Subject: Re: UGRR From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2011 12:25:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I wonderf if someone should come up with a book-mark size outline to give people about the UGRR..... Steph Whitson ----- Original Message ----- From: "cjsp70" <cjsp70 insightbb.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Friday, June 10, 2011 7:51 PM Subject: [qhl] UGRR

As I have shared before, my family spends a week every summer volunteering at the National Lincoln Boyhood Memorial in Spencer County Indiana. I get questions almost every day as I quilt under the trees at the farm about the UGRR and the quilt code. The most interesting response is the disbelief I sense from teachers. I do try to debunk the myth but if our teachers continue to teach the code, we may never get the truth out. Thanks, Pat Sauer

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Subject: Re: UGRR From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn rocketmail.com> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2011 11:05:58 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Excellent idea! I had thought about doing a critical analysis of HIPV but decided that I didn't want to devote that many brain cells to it. ;) But a nice little brochure...we could distribute it via QHL and people could print off their own copies to hand out.

________________________________ From: Stephanie Grace Whitson <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sat, June 11, 2011 12:25:16 PM Subject: [qhl] Re: UGRR

I wonderf if someone should come up with a book-mark size outline to give people about the UGRR..... Steph Whitson ----- Original Message ----- From: "cjsp70" <cjsp70 insightbb.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Friday, June 10, 2011 7:51 PM Subject: [qhl] UGRR

As I have shared before, my family spends a week every summer volunteering at the National Lincoln Boyhood Memorial in Spencer County Indiana. I get questions almost every day as I quilt under the trees at the farm about the UGRR and the quilt code. The most interesting response is the disbelief I sense from teachers. I do try to debunk the myth but if our teachers continue to teach the code, we may never get the truth out. Thanks, Pat Sauer

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Subject: Re: UGRR From: Mitzioakes aol.com Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2011 17:24:29 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

As a longtime volunteer at the Shelburne Museum, VT, I would think a small handout would be GREAT! I can not tell you how many times each season, I am asked about the UGRR/ Slaves....I do my best to inform them differently, but a handout might make things easier. I also have been buried with the Gee's Bend quilts and history - at this time I will not go one way or the other on how these 'quilts' are being advertised as masterpieces, etc...... Mitzi from Vermont OH - if such a publication is ever printed, please make sure I get copies of it.

In a message dated 6/11/2011 2:06:12 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, martinjocelyn rocketmail.com writes:

Excellent idea! I had thought about doing a critical analysis of HIPV but decided that I didn't want to devote that many brain cells to it. ;) But a nice little brochure...we could distribute it via QHL and people could print off their own copies to hand out.

________________________________ From: Stephanie Grace Whitson <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sat, June 11, 2011 12:25:16 PM Subject: [qhl] Re: UGRR

I wonderf if someone should come up with a book-mark size outline to give people about the UGRR..... Steph Whitson ----- Original Message ----- From: "cjsp70" <cjsp70 insightbb.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Friday, June 10, 2011 7:51 PM Subject: [qhl] UGRR

As I have shared before, my family spends a week every summer volunteering at the National Lincoln Boyhood Memorial in Spencer County Indiana. I get questions almost every day as I quilt under the trees at the farm about the UGRR and the quilt code. The most interesting response is the disbelief I sense from teachers. I do try to debunk the myth but if our teachers continue to teach the code, we may never get the truth out. Thanks, Pat Sauer

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Subject: Ireland trip From: Sarah Hough <dougandsarah1 gmail.com> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2011 16:29:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

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I am leaving next Friday for Ireland! Just checking to see if there are any not-to-miss fabric-related sites. We fly into Shannon and then proceed to Galway, Killarney, Cork, Waterford, Dublin and lots in between. Also, any suggestions on wardrobe, except it will be cool and rainy. Since we are having exceptionally HOT DRY weather here in the Florida Panhandle, the cool and rainy sounds great.

Thanks

Sarah

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Subject: retro clean product From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbingham att.net> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2011 22:23:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi, all - I found this product the other day in a quilt shop and am intrigued.

"Retro Clean" claims to safely bring age-stained textiles back to life.

Here is a link:

http://www.retroclean.com/

It is a white-crystalline powder which is dissolved in water. The textile is submerged and soaked in the sun for a few days. And viola - age spots are gone with no fading of the colored or printed fabric.

So, what is it? Is it really safe?

Any comments?

Thanks, Peg

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Subject: UGRR handout From: "Virginia Berger" <cifba netins.net> Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 06:01:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I know I have a one page fact sheet in my stuff at home (I'm currently traveling) that I think someone on this list put together. If it is someone on the list perhaps they'll step forward. I'll try to remember to look for it when I get home.

Virginia Berger

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Subject: Re: UGRR handout From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 05:16:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Could it be this one? http://ugrrquilt.hartcottagequilts.com/QuiltCodeFAQs.pdf

Kris

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Subject: Re: UGRR From: Sheryl Till <sheryl.till gmail.com> Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2011 17:05:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

On 6/11/2011 12:25 PM, Stephanie Grace Whitson wrote: > I wonderf if someone should come up with a book-mark size outline to > give people about the UGRR..... I had an experience with this today at a guild meeting. Our area is starting one of the quilt block trails and a little town in our area is going to use UGRR as their "theme" for blocks on buildings. I asked the lady (who is a teacher) doing the presentation about the trail to the group if she realized that UGRR is only a nice story but not a true one. She said "yes" but that she didn't care that it isn't true. She said it has nothing to do with their use of the theme and that if that were the case, no one should ever make another Wizard of Oz quilt again. I responded that WOZ is fictional literature that no one believes and promoting UGRR in this fashion is teaching false history. We had to change the subject because she just didn't care and I was on the road to being upset about it.

-- Sheryl in South Louisiana http://quiltingtizzy.wordpress.com/

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Subject: Re: UGRR From: Laurel Horton <laurel kalmiaresearch.net> Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 09:04:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

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When someone comes up to me and wants to talk about the Quilt Code, I smile sadly and say something like, "Yes, it's a lovely story. When it first came out, we all wanted it to be true. But, unfortunately, there's no real evidence to support it. It's a lovely story that makes people feel good about a difficult chapter in our history."

It took me a long time to get past my anger and the urge to *do *something to educate the masses. (I've described my experience in print and podcast.) Instead of being angry and negative, I choose to put my time and energy in positive directions.

A gentle approach, one on one, is the only approach that I've found that might make any difference at all. And this only when I'm confronted directly. But maybe your experience will be different from mine.

Laurel Horton

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Subject: UGRR hand out From: carylschuetz comcast.net Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 20:33:38 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 5

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A few years ago, Barbara Brackman wrote about the quilt code myth. She gave us permission to print and hand out the one page sheet. I always have a st ack along with my quilt care info sheet on the check in table when I do a l ecture for a guild or other group.  Below is the info.  Caryl  --  Caryl Schuetz  Woodhaven Studio  Professional Association of Appraisers -  Quilted Textiles  Certified by The American Quilter's Society  www.quiltvalues.com  Blog http://woodhavenstudio.wordpress.com  Blog http://aboutquilts.wordpress.com  http://indyfiber.com/artists/schuetz.html  Author of "Fabulous Tee Shirt Quilts" 

Fact Sheet 

The "Quilt Code" 

A hot topic in Black History is the story of quilts and the Underground Rai lroad. Americans eager to discuss slavery are fascinated by tales of quilts used as signals in the dangerous journey to freedom. The connection betwee n an American folk art, a mysterious secret code and the adventure of the U nderground Railroad has created an enduring tale that is fast becoming a pa rt of American legend. The quilt code has joined other appealing but false  stories like George Washington chopping down a cherry tree or Betsy Ross de signing the first American flag. 

Countless school curriculums include how-to instructions for a quilt made i n the secret code. Museums feature symbolic quilts in exhibits dedicated to slavery. Historians often are asked questions: 

 =A8 Is it true that quilts were hung on clotheslines to signal escaping  slaves of a "safe house"? 

 =A8 Were quilts read as maps to tell escapees the route to safety? 

 =A8 Did runaways use quilt patterns with names like the Double Wedding R ing or the Drunkard's Path as code to communicate escape plans? 

The fact is that we have no historical evidence of quilts being used as sig nals, codes or maps. The tale of quilts and the Underground Railroad makes  a good story, but not good quilt history. 

 =A8 The Double Wedding Ring, Sunbonnet Sue and most of the other quilt p atterns supposedly used as code did not exist before the Civil War. 

 =A8 While escaped slaves recorded signals such as whistles, songs and la nterns as useful in communicating on the run, absolutely no first person ac counts of using quilts as signals exist. 

 =A8 Women in slavery made quilts; we have much historical evidence and m any surviving quilts. People remembered using quilts in escapes, but they w ere used to warm fugitives or protect them from view. They did not serve as code. 

What harm can a charming yet false story do? You be the judge. But do reali ze that we are teaching a generation of children false history. And by focu sing on this connection we ignore our national obligation to learn about th e true and less charming stories of slavery. 

Feel free to photocopy this sheet to help spread the truth about the myth. 

Barbara Brackman 2006  Author of Facts & Fabrications: Unraveling the History of Quilts  & Slavery 

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Subject: UGRR From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 17:14:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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OH NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Yippee - just signed the contract for the sequel to the Gold Standard,  my cozy mystery. The Map Quilt, which makes liberal use of the Underground Railroad,  comes out next April. At least it's fiction......

Stephanie Whitson (NOT my post... I read it on a writer's loop) ------=_NextPart_000_005C_01C 924.317A4580--

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Subject: Re: UGRR From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 17:19:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I wonder who could be drafted to be the authoritative voice to sign off on such a publication. I'm not a graphics person and I don't have a known name in textile scholarship....Quilt History List could do it ... or American Quilt Study Group? .... or is it a can of worms no organization would want to put their name to?

