Subject: OLD FABRIC From: Sherry Cook <sas.cook gmail.com> Date: Tue, 31 May 2011 12:27:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I have found a box of old fabric over the weekend that has been stored in my sewing room for years. The fabric is in great shape, all about 24 inches wide & a few yards of each. Please write me off line if you want more info. I am in the middle of a big job of documenting my large feedsack collection with donations to the BRISCOE CENTER FOR AMERICAN HISTORY. I am short of time to do anything with the older fabrics & had forgotten I bought them years ago. I will be donating 1/4th to 1/3rd yard of these old fabrics to the CENTER, also. Thanks, Sherry at sas.cook gmail.com.

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Subject: Re: basting glue stain From: "Marilyn M. Withrow" <mmw marilynquilts.com> Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2011 09:06:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I would try baking soda and water, apply it to the stain with a cotton ball and let it sit for awhile, then remove it with clear water by patting the stain gently. If that doesn't work, use SoilLove, diluted -- I've not found anything that that product won't remove, except foxing and it at least lightens the foxing stains.

Marilyn Withrow

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Subject: pine burr design From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2011 21:20:23 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello Friends,

I am looking for info on the "Pine Burr" or "Pine Cone" quilts. The heavy ones with the folded pieces -- often organized into circles or "targets."

I have Googled -- and found some basic info, but am hoping that someone knows a lot about them, and/or has written about them.

Any ideas?

Thanks, Julie Silber

quiltcomplex hughes.net

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Subject: RE: basting glue stain From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeo sbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2011 06:42:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Marilyn introduced a new term to me: =94foxing." I didn't know there was a term for those rusty looking age spots on a vintage or antique quilt. 

On me, I've called them =94liver spots." I think =94foxing=94 is a classier name. VBG

Barb Vlack barb barbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at:=A0 www.AlzQuilts.org 

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Subject: RE: basting glue stain From: Dale Drake <ddrake ccrtc.com> Date: Thu, 02 Jun 2011 08:08:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I'm familiar with "foxing" from leather book conservation - I hadn't heard it associated with old quilts, either. In addition to the spots, is it also that overall browning effect that old quilts get? What causes it? Oxidation?

Dale in Indiana

Barb Vlack said:

Marilyn introduced a new term to me: ”foxing." I didn't know there was a term for those rusty looking age spots on a vintage or antique quilt. On me, I've called them ”liver spots." I think ”foxing” is a classier name.

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Subject: speaker needed -- southern CA, Oct 15, 2011 From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2011 10:08:59 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Hi,

I have been asked to speak in Fullerton, CA on October 15, 2011. Here is the request:

"I am the program chair of the Orange County Chapter of the American Sewing Guild, in California, and I'm seeking a speaker for our Annual Meeting to be Oct. 15, 2011 at the Fullerton Arboretum. The theme is "Sewing as a Life Skill," and I was hoping to find a speaker that could address sewing for the family and home."

The budget is small, and with travel, I cannot manage it. I am hoping someone living closer may be willing and available.

E-mail me and I will give you more details: quiltcomplex hughes.net

Thanks, Julie Silber

www.thequiltcomplex.com

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Subject: M Withrow's post From: <kathymoore neb.rr.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2011 20:49:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

With regard to Marilyn Withrow s post to dab a solution of water and baking soda on the stain: it would be advisable to use distilled water. Local water will have chemicals and minerals which can imbed in the fibers only to appear sometime later.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: NJ Quilt book From: Barbara Schaffer <bds23 hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 3 Jun 2011 10:26:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

The Heritage Quilt Project of NJ has a very limited quantity of their out-of-print book New Jersey Quilts 1777-1950 and is selling them at $65.00 ea. including shipping--first  come first served. The books are brand new. If anyone is interested or you'd like more  information please email me privately. 

Thanks.

Barbara Schaffer HQPNJ bds23 hotmail.com

 

--_bd06d4fb-e401-4be6-ac0b-ecc640b96e8b_--

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Subject: "Stitched", the documentary From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharron charter.net> Date: Fri, 3 Jun 2011 12:30:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

A group from our bee went to see the documentary "Stitched" last night at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Loved the movie! If you don't have a showing anywhere in your area consider buying the dvd. It's worth it for the music alone. The line last night to buy the dvd at the museum was too long so I came home and googled "stitched the documentary" and found a way to buy it online. It's funny and hits home on so many levels.

Warm regards (literally, WARM, actually hot and dry regards) Sharron Evans........... .....in Spring, TX where we haven't had rain in so long we're turning into a dust bowl

P.S. I know I'm sending info to two different groups but I don't want anyone to miss out on this documentary. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

S

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Subject: Re: "Stitched", the documentary From: quiltnsharron charter.net Date: Fri, 3 Jun 2011 17:28:51 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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It is a great dvd so I hope you find it. Someone has said that they could only find it for $70!!! Don't buy from whoever that is because you can buy it from the film maker for $19+.

Completely off topic, I can't figure out why a system has never been put into place that would send the raging flood waters to the drought stricken areas. California has a system that looks like it runs the entire length of their state. Oh well, if you could just start filling empty milk jugs and mailing them, I'd be quite appreciative. :)

Best regards to your daughter also. I know how warm she feels.

Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: Re: water on stains From: "Marilyn M. Withrow" <mmw marilynquilts.com> Date: Fri, 3 Jun 2011 21:00:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

There are so many variables in water supplies across this country that it goes without saying, to me anyway, that distilled water is preferable to use when handling delicate vintage and/or antique fabrics. However, on today's fabrics, with their mostly stable dyes and processing, distilled water isn't always necessary. Thank you, Kathy, for your cautionary comments regarding the use of distilled water. Living in rural Oklahoma, distilled water is a necessary part of our lives and is just normal to me.

As for the term "foxing," I've heard that term used for many years by other appraisers and historians -- and even by my grandparents who were antique buffs and collected almost everything. I thought everyone knew that term, and I sure can't take any credit for it. You're right, Barb, it does sound better than "liver spots" -- but then don't we all get a bit spotty when we're vintage or antique???

Marilyn Withrow

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Subject: Earliest date for polyester wadding? From: Sally Ward <sallytatters fastmail.co.uk> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2011 11:41:11 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

--Apple-Mail-1-311873576 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Does anyone know when Polyester wadding was first manufactured? I'm not looking for a quilting-specific date, just the stuff generically. Restoration work on an early 18th century bed (http://www.artfund.org/artwork/2486/the-hinton-house-state-bed , http://tinyurl.com/6fa75dm and http://tinyurl.com/5wm2dco) revealed it inserted behind the headboard damask and we were wondering about an 'earliest possible' date for this having been done. This wadding is the upholsterers' stuff, some kind of bonding on each side and looser fluffy filling. I do remember using it, unsatisfactorily, in some of my early quilts.

Thanks for any help.

Sally Ward/Tatters

--Apple-Mail-1-311873576--

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Subject: Re: Earliest date for polyester wadding? From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2011 05:16:45 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Sally,

I once worked on a 1950ish quilt with some sort of polyester/fiberglass batting. If I had seen it outside of the quilt, I would have called it insulation - and who knows, maybe it was! But without doing any sort of research whatsoever, I have always assumed that was an early form of polyester batting (wadding.)

Changing the subject, I've always used the word foxing to describe the little dots of rust colored spots on quilts. I believe them to be biological in origin - dead bugs, maybe. I've never been able to get them out, although they may lighten if you was the piece.

