Subject: Baskets and large Bows From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2011 11:10:19 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Who was the Indiana designer that was known for her baskets and bows? I am drawing a blank though I know I have a file in my computer about this woman!

Here is an exceptional such quilt from ebay. Could it be one of her designs?

http://tinyurl.com/3h2kkpa

Karen in the Islands karenquiltblogspot.com

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Subject: quilting hoops? From: lynnelynnezwoolsey.com Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2011 11:24:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Does anyone know when quilters began using hoops rather than frames? The question has been posed to me, and I don't know the answer--although it seems it would be in the period after cooperative quilting was common, when women more commonly quilted alone. And I know that, in New England at least, cooperative quilting died off gradually in the second half of the 19th century. Also, the round embroidery hoop came into use with the fashion for tambour work in the late 18th century, so I imagine the idea picked up from there. Does anyone have a primary reference to quilting in a hoop? An early photograph? My /Good Housekeeping Needlecraft Encyclopedia/ from 1947 mentions only a quilting frame; none of my earlier needlework books mention either a hoop or a frame.

Thank you!

All best, Lynne ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Baskets and large Bows From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2011 15:24:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Good catch, Karen! That is indeed "A Basket Quilt" by Esther O'Neill of Indianapolis, and it appears to be in good condition.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 29, 2011 From: dsmetzgeraol.com Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2011 12:58:23 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Regarding black cotton sateen, I don't know about its general use in quilts but I have several vintage 1860's day wear gowns where it has been used as lining in the bodices and as a foundation in one of the skirts. It's a much tighter weave than the fabric of the bodices themselves (one is cotton and the other is a lighter weight cotton (maybe almost a voile??). Both were mourning dresses but I think were summer weights. I suspect the voile might have been a lighter color but was home dyed,, but the other was definitely black to begin with. Don't know if this helps.

Sharee Metzger ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Black Cotton Sateen From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2011 17:47:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Laura I have a Roosevelt Rose on black cotton sateen ground. There's atleast one more listed in the Quilt Index that is on black. From what I've seen it appears that someone tried to get a following for the pastels ofthe 20's - 30's placed on a black ground. I think it was too soon after the turn of the century darks not to mention the long timeframe of Victorian dark darks. The gals just werent ready to embrace it yet and it never caught on.Just an ungrounded theory. But the rose quilts indicate the use of black sateen was more widespread than just the Amish. 

Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies

but I don't believe I deserved my friends."

Walt Whitman

 

www.teddypruett.com

 

--_e6f90518-8e1f-491c-a0e3-c7a4c0ecccf1_--

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Subject: white bedcovers From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2011 18:25:55 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

--0-1912045216-1309483555=:55205 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

HI all - happy holiday. Are littlefabric American flags still sold to wave at parades? I loveto see themin old quilts, and realize I have no idea if such ephemera still exits, and if so, is it textile or plastic or some other material, made in China no doubt, but still charming. Just curious.  Just finished reading Laurel Horton's piece in Blanket Statementson white bedcovers, and I am so interested to learn the discoveries of everyone's research becauseI have always had a variety of these19th century handmade white spreads in inventory. The woven candlewicks are indestructible and look remarkably fresh for being from 100-200 years old and presumably laundered a lot in their lifetimes.They are a pleasing and visiblytexturedalternativeto use; in summer I always switch out to a candlewick woven or embroidered spread, or a white cotton overshot coverlet (all of mine found inPA) for their interesting graphicsdespite beingmonochromatic.Of course it's helpful to findsuch spreadswith names either embroidered or woven in. I have several on my website and more in stock, including an embroidered one from Riverhead and Bayshore, Long Island NY, and even a signed Philadelphia woven raised candlewick for William and May Stuart, I need to have geneological research done on both.  I have somecomments on the informationso far, as I think somewovenovershot coverlets may have been made outside the home by professional weavers, likewisethe more elaborate raised motif woven candlewicks,madeon professional looms with a draw boy (?) handling the insertion of the rods or twigs to make the raised loops design. I think information in books on antique coverlets would apply to these all-white pieces as well. I have even had all white jacquard cotton coverlets, and some nearly monochromatic woven jacquards in two tones --natural linen and darker flax - soooo scrumptuous andchic looking (I have a pair now that even hasnarrowpanels to cover the pillow area!)  Thankfully there will be research done on all thiswhite workto give these the greaterimportance they deserve, and to save them from the upholsterer's scissors (sadly, I had a designer client who found them great to upholster wing chairs with (a la Mr. duPont and his linsey-woolsey upholstery escapades).  If Laurel would contact me privately, I can provide photos and whatever information I have on the group.  Laura Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1912045216-1309483555=:55205--

