

Have any on the list used this process? What is your evaluation or ideas about it?

Carol Gebel

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Arsenic Greens From: "Maureen" <maureenbooksandoldlace.com> Date: Sat, 7 May 2011 15:44:33 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

In The Poisoner's Handbook by Deborah Blum (Penguin, 2010), chapter 4 is a treatment of arsenic 1922-23 when forensic chemists were first able to detect trace postmortem amounts. The case presented in chapter 4 is that of arsenic poisoning of more than 60 persons at the Shelbourne Restaurant in NYC through the crusts of the restaurant's huckleberry and blackberry pie, killing at least 6.

As part of the investigation, the police considered arsenic exposure through other means, and here I quote:

"Arsenic was the primary ingredient in a number of dyes that were especially popular in the nineteenth century and sold under such names as Scheele's Green, Paris Green, Emerald Green, Parrot Green and Vienna Green. Mixing arsenic with coppy and hydrogen yielded shades that ranged from the brilliant color a a new-leafed tree to the softer tones of a shaded moss. Over the years, arsenic-based dyes were used to color fabric, the artificial leaves on hats and wreathes, cardboard boxes, greeting cards, labels, candles, India rubber balls, oil paint, artificial plants made of tin, Venetian blinds, carpets, soap and faux malachite for jewelry. As the Shelbourne's proprietor had noted, arsenic-green wallpaper remained common through the city."

My quilt related question is whether you have identified this dyed green fabric in vintage quilts, and how it wears over time. Does it deteriorate or is the fabric stable?

Reviewing Trestain, she notes a variety of hues but not the subtle and striking saturations described in The Poisoner's Handbook. And thinking back, I can't recall many greens in the 1890-1925 quilts that I've seen.

What have you seen?

Maureen In Southern Oregon

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: steaming ~ related? From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Sat, 7 May 2011 21:22:44 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I cannot speak directly to the question Carol asked:

In a group of slides about the hanging of the red and white quilt show in New York, there was an image of an assistant from the Museum using a hand held steamer to remove creases in a quilt that had been hung for this treatment.

Have any on the list used this process? What is your evaluation or ideas about it?

but I can tell you something vaguely related:

In speaking with the AFMA organizers of the Red & White Show, I learned that they steamed every single quilt as it went up.

WOW!

Julie Silber

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Alabama quilters From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sun, 8 May 2011 16:22:25 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

Does anyone on the list have contact information for Alabama Guilds that might be collecting quilting books, rulers, cutters, patterns, thread, fabrics to replace things that Alabama quilters have lost. Certainly they don't need quilts now in hot, humid summer days. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: Bird and bird house pattern From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net> Date: Sun, 8 May 2011 17:55:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Hi Karen,

It looks like Dicky Bird #52.3 in Brackman's Encyclopedia of Applique. Please let me know what you think.

Link to the 1940 newsprint:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=-xI_AAAAIBAJ&sjid=Bk8MAAAAIBAJ&pg=5922,4841710&dq=dickey+bird+quilt&hl=en

If the ebay quilt is from the same pattern, the maker changed the angle of the legs. See also Twentieth Century Quilts 1900-1950 by Woodard & Greenstein, page 67.

In case it's of any help, the copyright is under Laura Wheeler: Laura Wheeler knows you'll enjoy this friendly quilt. Dicky bird. Pattern 2560. c. May 30, 1940

We haven't visited in ages, Karen, but I feel like we do through your posts here and on FB.

Gloria

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 06, 2011 From: "M. Chapple" <mem914yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2011 05:50:07 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

--0-1371743375-1304945407=:12650 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Teddy - It is interesting to hear your view of re-enacting. I'm one of the "crazy people" who spend at least one weekend a month camping in a tent and wearing period dress. Our group does living histories as well as battle re-enactments and I always have an audience when I talk about quilts and fabrics from the period. And yes, handicapped bathrooms are a necessity when you are wearing hoops!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: American Folk Art Museum From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2011 08:52:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

In light of the recent quilt exhibitions I thought the list might be interested in this info.

American Folk Art Museum executive director quits

4 May 2011

The American Folk Art Museum

Maria Ann Conelli, executive director of New York's American Folk Art Museum, announced on the museum's website on May 3 that she would be leaving in July to return to academia.

The financially-troubled institution missed $3.7 million in payments to a debt service fund connected to bonds issued to construct a new building, it said in a January filing.