Kris

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Subject: someone in D.C. area to mount a quilt From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2011 10:18:12 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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HI all -=A0Can anyone put me in touch with a Washington D.C. area person who can=A0sew a velcro=A0 mounting on a client's quilt? Newbie, is this something you would do? Thanks in advance for any leads. =A0 And speaking of Newbie, she calls to mind 'costume' and I just hope any qhl'ers visiting NYC=A0make time to see the Alexander McQueen=A0show at the Metropolitan Museum. What is on exhibit is more than just clothing,=A0it is fabric sculpture, some of it pieced patchworky, some=A0with fabulous embroidered embellishments, some recycled vintage Japanese textiles (I think my favs),=A0amazingly crafted, absolutely worth the wait on line, you'll never see anything quite like it.=A0 =A0 Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage yahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1901972010-1307207892=:69431--

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Subject: Target Quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2011 10:46:50 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi again - have not seen any response on line yet about Julie's inquiry concerning TARGET or PINE BURR type quilts. I hope people have info to share with all of us on line. This is a form I am drawn to for its true three dimensionality. The first one I ever read about was in Karey's Texas quilt book. There is a huge Single Target from my shop in Gladys Marie Fry's book on African American quilts, and I have seen only two others.=A0I have,=A0and have had, a variety of these monumental efforts. The one huge Target is=A0less common,=A0more prevalent are examples made with multiple targets; I presume those=A0started out life as the individual pillow squares,=A0taken to the extreme=A0with many=A0pieced together as a quilt,=A0Hopefully someone has the=A0period ephemera that would have had=A0instructions to make such pillow faces or table mats. Oddly I=A0now have 2 in which the configuration isin horizontal rows, not circles,=A0they are literally=A0row sewn atop the prior row of folded triangles (numbering in the thousands but impossible to count).=A0Bravo to the strong armed=A0quilter who decided to expand the conceptinto a full size quilt, because the results weigh a ton- not so easy to maneuver on a lap, table or bed, but phenomenally modern looking when hangingon a wall. . Would also love to know whose idea this was first, I=A0have heard this was a southern design concept only. The method of construction iseasy enough to figure out by lifting the triangles, could this be considered=A0in an=A0approach similiar to log cabin patterns?.I'll post some photos=A0on eBoard =A0 Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage yahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-911085069-1307209610=:52237--

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Subject: Target quilt on eboard From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2011 10:58:41 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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I just posted one Targets quilt on eboard that was on file on my home computer, but.....it is such small pixels that when enlarged, it dissolves, so Iwill post better photos on Monday from the store. Also, there is an image,but the posting note has a little box with an X in it, can any one tell mewhy and how to avoid that? Am I doing something wrong in the uploading? Thanks =A0 Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage yahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1840490762-1307210321=:16309--

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Subject: Re: Target Quilts From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2011 17:01:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I know the Nebraska History Museum has at least one in its collection. Don't have ny info on it, but if you want to research them you could contact the museum and see about getting a gander at the donor file. ] I wonder ... were they really quilts? Or were they maybe used as rugs? I can't imagine sleeping under that many pounds..... maybe they were removed when it was bedtime unless it was winter?

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: polyester wadding/batting From: ikwlt <ikwlt yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2011 21:25:21 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

> Does anyone know when Polyester wadding was first > manufactured?=A0  > Thanks for any help. >  > Sally Ward/Tatters   i knew i had this in my notes, but no reference as to where i learned it. take it for what it's worth. patti   1957 dacron (polyester) batting invented

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Subject: pine burr or target quilts From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2011 23:10:13 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Hello Friends,

I got some very good leads on the origins of Pine Burr quilts in messages that came to me directly.

Surprising to me -- what has been suggested...

I have to follow them up and hope to have some very good, verified info soon.

Stay tuned!

And a big thanks to those who responded,

Julie Silber

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Subject: Hidden Treasure of Kalona, IA From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421 comcast.net> Date: Sun, 05 Jun 2011 12:12:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Good Morning All -

I'm recovering from a whirlwind vacation to Chicago and the midwest and wanted to thank those who alerted me to some quilt exhibits that I was able to enjoy. The first --

The Hidden Treasure of Kalona, IA -- I had visited the quilt museum about 5 years ago, and it was wonderful -- but since then they have added a second gallery. The original gallery features about 18-20 antique quilts plus a collection of department store spool cabinets that the collector donated to the museum. While I've seen many "counter top" versions from general stores, these very large ones were beautiful. The collector was there, and when I thanked him for sharing his collection, saying I was mostly familiar with the "general store types", he said "Marshall Fields was a general store -- just a very big one."

The newer gallery is their Midwest Amish Quilts exhibit, and it featured many full size and crib size examples, possibly 40 -- I didn't count. Just beautiful.

On the same grounds (Kalona Historical Village Museum) is the Iowa Mennonite Museum. There were several quilts on display there, including some interesting signature quilts. I didn't have time to visit the rest of the restored village style museum, so will hopefully return another time.

http://www.kalonaiowa.org/KQTM.htm http://www.kalonaiowa.org/KHV.htm

The town's newest quilt project is their sidewalk art -- http://www.washingtoniowa.org/news/cool-quilt-squares-installed-in-downtown-kalona-sidewalks-fi.html

I was fortunate to visit with Marilyn Woodin, the wonderful curator for the quilt museum. She knows and loves antique quilts, and works hard to exhibit a fair number of quilted textiles so the visitor does not leave disappointed. Exhibits are rotated several times a year, I believe.

Kalona is less than 1/2 hour driving time south of I-80 at Iowa City. Well worth the drive down, which is through pretty farmland.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Pine Cone quilts From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2011 13:19:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

In my neck of the woods, Target quilts are most often called Pine Cone. You cant believe how heavy they are - there are so many layers of fabric when it is all said and done. I've only known them to be made by African American ladies, but of course there is no reason a white (or green) hand can't make them as well.

I have one. Laura - you got a market for this thing??? It can be for sale! I think they are pretty close to being outsider art - one of my greatest loves. Teddy Pruett in the very very hot piney woods of North Florida. The REAL FLorida. 

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Subject: Re: pine burr or target quilts From: Quiltsappraised aol.com Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2011 18:31:23 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Julie,

I've only known these quilts as Pine Cone quilts too. I see them in southern Alabama mostly. The ones I've come across were made by white women. I saw 2 last year at a show in Al. and I heard lots of locals stating their family had one. One lady said her Grandmother made one and had trouble finishing it due to the weight of the thing.

Alma Moates Pensacola, Florida

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Subject: Illinois Quilt Exhibit From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421 comcast.net> Date: Sun, 05 Jun 2011 21:50:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Good Evening All --

A very nice exhibit of quilts in the Illinois State Museum's Collection is at their Lockport Gallery, in Lockport, IL.

http://www.museum.state.il.us/ismsites/lockport/exhibitions.html

This exhibit compares Amish and non-Amish made quilts, and is nicely done.

The exhibit runs through September 16. The gallery is relatively close to I-80 and about an hour southwest of Chicago, and is set in a beautiful park, which I unfortunately didn't have time to visit, but my husband said was very pretty/peaceful.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: pine burr or target quilts From: Gloria Hanrahan <gloria ak.net> Date: Sun, 05 Jun 2011 18:14:33 -0800 (AKDT) X-Message-Number: 7

I have a great one made out of 1970's poly cotton. Hangs over my upstairs railing and never fails to bring complements from visitors.

Gloria Hanrahan

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Subject: Pine Burr From: OzarkQuiltmaker aol.com Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2011 00:38:34 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

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Hi:

We have one of these at our local quilt shop in Springfield, Missouri. It is round and made as a rug. It's about 3 feet across. I think it was recently made. It is out of plaids and home spun fabrics. I'll have to ask about it.

I've also made a prairie point pine cone Christmas ornament by folding fabric into triangles and sticking them into a Styrofoam egg. Does that count?