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Reparing the UGRR controversy From: suereich charter.net Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 19:43:02 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 8

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My husband and I just attended a teachers' dinner. Across the table was a middle school teacher who told me about the ways he uses quiltmaking in his classroom. He was quite proud to announce his use of HIPV and the UGRR quilts. I asked him if he still teaches that George Washington chopped down the cherry tree. He chuckled and informed me that we all know this was a myth. After I informed him the UGRR concept is also a myth, he proclaimed disappointment and said "It makes total sense that it couldn't be true but it is such a great story!" Therein lies the problem. It makes such a great story! People don't care about historic accuracy.

The only true way to fix this error is to go on Oprah, (her new show). Do any of you remember James Frey and the book "A Million Little Pieces?" Oprah had him on her show to promote his book. When it came out that he had fabricated the whole story, Oprah had him back on her show and she eviscerated him for his dishonesty. There was even a class action suit against the author and Random House requiring a settlement with any reader who felt defrauded by the story. The following link comes from the Wikipedia site about James Frey. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Frey

To be clear, I am not recommending a class action suit but that WOULD get attention and fast. But if someone could get to Oprah, perhaps she would feel the same need to right a wrong she is part responsible for promoting.

Just saying.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 11, 2011 From: LinusDonna aol.com Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 22:30:32 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 9

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Barbara Brackman prepared a one page fact sheet on the Underground Railroad myth. It doesn't hit all the points; it would be too long. She does address all the points and discrepancies in her books.

She graciously has given permission for the fact sheet to be distributed.

_http://www.barbarabrackman.com/factsheet.pdf_ (http://www.barbarabrackman.com/factsheet.pdf)

Bright blessings!

~Donna Laing _www.northstarqualityquilting.com_ (http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com/)

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Subject: Does anyone know this fabulous early print? From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow comcast.net> Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 23:51:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Xenia? Lot #7.

http://copakeauction.auctionflex.com/showlot.ap?co=9768&weid=17451&weiid=6481895&mindate 110612&maxdate 120612&keyword=quilt&lso=lotnumasc&pagenum=1&lang=En

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Subject: Re: UGRR From: Gaye Ingram <gingram suddenlink.net> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 5:33:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

---- Laurel Horton <laurel kalmiaresearch.net> wrote: When someone comes up to me and wants to talk about the Quilt Code, I smile sadly and say something like, "Yes, it's a lovely story. When it first came out, we all wanted it to be true. --------

I'm sorry, but this is what I don't understand: WHY would anyone in the 21st century WANT this story to be true?

Aside from demeaning former slaves and their descendants, it betrays an astounding lack of common sense.

Here's my modest proposal: let's take all our Congressmen's I-pads/phones/texting devices away for a month and demand that in that time they pass a bill making it illegal to repeat this tale in any printed, audio/video/spoken materials used in any public school in the U.S. and its territories. Get the Texas delegation to come up with recommendations for a good stiff penalty, deny federal funds to any public school found in violation, and fire any teacher stupid or lazy enough to pass it along on the playgrounds. Zero tolerance. Recycle all the wasted paper. Or have a nice back-to-school book burning. And pass out some real history books.

Humbly, Gaye Ingram

I think that would save time and energy.

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Subject: Re: Does anyone know this fabulous early print? From: Judy Roche <judyq rocheclan.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 07:04:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Yes ,Judy ..........it is in a quilt page 16-17 of Chintz Applique from  Imitation to Icon by Carolyn Ducey IQSC Museum ....... parts of same chintz are in another quit I am studying......... Judy Roche Maine On Jun 12, 2011, at 11:51 PM, Judy Grow wrote:

> Xenia? Lot #7. >  >  http://copakeauction.auctionflex.com/showlot.ap?co=3D9768&weid=3D17451&wei id=3D6481895&mindate=3D20110612&maxdate=3D20120612&keyword=3Dquilt&lso=3Dl otnumasc&pagenum=3D1&lang=3DEn  >  >  > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: judyq rocheclan.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to  leave-qhl-1458669E lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: NQR printed cotton petticoat From: "Candace Perry" <candace schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 09:06:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I thought the list might be interested in looking at a fun example of a 19th century cotton petticoat at an upcoming auction in Lebanon County, PA. I think it's really charming! It's in the third row of the listing.

Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: NQR printed cotton petticoat From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovich yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 06:25:23 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Where is the site?

From: Candace Perry <candace schwenkfelder.com> To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, June 13, 2011 9:06 AM Subject: [qhl] NQR printed cotton petticoat

I thought the list might be interested in looking at a fun example of a 19th century cotton petticoat at an upcoming auction in Lebanon County, PA. I think it's really charming! It's in the third row of the listing.

Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: NQR printed cotton petticoat From: "Candace Perry" <candace schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 09:29:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Oh joy. You all are supposed to be clairvoyant and just know where it is!!!

http://www.auctionzip.com/cgi-bin/photopanel.cgi?listingid=1164625&category 0&zip=18073&kwd=fracktur

Hope it works okay -- there are a bunch of fun dutchy things to look at -- not much quilty though!

Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: NQR printed cotton petticoat From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 10:23:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Oh, my ... I want to go! I love household auctions...grew up going to them....That red lace on the edge of that worn petticoat...there's a story there! Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Published authors - profile on Amazon From: kyra hicks <kyra262 yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 10:56:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

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Hello -

Just a quick note to my sister (and brother) quilt historians who have a publication on Amazon.com. Have you taken a moment to create a free author profile on the site? It's available at https://authorcentral.amazon.com

I don't work for Amazon. However, having a free author profile means you can tie all your books together and folks who are interested in your quilt history books can conveniently see all your titles when they click on your name on the book site. Additionally, Amazon provides you with free weekly BookScan data, which covers nearly 80% of the US retail book market. You can see how your books are selling across the US by city or metro area.

Here are a couple profiles based on quilt themes: Mine: http://www.amazon.com/Kyra-E.-Hicks/e/B001JOY7U0 Jennifer Chiaverini - http://www.amazon.com/Jennifer-Chiaverini/e/B001IGQLEO Robert Shaw - http://www.amazon.com/Robert-Shaw/e/B001HMU25I

Amazon Author Central for UK - https://authorcentral.amazon.co.uk

With the changes in publishing and book sales, I'd love to hear more about how other quilt historians are successfully facing these challenges to continue to publish and document quilt history - particularly via self-publishing.

Best, Kyra

Kyra Hicks Arlington, VA www.BlackThreads.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: retro clean product From: Dale Drake <ddrake ccrtc.com> Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2011 15:53:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

All:

And is this the same type of product as Restoration from Engleside ...

http://www.englesideproducts.com/restoration.html

I'm guessing that Restoration is an oxygen bleach. The package says "Do not leave solution in a closed container; it will continue to give off oxygen and may leak." Retro Clean sounds like it might be the same type of thing, except that Restoration doesn't talk about using the sun.

I had a quilt that was going to be pitched if the stains couldn't be removed - large obvious dark blood stains. I soaked the quilt in Restoration for a few hours in my tub, swishing occasionally, and the stains are now faint shadows of their former serves. The stuff does work and with this quilt in particularly (a very solid 1930s dresden plate) no harm seems to have occurred. I washed it with orvus after the soaking just to be sure all of the Restoration product was removed.

But I'd love to know what others things about both of these. Was Biz removed from the market? Too many phosphates?

Dale in BEAUTIFUL Indiana (finally!)

Peg said: Hi, all - I found this product the other day in a quilt shop and am intrigued.

"Retro Clean" claims to safely bring age-stained textiles back to life. Here is a link: http://www.retroclean.com/

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Subject: UGRR From: Margaret Keirstead <pkeirstead mac.com> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 08:17:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Thanks to this list, I now feel more equipped to argue against this myth. Everyone who reads QHL has the facts to explain to someone that this is just a nice story.

Way to go, all you informed quilters!

Peggy Keirstead

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Subject: who knows imported quilts? From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 17:21:06 -0700 X-Message-Number: 10

Hi Friends,

Who among us KNOWS imports?

I have a quilt that MAY be an import and I gotta know before I release it for sale.

I certainly have never seen this particular (and peculiar) design before, "not never..."

I don't have photos yet, but was hoping to have you guys suggest someone who paid attention to imported designs over the years, with whom I could confer...

Thanks, Julie Silber

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Subject: Re: UGRR From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larryw greenhills.net> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 19:39:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

I usually just lurk, but I must respond to this. I too have had quilters tell me that they simply do not care if it is real or not. I even point out that if I were of African descent it would upset me that they were promoting a false history for me. There are enough true historical facts that no one need make up a false history. Ok, off my soap box and back to lurkdom.

Sherrie in Missouri

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Subject: RE: who knows imported quilts? From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larryw greenhills.net> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 20:11:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 12

WE want to see, too. Sherrie

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Subject: RE: Civil War From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieber verizon.net> Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2011 20:18:58 -0700 X-Message-Number: 13

 

Hi All - Just poking around on the Cowan's Auction of Civil War  Stereoviews and. 

 

IS THIS A QUILT on the bed??? Or perhaps a coverlet?? Just wondering. 

  http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?ItemId=3D94799

  Some cool pictures - sad, interesting, sad, and more sad to see all the  dead soldiers.

  I could look at these pictures for hours.  

  Happy looking.

Leah Zieber

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Subject: RE: who knows imported quilts? From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533 frontiernet.net> Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2011 08:01:08 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Julie, I have a pretty extensive collection of mail order catalogs from '80s, 90's, 2000 with pictures of imported quilts and may be able to help identify the quilt-when you have a photo available, let me know.

Beth Davis in NY

From: Julie Silber [mailto:quiltcomplex hughes.net] Sent: Monday, June 13, 2011 7:21 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] who knows imported quilts?

Hi Friends,

Who among us KNOWS imports?