Attendance and revenue figures fell short over the past decade even with the success of several of the museum's exhibitions. For one, Conelli noted the recent Infinite <http://www.folkartmuseum.org/index.php?p=folk&id=7262> Variety: Three Centuries of Red and White Quilts, a remarkable display at the Park Avenue Armory in March, drew in 25,000 visitors.

Adding to the museum's woes, former board president Ralph <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/23/nyregion/23jewels.html> O. Esmerian, the one-time owner of the jewelry company Fred Leighton and once among the musem's biggest patrons, was charged in a $217 million fraud last November.

The museum currently has on view, "'Eugene Von <http://www.folkartmuseum.org/vonbruenchenhein> Bruenchenhein: 'Freelance Artist-Poet and Sculptor-Inovator-Arrow maker and Plant man-Bone artifacts constructor-Photographer and Architect-Philosopher,'" "Perspectives: Forming the Figure," and notable quilt displays.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: American Folk Art Museum From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2011 07:21:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

What a mess and HOW SAD to see a great museum go to pieces.

Jeanne

----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: steaming ~ related? From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 9 May 2011 11:36:08 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

It would be interesting to know more about this. Perhaps the conservators could weigh in about steaming quilts 100+ years old. I would never even think to do it, as it seems like a recipe for disaster. Candace Perry

________________________________ From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplexhughes.net> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sat, May 7, 2011 11:22:44 PM Subject: [qhl] steaming ~ related?

I cannot speak directly to the question Carol asked:

In a group of slides about the hanging of the red and white quilt show in New York, there was an image of an assistant from the Museum using a hand held steamer to remove creases in a quilt that had been hung for this treatment.

Have any on the list used this process? What is your evaluation or ideas about it?

but I can tell you something vaguely related:

In speaking with the AFMA organizers of the Red & White Show, I learned that they steamed every single quilt as it went up.

WOW!

Julie Silber

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Dancing, frisking & worse.... From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Mon, 9 May 2011 11:26:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Yesterday, I realized we had not had May Day this year. Maybe we've not had it for a long time, but when I was in school in 1340, children made May Day baskets and I've always liked the idea of celebrating the advent of the floral season that way. The death of OBL on May 1 overshadowed it, I think. Alas.

Yes, yes, I know that May Day and the Maypole were pagan ceremonies. But that just suits them to what Billy Wordsworth called the "glad animal spirits" of elementary school children, old and young.

It is those spirits that May Day celebrates, and Puritans have always known it. And not liked it. In his journal William Bradford describes a certain Morton who was possessed of these spirits, perhaps in excess, one spring. Bradford describes how Morton and company got ahold of some money and "spent it vainly in quaffing and drinking, both wine and strong waters in great excess...10 pounds worth in a morning. They also set up a maypole, drinking and dancing and about it many days together, dancing and frisking like so many fairies and worse practices. As if they had anew revived and celebrated the feasts of the Roman goddess Flora...."

My upbringing has always ill equipped me for such behaviors, but I rather like the idea of them and the thought that even in Plimouth Plantation, they bubbled up. Briefly, for, of course, they were eventually suppressed.

May baskets were more in my line, and this morning I noted Jean Demeter and Julie Silber have added some homages to Flora to their site, one a yellow beauty with exquisite quilting.

Which makes me wonder: what is the earliest documented floral quilt in America?

In leafy Louisiana, Gaye Ingram

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Amy Emms quilted wedding dress From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 09 May 2011 16:02:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

I think there was a bit of a discussion on this particular quilted wedding dress several months ago on either QHL or the AQSG discussion group.

The quilted wedding dress that TQHF Honoree made for her daughter in 1957 will be on exhibit at the York Quilt Museum this summer in the U.K.

http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/leisure/exhibitions/9013879.Summer_exhibition_at_ York___s_Quilt_Museum_and_Gallery/

Amy Emms was inducted into The Quilters Hall of Fame in 1992, the first Honoree to be inducted after TQHF moved from Virginia, where it was founded by Hazel Carter in 1979, to Marion, Indiana.

http://www.quiltershalloffame.net/yahoo_site_admin/assets/docs/Amy_Emms.2411 72123.pdf

Cheers!

Karen in the Islands

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: steaming ~ related? From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 10 May 2011 04:19:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I'm wondering if, for contemporary quilts, wool batting resists the creasing of packing that happens with quilts made with cotton batting. Would it take less steam to straighten out wool fibers than cotton? There would still be the concerns for dyed fabrics and painted pieces. I see so well what steaming and blocking can do for my wool knitted projects, and the blocking holds so well until the piece gets doused for cleaning. I know with some wool knit pieces I've blocked, they hold their shape even after being scrunched into a ball. Wouldn't wool batting have a similar property?