Kathy Kansier AQS Appraiser Ozark, Missouri

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Subject: Re: Illinois Quilt Exhibit From: "The Motls" <motl jefnet.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2011 08:56:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

The quilt exhibit at Rend Lake is also very nice, part of the Illinois State Museum Collection. I visited on the way home from Paducah. Chris ----- Original Message ----- From: "Barb Garrett" <bgarrett421 comcast.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2011 8:50 PM Subject: [qhl] Illinois Quilt Exhibit

> Good Evening All -- > > A very nice exhibit of quilts in the Illinois State Museum's Collection is > at their Lockport Gallery, in Lockport, IL. > > http://www.museum.state.il.us/ismsites/lockport/exhibitions.html >

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Subject: Re: Pine Burr From: Quiltsappraised aol.com Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2011 11:37:28 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Kathy,

I made 55 of those egg ornaments one year for everyone at work and about 10 per year x 10 yrs.. They are addictive, pretty and a pain in the fingers if you don't use a thimble to push in the pins!

Take care, Alma Moates AQS Appraiser Pensacola, Florida

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Subject: Pine Burr Quilt - 1895 From: kyra hicks <kyra262 yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2011 08:56:39 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Julie,

Hello! You likely know this - the Pine Burr Quilt is the state quilt of Alabama. http://blackthreads.blogspot.com/2006/10/pine-burr-quilt-pattern.html

Also - in my book on Harriet Powers (This I Accomplish), there is a photo on page 16 of Mrs. Powers' Bible Quilt at the 1895 Cotton States and International Exposition in Atlanta, GA., B. W. Bilburn Stereoview Collection, Littleton, NH. If you look to the right of the Bible Quilt, you'll see a glorious Pine Burr quilt, with at least 7 pine burr circles, on display there in the Negro Building.

Best, Kyra Hicks Arlington, VA --0-235421333-1307375799=:13794--

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Subject: Did QNM ever have a board game? From: kyra hicks <kyra262 yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2011 08:59:00 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Hello!

Trivia Question of the day (smile!)

Did Quilters Newsletter Magazine ever have a board game or deck of playing cards with questions about quilting and different quilters? I heard one may have come out 20 or 25 years ago - before I started quilting. Would love to know if there was such a game and if anyone has one.

Thank you!

Kyra Hicks Arlington, VA www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com

--0-1677683118-1307375940=:24162--

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Subject: Re: Did QNM ever have a board game? From: Mary Persyn <mary.persyn valpo.edu> Date: Mon, 06 Jun 2011 11:11:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

There was a bingo-like game called "Quilto", but I don't think that it was put out by QNM.

Mary

kyra hicks wrote:

Did Quilters Newsletter Magazine ever have a board game or deck of playing cards with questions about quilting and different quilters?

-- Mary G. Persyn mary.persyn valpo.edu Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917

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Subject: One more thing From: Quiltsappraised aol.com Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2011 12:15:34 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

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I have not had time to read all the emails about this subject but did anyone else ever make the pine cone covered cheese boxes? I made several of these in the early '80's and I used folded fabrics and each top had the equivalent of one pine cone block.

Just one more use of this pattern.

Alma Moates AQS Appraiser Pensacola, Florida --part1_108db.6dd8623d.3b1e5726_boundary--

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Subject: Re: Did QNM ever have a board game? From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2011 12:05:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Atkinson Designs had something like this - it was a deck of cards, anyway..=A0  It's not on their website any more, but you can E-mail them and see if they have  any left.  Kris

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Subject: The Norwalk Quilt Trail update From: suereich charter.net Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 00:10:08 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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The Norwalk Quilt Trail just updated their web site with a gallery exhibit of their quilts shown with musical accompaniment. The link is below. There are two parts - Gallery One and Two. To get to Gallery Two find the boxed arrow at the bottom left of the marque and click on it. This will take you to the second gallery. What an amazing job this group of museums have done to present their quilts!

http://www.norwalkquilttrail.org/?page_id=646

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Triangle Cheese Boxes From: OzarkQuiltmaker aol.com Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 02:34:20 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

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Alma:

You definitely win the award for making the most pine cone Christmas ornaments. I forgot about those cheese boxes. I made one in country blue fabrics and another one in purple fabrics and I still have them. I also made a number of folded triangle projects that were round and put in 10" embroidery hoops. They were geometrical in their design setting and a pain to make because the triangles had to be perfectly spaced and tacked down. I did a larger one that went into a 16" hoop. Four hearts were formed in the center by how the triangles were placed. It was from a pattern that I bought at the first quilt show I ever attended in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin.

Also in the late 1970's we were doing Candlewicking Embroidery on muslin and Chicken Scratch Embroidery on gingham. There was an article Chicken Scratch today on Mary Corbet's newsletter and web site. She also has an article about twilling embroidery on quilts. _http://www.needlenthread.com/_ (http://www.needlenthread.com/) . She sends out a good email newsletter about embroidery and often includes historical info about needlework if anyone is interested.

Kathy Kansier AQS Certified Appraiser Ozark, Missouri

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 05, 2011 From: gebel earthlink.net Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2011 20:25:14 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Sally -

Mountain Mist Blue Book of Quilts, celebrating 150 years of the perfect quilting, 1846-1996, p.46 states "Polyester fiber developed in the early 1950s gives quilters a wider range in the finished look of the quilt". It also states: "The polyester batting allowed the quilter to become 'lazy' in the quilting process, and tied comforters became very popular".

"The first Mountain Mist 100% Quality Polyester Batting was made available to quilters in 1956 in a twin size..."

Carol Gebel

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Subject: Indiana Quilt Exhibit From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421 comcast.net> Date: Tue, 07 Jun 2011 07:54:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Good Morning All --

During my "end of May Midwest Quilting Adventure" I was fortunate to visit the wonderful quilt exhibit, Frugal and Fancy, at the Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis.

http://www.indianamuseum.org/visit/exhibit/exhibitview.asp?exhibitid=39

Be sure to read the writing on the quilt on the above link -- that maker wanted everyone to know this was her "fancy quilt".

The "fancy" quilts are exquisite. Some wonderful appliques, and beautiful quilting. The polished cottons of a Marie Webster Dogwood shimmer. And I love to study the fabric collections often found in "frugal" quilts. Curator (and AQSG member) Mary Jane Teeters-Eichacker has provided us with a beautiful, well balanced, quilt exhibit with informative labels. A wonderful job! Thank you.

The museum building is beautiful also, and contains many interesting, non-quilt related, exhibits -- something for every member of the family.

If you are going to the Quilters Hall of Fame Celebration July 14-16, try to plan a visit to Indianapolis on the way there -- this exhibit ends July 17, and should not be missed.

The final stop on my adventure was the Quilters Hall of Fame in Marion, IN. The house and gardens are beautiful, and you can get the feeling of what Marie Webster's life was like when she was doing her quilting.

http://www.quiltershalloffame.net/

I was excited to view the panels of blocks from the Cuesta Benberry collection that are currently on display (through July). Looking at the fabrics in the blocks was like a walk down memory lane -- I recognized so many of the fabrics from my childhood and early quilting. There were some unusual patterns I hadn't seen before, and the story of how these women exchanged Round Robin blocks to keep quilting alive has always fascinated me.

Thus ended my week of quilting treasures of the midwest, with special thanks to my driver, Bill, and my Chicago-living daughter who invited us out to activities on 2 consecutive weekends, and we "had" to find something to do in between. Thank you to those from this list who helped me plan this adventure by telling me of the exhibits. Your help was invaluable.

Barb in "cool for one last day" southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Triangle Cheese Boxes From: Quiltsappraised aol.com Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 10:47:25 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Kathy,

I forgot about the hoops. I did 1 small one and that was enough for me. The cheese boxes were labors of love for family and friends who wanted one. I remember a red white and blue one I did and a red white and green one for a Christmas present for another friend. I was working so much that the small projects whether quilts or crafts was about all I could do for awhile.

I look forward to looking up that article.

Thanks, Alma

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 05, 2011 From: Sally Ward <sallytatters fastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 16:56:55 +0100 X-Message-Number: 6

My thanks to Carol and all who replied. Everyone is singing from the same hymn sheet, and I feel confident that I have a date to take back to the enquirer. What I now have to ask the conservator is whether she thinks the polyester caused any greater damage to the silk damask than was experience elsewhere on the bed without it.