I have a quilt that MAY be an import and I gotta know before I release it for sale. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: who knows imported quilts? From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2011 07:44:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I don't know them well, although I've been known to write below price tags at "antique malls" .... "also available at Dillards for $49 on sale"... on days when I felt cranky. Ahem.

Julie ... another idea to track down something like that might be to try to find the Dillards textiles BUYER. Or one for another major chain like that who carries "quiltish" products. Because they might be able to lead you to the wholesaler and, hence, a catalogue or someone "in the know" to help you out..

I used to buy from a great guy in New York, but that was another lifetime ago and my records of all that business are long gone..

I bought imported quilts in bulk because I needed quilt squares for a gift product. So I bought twin size quilts for $39 which yielded LOTS of little squares . As I said ... another lifetime ago.

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: RE: who knows imported quilts? From: ag32040 <ag32040 aol.com> Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2011 09:31:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

On Jun 14, 2011, at 8:01:08 AM, "Beth Davis" <bethdan533 frontiernet.net > wrote:

From: "Beth Davis" <bethdan533 frontiernet.net> Subject: [qhl] RE: who knows imported quilts? Date: June 14, 2011 8:01:08 AM EDT To: "Quilt History List" <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Hi Julie, I have a pretty extensive collection of mail order catalogs from '80s, 90's, 2000 with pictures of imported quilts and may be able to help identify the quilt-when you have a photo available, let me know.

Beth Davis in NY

From: Julie Silber [mailto:quiltcomplex hughes.net] Sent: Monday, June 13, 2011 7:21 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] who knows imported quilts?

Hi Friends,

Who among us KNOWS imports?

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Subject: Re: Imported quilts From: MMiller138 aol.com Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2011 14:31:24 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Julie...you might check with Connie Ark...she is a member of the list and just presented a talk to our guild about imported quilts...she has tons of samples and is very knowledgeable. Bet she can help you out. Try _connie.ark cslocal.org_ (mailto:connie.ark cslocal.org) . Good luck! Mary in SW Ohio

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Subject: import or not? From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2011 21:31:10 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Friends,

Thanks for all the great leads for me on my quest to learn if my newly acquired quilt might be imported.

I don't have an answer yet; a photo is the key to accessing what those-of-you-who-know, know...

I should have photos of the quilt tomorrow and once I do, I'll post them on the eBoard.

You guys are so great ~ thanks!

Julie Silber

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Subject: old quilt tops From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltn comcast.net> Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2011 06:36:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I met some cousins for dinner last night who are passing through the area on their way from Indiana to Newfoundland, visiting family. They know I am a quilter and none of that side of the family are. I was presented with old blocks and 5 quilt tops that were done pre-1954, we know. The woman who did them passed away in '54, so we have that date for sure. The woman had cancer and during the last few years of her life, was unable to work on her quilts. Was sad to see a needle with thread still in it anchored right in one of the unfinished blocks I am pretty good dating, and I see fabric that is mostly 30s and 40s and will work on establishing some kind of time approximation for them. There are 5 quilts, and my cousins sweetly enquired about getting one of the tops finished. I would gladly take care of that in return for them sharing these wonderful heirlooms with me. I have a question... I know what one of the answers is going to be, but I must ask anyway. The quilt top my cousin would like to have finished is a 30s butterfly pattern, quite similar to one the pictured on a book put out by the New England Quilt Museum a few years back. But, sadly, the quilts were stored in a cedar trunk and there are those inevitable water/wood stains in a few places. I have to say that overall these quilts are in excellent condition, though. My question is, would you try soaking the stained quilt for a persion of time (no machine involved) to try to get that stain out? The fabrics are in such fine shape that I have no concern about them being unable to withstand this. They also smell a bit musty, so getting that smell out would be a great idea as well. What would you use? Is there anything well known to take a stain like that our or at least lighten it considerably before it's quilted? Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Re: old quilt tops From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2011 08:57:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I have a machine made 19th century green and red applique quilt that has those stains migrating across it. (Quilted to death and quilt-as-you-go). It had them when I bought it. Gerald Roy told me what they were (I had no idea) when I took an appraisal class from him once. He recommended a conservator to address the issue. I haven't had the $ to do that yet ... I'm doing the best I can to keep the quilt safe until I do.

Thanks for asking this ... and congratulations on your wonderful inheritance. What a joy to see those quilts find a home with someone who loves them.

Steph Whitson

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Subject: eBay "Civil War Quilt" & UGRR From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeks gmail.com> Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2011 18:47:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

--20cf303a318b8bf0c504a5c7ef80 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Oh brother....here's another one!

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110701699430&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:US:1123

Pam Weeks

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 603-661-2245 Quilt Historian, Teacher AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles PO Box 123 Durham, NH 03824

Subject: Turning 30 & Linkedin From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2011 23:09:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Hello all - I am in the midst of changing over from a virus ridden PC to a  new Mac. A steep learning curve to say the least. Because of this I 've missed reading some mail including the ode from Gaye about my 30th b irthday. Kris - I can't believe you let that one through!! Talk about NQR . I wondered why I was getting slammed with notes about the birthday and w as particularly curious why so many congratulations were for my 30th. Bewi ldering - until I finally days later ran into the QHL post from Gaye. Many thanks all of you it was greatly appreciated and very very funn y. However Gaye was far too kind - I'm actually 39.   WHile I have your attention I have a question. Many of you have been ki nd enough to ask that I join you in Linkedin. I have not responded to any  of the requests as yet as I'm not clear WHY I should be on Linkedin. It is my understanding it is business related? As Gaye mentioned I don't  even tend to Facebook. I find these social benefits to be very time consum ing and I'm very stingy with that limited commodity. But I'm up to lear ning more and would like to know why yall think it is beneficial.   And thanks again for the birthday greetings. 

Teddy Pruett

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Subject: Painted quilt - is it Tom Sawyer's story? From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt rockisland.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2011 09:41:46 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

http://tinyurl.com/6zh9zqx

Gaye, being the resident QHL expert of lit that you are, do you think this quilt top is telling the story of Tom Sawyer or is it possibly a combo of stories? Kind of cool.

Cheers!

Karen

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Subject: Re: Painted quilt - is it Tom Sawyer's story? From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn rocketmail.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2011 10:24:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Two blocks are definitely from Huckleberry Finn- the block featuring Jim, the escaped slave, and the block of Huck masquerading as a girl. He's 'outed' by an old lady because he tries to thread a needle by holding the thread still and moving the needle onto it. :)

________________________________ From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt rockisland.com> To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Fri, June 17, 2011 11:41:46 AM Subject: [qhl] Painted quilt - is it Tom Sawyer's story?

http://tinyurl.com/6zh9zqx

Gaye, being the resident QHL expert of lit that you are, do you think this quilt top is telling the story of Tom Sawyer or is it possibly a combo of stories? Kind of cool.

Cheers!

Karen

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Subject: Re: Painted quilt - is it Tom Sawyer's story? From: lynne lynnezwoolsey.com Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2011 13:50:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

The entire quilt is Huckleberry Finn.

All best, Lynne (Who was guest curator of an exhibition for the Mark Twain House in Hartford, CT, and LOVES Huckleberry Finn...)

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Subject: Re: Painted quilt - is it Tom Sawyer's story? From: Gaye Ingram <gingram suddenlink.net> Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2011 19:41:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Lynne, you have GOOD taste in people. I've known people who believe one should read Huck Finn at least once a year.

As a curator, would you be interested in that lovely painting done by Emmaline Grangerford? You know the one---the one in which the late departed Emmaline had posed a maiden on a bridge in jumping-off position and was dissatisfied with the first position of her arms and so painted in two more sets, trying out which looked best. Then died before she chose. Huck allowed as to how he could tell Emmaline had talent and all, but the painting struck him as somewhat "spidery."

Being of a somewhat literary bent, I myself have admired the elegy Emmaline wrote for

Stephen Dowling Bots, Deceased;

And did young Stephen sicken, And did young Stephen die? And did the sad hearts thicken, And did the mourners cry?

No; such was not the fate of Young Stephen Dowling Bots; Though sad hearts round him thicken, 'Twas not from sickness' shots.

No whooping cough did rack his frame, Nor measles drear, with spots; Not these impaired the sacred name Of Stephen Dowling Bots.

Despised love struck not with woe That head of curly knots, Nor stomach troubles laid him low, Young Stephen Dowling Bots.

O no. Then list with tearful eye, Whilst I his fate do tell. His soul did from this cold world fly, By falling down a well.

They got him out and emptied him; Alas it was too late; His spirit was gone for to sport aloft In the realms of the good and great.

With Huck, I remain without words to characterize that poem.

gaye ---- Lynne Bassett <lynne lynnezwoolsey.com> wrote: The entire quilt is Huckleberry Finn.

Lynne (Who was guest curator of an exhibition for the Mark Twain House in Hartford, CT, and LOVES Huckleberry Finn...) ---

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Subject: Re: Turning 30 & Linkedin From: Gaye Ingram <gingram suddenlink.net> Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2011 19:52:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Pay no attention to Teddy Pruett's recent disclaimer of 30 as her real, official age.

She has not been at herself lately.

I think by claiming to be 39, she is trying to appear older in order to get in the UDC and wear hoop skirts and all that sort of thing.

She's a nice person, but no mathematician.

Gaye Ingram -

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Subject: Re: Painted quilt - is it Tom Sawyer's story? From: Lynne Bassett <lynne lynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2011 21:54:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Gaye,

As soon as I hit "send" on that message, I thought, "Blast! That message was to Gaye and I should have left it alone, because I want to see what she says about it." But I love Mark Twain, and I love Huck Finn, and I couldn't help myself... Indeed, the passages regarding Emmaline Granger are priceless.

That was a really interesting quilt. Wish I had known to bid on it. I love the quilt's painting of the King and the Duke. That chapter has the best line (IMHO) of the book: Upon seeing the King and the Duke in their new "store bought" clothes, Huck says "I never knowed how clothes could change a body before." Twain absolutely understood how clothes "could change a body"--witness his white suit.