I have one quilt with wool batting that seems to resist permanent creasing after being folded for storage. That's a very limited =94test group."

Barb

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: to steam or not to steam From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Tue, 10 May 2011 19:20:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I've seen museum set-ups for quilt handling and photography, but I can only imagine how other publishing houses and show management companies do things.

At AQS, we ask for the show quilts as late as possible so they aren't creased in boxes or wrinkled on rolls while they wait to be hung. It takes a lot of tap dancing to log in the quilts without sitting on them for an excessive length of time. The only show for which we have a steamer on hand is the one in Paducah, and it is rarely used.

I was on a judging team at another show that chose a deeply creased quilt to win a major prize. The judging occurred before the show opened. The quilt would have relaxed in another day, was our thinking; we looked beyond the wrinkles. Not everyone agreed with our choice, but those quilts were hung as they were.

Where quilts for photography are concerned at AQS, whether for books, magazines, or calendars, we try to schedule photos so that every quilt can relax flat as long as needed to look its best. We do resort to a hand-held steamer every once in a while, when the magic of photography and Photoshop can't handle what we're given.

We've had quilt owners send us notes with specific wishes -- steam or don't steam. We honor those.

Andi in Paducah

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 10 May 2011 18:23:00 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Hello -

I just read another British mystery novel on my iPhone using the Kindle app. I find it so easy and convenient to read novels and other fiction on my iPhone. However, I haven't been comfortable reading non-fiction on my iPhone as I prefer to underline text, write in the margins, etc.

Where do you think quilt instructional books and quilt history books will go? Will there always be hardbacks or paperbacks of these or will quilt books become more popular as eBooks?

Here is a link to the top Quilting ebooks on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/digital-text/156809011

Best, Kyra

Kyra Hicks www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com --0-87087575-1305076980=:95632--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Tue, 10 May 2011 20:26:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I love my Kindle. It's easy to hold, you don't have to turn pages, and I can take hundreds of books with me on trips. My son has the Nook color-he's more of a geek than I am.

Wasn't very impressed with the top 100 Amazon books. Kim

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Tue, 10 May 2011 22:07:59 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

--part1_13d3b0.4e1f05d0.3afb497e_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have a Nook and adore it. Barnes & Noble classics are cheap or free, I can download copyright-free books or PDFs from Project Gutenberg, and it fits neatly in my purse. Best purchase I've made in years.

Lisa Evans --part1_13d3b0.4e1f05d0.3afb497e_boundary--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: the future of quilt books From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 04:43:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Kyra asked:

Where do you think quilt instructional books and quilt history books will go? Will there always be hardbacks or paperbacks of these or will quilt books become more popular as eBooks?

This question comes up at every lecture on getting published with AQS. Our crystal ball is no clearer than that of anyone else, but these are our thoughts. Although I have numbered them, they intertwine more than they exist in hierarchy:

1) Technologies overlap for a long time. If hard copy books go away as the mainstream consumer choice, they will remain as objects of interest. They will be affordable if there is enough consumer demand to make them profitable. At first, new technology is much more expensive than the tried-and-true. Over time, the two formats become competitive. Finally, the old way becomes exotic and more expensive. Publishers may remain interested in hard copy books but not in the same way.

2) Certain types of how-to quilt books lend themselves more to e-readers than others with currently available technology. Note the number of "reading" books on the link Kyra sent as opposed to how-to or photo-heavy books. No doubt the graphics technology as well as other aspects of e-readers will continue to improve so a continuing shift towards e-readers is likely.

3) Quilters are tactile people. Many, many quilters who love their e-readers for other books still want to hold quilt books. They want to break the spine open to see a visual spread (if they haven't had the book spiral bound) as they piece, applique or quilt. They like taking books to their bees or sewing groups. They like to make pattern and design copies (tut, tut) to share with friends. The hard copy book is not likely to disappear altogether for quite some time.

4) Audio books, many quilters' best friends, have not displaced hard copy books of the same genres. Different technologies can co-exist.

5) Another question beyond the physical format of instructional quilt books is content source. If someone decided today to learn how to quilt, she could find everything she needs to know on the Internet for free, as people share what they know and how they do things. The thing is, this is a messy way to go about learning (although it may not seem that way to those who learned how to learn online, and this method is becoming more prevalent).

6) Just as books have not supplanted classes, guild meetings, sewing groups, or shows, neither have these methods obliterated learning how to quilt from family and friends.