Thanks

Sally

> "The first Mountain Mist 100% Quality Polyester Batting was made available > to quilters in 1956 in a twin size..." >  > Carol Gebel

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Subject: re: pine cone cheese boxes From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ss yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 11:48:54 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Really?=A0 the mind boggles.=A0 I can't remember, and I can't envision these - any chance of a picture?=A0 Susan

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Subject: re: pine cone cheese boxes From: Quiltsappraised aol.com Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 15:02:38 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 8

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Susan,

Since I did not keep one for myself I and I never took a picture of my works back then, no, there's no pictures. Some of the older Crafts magazines featured them. What you did was go to flea markets or groceries and purchase the round wooden cheese boxes with the wood lid and starting at the center, fold your fabric squares into prairie points and hot glue them down creating a pattern from the different colors you picked out. With mine each circle of fabrics was a different color. One I did was like a Sunburst, yellows, oranges then reds. After covering the entire surface of the top you would add fabric to the tops edge creating a look of binding I would use piping on the edge too. I would stain the box bottom if it was a new one, the old boxes have a great patina to them. I have antique wooden pantry boxes that I'm so glad I did not have at that time. I would never want to do anything like that to them!

Hope this gives you a "picture" of what they looked like.

Alma Moates AQS Certified Appraiser Pensacola, Florida

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Subject: TARGET qlts continued From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 12:20:03 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

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Thanks Julie for raising the subject of these=A0 exciting (to me, anyway) quilts. I just posted most of mine on eboard and was surprised at the various forms=A0that even=A0this construction can take. In the ones I=A0have, thetriangles vary in size, and some are color orchestrated while others are not. --=A0hmmm. I do remember one=A0I had=A0ages ago--64 small=A0Target squares in delicious 1930s prints, but so precisely measured and sewn and coordinated, as compared to the more informal ones that are seen more often. Most often this construction form is seen in small squares about 12-16" intended as table mats or pillow fronts I guess. Did you get any response that led you to published instructions on how to make them? Would love to know when the first one came about and how.They call to mind other textile forms, like small =A0rugs or mats which used ticking or canvas as the foundation onwhich to sew rows of scrap fabrics to create some kind of rustic covering.I wonder if that was the inspiration. and got tgranslated from heel flap or lamb's tongue rugs into folded triangles for pillow or quiltmaking? =A0 Laura Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage yahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-744566913-1307474403=:45043--

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Subject: Re pine burr cheese boxes From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ss yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 14:39:02 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

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Alma, thank you.=A0 Of course the cheese box had to be round, and hence my "problem" of imagination - I was picturing the oblong cream cheese boxes from which many a home carpenter made drawers for nuts and bolts and other valuable things.=A0 I couldn't put that picture and pine burr together to getanything but "HUH?"

Now I fear what similar items I might find in the scary basement when I start digging around!=A0=A0 Susan

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Subject: Re: Re pine burr cheese boxes From: Quiltsappraised aol.com Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 18:26:18 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 11

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Oh, we eat a lot of hoop cheese here in the South! Always round. LOL! Alma

In a message dated 6/7/2011 4:39:13 P.M. Central Daylight Time, schreurs_ss yahoo.com writes:

Alma, thank you. Of course the cheese box had to be round, and hence my "problem" of imagination - I was picturing the oblong cream cheese boxes from which many a home carpenter made drawers for nuts and bolts and other valuable things. I couldn't put that picture and pine burr together to get anything but "HUH?"

Now I fear what similar items I might find in the scary basement when I start digging around! Susan

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Subject: Target - Pine Burr Quilts From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 21:43:01 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Thanks very much to all of you who responded re: Targets and Pine Burr quilts, etc. (Cheese boxes???)

I am gathering information for a mailer (more like a newsletter this time...) we are sending out soon, featuring the best and most unusual example of this genre I've ever seen.

I want to be have the most complete and most accurate information I can.

Again, I thank you all for the info and the leads to photos ~ and Laura, for posting photos of 5 examples on the eBoard.

I will post what I find in some (hopefully) comprehensible form on QHL soon.

This is great. Thanks!

Julie Silber

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Subject: im online now From: joyce <joyce04 glamsham.com> Date: Tue, 07 Jun 2011 07:03:46 GMT X-Message-Number: 2

i found your profile on the internet and wanna know you :) i can send you few hot pictures of me too, i`m online right now so email me at alativemlansku hotmail.com and i`ll send you some pictures within 5 mins ;)

kisses

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Subject: out of print Elly Sienkiewicz book From: dsmetzger aol.com Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2011 22:48:05 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CDF39DA07A3777_BE8_546F1_webmail-d149.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I don't know if anyone is interested, but I have a friend who is cleaning out some of her quilting "stuff" and she has an autographed copy of "Spoken Without A Word" that she is willing to entertain offers for. I'd think about it but its another trip back to Paducah next year to retest - and Mom just told me she wants to go back to Ireland next year....sigh! Anyway, if you're interested, email me at metzger2570 aol.com with your offer and phone number and I'll give them directly to my friend for her to get in touch!

----------MB_8CDF39DA07A3777_BE8_546F1_webmail-d149.sysops.aol.com--

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Subject: History/traditiona of heart and hand symbol From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2011 09:41:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

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Does anyone know the "backstory" of the heart and hand symbol that I connect with quilting? Where did the association begin? Why?

Thanks for any input.

Stephanie Whitson ------=_NextPart_000_0005_01CC25C0.3CEFD180--

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Subject: RE: History/traditiona of heart and hand symbol From: "Candace Perry" <candace schwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2011 11:19:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

I think the Shakers used it but I also think it is probably older, perhaps from emblemology -- meaning the European emblem books. It's interesting, if it is indeed Shaker, that it entered common usage and became such a well known folk symbol. I guess that doesn't answer your question in regards to quilts, though! Candace Perry -----Original Message----- From: Stephanie Grace Whitson [mailto:stephanie stephaniewhitson.com] Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2011 10:41 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] History/traditiona of heart and hand symbol

Does anyone know the "backstory" of the heart and hand symbol that I connect with quilting? Where did the association begin? Why?

Thanks for any input.

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: Polyester wadding From: "Marilyn M. Withrow" <mmw marilynquilts.com> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2011 13:13:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

To my knowledge, polyester was developed during World War II, but didn't become commercially available as batting for quilters until the late 1940s or early 1950s. So if there is polyester batting in the headboard of that antique piece, it isn't original to the piece. Perhaps it was something else. Marilyn Withrow

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Subject: RE: History/traditiona of heart and hand symbol From: erwerner3104 yahoo.com Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2011 12:39:41 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

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Does anyone know the "backstory" of the heart and hand symbol that I connect with quilting? Where did the association begin? Why? The first thing that comes to my mind is the 4-H pledge, which includes both heart and hand as two of the 4-Hs. I pledge my head to clearer thinking my heart to greater loyalty my hands to larger service and my health to better living or my club, my community, and my country. The first 4-H club was established in 1902. Just a thought Rosie Werner www.quiltkitid.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: History/traditiona of heart and hand symbol From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421 comcast.net> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2011 19:48:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

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Hi Stephanie -

When I see the heart in hand motif, I think of the Shaker concept/practice/belief "Hands to work, Hearts to God." I don't know if there's a quilting connection there.

Barb in very warm southeastern PA

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Subject: Hearts and Hands - an 1834 reference From: suereich charter.net Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2011 20:06:42 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 9

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I just bought an antique Hearts and Hands Quilt block from Cindy Rennels in Paducah. The Turkey red print and white applique is a symbol that is fascinating. Stephanie, thanks for bringing it up for discussion. I decided to do some research and was interested to find the references in historic newspapers. Hopefully, we will be able to understand some of the historic meaning of this symbol with these articles. So far, here is the earliest reference.