See you in Jersey!

Lynne

On 6/17/2011 8:41 PM, Gaye Ingram wrote: > Lynne, you have GOOD taste in people. I've known people who believe one should read Huck Finn at least once a year. >

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Subject: Blog From: maggmalone aol.com Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2011 11:37:42 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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I've given up on a web site and started a blog instead. If you would like  to check it out go to maggiemalonesquickquilts blogspot.com. I'll appreciate any feedback.  

----------MB_8CDFCADF6530E46_2190_56868_Webmail-d115.sysops.aol.com--

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Subject: RE: Blogging From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton comcast.net> Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2011 11:33:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I'd love to check it out, Maggie - but the link didn't take me there. Please send a new link? I too got in to blogging (last March.) It's really fun. I focus on vintage quilts mostly from my (growing) collection, some projects that I'm working on (again mostly inspired by vintage) and taking stuff apart to do new things with it, sewing do-dads Etc....which is part of the blog name. Just bought two tops at the MQ show from vendor Bill Wivell - and may revise one of them to deal with one block that is damaged. I love this stuff. p.s. And you're all welcome to stop by mine, too. I've recently talked about Picnic Quilts and an old top I bought and the two new quilts I've made from it so far. - feedback and suggestions welcome!

Jean http://quiltsetcetera.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Others collecting quilter's stories From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt rockisland.com> Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2011 17:35:43 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Interesting. I had not seen or heard of this website before.

http://piecesofmeexhibit.lds.org/index.php

Karen A. in the Islands

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Subject: maggie malone blog From: carylschuetz comcast.net Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2011 18:31:30 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

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It is: http://maggiemalonesquickquilts.blogspot.com/

-- Caryl Schuetz Woodhaven Studio Professional Association of Appraisers - Quilted Textiles Certified by The American Quilter's Society

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Subject: Oregon Quilts From: Lynn <lynnquilt aol.com> Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2011 10:45:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Hey all you quilt history people in Oregon, anything special I need  to see or visit while in this beautiful state. We have never been here before. Quilt related I mean, we will do all the usual tourist stuff. We are traveling in an RV, in Grants Pass now headed up the I5, will be he re about  a week. Staying in Eugene and Portland areas.

 

Thanks, Lynn

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Subject: Oregon Quilts From: Lynn <lynnquilt aol.com> Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2011 10:57:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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  Hey all you quilt history people in Oregon, anything special I need  to see or visit while in this beautiful state. We have never been here before. Quilt related I mean, we will do all the usual tourist stuff. We are traveling in an RV, in Grants Pass now headed up the I5, will be he re about  a week. Staying in Eugene and Portland areas.

 

Thanks, Lynn http://quilts-vintageandantique.blogspot.com

 

----------MB_8CDFF03D74140E7_1F14_F11EA_webmail-m003.sysops.aol.com--

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Subject: Re: Oregon Quilts From: "Christine Thresh" <christine winnowing.com> Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2011 08:48:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Speaking of Oregon quilts -- look at this Oregon Trail quilt that Terry Grant is making: http://andsewitgoes.blogspot.com/2011/06/oregon-trail.html

Terry lives in Oregon. This will someday be an historical quilt.

Christine Thresh on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog and http://www.winnowing.com <-- website

----- Original Message ----- From: "Lynn" <lynnquilt aol.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2011 7:57 AM Subject: [qhl] Oregon Quilts

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Subject: RE: Blogging From: maggmalone aol.com Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2011 16:55:26 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CDFF35D8D8037C_2C4_C8CDD_webmail-m091.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Thanks for the interest. The link is maggiemalonesquickquilts.blogspot.com / I had trouble myself getting to it at first,  but found I was making mistakes when typing it in I will be sure to check yours out.

-----Original Message----- From: Jean Carlton <jeancarlton comcast.net> To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sun, Jun 19, 2011 9:52 pm Subject: [qhl] RE: Blogging

I'd love to check it out, Maggie - but the link didn't take me there. Pleas e end a new link? I too got in to blogging (last March.) It's really fun. I focus on vintage uilts mostly from my (growing) collection, some projects that I'm working n (again mostly inspired by vintage) and taking stuff apart to do new hings with it, sewing do-dads Etc....which is part of the blog name. ust bought two tops at the MQ show from vendor Bill Wivell - and may revise ne of them to deal with one block that is damaged. I love this stuff.  .s. And you're all welcome to stop by mine, too. I've recently talked about icnic Quilts and an old top I bought and the two new quilts I've made from t so far. - feedback and suggestions welcome! Jean ttp://quiltsetcetera.blogspot.com/

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Subject: You never stop learning From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow comcast.net> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 00:14:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I am old and grey, and have been using a tape measure for almost all of my adult life. Just tonight while reading a Nancy Zieman Slacks fitting booklet, I read that "the easiest way to add a seam allowance is to line up your tape measure along your tracing line and mark along the outer edge of the tape. (Almost all tape measures are 5/8" wide.)"

Who knew??? I worked with fine measurements for 31 years. I've sewn clothing using that 5/8" seam allowance. I can see 18", or 14", I can point out the difference between 1/8th inch and 3/16ths inch, but never noticed the width of my tape measure(s). Of course for the past 20 years my seam allowance of choice has been 1/4", but still..............

I am so embarrassed I just had to share my embarrassment with others who might also have just had the same AHA ! moment. Come clean, if you didn't know that, please let me know and don't let me suffer alone.

Judy Grow

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Subject: Re: measurements From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ss yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 03:16:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Judy, you have to learn to fake it! Something like, "and that's the reas on most seams are 5/8" wide- because that's the width of a tape measure!!!"   

I wouldn't have noticed because all the measurement marks are lengthwise, n ot crosswise, and MY angst runs in that direction....

Off to VT quilt festival this am!! Susan

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Subject: RE: You never stop learning From: "Debbie Welch" <deb quiltingposs.com> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 07:41:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I'm with Judy, I didn't know the tape measure was 5/8" wide.

Debbie Welch Forked River, NJ www.quiltingpossibilities.net

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Subject: Success! From: Xenia Cord <xenia legacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 08:27:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

This message was forwarded from LIz Whitehouse, CEO of the Quilters'   Guild of the British Isles:

< I would like to pass on a huge =93thank you  to everyone who voted  for 'Unfolding the Quilts' in the National Lottery Awards. We made it into  

the top three in the Heritage section and will now go through to the   final, with voting starting (again...) on 2 September. This will give the Quilt   Museum and Gallery much-needed publicity on national TV. Thanks again to   everyone - we could not have done it without you! We will keep in touch and let everyone know when we need you to start voting again. With best wishes  

and thanks for your support. Liz >

Thanks to all on this list who helped draw attention to the work of   quilters in the UK!

Xenia

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Subject: FW: RE: You never stop learning From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton comcast.net> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 07:29:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I confess, too - I didn't know that...and I have been sewing since I was a child. Great idea and yet I guess we all did okay... And knowing it will not make me go back to garment construction! jean

> I'm with Judy, I didn't know the tape measure was 5/8" wide. >

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Subject: RE: You never stop learning From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 05:40:40 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

I didn't know about the tape measure either - I *did* know that the distance between two blue lines on a 3 x 5 card is 1/4 inch...

Kris

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Subject: RE: You never stop learning From: JLHfw aol.com Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 08:55:06 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

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Dear Kris, More interesting trivia. I made garments for decades before learning to quilt and didn't know the width of the tape measure was 5/8 ". The width of the lines on index cards, who would have ever had reason to measure it unless their handwriting was large and the space too small. Janet H musing in Fort Worth

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Subject: Re: You never stop learning From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 09:27:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Had no idea .... what a great tidbit to know!

I also appreciate your sharing because you're an expert in that field and still learning, too ... that's a great reminder as well.

Steph Whitson

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Subject: RE: You never stop learning From: "Kim Baird" <kbaird cableone.net> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 09:59:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

How about this one--the middle joint of your little finger is a good substitute for 1 inch. Kim

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Subject: have to brag on our recent acquisition From: "Candace Perry" <candace schwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 11:29:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Am trying this again - not sure if it went through the first time!

http://www.auctionzip.com/Full-Image/1151450/fp119.cgi

I hope the link works - if not, let me know. The quilt is actually smaller than bed size, and I guess is early 20th century. I rarely want to buy quilts that do not have an identified maker, or at least a possibility of one, because of the limited acquisition funds we have. This lovely fellow, however, came out of a local lady's collection, and she only bought locally.at country auctions for decades. And it is so delightful - the aesthetics are usually very very low priority for me, but I think this one's a stunner!

Candace Perry

Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

Pennsburg, PA

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Subject: have to brag on our recent acquisition From: "Candace Perry" <candace schwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 09:03:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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http://www.auctionzip.com/Full-Image/1151450/fp119.cgi

I hope the link works - if not, let me know. The quilt is actually smaller than bed size, and I guess is early 20th century. I rarely want to buy quilts that do not have an identified maker, or at least a possibility of one, because of the limited acquisition funds we have. This lovely fellow, however, came out of a local lady's collection, and she only bought locally.at country auctions for decades. And it is so delightful - the aesthetics are usually very very low priority for me, but I think this one's a stunner!

Candace Perry

Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

Pennsburg, PA

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Subject: imported quilt? qhl jury is in! From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 09:02:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

I had asked you generous, knowledgeable people to look at photos of a quilt and weigh in on whether you thought it was an import.

I heard from several of you and promised the results.

None of those who responded had seen the quilt before (a good sign that it is not imported), and only a couple felt that it was likely to be an import.

A large majority felt quite confident that this fascinating quilt is home-grown.

I cannot get into the eBoard to post photos, so here is a link to the quilt, now on our website:

http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2011/06/maverick-tree-of-life.html

If you like, please check it out yourself and see what you think.