7) As long as there are quilters with a burning desire to share something they know, or a design, pattern, technique, or process, there will be people who want to have their idea published. As long as marketing and distribution remain the challenges they are, traditional publishing houses will co-exist beside self-publishers (in all genres).

No solid answers, Kyra -- like every other publisher, AQS is feeling its way along. Great question!

Andi in Paducah, where the receding water is still very high. We wish the best for everyone in this historic flood's way.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: Quilltraol.com Date: Tue, 10 May 2011 21:27:03 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

Kyra, I've never heard anybody say anything good about quilt history books on kindle. They always say "what a waste of money." I think the future of those and the instruction books is in the print-on-demand format, which some of the out-of-print books have already been reissued in.

Lisa

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 08:04:58 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Actually, out of copyright quilt history books have been digitized and are available on Project Gutenberg. That's how I got my copy of Ruth Finley, which I'd heard about for years and never read because I couldn't find an old copy. I expect the same will happen to Kretsinger & Hall, Webster, and other early writers as their work goes out of copyright.

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 10, 2011 From: "M. Chapple" <mem914yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 06:15:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

I don't know about contemporary quilts, but I do reproduction quilts as a living history and have found that the wool doesn't crease as badlyas cotton but takes more steam to get the creases out if they happen. This is true of my husband's uniform as well. How densely quilted the piece is also seems to affect the creasing. I use both "virgin" wool (wool cleaned, combed and layered) following a "receipt" in a housewife's book, as well as commercial batts and have found little difference between how they behave. The pieces I have done with fresh cotton have been small, mostof my cotton-batted quilts have been with commercial batts.Mary in Virginia----------------------------------------------------------------------Subject: RE: steaming ~ related?From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>Date: Tue, 10 May 2011 04:19:56 -0500X-Message-Number: 1I'm wondering if, for contemporary quilts, wool batting resists the =3Dcreasingof packing that happens with quilts made with cotton batting. Would it =3Dtakeless steam to straighten out wool fibers than cotton? --0-1554567851-1305119749=:93924--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Upcoming Kalamazoo panel From: "Lisa Evans" <kittencat3charter.net> Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 09:30:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

I'm off to the Kalamazoo Medieval Studies Congress, and will be attending a panel that may be of interest:

Maria Hayward will be speaking on the Rothwell Jack, one of the few remaining pieces of quilted armor from the 14th century. From what little I've heard it's a rare and significant artifact that provides some interesting insights into what professional quilters and armorers actually did did the Middle Ages. I'll definitely write this one up and share what I learn.

Also forthcoming: my trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to see - get this - a 13th century piece of Chinese embroidered patchwork. It *may* have been a cover for Buddhist scriptures but I'm still researching its function. However, the patchwork itself had a definite pattern and was made to size, not cut down from something else. If the Met is correct on the date, this predates both the Angevin royal textile from Hungary (early 14th century) and the Impruneta Cushion (mid 15th century) as early evidence for decorative pieced work.

I'll be back Sunday very late, so look for detailed write-ups next week. 

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: Karan Flanscha <sadierosecfu.net> Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 08:45:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I got a Kindle app for my Android smart phone, and have thoroughly enjoyed reading again... I have my phone with me just about all the time, and can pop up my current book whenever there are a few free minutes. I have read the entire series of "Anne of Green Gables", Little Women, several Jane Austen books, all for free, and have purchased several books, too. Much better than staring out the car window or leafing through old magazines in a waiting room! And I don't have to find a shelf to store the books. But... my quilting books are entirely different... there is nothing nicer than paging through a new book, like Kathy Moore and Stephanie Grace Whitson's "Home on the Plains: Quilts and the Sod House Experience". Wonderful old photos, with some enlarged to show quilts on the bed in the shadows through the door of a sod house!! Wonderful quilts, with patterns as well as stories of the quiltmakers. Excellent photography and beautifully styled... which would be lost on the 2" by 4" screen on my phone!! I want to be able to share my quilt books with my darling granddaughters, sit together and page through discussing patterns and colors... not something you can do with your phone screen! Hopefully someday the books will be a remembrance of Nana and times spent together, as will the quilts I leave to them. So I see the digital books as a great addition, but not a replacement, for printed books. Happy Reading! Karan from Iowa (hoping it won't be 96=BA again today!)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 12:23:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

You can also download a free app that will allow you to read ebooks on your PC or Mac. I have the Nook app on my PC.