The Adams Sentinel Gettysburg, Pennsylvania September 8, 1834 Page 1 WHIG SONG Sung at the Pavilion Dinner, at Salem.

Ye Senators of Congress! Who guard our nation's rights, Whose hearts and hands have nobly braved Corruption's topmost heights; Your glorious standard launch again, To watch anew the foe, And sweep corruption's deep, While the storms of party blow, While the battle rages loud and long, And the storms of party blow.

The spirit of our leaders, Is starting to the strife; Their country is their field of fame, And honor is their life. Where Clay and mighty Webster fight, Your many hearts shall glow, As ye sweep corruption's deep, While the storms of party blow, While the battle rages loud and long, And the storms of party blow.

Columbia needs no bulwark, No towers along the steep-- Her march is safe o'er faction's waves, Her home above its deep. With thunders from her patriot sons, She quells the floods below, As they roar on the shore, When the storms of party blow, When the battle rages loud and long, And the storms of party blow.

The patriot Flag of Freedom , Shall yet in splendor wave, Till danger's troubled night depart, And faction finds its grave, Then, then, ye civic warriors! Our song and feast shall flow, To the fame of your name, When the storm has ceased to blow, When party strife is heard no more, And the storm has ceased to blow.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: History/traditiona of heart and hand symbol From: Karan Flanscha <sadierose cfu.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2011 20:26:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

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Here is info I had written up to go along with a Hand & Heart applique block a few years ago:

"Heart-In-Hand"

The "Heart-In-Hand" was a favorite folk art motif in the 19th century. It was used to decorate Valentines or love letters, often inscribed with romantic phrases such as "Hand and heart shall never part. When this you see, remember me." Another custom was a gift of gloves from a suitor, accompanied by a verse: "If that from Glove you take the letter G, then Glove is Love and that I send to thee." This sometimes was a form of marriage proposal, if the recipient wore the gloves to church, it indicated she had accepted the proposal. The Heart-In-Hand motif was also found on quilts and hooked rugs, carvings and as tin cookie cutters. The heart on the palm of the hand symbolizes 'an unselfish giver, whose hand is always extended to a brother'. It was used as the official emblem of the Order of Odd Fellows, a fraternal organization. More information on the Heart-In-Hand design can be found in "Folk Hearts" by Cynthia V. A. Schaffner and Susan Klein, published in 1984 by Alfred A. Knopf Publisher, New York.

On Wed, Jun 8, 2011 at 9:41 AM, Stephanie Grace Whitson < stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> wrote:

> Does anyone know the "backstory" of the heart and hand symbol that I > connect with quilting? Where did the association begin? Why? > >

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Hearts and Hands - an 1834 reference From: xenia cord <xenia legacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2011 21:40:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

The heart in hand is a symbol of charity, and was used in that manner 

by the International Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF). That organization   was founded in 1819 in Baltimore with the charge to =93visit the sick, 

relieve the distressed, bury the dead and educate the orphan=94. The 

symbol is also associated with the Shakers (Wiki) and founder Mother   Ann Lee (1736-1784) - Hands to work, hearts to God. As other   researchers have said, the symbol was used in a variety of formats to 

express love, charity, and piety.

I have a Quaker wedding quilt dated 1855, from Indiana, that includes 

a quilted hand with a heart in the palm, and the initials of the   wedding couple within the heart.

Xenia=

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Subject: RE: History/traditiona of heart and hand symbol From: Quiltsappraised aol.com Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 08:00:01 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Barb,

This has always been my understanding of the symbol of the heart in hand too. In the 1970's I saw this symbol a lot and it was always referenced to the Shaker's belief "Hands to work, Hearts to God". I did have a applique' quilt pattern for this once upon a time. Maybe I'll come across it again one day.

All my best,

Alma Moates AQS Certified Appraiser Pensacola, Florida

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Subject: Hearts & Hands From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 08:58:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I did some internet research after I asked the question, but especially appreciate this group's scholarship.

From from what y'all have said, the heart-in-hand wasn't first noticed on quilts, but was put on quilts as a reflection of a symbol/meaning already used in society and, therefore, part of "the vernacular" so to speak. 

I didn't know why I connected it with quilting per se, but Xenia and others have confirmed that it was used on 19th century quilts as a quilting motif.

I had thought so, but I didn't have any evidence ... and I don't want to be guilty of adding to false oral history!!!

So thank you all ... we are considering new copies for one of my fiction series and the "heart/hand" idea came up (becaues they have quilts & quilters & milliners & dressmakers & etc. in them) and I didn't know if it was a bona fide symbol that was truly connected to quilts or if I had done that in my own head. 

I didn't find anything online about heart-in-hand that referred specifically to 19th century quilts. At some point I'm intrigued enough by this that I may pull down all my quilt history books and go looking for hearts and hands on old quilts!

Steph Whitson ------=_NextPart_000_0038_01CC2683.5892F8E0--

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Subject: The UGRR From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 09:10:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

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This is anecdotal but the beat goes on. Last Friday Kathy Moore and I did a lecture/book talk at the International Quilt Study Center here in Lincoln. Afterwards the gift shop hosted a signing of our new book, and one of the signees was telling me the exciting story of how at the quilt show in a small town nearby (hosted for the town's anniversary celebration) she learned about how slaves used quilts to run for freedom. She had a slip of paper in her pocket where someone had written down the book title Hidden in Plain View as recommended reading. 

I hopefully handled it well. I said, "You know, I've read that book and it is a wonderful story. I think you'll really enjoy it. There's just a few things you should know ..." I counted on my fingers as I said ... (hopefully with grace and a friendly tone) 1. There are no known existing slave narratives that actually say slaves ever used quilts to escape. That's a problem because it seems someone somewhere would have found at least one reference from former slaves ... and no one has. 2. Some of the quilt patterns which the book says were used didn't exist before 1900.. 3. The scholarship of the book has been questioned by some very well respected historians and textile history people.  4. A quilt takes a very long time to make. How did they communicate what the quilts meant from one plantation to another and one place to another in a way the slaves all knew what everything meant?

So ... I did what I could. It was hard, though, because this woman was SO excited about her discovery. And I agreed with her that it is a wonderful story ... but that it probably isn't a TRUE story.

Whew. That varmint just won't die.

Stephanie Whitson

P.S. Has anyone considered that the story seems a bit racist? What I mean is, that the poor, ignorant black slaves needed the white man's tradition (i.e. quiltmaking) to help them figure out a way to find freedom. (Note intended sarcasm in the syntax). Excuse me ... weren't Africans brilliant navigators? Wouldn't they have known how to read the sky? Why would they have needed a quilt block to tell them to "leave at night" ... and so many of the other things those quilt blocks are supposedly relaying. Good grief. Some of it seems so elemental. I've always thought it was something of an insult to African intelligence to suggest they needed that kind of advice. But that's just me. ------=_NextPart_000_0041_01CC2685.1C0D95E0--

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Subject: Pine Burr From: Joe Cunningham <Joe joethequilter.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 07:28:56 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

I missed most of the Pine Burr discussion, because I was in Gees Bend visiting my friends there, not paying attention to my email. Anyway, my best friend in the group is the great Lucy Mingo, not only a master quilter but also a great cook. On this trip Lucy showed me three of the ten Pine Burr quilts she has made, the rest having been given to her children. When I asked her why she would pick such a difficult pattern, she said, "I never wanted to do the easy thing. I wasn't made for doing the easy thing. I always wanted to do the hard thing to see if I could do it." Her blocks were set together various ways, some side by side, some with plain fabric around them.   Joe Cunningham, still reeling in San Francisco

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Subject: Re: Hearts and Hands From: Jonathan Gregory <jonathangrego gmail.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 08:13:22 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

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Xenia's reference to the Oddfellow's and Quaker's charitable and religious connections to the symbol reminded me of Psalm 24: 3-4. It would be interesting to investigate a connection of the symbol as a visual translation of the ideas of this text.