Thanks to QHL ... again!

Julie Silber quiltcomplex hughes.net

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Subject: Re: imported quilt? qhl jury is in! From: pollymello comcast.net Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 21:58:59 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 14

 

Julie, 

  I have seen 2 or 3 quilts like this in different color ways. 1930's. I beleive they are cherry trees. 1936 was the 200th anniversary of Gearge  Washington's birthday. There are many cherry tree George and Martha quilts  and needlework from that time period as they  commemorated his 200th bi rthday. 

I think I have a simular quilt. I will try to locate it and send you a pict ure. 

Polly Mello 

Elkridge, Maryland 

ory List" <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com>  Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 12:02:41 PM  Subject: [qhl] imported quilt? qhl jury is in! 

I had asked you generous, knowledgeable people to look at photos of a quilt  and weigh in on whether you thought it was an import. 

I heard from several of you and promised the results. 

None of those who responded had seen the quilt before (a good sign that it  is not imported), and only a couple felt that it was likely to be an import . 

A large majority felt quite confident that this fascinating quilt is  home-grown. 

I cannot get into the eBoard to post photos, so here is a link to the quilt ,  now on our website: 

http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2011/06/maverick-tree-of-life.html 

If you like, please check it out yourself and see what you think. 

Thanks to QHL ... again! 

Julie Silber  quiltcomplex hughes.net 

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Subject: Re: imported quilt? qhl jury is in! From: pollymello comcast.net Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 22:01:25 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 15

I forgot to say that I think it was a kit or a pattern,

Polly

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Subject: Re: imported quilt? qhl jury is in! From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 00:48:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I've never seen an imported quilt made for mass market with that much quilting on it. This is WONDERFUL!!!! And that unusual binding ... purchased bias maybe? What a delightful quilt. It makes me SMILE.

Steph Whitson

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Subject: Tape Measure Tips From: OzarkQuiltmaker aol.com Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 02:29:15 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

Judy:

Here's another tape measure tip. When you need to measure a curve, you can stand your tape measure on its side and it will curve right around the curve like those bendable rulers that we can buy in quilt shops or office supply stores. I had been sewing for over 30 years before I knew this tip and yes ... I felt really dumb when I learned it.

I measure the length of a scallop on a quilt this way when I need to figure how many inches of binding I need for a quilt. I show this in my edge treatment class and seldom find students who know this. It always brings shaking heads and a laugh.

Kathy Kansier Teacher, Judge & AQS Appraiser Ozark, Missouri

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Subject: RE: You never stop learning From: JLHfw aol.com Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2011 21:52:14 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

But the middle joint of my little finger only measures 3/4 ". We come in all sizes. Janet H

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Subject: RE: 5/8" tape measure width From: "Mary Waller" <mwaller vyn.midco.net> Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 08:29:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Judy,

I, too, learned a tape measure is 5/8" wide from watching Sewing with Nancy. It was a while ago, but that little fact has come in handy so many times. It is wonderful to teach Theatre students who are learning to sew in costume classes and shop. And here's another wrinkle on that: a 60"-long tape measure is 5/8" wide; a 36"-long tape measure is 1/2" wide, and a 120"-long tape measure is 3/4" wide. Hmm, I wonder how wide my retractable 25'-long tape measure is?

I've learned a lot about sewing and quilting from the how-to shows on Public TV. I don't know that I would be a quilter if I hadn't learned the basics and seen rotary cutters on Lap Quilting with Georgia Bonesteel and Eleanor Burns' Quilt in a Day.

Kris, I had no idea about the index card lines being 1/4"! Thank you!

And, Judy, I've always thought your white hair is regal.

Mary S. Waller Vermillion, South Dakota, USA

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Subject: RE: 5/8" tape measure width From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larryw greenhills.net> Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 08:48:20 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I am afraid these may change as companies look for ways to decrease costs. They may just make the tape narrower, instead of raising the price. Like the candy companies. The candy bars we bought when I was a child were huge compared to today's. It is all about the bottom line.

Sherrie in Missouri

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Subject: RE: 5/8" tape measure width From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton comcast.net> Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 09:00:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

and 45" width of fabric is closer to 42" now. jean

The candy bars we bought when I was a child were huge > compared to today's. It is all about the bottom line. > > Sherrie in Missouri

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Subject: Re: imported quilt? qhl jury is in! From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton comcast.net> Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 08:58:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I'd love to see that,too, Polly - if it's a kit. jean

> Julie, > > I have seen 2 or 3 quilts like this in different color ways. 1930's.

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Subject: RE: 5/8" tape measure width From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larryw greenhills.net> Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 11:30:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Yes and sometimes less than that after you cut off the selvage edge.

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Subject: RE: 5/8" tape measure width From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 13:06:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

When Kathy and I were figuring yardage requirements for the patterns in our book, we were told to figure it based on 42" wide fabric. Who knew. Not us.

Steph Whitson

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Subject: RE: 5/8" tape measure width From: "Kim Baird" <kbaird cableone.net> Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 13:19:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

If you've seen how fabric is manufactured, printed and processed, you will understand that the finished size is not perfectly predictable. Looms are one size, but printing, dyeing and washing distort and shrink the fabric. Kim

-

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Subject: link to "import" opinions From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 13:40:02 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

Here is a link to QHL-ers opinions on our "Tree of Life" quilt and whether it is an import.

More said NOT an IMPORT than YES. Check it out if you are interested.

Thanks again, QHL! Julie

http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2011/06/opinions-on-import-or-no-import.html

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Subject: import or not -- added opinions From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 09:37:59 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I will be adding more opinions offered by QHL-ers on whether our quilt is an import. See quilt here:

http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2011/06/maverick-tree-of-life.html

See opinions here:

http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2011/06/opinions-on-import-or-no-import.html

Julie Silber quiltcomplex hughes.net

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Subject: a fresh quilt exhibition in September From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 13:09:22 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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I just received this notice from the Newark Museum in New Jersey concerning their forthcoming quilt exjhibition k Art to Fine Art is a must see for th ose who appreciate textiles, both for their artistic beauty and their exqui site craftsmanship. Accompanying this exhibition is The Global Art of Patch work: Africa and Asia, showcasing work of patchwork traditions outside the  world of quilts, also drawn from the Museum  =99s holdings"Patchwork: F rom Folk Art to Fine Art." It opens September 14 and runs through December  31st.  Since purchasing its first quilt in 1918, the Museum  =99s  has amassed one of the most comprehensive quilt collections in the nation,  both stylistically and historically, consisting of more than 150 pieces tod ay. Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art tracks the evolution of quilts    from functional masterpieces of women  =99s folk art to self-cons cious artworks intended for display rather than practical purposes. Many ha ve never been on public view before. The exhibition features more than two dozen quilts, some crea ted with powerful graphic designs pieced together from geometric patches of silk, wool or cotton, while other are more complex works of narrative folk art, filled with appliqu =A9 motifs and embroidered enrichment. Album qu ilts, commemorative quilts and crazy quilts   all of these were ways  in which women in centuries past built community and were able to express t heir artistic skills within the confines of gender roles. Contemporary stud io quilters have also embraced the historic traditions of their craft, whil e creating a kind of quilt that has only existed since the late twentieth c entury. Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art tracks the evolution of quilts    from functional masterpieces of women  =99s folk art to self-c onscious artworks intended for display rather than practical purposes. Many have never been on public view before. The exhibition features more than t wo dozen quilts, some created with powerful graphic designs pieced together from geometric  patches of silk, wool or cotton, while other are more complex works of narr ative folk art, filled with appliqu =A9 motifs and embroidered enrichment . Album quilts, commemorative quilts and crazy quilts   all of these  were ways in which women in centuries past built community and were able to express their artistic skills within the confines of gender roles. Contemp orary studio quilters have also embraced the historic traditions of their c raft, while creating a kind of quilt that has only existed since the late t wentieth century. Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art is a must see for tho se who appreciate textiles, both for their artistic beauty and their exquis ite craftsmanship. Accompanying this exhibition is The Global Art of Patchw ork: Africa and Asia, showcasing work of patchwork traditions outside the w orld of quilts, also drawn from the Museum  =99s holdings   It's so  reassuring to see  such major qujilt exhibitions regularly on view throughout the country. Newark is a lovely museum, easy to get to  on NjTransit or Amtrak.   Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage yahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-83133707-1309032562=:82806--

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Subject: Re: a fresh quilt exhibition in September From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow comcast.net> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 16:51:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

AQSG Seminar is taking a bus tour to the Newark Museum on Monday , September 26th. Unfortunatley that tour is already full. In addition to the exhibition Laura described curator Ullyses S. Dietz will be giving us a special quilt turning of quilts from the collection that are not on view.

Judy Grow

----- Original Message ----- From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafisherquilts yahoo.com> I just received this notice from the Newark Museum in New Jersey concerning their forthcoming quilt exjhibition k Art to Fine Art is a must see for those who appreciate textiles, both for their artistic beauty and their exquisite craftsmanship. Accompanying this exhibition is The Global Art of Patchwork: Africa and Asia, showcasing work of patchwork traditions outside the world of quilts, also drawn from the Museum’s holdings"Patchwork: From Folk Art to Fine Art."

It opens September 14 and runs through December 31st. Since purchasing its first quilt in 1918, the Museum’s has amassed one of the most comprehensive quilt collections in the nation, both stylistically and historically, consisting of more than 150 pieces today. Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art tracks the evolution of quilts—from functional masterpieces of women’s folk art to self-conscious artworks intended for display rather than practical purposes. Many have never been on public view before.

The exhibition features more than two dozen quilts, some created with powerful graphic designs pieced together from geometric patches of silk, wool or cotton, while other are more complex works of narrative folk art, filled with appliqué motifs and embroidered enrichment. Album quilts, commemorative quilts and crazy quilts—all of these were ways in which women in centuries past built community and were able to express their artistic skills within the confines of gender roles.