Stephanie Whitson

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 12:11:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Project Guternberg and Google Books have some great stuff available. Google Books particularly has helped me find amazing information for my historical fiction. I remember late one night discovering a medical book online that decribed a "new" way to treat a compound fracture -- in 1872. So I was able to save my rancher's leg instead of cutting it off :-). Sadly, some digital book stores also offer free versions of working authors' copyrighted works. In other words, they steal and post them for free. Pirating almost destroyed the music industry and the same thing is happening to the publishing industry. It's a scary time to be someone who earns their living from intellectual property. For quilt book authors especially, I hope they can be protected.

But again, yes ... some of those digital services offer an invaluable service when it comes to usually inaccessible antiquarian and other books that are no longer available in print.

Steph Whitson

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 12:04:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I don't own an ereader, but I will probably buy a Nook someday and I'll want the one that has a color feature for magazines and quilt books that might be available in digital format.

For avid readers. ereaders are great, especially for travel. No more stuffing books into bags for the plane or having to haul it home if it's a "keeper." You have hundreds of books in one light-weight device and you keep them as long as you want to keep them in your online library. You can share them with friends who have readers, download books online that you borrow from the library (which would be great for homebound seniors once they got past the technology learning curve) & etc. And they certainly are "green."

As a published novelist, I'm part of "quaking in my boots" conversations often about ereaders and what they mean for authors and publishers. Right now, everything is in flux. Sadly, digital formats make it easier than ever to steal content. Digital format also drops the "perceived value" of a book in many readers' minds, because they don't realize that the cost of a book is more in the production of the words than in the physical thing you can hold in your hands. But since it can be gotten in a flash and isn't "real," readers tend to think it's worth less (not worthless, but worth less). For me as a writer, it doesn't matter how a person acccesses my words, those words cost me the same number of hours to produce and they cost my publisher the same number of hours to edit and market. But there have been all kinds of angry readers posting on amazon about book prices in eformat ... some have even suggested boycotts of "greedy" NYT Best-selling authors, not realizing that an AUTHOR has nothing to do with how a book is priced.

But even though I don't like some of the things ereaders have done to the publishing industry, I absolutely see the usefulness of the device.

There's a high school in Florida that is trying out ereaders INSTEAD of textbooks for their students. I imagine that will create an entirely new host of problems (I lost my books---all of them --- and that $200 machine you gave me), but it seems "green" and it will save those kids' backs when they don't have to haul around 30 pound (or more) backpacks all day every day. Interesting idea at any rate.

As for quilting books in ebook format, I just don't know. I buy quilting books to savor the pictures ... oh, I tell myself I'm going to make this or that, but I rarely do. Still, I have shelves of quilt books and I don't see myself giving up the cup of coffee with those gorgeous photos spread across my lap and the mental vacation .... for an ereader. Not for this genre.

I am a book lover and I have over 50 running feet of floor-to-ceiling book shelves in my office (which is the entire basement of my home--designed with high ceilings so it doesn't seem like a basement) ... and I will never stop buying books. Just last month I purchased 4 gorgeous leather-bound books published in 1856. Then last night I bought Stephen Hunter's new novel in hardback at Barnes and Noble.

Books won't die in my lifetime and I don't think they ever will completely, but the digital revolution is just that --- a revolution.Small publishing houses are struggling. Big ones are frightened. And you've all likely noticed that your local book stores are ... disappearing. Which is why I frequent Barnes and Noble. I want to support the companies who put "on the ground" stores in my community and hire local people and provide jobs. Plus ... I just like being surrounded with "real" books.

Stephanie Whitson www.stephaniewhitson.com www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: hknight453aol.com Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 16:22:06 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 10

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CDDE303B682A40_1434_5E48_Webmail-d117.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Ebooks are very handy for out of copyright books. They'll never replace printed books entirely, but my Nook means I only need to take one suitcase on vacation, and leave the books at home. I do have hundreds of print books, and buy hardcovers or paperbacks if I know I will use it often. But reading on a screen is not the same as holding a book. As for lower prices for ebooks, I'm willing to pay around 70-100% of what a paperback of the same book would cost.

Heather who was voted Most Likely to Own Most Books in high school

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: steaming ~ related? From: Arden Shelton <ardenlsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 11 May 2011 21:36:15 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

What about folding on the bias? I seem to remember someone touting that as a solution because when the quilt is hung straight the bias folds/creases fall out.....just a thought....arden

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

________________________________ From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Mon, May 9, 2011 8:22:29 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: steaming ~ related?