Who may ascend the mountain of the LORD? Who may stand in his holy place? The one who has clean hands and a pure heart, who does not trust in an idol or swear by a false god.

Jonathan Gregory

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Subject: Re: The UGRR From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn rocketmail.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 10:00:31 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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Stephanie, No, it's not just you. I've said the same thing more than once. ;) It IS an insult to the intelligence and resourcefulness of the African slaves,  that they wouldn't intuitively know such things as to leave at night and carry  supplies with them. Just knowing about the North Star block wouldn't tell a  person a darned thing, if they couldn't tell whichway was north. The journey  was entirely too complex=A0for a map no morecomplex than a quilt to have been  useful. And how were these quilts passed from plantation to plantation? Why  didn't the whites notice that slaves were transporting quilts about? Did slaves  have such wide access to fabric that the owners wouldn't notice that quilts were  disappearing? It's like the black-centered log cabin: how far would you want to be from a quilt for you to bet your life that the dark square was black, as opposed to  navy, purple or chocolate brown? How would UGRR 'conductors' prevent their  neighbors from seeing the quilt and copying it?   Barbara Brackman says that the ONLY link between the UGRR and quilts that she  hasever found, was a slave account from Douglas County KS. An escaped slave  stopped a wagon on the road, because the man driving it was reading a book, and  she knew that the abolitionists were educated people, so she figured she'd take  a chance on asking him for help. Now, that's an assumption! But she was  right...the man WAS involved with the UGRR, and he took her to the next station.  On the way, she hid in the wagon under a quilt.Boom. That's it. We know Harriet  Tubman hid in swamps to avoid capture-now let's await the invention of the  famous Swamp Code, whereby slaves built swamps to tell other slaves how to  escape. Or the famous Box Code,after Henry 'Box' Brown, who had himself crated  and shipped north. Actually, we DO know that the account of his escape was  passed around among slaves, as at least 2 other slaves used the same method,  shipping themselves to the same address! But I doubt they learned about it  because slaves were creating boxes, or quilts to tell each other. Word of mouth  would work nicely.  Jocelyn  

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Subject: Re: The UGRR From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 10:05:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Stephanie,

I agree! People that just love the story are not taking the second step - that slaves were so stupid they needed to be told to run north. Which isn't true, anyway. According to Giles Wright, who actually studied this topic, most slaves

did not preplan their escape and they didn't tend to head north. (http://www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml)

What bothers me the most is that by glorifying this myth, we are not giving proper credit to the real heros of the UGRR, such as Harriet Tubman and Levi Coffin. Argh.

Kris

>P.S. Has anyone considered that the story seems a bit racist? What I mean is, >that the poor, ignorant black slaves needed the white man's >tradition (i.e. >quiltmaking) to help them figure out a way to find freedom

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Subject: re: Hearts & Hands From: Gaye Ingram <gingram suddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 12:34:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Stephanie, I think most early quilt designs were originally part of the venacular design heritage. They moved from weaving patterns and church ornamentation and sundry traditional sources to quilts---and walls and pottery and everything else.

I think Candace's suggestion that the motif is seen in the emblem books that were especially popular in the sixteenth-seventeenth centuries has real merit. Most of these were used to guide meditation, like momento mori. There were specific steps in the meditation process, with the goal of making concrete and experiential something essentially abstract, like love, especially God's love. Any university library would have material on these books. Louis Martz' two books are, I think, still the basic commentary.

My guess is that originally the heart signified the sacred heart of Jesus and the hand the practical manifestation of the love that represented. The phrase "hearts and hands" is pretty common in seventeenth-century British literature, always referring to the union of feeling and action. In the meditations one was encouraged to move from a lively awareness of God's great love for man to the manifestation of his own love---through love for his neighbor and mankind(Karitas, charity) that is expressed in deeds.

Since one of the chief complaints of Luther and his many Reform followers both on the continent of Europe and in England was the disjunct of love of God and love of one's fellows, I would suspect the motif would be found more in Protestant circles, though it was used as a "visual" in the Church of Rome's meditations in mid and late Renaissance.

Because they morph so readily, it's hard to track down the final origin of such motifs. The best we can do usually is to say 'it first showed up in quilts (or other places) at this point.'

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: re: Hearts & Hands From: "Candace Perry" <candace schwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 13:41:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Excellent points Gaye -- also, I don't know if anyone mentioned this, but it's a common motif in scissor cutting -- I don't know how much in PA German scherenschnitte, as it is known, but I have seen it in the New England version, for sure. Candace Perry

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Subject: re: Hearts & Hands From: "Candace Perry" <candace schwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 13:51:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

One more thought -- while digging around a bit I found that a heart being held in a hand was a personal emblem of John Calvin. It's not the same thing, exactly -- the well known folk symbol is more "folkified" -- but my point is that variations of these emblems, especially a disembodied hand, are quite old. I actually collect representations of hands...and sacred hearts...but not together...weird collection that it is! Candace Perry 

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Subject: re Psalm/Hearts & Hands From: Gaye Ingram <gingram suddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 15:01:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

It would be interesting to investigate a connection of the symbol as a visual translation of the ideas of this text. Who may ascend the mountain of the LORD? Who may stand in his holy place? The one who has clean hands and a pure heart, who does not trust in an idol or swear by a false god.

Jonathan Gregory

Exactly!

I have always believed the popular use of this symbol originated in such passages from the vernacular language translations of the Bible that resulted from the Protestant Reformation. The English one we know best is the King James Translation of the Bible (1611), but this was preceded by others.

The popularity of this particular text and the symbolism implicit in it was still critically important in 20th-century philosophy and literature.

Robert Penn Warren's novel "All the King's Men" is really a study of this verse, alludes directly to it..

Like T.S. Eliot, William Butler Yeats, and others, Warren dealt with is called "the dissociation of sensibilities" that occurred in the late 19th and early 20th centuries---- the disconnect between intellect/reason and spirit/soul that grew out of the advances in science and the too consequent dependence on pure reason.

In Warren's point is that people of "pure heart" had withdrawn from the world of action out of fear that any action they took in a world that was flawed would dirty their hands. They left the world of action to people less qualified by experience, education,and spiritual values, people who were not bound by moral codes. Shakespeare's Brutus had said he feared such men who "have a lean and hungry look. Such men are dangerous; they think too much," and by that, he meant their heart and hands were no long cooperating. The brain ruled without a stay from the heart.

Nearly every important writer in the first part of the twentieth century saw this as a problem for their time. Wm Butler Yeats's famous poem "The Second Coming" puts the problem this way: "the best lack all conviction; the worst are full of passionate intensity." Yeats uses the image of a falcon that can no longer hear the call of the falconer to suggest what happens when this disjunct occurs. The hand is no longer guided by the heart.

The results were seen in the Superman theories of Wagner and Nietzche and Hitler's use of them to create the Third Reich. The Russian Revolution was a result of the brain's operating without the moderating influences of experience and a moral code. Millions were killed in brutal mass murders in the Soviet Union in the name of a world where all people ended up being equal, though some were more equal than others, as George Orwell shows in "Animal Farm."

So, the motif and the analogy it represents are expressed in many art forms and has remained vibrant through the present time as a way of describing a good life, one where one's actions are guided by a "pure heart." It is not exclusive to quilts, as Stephany observed.

Yet clearly certain groups used the symbol to represent their own mission, and we know that from the links between quilts and makers from those groups.

Thanks, Jonathan, for this important reminder. It enlarges the meaning of the symbol.

Gaye Ingram

---- Jonathan Gregory <jonathangrego gmail.com> wrote: Xenia's reference to the Oddfellow's and Quaker's charitable and religious connections to the symbol reminded me of Psalm 24: 3-4. It would be interesting to investigate a connection of the symbol as a visual translation of the ideas of this text.