Contemporary studio quilters have also embraced the historic traditions of their craft, while creating a kind of quilt that has only existed since the late twentieth century. Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art tracks the evolution of quilts—from functional masterpieces of women’s folk art to self-conscious artworks intended for display rather than practical purposes. Many have never been on public view before.

The exhibition features more than two dozen quilts, some created with powerful graphic designs pieced together from geometric patches of silk, wool or cotton, while other are more complex works of narrative folk art, filled with appliqué motifs and embroidered enrichment. Album quilts, commemorative quilts and crazy quilts—all of these were ways in which women in centuries past built community and were able to express their artistic skills within the confines of gender roles.

Contemporary studio quilters have also embraced the historic traditions of their craft, while creating a kind of quilt that has only existed since the late twentieth century. Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art is a must see for those who appreciate textiles, both for their artistic beauty and their exquisite craftsmanship. Accompanying this exhibition is The Global Art of Patchwork: Africa and Asia, showcasing work of patchwork traditions outside the world of quilts, also drawn from the Museum’s holdings

It's so reassuring to see such major qujilt exhibitions regularly on view throughout the country. Newark is a lovely museum, easy to get to on NjTransit or Amtrak.

Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

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Subject: Re: imported quilt? qhl jury is in! From: Rose Werner <erwerner3104 yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 11:42:19 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Some indicated that they thought this might be from a kit or published patt ern, since the design has turned up more than once. I'd like to weigh in on that discussion. I do not think that this is the product of a kit - for th e following reasons: a. The tree patches are not uniform. There is quite  a bit of variation in the shape of the bottom of the trees, and one is of a different fabric. Of course the variation could result from unskilled appl ique technique, and one of the tree patches could have been damaged and r eplaced. b. There is no consistency in the number of leaf patches in each block. The number of leaves ranges from 12 to 16. If there were a stam ped background, every leaf would be in the same position on each block. The cherries (?) also vary from 16 to 20 on a block.  I'd be inclined to say that the pattern was copied from a newspaper or magazine - or from a qu ilt seen somewhere. Having spent the last few months researching Colonial R evival, I'd also agree that it might be a representation of the George Wash ington/cherry tree story. In that case, it could have been copied from othe r artistic renderings in Colonial Revival literature or souveniers. Just  my two cents worth. Rosie Werner www.quiltkitid.com   From: Ju lie Silber <quiltcomplex hughes.net> To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.qu iltropolis.com> Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 11:02 AM Subject: [qhl] i mported quilt? qhl jury is in!      --- --0-1206920283-1309027339=:18287--

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: Country Woman magazine contest From: "Gale Slagle" <glslag cox.net> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 08:39:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

I manage the web-site for my quilt guild and I just got the following email about the Country Woman magazine contest sent to it. I thought I would pass it on to this list too as some of you are creative and are getting a lot of inspiration from vintage quilts. -- Gale

Shalana Frisby wrote: Hello,

As the craft editor for Country Woman magazine, I am so excited to share with your guild the news of our Quilt-a-Block Contest, offered in partnership with Hancock Fabrics and running through Sept. 12. Prizes total more than $2,400!

We're looking for the best quilt block designs, and will consider featuring some in future magazine craft projects. We hope some of your guild members will consider sending an entry or two. There is no purchase necessary.

Find the link to complete contest rules on our website at http://www.countrywomanmagazine.com/

And if you have any questions or comments, please don't hesitate to contact me! Thanks for your time.

Sincerely, Shalana Frisby

---------------------- Shalana Frisby, Craft Editor Country Woman Magazine 5400 S. 60th Street Greendale, WI 53129 Shalana_Frisby rd.com (414)423-0100 ext.3281

http://www.countrywomanmagazine.com/ https://www.facebook.com/CountryWomanMag

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Subject: Question about DAR From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt rockisland.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 17:13:36 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

I saw a quilt on eBay with the words 1977 Grand Pages... Grand Page Escorts. There is also one block that contains <Multnomah 104.> I am thinking that might be a chapter # of an organization.

I know there is a Multnomah Co. in Oregon.

I know very little about the organization of the DAR. Does the DAR have a position called <Grand Pages> or <Grand Page Escorts>?

Thanks,

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: More measurements From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 20:23:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

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I'd venture to say that most of yall already know this measuring tip but if there is even one person who does not know you will enjoy knowing th is tidbit. I've used it for years. If you turn your head to the left h old a piece of fabric near your nose and stretch your right hand out ful l length you've just measured a pretty accurate yard of fabric. As Jane t said we come in all sizes - from near midget to Amazonian but I'm a bout 5'6" - a very "average" gal. I do this in thrift shops - they always  wonder what I'm doing then I get to the register and tell them how many  yards of fabric in the piece I'm buying. For a quarter a yard............

Teddy Pruett in scorching (literally) north Florida

"I no doubt deserved my enemies 

but I don't believe I deserved my friends." 

Walt Whitman

 

www.teddypruett.com

 

--_4f2e9da4-cba8-43ca-9452-623421ec1136_--

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Subject: FYI - Lost quilt alert video link From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt rockisland.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 17:23:44 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

This quilt appears on the cover of the June/July 2011 QNM magazine

http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cash-no-substitute-for-missing-quilt -1436177.php

Or

http://tinyurl.com/5wppxgq

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: Question about DAR From: "Karen Musgrave" <KarenMusgrave sbcglobal.net> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 22:04:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Karen,

It sounds more like Eastern Star than DAR.

Karen Musgrave

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Subject: Re: More measurements From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn rocketmail.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 20:53:19 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

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Teddy, There is a fabric store in St. Joseph MO (at least there WAS) called Esther's. In the late 1980s, it was owned by her son, Stanley, who was renown for his unhospitable attitude towards customers. Stanley loved his merchandise, and responded much as any of us would if someone came into our home, rifled through our stash, and tried to take bits and pieces of it away. That Stanley owned a store stuffed on 3 levels with fabric, plus a warehouse across town, made no difference: it was painful to him to part with any of it. It had the most amazing stuff. When the Austin Powers people contacted Nancy Kirk about where to get the burnt orange velvet to make 6 suits for Austin Powers (they had to have duplicates in case any were damaged) she knew right where to send them....Esther's. It was a mainstay for those of us doing Renaissance Fair costumes. But that is getting ahead of the story. You'd shop at Esther's, telling yourself someday you'd come back for this or that, certain it would be there. Then, suddenly, Stanley died and the store was locked up tight. Oh, the calamity! I contacted Stanley's nephew who was executor, and told him I would have no fewer than a dozen women there, each prepared to spend no less than $100, if he would just reopen the store for a day. I think he was astounded that people actually wanted Uncle Stanley's stuff, but he agreed. I went in and scooped up the metallic braids...all marked at a quarter per yard or less. When I got to the cutting table, the nephew measured them by taking one end in his left hand, stretching his arms to full extension and shouting 'ONE!' Repeat, 'TWO!' I turned and looked at the ladies in line...all of whom looked daggers at me as if to say, 'Don't you DARE!' I had ordered 10 yards of each trim...I measured one when I got home: 23 yards.

A few years later, I was in the Creation Collection (a lovely fabric store, I was so sorry when it closed) and happened to comment, 'She who dies with the most fabric, wins.' The owner looked over her glasses at me and said dryly, 'Stanley already won.'

________________________________ From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer hotmail.com> To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sat, June 25, 2011 7:23:16 PM Subject: [qhl] More measurements

I'd venture to say that most of yall already know this measuring tip, but if there is even one person who does not know, you will enjoy knowing this tidbit. I've used it for years. If you turn your head to the left, hold a piece of fabric near your nose, and stretch your right hand out full length, you've just measured a pretty accurate yard of fabric. As Janet said, we come in all sizes - from near midget to Amazonian, but I'm about 5'6" - a very "average" gal. I do this in thrift shops - they always wonder what I'm doing, then I get to the register and tell them how many yards of fabric in the piece I'm buying. For a quarter a yard............

Teddy Pruett in scorching (literally) north Florida

"I no doubt deserved my enemies,

but I don't believe I deserved my friends."

Walt Whitman

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Subject: import or no? -- you are the best! From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 21:17:27 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

You all are just wonderful.

I know I have learned a great deal through this "thread" on imported quilt or not.

Many thanks! Julie Silber

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Subject: newark museum, measurements From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 22:28:32 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Sorry about the repeats of the Newark museum show info, my cut and pasting somehow got duplicated. I always keep a tape measure or yardstick around to try and measure everything, especially the bedcoverings, seems like people always need to know the size, and I marvel at sellers who don't put the size on their tags. I do admire the people who can use their body parts as rulers (no Anthony Weiner jokes here) and come out with pretty accurate results. Of course they remember what length the span of their hand is from tip of the thumb to little finger, and how long their foot is, or the length of their forearm to the elbow, and Teddy's nose-to-fingertip yard measurement (that must be a southern thing because the people I know who do it are all from the south). The trick is to remember the measures of the parts whose sizes don't change with age and time, so as to not need a tape measure.

Laura Fisher at

FISHER HERITAGE

305 East 61st Street

5th floor

New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596

www.laurafisherquilts.com

fisherheritage yahoo.com

find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-461604458-1309066112=:46992--

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Subject: Re: More measurements From: JLHfw aol.com Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 22:23:39 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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Hey, Teddy, glad you shared the measuring technique that I learned from my grandmother years ago. I am 5' 5" and have my mother's small hands and frame. So my little finger middle length isn't as long as yours might be. As a gynecologist, I wear a 5 1/2 glove in surgery which is also worn by one of my colleagues. Otherwise it would be a problem to get the surgery department to special order them. Believe me, you want your surgeon to be wearing proper fitting gloves to do her best job. :-))) Janet H

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Subject: Yankton Yellowbone Indian Family Photo, c.1908 From: DDBSTUFF aol.com Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2011 07:03:46 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

I posted a photo on eboards the other day along with the info on this list and have never seen it posted and the eboard picture has disappeared so I'm trying again

It is an old photo from 1908 that shows a Yankton Yellowbone Indian Family and the baby is wrapped in a quilt.