Hi all, I can speak from experience about steaming. A contemporary quilt with hand-dyed fabrics was badly wrikled when we installed it. Based on discussion with the maker, we steamed it. Never again: evidence of dye was found behind the quilt. I have had contemporary quilters tell me it's OK to steam their quilts or iron them. i won't do either. It's just too risky. As for rolling, many contemporary quilts are shipped to us in a rolled condition

by the makers. Typically they are rolled with the front of the quilt out so that there are no creases or wrinkles to the face of the quilt. This tells me even contemporary quilters know rolling can cause creasing. I will say that you

have to consider the individual quilt. Most quilts will do fine with acid-free padded acid-free boxed storage. Some, particulary contemporary ones with paint on them, won't; they either need to be storge flat or rolled. You just have to consider the individual quilt. I find it interesting that some contemporary quilt makers have an extra sleeve at the bottom of their quilts for a flat aluminum slat to make the quilt hang straight and flat. This can only create extra deterioration and stress over time. Not related to antique quilts but these will be antiques someday... Judy Schwender Curator of Collections / Registrar National Quilt Museum Paducah, Kentucky

________________________________ From: Julie Silber <quiltcomplexhughes.net> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sat, May 7, 2011 11:22:44 PM Subject: [qhl] steaming ~ related?

I cannot speak directly to the question Carol asked:

In a group of slides about the hanging of the red and white quilt show in New York, there was an image of an assistant from the Museum using a hand held steamer to remove creases in a quilt that had been hung for this treatment.

Have any on the list used this process? What is your evaluation or ideas about it?

but I can tell you something vaguely related:

In speaking with the AFMA organizers of the Red & White Show, I learned that they steamed every single quilt as it went up.

WOW!

Julie Silber

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: steaming ~ related? From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Thu, 12 May 2011 09:56:15 +0100 X-Message-Number: 2

And there was I, idly wondering about the humidity rising from thousands of hyper-ventilating quilt enthusiasts.... and wondering how much of an airing the quilts could be given before going back in the closet? (not to mention the size of the closet)

Sally Ward

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Do you have a Kindle or eReader? From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Thu, 12 May 2011 11:09:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

--0-776163813-1305223789=:56883 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

I love my Kindle. Actually, it's my second Kindle- the first one was damaged, and I had no qualms about immediately calling Amazon for another. (it was a freak accident involving a feline- he leaped and cracked the ink layer when he landed on the Kindle, and Amazon replaced it under warranty!) I have at least 300 books on it, and the vast majority of them were freebies. The thing I really dislike is that Amazon hasn't figured out how to bundle multiple charges together, and I hate making a purchase of 99 cents. Why they can't just assemble 10 charges into $9.90 and then send them on, I don't quite understand. I do not believe Kindles will replace illustration-heavy books in my lifetime. I might consider buying a quilt book in e-format for the computer screen...but an ittybitty Kindle? No, that's for tucking in my purse and toting around town with me. ;)

--0-776163813-1305223789=:56883--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: E-books and Karen Flanscha's comments From: <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Thu, 12 May 2011 17:54:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Thank you, Karen, for your enthusiastic comments about our new book, Home on the Plains: Quilts and the Sod House Experience. I am so very glad you are enjoying it. 

As for the e-book question, I have to admit that we have a Kindle and and I-Pad. I have enjoyed reading on the Kindle...it=E2=80=99s new so I haven=E2=80=99t used it much...but I cannot imagine using it to access quilting books. I=E2=80=99m too much of a bibliophile to give up the tactile and cognitive experience of holding/fondling a book, turning the pages, and admiring the images...even turning the book around so I can get another angle on the images. You can=E2=80=99t do that with an e-reader...the image turns, too!

My husband uses the I-Pad so much I don=E2=80=99t get to use it much, but my feelings are much the same...Pretty handy, nice to know about, but I remain a Luddite when it comes to the printed word.

Were in for a second dark and stormy night here. Hope all is well with everyone else.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

-------

Subject: Symposium in Lowell, MA From: Laura Lane <collectionsnequiltmuseum.org> Date: Thu, 12 May 2011 09:55:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------050009090101040801000407 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Please join us for a symposium presented by the New England Quilt Museum and the American Textile History Museum in Lowell, MA!