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Subject: Frames and Hoops From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 16:24:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

--Apple-Mail-2-535817080 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

I'm not totally certain, but when I started quilting in 1977 we were taught the new "quilt as you go" method, using square frames that we built with 1X2s and wing nuts. The hoops that the store sold for quilting were oversized embroidery hoops. In early 1980 when I went to the first Quilts, Inc. Mini Market in San Francisco, Marie's (later American Heritage) came out with the "quilting hoop". Wider wood width to hold the weight of the 3 layers hoop, softer wood with a curved edge instead of the straight sharp edge needed for embroidery and 1 single layer of fabric, and a longer shank so that you could open it wider to get the quilt in place. Laura

Laura Syler Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles Teacher, Lecturer, Judge Richardson, TX 972-345-2787 hi-spiritairmail.net

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Subject: white bedcovers From: laurelmhortongmail.com Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 17:20:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I responded directly to Laura Fisher, but I thought I'd point out that, to me, the most important part of my article in the most recent *Blanket Statements *is the final paragraph. If you're interested in my invitation to participate in a collaborative research effort but don't have access to the AQSG newsletter, you can access a podcast of my longer oral presentation at the IQSCM Symposium last April. Go to www.quiltstudy.org, click on "Podcasts" on the left sidebar, and look for my name. Briefly, there are so many of these early, white, embellished quilts and counterpanes with researchable provenance that it would take me many lifetimes to follow them up on my own. I'm on three different trails at the moment, and I'm trying not to get distracted by others.

I'm also leading a round table discussion on the same collaborative effort.

Laurel Horton

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Subject: Re:Frames and Hoops From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 17:34:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

If you look at the cover art for Needlecraft/Home Arts, Modern Priscilla, and some of the quilt pattern magazines from the late 1920s into the 1930s, there are many illustrations that show women quilting either without any sort of frame at all, or with a hoop. Admittedly, many of the illustrations contain gross inaccuracies, but the fact that hoops are shown suggests that they were an accepted form of support for quilting in the Colonial Revival.

And as a point of conversation, quilting in a hoop obviously negates the idea of cooperative quilting, but the decline of cooperative quilting did not automatically lead to retiring the rectangular floor frame or ceiling-hung frame. Many women - myself included - still use a rectangular frame (although I also use a hoop), and the Amish in my area use a rectangular frame exclusively, and still do cooperative quilting.

Xenia

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Subject: Second Annual Quilt Study Day Ohio From: Sharon Pinka <sharonpinkayahoo.com> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 20:30:27 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

 The Midwest Fabric Study Group is pleased to offer its Second Annual Quilt and Textiles Study Day, aday-long program on August 13, 2011, featuring presentations by Dr. Virginia Gunn, Merikay Waldvogel, and Xenia Cord. Travel back in time with us as we consider antique quilts, garments, and textiles from the 1860-1870 decade including the Civil War. The event will be held at the Lexington Congregational Church in Lexington, Ohio (near Mansfield).  The sessions will also include hands-on quilt study featuring examples fromthe period, the introduction of a local museum collection, lunch, show & tell, and other fun activities. Proceeds from a scheduled silent auction will benefit The Quilters Hall of Fame, and study day proceeds will augment the AQSG Endowment Fund.

Dr. Virginia Gunn  Northern Quilts and Textiles of the CivilWar Era  An overview of quilts made by women in the Union states during the Civil War era, including patriotic quilts, quilts for soldiers, appliqu=C3=A9d quilts, pieced quilts, and log cabin quilts. The presentation will explore the relationship between textiles used in quilts and in clothing of the 1860s to help in identifying the characteristic fabrics and designs used during this decade.  Merikay Waldvogel  Southern Quilt Survivors of the Civil War  Merikay will share little-known aspects of the roles Southern women played during the bloody four-year war using quilt-centered true-life stories. Quilt styles to be discussed are: white whole cloth, broderie perse, album, red-and-green appliqu=C3=A9, and pieced linsey quilts. Xenia Cord  Three Lincoln Quilts  In the aftermath of Lincoln=99s assassination and the departure of the Lincoln family from Washington, many individuals made commemorative quilts. Three such quilts are examined here, two privately owned and one in a museum collection, their common link being the makers=99 personal connections to the Lincoln family. For a full description of events, costs, hotel information, and a registration form, please email Sharon Pinka at sharonpinkayahoo.com. Registrationspots arelimited; please respond by July 12 (motel discount rates expire July 13.) Hope you can join us! Xenia Cord and Sharon Pinka  Sharon Pinka Rainbow Quilt Blocks, Quilt Study & Research 6323 Possum Run Rd. Bellville, OH 44813 USA 419.938.8040 sharonpinkayahoo.com --0-1773680161-1309577427=:13803--