Who may ascend the mountain of the LORD? Who may stand in his holy place? The one who has clean hands and a pure heart, who does not trust in an idol or swear by a false god.

Jonathan Gregory

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Subject: Re: Hearts and Hands From: "Janet O'Dell" <janet techinfo.com.au> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 08:30:21 +1000 X-Message-Number: 12

I remembered the words of this beautiful hymn after reading all the discussion: Now Thank We All Our God Hymn Words: Martin Rinkart, circa 1636 (Nun danket alle Gott); first appeared in Praxis Pietatis Melica (Devotional Tunes, Sweet as Honey) by Johann Cr=FCger (Berlin, Germany: 1647); translated from German to English by Catherine Winkworth, 1856. Music: Nun Danket, attributed to Johann Cr=FCger, 1647; harmony by Felix Mendelssohn, 1840. Though the tune is found Cr=FCger's Praxis Pietatis Melica, and is attributed to Cr=FCger, Catherine Winkworth believed Martin Rinkart wrote the tune in 1644. Martin Rinkart, a Lutheran minister, was in Eilenburg, Saxony, during the Thirty Years' War. Soon afterward, the Thirty Years' War ended, and Rinkart wrote this hymn for a grand celebration service.   It has been in Hymns Ancient & Modern since 1861.  (first verse only quoted)

Now thank we all our God, with heart and hands and voices, who wondrous things hath done, in whom his world rejoices; who from our mother's arms hath blessed us on our way with countless gifts of love, and still is ours today. Words: Martin Rinkart (1586-1649), 1636 trans. Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878), 1856

One may imagine that the words of such a popular traditional hymn would have an effect on the depiction of religious symbols in quilts. I look forward to more examples coming forward.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Re: The UGRR From: Mitzioakes aol.com Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 20:01:24 EDT X-Message-Number: 13

Hi! - I have been a volunteer for almost 9 years now at the Shelburne Museum, VT where I as the 'Quilter in Residence' each Tuesday (other quilters fill in the rest of the week)...One of the first questions I am asked each season is about the UGRR/Quilts. I spend many hours explaining to these visitors about this myth many except it, others stomp off in a huff saying 'She doesn't know anything!'....I am afraid this myth will go on for years (I could get very vocal also about the Gee's Bend 'masterpieces', but I have enough on my plate trying to explain the UGRR and its quilts.) It makes a nice fairytale so some times just let people enjoy - that goes for Hidden in Plain Ciew - maybe I am just jealous that I am not getting money from the sale of this book. Oh, well, come to the Shelburne Museum and see wonderful quilts with no baggage, just beautiful wonderul works. Mitzi from Vermont - where some of the water on the lakes is starting to finally go down.

In a message dated 6/9/2011 6:38:34 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, stephanie stephaniewhitson.com writes:

This is anecdotal but the beat goes on. Last Friday Kathy Moore and I did a lecture/book talk at the International Quilt Study Center here in Lincoln. Afterwards the gift shop hosted a signing of our new book, and one of the signees was telling me the exciting story of how at the quilt show in a small town nearby (hosted for the town's anniversary celebration) she learned about how slaves used quilts to run for freedom. She had a slip of paper in her pocket where someone had written down the book title Hidden in Plain View as recommended reading.

I hopefully handled it well. I said, "You know, I've read that book and it is a wonderful story. I think you'll really enjoy it. There's just a few things you should know ..." I counted on my fingers as I said ... (hopefully with grace and a friendly tone) 1. There are no known existing slave narratives that actually say slaves ever used quilts to escape. That's a problem because it seems someone somewhere would have found at least one reference from former slaves ... and no one has. 2. Some of the quilt patterns which the book says were used didn't exist before 1900.. 3. The scholarship of the book has been questioned by some very well respected historians and textile history people. 4. A quilt takes a very long time to make. How did they communicate what the quilts meant from one plantation to another and one place to another in a way the slaves all knew what everything meant?

So ... I did what I could. It was hard, though, because this woman was SO excited about her discovery. And I agreed with her that it is a wonderful story ... but that it probably isn't a TRUE story.

Whew. That varmint just won't die.

Stephanie Whitson

P.S. Has anyone considered that the story seems a bit racist? What I mean is, that the poor, ignorant black slaves needed the white man's tradition (i.e. quiltmaking) to help them figure out a way to find freedom. (Note intended sarcasm in the syntax). Excuse me ... weren't Africans brilliant navigators? Wouldn't they have known how to read the sky? Why would they have nee ded a quilt block to tell them to "leave at night" ... and so many of the other things those quilt blocks are supposedly relaying. Good grief. Some of it seems so elemental. I've always thought it was something of an insult to African intelligence to suggest they needed that kind of advice. But that's just me.

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Subject: Re: Hearts and Hands From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn rocketmail.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 17:16:55 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

I was flipping through an old Sew Many Quilts tonight, and there was a quilt  with the Hearts and Hands design that the owner said had been made in 1880. I do  hope Fons and Porter made sure that wasn't the maker's birth year! :)     ________________________________

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Subject: Re: Hearts and Hands From: Gaye Ingram <gingram suddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 19:28:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15

Janet, this song is sung every Sunday morning in our Lutheran church. And, as I recall, in the Presbyterian church I attended most of my life.

Note the dates of its composition----Luther made "hymns" (in the vernacular languages) a part of the service of worship. He saw in music in general an under-used means of spiritual expression and teaching.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: The UGRR From: textique aol.com Date: Thu, 09 Jun 2011 21:15:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 16

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No, it isn't just you Stephanie. I've long considered it racist to implythat ridiculous symbols such as the pieced boat meant to sail a ship to some location...and slaves would get such a profound message of well-being from seeing it  they'd trust they're lives to the fabric in that block. Slaves were neverthat stupid. The whole wedding ring story is  beyond racist. The slaves I studied wouldn't have fallen for any of it.A woman as brilliant as Harriet Tubman would  have laughed Jacqueline Tobin off the Oprah sound stage with "Are you kidding me?".

Jan Thomas

Stephanie Whitson

Has anyone considered that the story seems a bit racist? weren't Africansbrilliant navigators?  Wouldn't they have known how to read the sky? Why would they have neededa quilt  block to tell them to "leave at night" ... and so many of the other thingsthose  quilt blocks are supposedly relaying. Good grief. Some of it seems so elemental.   

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Subject: Re: The UGRR From: "Karen Musgrave" <KarenMusgrave sbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 20:32:49 -0500 X-Message-Number: 17

The reality is that an African American woman is very much vested in keeping the idea of quilts as symbols alive and it seems to resonate with people. I've always wondered what does this do for the people who believe? How does this help the cause?

Thanks, Karen Musgrave

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Subject: Re: The UGRR From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn rocketmail.com> Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 21:34:15 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Once I told a little boy the story of the Prophet Keokuk, a Kickapoo Indian who was greatly responsible for his tribe, and the Potawatomie tribe, not losing their allotted lands in Kansas when most tribes were being kicked to Oklahoma so the whites could take their lands. To make a long story short, Keokuk was a shaman who played the white settlers like a Stradivarius. At the conclusion of my story, the boy said, 'Wow, I never knew there were SMART Indians!'

I didn't have to mention that the boy was himself of Indian ancestry, did I?

What would it mean if you had bought into the dominant-power belief that your ancestors were stupid, that they deserved to be dominated by another culture (that the domination was really a very beneficial thing, bringing them out of ignorance), that there were no stories about their courage and cleverness in defeating their oppressors? A pretty fairy tale might feel wonderful to you. The sad part being, you'd never hear the true tales of the heroic exploits of your ancestors.