*October 15, 2011 -- 8 am to 4 pm*

*at The New England Quilt Museum*

*and The American Textile History Museum*

*in Lowell Massachusetts*

*//*

*/Fabric, Fashions, & Quilts:/*

*/From the Armistice to Pearl Harbor/*

This collaborative study symposium will examine 20th Century

textiles as produced and used during the l920s & l930s, featuring

two talks and a series of three concurrent, rotating sessions that all

attendees will be able to attend. The Opening Address by Madelyn

Shaw will be /Between the Wars: Textiles and Clothing in American/

/Society, 1918-l941/. The Keynote Address by Merikay Waldvogel will

be /Soft Covers for Hard Times: What Role Did Quilts Play in the l930s/,

an examination of the context of quiltmaking during the late l920s

and l930s. Sessions featuring Giles Kotcher-- /Decorative Arts and/

/Designers, 1920-1940/, an overview of decorative arts and designers

of the period; Diane Fagan Affleck & Karen Herbaugh--/Printing a/

/Look: Fashions and Fabric Between theWars/, an opportunity to view

primary source materials from the archives of the ATHM; Merikay

Waldvogel, Cyndi Black & Stephanie Hatch--/Soft Covers for Hard/

/Times/, a quilt-turning with comments on quilts from the 1920s and

30s; a Buffet Lunch at the Gazebo Café and Tour of the ATHM

exhibit; and /Grace and Glamour: Fashions of the l930s/, are included

as part of the Registration Fee. A Show and Tell, which concludes the

Symposium, invites attendees to bring and share their quilts and ephemera

from the era covered by the symposium. Following the Symposium, there will

be time for attendees to view the NEQM exhibition /Maine's Quilt Heritage /and

meet guest curators Cyndi Black and Wendy Reed. Symposium attendance is

by registration only. Deadline date to register is October 03, 2011. Symposium

Fees, Registration Form, and full Symposium details are available on the web

sites listed below, or contact Karen Herbaugh at ATHM 1-978-441-0400 and

Connie Barlow at the NEQM 1-978-452-4207.

Presented by

The New England Quilt Museum & The American Textile History Museum

nequiltmuseum.org athm.org

978-452-4207 978-441-0400

Sponsored by The Binney Foundation

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: part two of American Folk Art Museum quilt exhibit From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 14 May 2011 07:37:36 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Went to see part 2 of the AFAM Masterpieces Quilt Exhibit, and was moresatisfied with these selections from among the museum's many many quilts. There were familiar quilt icons, and some that have never been on view before. Which brings me to the question I would love to see discussed on qhl- what constitutes a 'masterpiece' quilt?  There were two standouts for me, neither exhibited before--a wool piecedquilt New England c. first quarter 19th c, unique in format. It's shownon a slant board so one can really examine the floraly baskety quilting inthe wideborder that is reminiscent of work in muchlater quilts and even inAmishand may be the firstsuch expression of this treatment. Its piecing is so unusual too, in smaller patterning, assymetric,confined to only the upper center portion. I want to learn more about it thanis offered in the caption.  The other one I lovedis a Variable Stars in a lustrous greens silk palette in which the star arms were 'fussy' cut so the stripes all pointed intoward the middle. Simple elegant solution, made me wonder how come we don't see more stars like this? If definitely boosts up the impact of the pattern.  Other quilts on view that are favorites are the whitework with stuffed dotsplacedregularly all across the ground,alternatingtrapunto motifs of flowers and ferns and such, allso breathtakingly executed - fantastic, pristine, extraordinary, I remember it as a favorite from AFAM's all whitework show.  Questionablefor me was the onetermed Baltimore Album; we are accustomed to seeing these immaculate, brilliantly colored, etc. This one has no border, surprising for a BAQ; looksto be a top though that's not indicatedon the caption, and had been through thewash to such a degree that it was sad, weathered, and even had replacement 1950s fabrics (noted on the caption) Curious choice, when they likely have so many examples of BAQ's.In the first portion of the showthere were a number of album quilts, and mostalsohad no border, which is an unsatisfyingvisual to me.  There are many log cabins, and only one achieved 'masterpiece' status for me visually, a sort of Streak of Lightning in and out Barn Raisinghung horizontally. In wool solids, Mennonite, it was dynamic and intense, different from the traditional, and with great visual impact even from way across the room. Other Logs there were familiar treatments whose explanations referred to maker or community of origin rather than visual impact.  Worth a re-visit to NYC, as there are alsoother great shows in town. Don't forget some museums are open evenings weekdays or weekends, so look at everyplace's schedule.  Laura   Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1820542957-1305383856=:53005--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: E-books and Karen Flanscha's comments From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Sat, 14 May 2011 11:30:45 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

turning the pages, and admiring the images...even turning the book around so I can get another angle on the images. You can=E2=80=99t do that withan e-reader...the image turns, too!Kathy,Hmm...my Kindle resolutely remains upright, just like a book, unless I tell it to rotate. I guess that feature would be good if I were wanting to look at images, but aside from playing with it, I've not found a situation when I wanted to use it. ;)I'm preparing for a move, which means a lot of books are getting re-homed...but not the quilt books.;) Literature, I can rely on the Kindle for, but I'm willing to tote those heavy boxes for the color images and big how-to pictures.Jocelyn --0-1564789025-1305397845=:57202--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Do you know people making red and white quilts, or challenges to do so? From: MegMaxCaol.com Date: Fri, 13 May 2011 16:27:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