The photo is fantastic but I was curious about what members would say about the quilt and the fact that it was being used by this Native American Family

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Subject: RE: newark museum, measurements From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton comcast.net> Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2011 17:10:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Nose to finger-tip  one yard is also here in the midwest.... jean Minnesota > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: jeancarlton comcast.net. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1668770J lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Measurements From: Sally Ward <sallytatters fastmail.co.uk> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 00:33:48 +0100 X-Message-Number: 6

Not a numerical measurement, but the 'correct' length for a piece of  hand sewing thread.

Thread the needle with thread still on the spool. With a tail of about  3-4 inches hanging through the needle, hold the needle between thumb and  forefinger and measure the thread on the spool down to your elbow, then  cut. Long enough to do some useful work, short enough not to tangle,  and you have threaded the needle with the thread the right way round.

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: newark museum, measurements From: Bonnie Dwyer <bonniedwyer2 mac.com> Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2011 21:48:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Hey Laura, Here in Maine I also learned the nose-to-fingertip yard measurement! Not just a southern thing... <g> Bonnie Dwyer

On Jun 26, 2011, at 1:28 AM, Laura Fisher wrote: > ..... Teddy's nose-to-fingertip yard measurement (that must be a southern thing because the people I know who do it are all from the south).

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Subject: Re: newark museum, measurements From: "Lorraine Olsson" <sven pnc.com.au> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 13:00:30 +1000 X-Message-Number: 8

I do it here in Australia too

Cheers, Lorraine

> Hey Laura, > Here in Maine I also learned the nose-to-fingertip yard measurement! Not > just a southern thing... <g> > Bonnie Dwyer

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Subject: Measurements From: Judy Knorr <jknorr optonline.net> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 08:43:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I grew up in Ohio and learned to measure fabric fingertip to nose. Still do it! I also taught my students to measure the length of their sewing thread to the elbow. Otherwise, they tried to sew with thread that was 3 or 4 feet long so they didn't have to stop and thread the needle!!

Judy Knorr

--Boundary_(ID_QfeqFQycPbLmty5X1POd6w)--

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Subject: Looking for 19th and 20th Century Hexagon Pattern Quilts!!! From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquilt gmail.com> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 07:56:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Looking for 19th and 20th Century Hexagon Pattern Quilts!!! Hexagon Quilt Exhibition Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival, January 2012

I have been asked to curate an exhibition of 19th century / 20th c Hexagon pattern quilts for the Jan. 2012 Festival in Tokyo. . The objective is to demonstrate the infinite variety and expressions possible when using the hexagon I am looking for fifteen to twenty superb examples from 1820- 2012 in excellent condition and seek your help!!

This will be the eleventh year for the Festival, held at the Tokyo Dome. This is the 4th time that I will have curated an exhibition for the Festival. The quilts will be seen by approximately 300,000 people over the 9 days of the Festival. It is a wonderful opportunity to introduce great examples of antique American quilts to a broad Japanese audience.

I am asking for your participation if you have one example or several that you are willing to lend. We are looking for 75% antique examples and 25% contemporary use of the hexagon in quiltmaking.

If you know of another person or institution that might have examples, please send me the information for your contacts. We are limited to borrowing in North America only

The quilts will initially be sent to my home in Louisville to be photographed and processed. They will be sent together from Louisville to Tokyo. NHK, the sponsor, will pay a $300.00 honorarium to borrow each quilt and will cover all insurance, all shipping, and photography. I will do condition reports at both ends of the trip. I will also be in Tokyo for the installation and the take down to supervise. At the festival the quilts are handled as they would be at a museum.

I am particularly interested in your thoughts re any concerns you might have sending quilts to Tokyo for the Festival given the nuclear issues there, though I am assured that Tokyo is almost back to normal.

I will need the quilts in Louisville on December 1, 2011 and they will be returned to you no later than March 31, 2012.

For your quilts to be considered, please let me know pertinent details about the quilt and send a photograph (preferably jpeg) to zegartquilt gmail.com or mail to Shelly Zegart, 300 Penruth Avenue, Louisville, KY 40207 (landline 502-897-7566).

With many thanks in advance for your help,

Shelly Zegart

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

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Subject: Re: Measurements From: Mitzioakes aol.com Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 10:25:55 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

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Boy, does that bring back memories - I was taught this method way, way, way back when my Mother taught me to embroider. You know what? I still embroider (and quilt) and still use that exact method. Thanks for the memories! Mitzi from sunny (finally) and dry Vermont

In a message dated 6/26/2011 7:34:01 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, sallytatters fastmail.co.uk writes:

Not a numerical measurement, but the 'correct' length for a piece of hand sewing thread.

Thread the needle with thread still on the spool. With a tail of about 3-4 inches hanging through the needle, hold the needle between thumb and forefinger and measure the thread on the spool down to your elbow, then cut. Long enough to do some useful work, short enough not to tangle, and you have threaded the needle with the thread the right way round.

Sally Ward

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mitzioakes aol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1714905I lyris.quiltropolis.com

--part1_19443.658167f5.3b39ecf3_boundary--

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Subject: Re: Measurements From: Sally Ward <sallytatters fastmail.co.uk> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 15:36:48 +0100 X-Message-Number: 4

Since nobody has spoken up for the UK on the nose-to-hand yard  measurement, I'll say yes, I was taught that by seamstress grandmother.  When we went metric I worked out that if I turn my head to the left and  go right out to the longest (middle) finger to measure, I get a  near-enough metre.

Sally Ward Sizzling (for once, and probably not for long) in Yorkshire

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Subject: RE: newark museum, measurements From: Julia Zgliniec <rzglini1 san.rr.com> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 09:45:38 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------050104030409080009050608 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Good Morning! In regards to the variations in body measurements.... I was told ... Those in the dry goods business put brass tacks on the wooden counters. When customers were purchasing material, they told the shop keeper to "get down to brass tacks" instead of measuring yards by the "nose / arm length methods.

Coulda happened,

Julia Zgliniec, Poway CA - beautiful sunny days, comfortable evenings

On 6/26/2011 3:10 PM, Jean Carlton wrote: > Nose to finger-tip  one yard is also here in the midwest.... > jean > Minnesota

--------------050104030409080009050608--

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Subject: RE: Looking for 19th and 20th Century Hexagon Pattern Quilts!!! From: donna.stickovich <donna.stickovich yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 13:01:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi shelly i have one. Can send you a picture later when i am home

Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone

-----Original Message----- From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquilt gmail.com> Sent: Monday, June 27, 2011 07:56 AM To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Subject: [qhl] Looking for 19th and 20th Century Hexagon Pattern Quilts!!!

Looking for 19th and 20th Century Hexagon Pattern Quilts!!! Hexagon Quilt Exhibition Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival, January 2012

I have been asked to curate an exhibition of 19th century / 20th c Hexagon pattern quilts for the Jan. 2012 Festival in Tokyo. . The objective is to demonstrate the infinite variety and expressions possible when using the hexagon I am looking for fifteen to twenty superb examples from 1820- 2012 in excellent condition and seek your help!!

This will be the eleventh year for the Festival, held at the Tokyo Dome. This is the 4th time that I will have curated an exhibition for the Festival. The quilts will be seen by approximately 300,000 people over the 9 days of the Festival. It is a wonderful opportunity to introduce great examples of antique American quilts to a broad Japanese audience.

I am asking for your participation if you have one example or several that you are willing to lend. We are looking for 75% antique examples and 25% contemporary use of the hexagon in quiltmaking.

If you know of another person or institution that might have examples, please send me the information for your contacts. We are limited to borrowing in North America only

The quilts will initially be sent to my home in Louisville to be photographed and processed. They will be sent together from Louisville to Tokyo. NHK, the sponsor, will pay a $300.00 honorarium to borrow each quilt and will cover all insurance, all shipping, and photography. I will do condition reports at both ends of the trip. I will also be in Tokyo for the installation and the take down to supervise. At the festival the quilts are handled as they would be at a museum.

I am particularly interested in your thoughts re any concerns you might have sending quilts to Tokyo for the Festival given the nuclear issues there, though I am assured that Tokyo is almost back to normal.

I will need the quilts in Louisville on December 1, 2011 and they will be returned to you no later than March 3

[The entire original message is not included]

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Subject: Fw: signature database info From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciark earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 15:22:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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----- Original Message -----  From: marciark earthlink.netTo: Quilt History List  Sent: Monday, June 27, 2011 1:52 PM Subject: signature database info

Would someone please refresh my memory on the signature quilt database  again and how i might access the info? thanks, Marcia Kaylakie

__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus  signature database 6244 (20110627) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com

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Subject: Re: Julie Silber's "import or not" tree quilt From: "Marilyn M. Withrow" <mmw marilynquilts.com> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 21:28:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Hi, Julie -- I'm interested in the comments on this tree quilt. The quilting does not look like an import to me. It has a folksy A-A feeling, but I wouldn't want to label it that. The "berries" are what caught my eye mostly = they look like the berries made by the Russian women. I've spent several weeks living in Russia with Russian quilters, and these berries are frequently used -- as fruit on a tree quilt, as shall we say upper adornment on the female form, painted on boxes and used as quilt embellishments as well as a tribute to the Russian plants which produce these berries. I've forgotten their name, but I do have some in my Russian collection on clothing and other quilted items. I don't think this quilt looks Asian or Chinese or Indian. I think it's folk art using techniques and ideas from other countries, sort of a conglomeration of a variety of styles. Keep us all posted as you get more information.'