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Subject: Heart and Hand Symbol From: Judy Knorr <jknorr optonline.net> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 07:29:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I couldn't help tossing this into the discussion of Hearts and Hands. I just finished appliquing a motif of each of my grandchildren's hands on a quilt along with the outline of my own hand. I added a heart to my hand to show my love for my grandchildren. I sing the hymns and read the Bible verses etc., but my inspiration for this quilt detail was much simpler, just love. I wonder if early quilters with little access to printed patterns might have used hands and hearts for the same reason I used them...love? Just a thought! Judy Knorr

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Subject: Re: Hearts and Hands From: "Candace Perry" <candace schwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 10:09:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Those of us of the PA Dutch persuasion love this hymn, in German, and sing it with great vigor! Candace Perry

-----Original Message-----

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Subject: Re: Pine Burr From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 10:30:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Joe...thanks for taking time to share Mrs. Mingo's words! Inspiring. Truly. Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: Hearts and Hands From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 10:34:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Thanks, Jonathan ... another research project for someone! Fascinating to connect it to that Psalm ... hhhmmm.....

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: Heart and Hand Symbol From: textique aol.com Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 11:39:08 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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They did Judy, for love and a few other reasons. I'm in OH trying to getan emergency flight back to the Springs because my hunny  was taken to the hospital by paramedics so I hope I did this correctly. I uploaded a few of the photos of Maggie Blosser's 'Hand" Quilt  to the eboard. "Comensed in 1901", she gave it to her niece Ada M Comerin 1907 but I believe the quilt was finished well before the  appliqued words were added to the back. I have secondary documentation toexplain that too.

Julie Silbur owns a quilt made by our Maggie Blosser that is full of lovetoo. Her granddaughter's appliqued hands are on that one and what a quilt!

Gotta go but someone email if the eboard pics won't open.

Jan Thomas

wonder if early quilters with little access to printed patterns might haveused hands   or the same reason I used them...love? Just a thought! Judy Knorr

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Subject: re: Hearts & Hands From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 10:41:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

The connection to the reformation is particularly interesting to me, especially in light of Jonathan's mention of that Psalm. I wonder when mankind in general transferred the center of emotions from "the loins" (or whatever the biblical term was) to the heart. Steph Whitson (who never ceases to wonder at the things she increasingly doesn't know/understand as she gets older)

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Subject: re: Hearts & Hands From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn rocketmail.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 09:35:06 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

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Merriam Webster says that 'sweetheart' was used as a term of affection in the 14th century.

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Subject: re: Hearts & Hands From: "Candace Perry" <candace schwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 13:37:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Not sure if this will help, but the pietistic movement that was an off shoot of Lutheranism in the 17th century focused on the a personal relationship with Christ, and concept of faith emanating from the heart -- something like that, I'm pretty dumb about these things -- became significant at that time. Today it's sort of no-brainer, to approach faith that way, but was something new and exciting in the 1600s. Candace Perry

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Subject: With heart in hand From: Gaye Ingram <gingram suddenlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:11:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Speaking of hearts and hands, I have an announcement to make that I hope will offend no one. (Truth: don't you always just know you're getting ready to be offended when anyone says what I just said? Well, this time you're wrong.)

I suspect the average age in our group is perhaps past forty. I myself am among those past forty and am always happy to see the young involved in our mutual passion, the history of quilts and quilt making. And so I thought many of you might find this interesting.

One of our members turns thirty today. She would never tell anyone, of course. Unlike many of us, she's a little quiet. Reticent. But she got an early start in the study of quilts and has been a member of the list almost as long as the list has been around, I imagine. Because she doesn't do Facebook and she has not been keeping up her blog lately, I thought it might be all right to wish her a happy thirtieth birthday in this forum. I know she reads posts from qhl. Digest form, I think.

Teddy Pruett. That's who the celebrant is. Thirty years old! Today! Just imagine. (I'm serious, now: Imagine!)

When I first joined qhl, I got Teddy, Pepper Cory, and Lynn Gorges all mixed up.I could never be certain who it was that was so big on sweet potatoes and who lived in New Bern and who lived in Flawrida---North Flawrida, the real part. Fewer folks remained silent at that time, so there were many posts from many people, and it took a while to get down the personalities. And, as I said, Teddy is a quiet person, no doubt restrained by her youth in such an august group.

Thanks to Xenia, who kindly invited me to join AQSG and sent me a registration packet (I'd tried to join online and when I visited the James collection, but there were no registration forms and no one to take my money: I concluded one had to be invited), I became a member of AQSG, and Judy Grow, whom I'd "met" on qhl, came to Ruston to be my chaperone for my first seminar, in Dallas.

I was so happy to put faces on personalities and was working my way along doing just that when a tall, dark-haired woman came up and noted that North Carolina grew more sweet potatoes than Louisiana and that she really liked to use the color "cheddar" in quilts. I thought, "Teddy Pruett!" and said as much. No, Peppy Corey. The redhead with her turned out to be Lynn Gorges. That got New Bern in. Then Xenia, whose accent assured me she was not from Flawrida, came with a blond in tow---a really young thing way back then---and the minute she opened her mouth, I knew SHE was Teddy Pruett. A southern triumverate, all figured out.

Because Teddy was so quiet, it took a while to draw her into a conversation. Probably one, two seconds anyway. But what fun she was when she finally warmed up to one. That night she invited me along with probably the rest of the registrants up to her and Xenia's suite to a show-and-tell. Oh what joy that was! That was when I first saw Marcia the Harpist's Rattlesnake quilt, the one with the triangular head and beady little eyes (the rattlesnake; not MarciaK). I don't think I've ever been in touching distance of such a glorious wealth of quilts as I was that night----thanks to Teddy. I felt so wonderful that I stayed late and let Xenia rob me blind while I thanked her for doing it and went off clutching the little bits of fabric for which I had felt privileged to write what then, at the beginning of my habit, was a rather large check. Because of Teddy.

Teddy has made so many of us happy and has been so generous with her knowledge that it seems only right to wish her a happy thirtieth birthday here.

So Teddy, Happy Birthday! If we were as young as you, we would come down there and help you straighten up your new house and get your studio in perfect order and prepare you a nice birthday supper and sing Happy Birthday to you. In fact, in our hearts that's exactly what all of us will do. Our hearts are with you, but our hands must be absent, for the time.

But Teddy, we have a favor to ask for all the work our hearts will do.

I am absolutely confident everyone joins me in asking this, Teddy, so listen carefully and be obliging: Ask the Jacksonville antique fair folks to excuse you just this one time so you can come to Cherry Hills and frolic with us, share your youth and pep with us, keep us crooked and sidewise. Those of us from the South are in particular need of you, for we will be in foreign territory---among Quakers and German pietists and seriously serious folks. Yes, the Midwesterners and Californians and Coloradans will be there with us, and that will be nice. But we want you, Miz Pruett.

You come to Cherry Hills and our hands will see that you have a birthday supper!

All love and good wishes, Gaye

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Subject: UGRR From: "cjsp70" <cjsp70 insightbb.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:51:20 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

As I have shared before, my family spends a week every summer volunteering at the National Lincoln Boyhood Memorial in Spencer County Indiana. I get questions almost every day as I quilt under the trees at the farm about the UGRR and the quilt code. The most interesting response is the disbelief I sense from teachers. I do try to debunk the myth but if our teachers continue to teach the code, we may never get the truth out. Thanks, Pat Sauer ------=_NextPart_000_0003_01CC27A7.C4EEAE60--

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Subject: Re: Hearts and Hands From: JLHfw aol.com Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 20:41:01 EDT X-Message-Number: 12

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Dear Jan, Thank you for sharing this beautiful expression of thankfulness and devotion. It is new to me and so lovely. Janet H ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hears and Hands motif From: Louise Bequette <midmoquilter yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2011 10:56:14 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 13

Marti Michell uses this motif on her templates and website. Wonder why she might have chosen this motif.

Wonderful information in the past few days, too.

Louise - in mid-Missouri