----------MB_8CDDFC35E7016B4_17B0_3DC85_webmail-stg-d12.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear QHL Friends:

For an article I'm writing, I'm trying to track down people making red and white quilts because they were inspired by the Infinite Variety show at the Park Avenue Armory. Also, trying to find out about red and white quilt challenges, whether declared within guilds or by quilt shops, or even makers of quilt products. I know that Electric Quilt's Club EQ is doing a monthly challenge for May (they design the quilts using the software, but don't have to actually sew them). Please write to me if know anything like that: megmegcox.com. Thanks so much! Meg Cox

www.megcox.com Latest book: The Quilter's Catalog: A Comprehensive Resource Guide President, Alliance for American Quilts Find me on Facebook: www.facebook.com/meg.cox1

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: need quilt maker to add border From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 11:51:14 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

HI - don;t gasp, but, a client wants to buy a quilt from me and wants it enlarged with a border to fit her client's needs. Is there someone in the Dallas TX area who can be hired to do this work? The quilt is a wool challis log that has a narrow binding, I am awaiting information about the width of the binding, and whether the client has the fabric to expand it, or whetherit has to be provided elsewhere. Please contact me off line if you are interested in tackling this. Thanks  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-9542464-1305571874=:51563--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Amateur Quilt History Program.. From: Kathryn Herrmann <kathrynherrmannaol.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 16:11:52 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CDE21CA146D6D3_5CC_126673_Webmail-m111.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hello, I'm doing a quilt history program for a Colonial Dames XVII Cent. group next week. This was a last minute favor and I can put together a basic timeline and take some time to debunk a few myths. Content is not my problem with this program. I would like todo a powerpoint projection and can pull some of my own photos from historical quilts. I will, however, need more than what I have.

I worry about copyright and photo resolution issues. Hopefully, the members of this list can offer some guidelines and suggestions.

Kathryn Sterling Herrrmann Hendersonville, NC

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Appraiser From: "J Perkins" <qltrstoreharlannet.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 15:18:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi,

I wanted to announce that I found out today that I passed the tests, and am now an AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser!

This has taken many years of study and preparation, and is truly one of the hardest things I have ever done, so WOO HOO!!

Smiling in Iowa,

Jennifer Perkins

AQS Certified Appraiser

NQA Certified Judge

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Appraiser From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 16:45:43 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Congratulations, Jennifer!!!!!

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Mon, May 16, 2011 at 3:18 PM, J Perkins wrote:

Hi, I wanted to announce that I found out today that I passed the tests, and am now an AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser! This has taken many years of study and preparation, and is truly one of the hardest things I have ever done, so WOO HOO!! Smiling in Iowa, Jennifer Perkins AQS Certified Appraiser NQA Certified Judge --- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: quiltnsharroncharter.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1812780Flyris.quiltropolis.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Appraiser From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 19:17:17 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Jennifer,

Congratulations! I'm happy for you. It is a great feeling isn't it!

Take care, Alma Moates AQS Certified Appraiser-Quilted Textiles Pensacola, Florida

In a message dated 5/16/2011 3:18:47 P.M. Central Daylight Time, qltrstoreharlannet.com writes:

Hi, I wanted to announce that I found out today that I passed the tests, and am now an AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser! This has taken many years of study and preparation, and is truly one of the hardest things I have ever done, so WOO HOO!! Smiling in Iowa, Jennifer Perkins AQS Certified Appraiser NQA Certified Judge --- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: Quiltsappraisedaol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1789776Nlyris.quiltropolis.com

--part1_52ef9.595c6834.3b030a7d_boundary--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Appraiser From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 20:16:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Congratulations. What a HUGE milestone! I've taken classes and chickened out. YOU GO!!!!!!!! Stephanie Whitson ----- Original Message ----- From: J Perkins To: Quilt History List Sent: Monday, May 16, 2011 3:18 PM Subject: [qhl] Appraiser

Hi,

I wanted to announce that I found out today that I passed the tests, and am now an AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser!

This has taken many years of study and preparation, and is truly one of the hardest things I have ever done, so WOO HOO!!

Smiling in Iowa,

Jennifer Perkins

AQS Certified Appraiser

NQA Certified Judge