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Subject: Re: quilting hoops? From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 07:19:21 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Lynne,My mother remembers helping her mother quilt at a frame that was suspended from the ceiling in their house. Quilts had to be laid in flat,because my grandmother made her own batts from the cotton my grandfather grew, and they were composed of combed cotton about the size of her hand. I don't think you could use a hoop unless the batt were all one piece.Jocelyn________________________________From: Lynne Z. Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>Sent: Thu, June 30, 2011 10:24:33 AMSubject: [qhl] quilting hoops?Does anyone know when quilters began using hoops ratherthan frames? The question has been posed to me, and I don't know theanswer--although it seems it would be in the period after cooperative quilting was common, when women more commonly quilted alone. And I know that, in New England at least, cooperative quilting died off graduallyin the second half of the 19th century. Also, the round embroidery hoop came into use with the fashion for tambour work in the late 18th century, so I imagine the idea picked up from there. Does anyone have a primary reference to quilting in a hoop? An early photograph? My /Good Housekeeping Needlecraft Encyclopedia/ from 1947 mentions only a quilting frame; none of my earlier needlework books mention either a hoop or a frame.Thank you!All best,Lynne---You are currently subscribed to qhl as: Martinjocelynrocketmail.com.To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442652Wlyris.quiltropolis.com --0-279549145-1309616361=:91451--

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Subject: Mennonite Quilts From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 10:39:25 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

Dear QHLers, Can anyone suggest titles of books dealing with 19th Century Mennonite quilts? You were a fund of knowledge when I asked about Pennsyvania quilts a few months ago. Thanks in advance. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Mennonite Quilts From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 11:24:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

For reading on Mennonite quilts, try these:

Tomlonson, Judy Schroeder. Mennonite Quilts and Pieces. Intercourse, PA: Good Books, 1985. ISBN 0-934672-27-X (paper)

Pellman, Rachel and Kenneth. A Treasury of Mennonite Quilts. Intercourse, PA: Good Books, 1992. ISBN 1-56148-059-2 (paper)

Siegrist, Joanne Hess. Mennonite Women of Lancaster County, a story in photographs from 1855-1935. Intercourse, PA: Good Books, 1996. ISBN 1-56148-205-6

And try:

mennonitequiltcenter.com/blog/

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Mennonite Quilts From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 11:29:43 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

Dear Xenia, I knew I could count on you to come up with help in my search. Thank you so much. Janet H ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Frame and Hoops From: sgmunseycomcast.net Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 21:40:43 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 5

In checking my old quilting books I have found the following comment about hoops. "If you have one of the individual frames that are like large embroidery hoops, begin quilting in the center and work outward. The same is true of a square embroidery frame." The quote is found on page 63in Elizabeth King, "Quilting", 1934, Leisure League of American, New York, The Maple Press. This is the oldest actual quote that I found in my collection of old needlework/quilting books. A number of other slightly later books including Florence Peto's "American Quilts and Coverlets" (1949, Chanticleer Press, New York) states "There have been excellent quilting jobs done on hoops." going on to say "One secret for successful quilting done in the lap or on hoops is basting and more basting . . . ."  In the "Dictionary of Needlework", S. F. A. Caulfeild and B. C. Saward ((from an 1989 reprint of the 1885 second edition)do not specifically referencequilting frames. However, their discussion of embroidery frames discuss Tambour Hoops "made of two circular wooden hoops . . . . and exactly fit within another." Although square embroidery, quilt and rug frames are often recommended (usually) as the preferred configuration, the reason seems to be that "One could improvise one easily enough out of ordinary strips of wood, the important part is to have the corners at right angles. . . .", a task readily performed by anyone with simple woodworking tools. (King, pg. 64) A very old (undated) "New Edition" of Therese de Dillmont's Encyclopedia of Needlework refers to the round embroidery hoopfastened to a clamp to be attached to a table as a Swiss hoop. De Dillmont does not address quilting.  Rereading the de Dillmont Encyclopedia and Caulfeild and Saward Dictionary quickly reminds us how much needlework from the 19th Century and before areunknown now or practiced by very few stitchers today.  Sandra on Cape Cod  ------=_Part_163769_2094457479.1309642843705--