Marilyn Maddalena Withrow Professional Quilt Appraiser, Judge, Quilt Historian, Speaker, Teacher "The Quilted Rooster" Quilt Studio Checotah, OK www.marilynquilts.com

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Subject: Re: Looking for 19th and 20th Century Hexagon Pattern Quilts!!! From: Arden Shelton <junkorama comcast.net> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 20:49:17 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

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Shelly, I hope you let us see photos of the ones you finally choose for the exhibit!....arden     (Ms) Arden Shelton  Portland, OR   ________________________________ From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquilt g mail.com> To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Mon day, June 27, 2011 4:56 AM Subject: [qhl] Looking for 19th and 20th Centu ry Hexagon Pattern Quilts!!!  Looking for 19th and 20th Century Hexagon Pattern Quilts!!! Hexagon Quilt Exhibition Tokyo International Great Q uilt Festival, January 2012  I have been asked to curate an exhibiti on of 19th century / 20th c Hexagon pattern quilts for the Jan. 2012 Fest ival in Tokyo. . The objective is to demonstrate the infinite variety and expressions possible when using the hexagon I am looking for fifteen  to twenty superb examples from 1820- 2012 in excellent condition and s eek your help!!  This will be the eleventh year for the Festival, hel d at the Tokyo Dome. This is the 4th time that I will have curated an exh ibition for the Festival. The quilts will be seen by approximately 300,00 0 people over the 9 days of the Festival. It is a wonderful opportunity t o introduce great examples of antique American quilts to a broad Japane se audience.  I am asking for your participation if you have one exampl e or several that you are willing to lend. We are looking for 75% antique examples and 25% contemporary use of the hexagon in quiltmaking.  If you know of another person or institution that might have examples, plea se send me the information for your contacts. We are limited to borrowing in North America only  The quilts will initially be sent to my home in Louisville to be photographed and processed. They will be sent together  from Louisville to Tokyo. NHK, the sponsor, will pay a $300.00 honorarium to borrow each quilt and will cover all insurance, all shipping, and p hotography. I will do condition reports at both ends of the trip. I will  also be in Tokyo for the installation and the take down to supervise. At  the festival the quilts are handled as they would be at a museum.  I  am particularly interested in your thoughts re any concerns you might hav e sending quilts to Tokyo for the Festival given the nuclear issues there , though I am assured that Tokyo is almost back to normal.  I will need the quilts in Louisville on December 1, 2011 and they will be returned t o you no later than March 31, 2012.  For your quilts to be considered,  please let me know pertinent details about the quilt and send a photograp h (preferably jpeg) to zegartquilt gmail.com or mail to Shelly Zegart, 30 0 Penruth Avenue, Louisville, KY 40207 (landline 502-897-7566).  With many thanks in advance for your help,  Shelly Zegart       --  Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502 -897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com   --- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: junkorama comcast.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to l eave-qhl-1813068S lyris.quiltropolis.com --0-1024009144-1309232957=:72029--

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Subject: Signature Quilt Project From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt rockisland.com> Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2011 23:20:03 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Marcia,

http://www.quiltindex.org/

Under <Galleries> on this page, click and select Signature Quilt Project.

Karen Alexander Member of the Signature Quilt Pilot Project Team

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Subject: another imported quilt From: Sandra Starley <gingham frontiernet.net> Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 15:41:45 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 2

Yikes, here's another commercially made imported quilt being passed off as an antique. It is a machine satin stitch appliqued medallion with lots of folk art animals alternating with pieced blocks. The owner is saying it is from the 1860's. Item number 150623477014

http://cgi.ebay.com/Antique-applique-quilt-animal-tree-life-/150623477014?pt=Quilts&hash=item2311dbdd16

I wrote the seller and told them it was a reproduction and gave the item number for its almost twin that sold last month, so I'll let you know how they respond.

And here is its twin - EXACT same center with slightly different border, item number 390316220936

http://cgi.ebay.com/390316220936?ru=http%3A%2F%2Fshop.ebay.com%3A80%2Fi.html%3F_from%3DR40%26_trksid%3Dm570.l2736%26_nkw%3D390316220936%26_fvi%3D1&_rdc=1

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: update on another imported quilt From: Sandra Starley <gingham frontiernet.net> Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 16:45:21 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 3

Double Yikes!! While the seller did post my question/statement about it being a reproduction not an antique he is adamant that it is an antique c. 1860. His response:

"Thank you for the information. I did look at the item #390316220936 that sold that you referred to and that quilt was a reproduction but I will guarantee that this one that I have for sale is not a reproduction - it is a definite antique. The materials used and wear on the quilt we believe date it to circa 1860. This pattern is definitely copied and still popular today as the item you point out demonstrates- but the one I am selling is not a reproduction. If there are closer shots that you would like to see please let me know and I would be happy to provide them to you. It is a lovely old piece."

His quilt http://cgi.ebay.com/Antique-applique-quilt-animal-tree-life-/150623477014?pt=Quilts&hash=item2311dbdd16

Its exact twin (same fabrics etc.) except doesn't have appliqued side borders. http://cgi.ebay.com/390316220936?ru=http%3A%2F%2Fshop.ebay.com%3A80%2Fi.html%3F_from%3DR40%26_trksid%3Dm570.l2736%26_nkw%3D390316220936%26_fvi%3D1&_rdc=1

Oh well, at least if someone reads the question section, this may give them pause and make them think twice.

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: Further update on another imported quilt From: Sandra Starley <gingham frontiernet.net> Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 20:27:34 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 4

Part 3

I replied again to the seller and stated that the quilts were exact copies with only difference of side borders, that machine satin stitch applique wasn't done in 1860 and the fabrics are new (made within last 20 years).

He responded that I must be right and if it doesn't sell, he will lower the price. Don't know if he will change anything on the description though. But I made him think -- always a good thing.

His quilt: http://cgi.ebay.com/Antique-applique-quilt-animal-tree-life-/150623477014?pt=Quilts&hash=item2311dbdd16

Its exact twin except side borders. http://cgi.ebay.com/390316220936?ru=http%3A%2F%2Fshop.ebay.com%3A80%2Fi.html%3F_from%3DR40%26_trksid%3Dm570.l2736%26_nkw%3D390316220936%26_fvi%3D1&_rdc=1

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: update on another imported quilt From: Donna Stickovich <donna.stickovich yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 13:28:11 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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I also questioned him about this quilt on ebay, His response was 1860. I al so doubted it as being old.    From: Sandra Starley <gingham frontier net.net> To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Tues day, June 28, 2011 12:45 PM Subject: [qhl] update on another imported qui lt  Double Yikes!! While the seller did post my question/statement a bout it being a reproduction not an antique he is adamant that it is an ant ique c. 1860. His response:   "Thank you for the information. I did loo k at the item #390316220936 that sold that you referred to and that quilt w as a reproduction but I will guarantee that this one that I have for sale i s not a reproduction - it is a definite antique. The materials used and wea r on the quilt we believe date it to circa 1860. This pattern is definitely copied and still popular today as the item you point out demonstrates- but the one I am selling is not a reproduction. If there are closer shots that you would like to see please let me know and I would be happy to provide t hem to you. It is a lovely old piece."  His quilt http://cgi.ebay.com /Antique-applique-quilt-animal-tree-life-/150623477014?pt=3DQuilts&hash=3Di tem2311dbdd16  Its exact twin (same fabrics etc.) except doesn't have a ppliqued side borders. http://cgi.ebay.com/390316220936?ru=3Dhttp%3A%2F%2 Fshop.ebay.com%3A80%2Fi.html%3F_from%3DR40%26_trksid%3Dm570.l2736%26_nkw%3D 390316220936%26_fvi%3D1&_rdc=3D1  Oh well, at least if someone reads th e question section, this may give them pause and make them think twice.  Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser  Moab, Utah  my an tique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com    my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com    --- You are  currently subscribed to qhl as: donna.stickovich yahoo.com. To unsubscrib e send a blank email to leave-qhl-1820784D lyris.quiltropolis.com --0-1849429800-1309292891=:39397--

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Subject: Re: update on another imported quilt From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 14:07:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

I actually have (or had) this quilt. I recognized the fabric in the bird. I replied and told him that but since it is now in a landfill somewhere, I can't send him a picture. Wish I could!

Kris

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Subject: Re: update on another imported quilt From: ag32040 <ag32040 aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 18:02:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

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On Jun 28, 2011, at 5:07:01 PM, "Kris Driessen" <krisdriessen yahoo.com> wrote:

From: "Kris Driessen" <krisdriessen yahoo.com> Subject: [qhl] Re: update on another imported quilt Date: June 28, 2011 5:07:01 PM EDT To: "Quilt History List" <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> I actually have (or had) this quilt. I recognized the fabric in the bird . I replied and told him that but since it is now in a landfill somewhere, I can't send him a picture. Wish I could!

Kris

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Subject: Re: update on another imported quilt From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 18:12:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I wonder if he noticed where the "care tag" was removed. Ahem. Steph Whitson

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Subject: merry silber -- 97th birthday! From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplex hughes.net> Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 22:32:49 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello Friends,

Some of you have been kind enough to send my Mom, Merry Silber, a card for her last few birthdays.

It's come around again ~ July 10 will be here 97th birthday!

If anyone wants to brighten her again, here is her address:

Merry Silber Fleischman 2039 6710 W. Maple Rd. W. Bloomfield, MI 48322

I posted a couple of photos of Mom and some of her wonderful 19th century blue and white quilts on the eBoard.

Thanks so much! Julie S

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Subject: black cotton sateen From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2011 10:40:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi all - have a question about when black cotton sateen came into use in qu ilts. I think of it as being used primarily in Amish quilts from Holmes Cou nty Ohio from the 1920s-ish era forward, and occasionally have seen it in non Amish quilts like those black background appliques with a lot of green ery, also from that era. Anyone know when it was 'invented'? and how come i t seems limited to use among the Amish community? Thanks  Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage yahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1117450703-1309369252=:30093--