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Subject: Hoops & Frames From: Karan Flanscha <sadierosecfu.net> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 22:07:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I looked up the text in Ruby McKim's "101 Patchwork Patterns" copyright 1931, and she describes 'apartment quilting' which was later renamed 'quilt as you go'. Ruby says you can do single blocks to larger sections up to a quarter of the quilt, held 'on the table or even in your lap'. She explains how to join the sections and even cover the back seams with bias tape! She goes on to say 'The authentic way to quilt is to have a large frame into which the entire coverlet is stretched...' and gives details on quilting with a frame. No mention of hoops. My Dover reproduction edition was the first quilt book I purchased, wish I had dated it but it was 1971 or 72. I remembered reading the part about 'apartment quilting', so I was curious if she mentioned hoops. This doesn't mean others weren't using hoops for quilting at the time, but Ruby didn't recommend it. Happy Independence Day! Karan from sunny Iowa

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Subject: Second Annual Quilt Study Day Ohio (in plain text) From: Sharon Pinka <sharonpinkayahoo.com> Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2011 06:13:36 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Hello everyone - sorry there was so much garbage in my earlier posting. I'm now sending this in plain text which should be much easier to read! Sharon ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Midwest Fabric Study Group is pleased to offer its Second Annual Quilt and Textiles Study Day, aday-long program on August 13, 2011, featuring presentations by Dr. Virginia Gunn, Merikay Waldvogel, and Xenia Cord. Travel back in time with us as we consider antique quilts, garments, and textiles from the 1860-1870 decade including the Civil War. The event will be held at the Lexington Congregational Church in Lexington, Ohio (near Mansfield).  The sessions will also include hands-on quilt study featuring examples fromthe period, the introduction of a local museum collection, lunch, show & tell, and other fun activities. Proceeds from a scheduled silent auction will benefit The Quilters Hall of Fame, and study day proceeds will augment the AQSG Endowment Fund.

Dr. Virginia Gunn  Northern Quilts and Textiles of the CivilWar Era  An overview of quilts made by women in the Union states during the Civil War era, including patriotic quilts, quilts for soldiers, appliqu=C3=A9d quilts, pieced quilts, and log cabin quilts. The presentation will explore the relationship between textiles used in quilts and in clothing of the 1860s to help in identifying the characteristic fabrics and designs used during this decade.  Merikay Waldvogel  Southern Quilt Survivors of the Civil War  Merikay will share little-known aspects of the roles Southern women played during the bloody four-year war using quilt-centered true-life stories. Quilt styles to be discussed are: white whole cloth, broderie perse, album, red-and-green appliqu=C3=A9, and pieced linsey quilts. Xenia Cord  Three Lincoln Quilts  In the aftermath of Lincoln=99s assassination and the departure of the Lincoln family from Washington, many individuals made commemorative quilts. Three such quilts are examined here, two privately owned and one in a museum collection, their common link being the makers=99 personal connections to the Lincoln family. For a full description of events, costs, hotel information, and a registration form, please email Sharon Pinka at sharonpinkayahoo.com. Registrationspots arelimited; please respond by July 12 (motel discount rates expire July 13.) Hope you can join us! Xenia Cord and Sharon Pinka  Sharon Pinka Rainbow Quilt Blocks, Quilt Study & Research 6323 Possum Run Rd. Bellville, OH 44813 USA 419.938.8040 sharonpinkayahoo.com

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Subject: Re: Mennonite Quilts From: Trishherraol.com Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2011 10:23:19 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Clarke Hess in his book: "Mennonite Arts," published by Schiffer has an excellent chapter on "Pieced Textiles: Quilts, Rugs, and Animals."

In my book "Quilting Traditions: Pieces from the Past" I also deal with Mennonite quilts in one chapter specifically with one small group and throughout the book. That is also published by Schiffer.

Trish Herr

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Subject: Re: quilting hoops? From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 07:19:21 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Lynne,My mother remembers helping her mother quilt at a frame that was suspended from the ceiling in their house. Quilts had to be laid in flat,because my grandmother made her own batts from the cotton my grandfather grew, and they were composed of combed cotton about the size of her hand. I don't think you could use a hoop unless the batt were all one piece.Jocelyn________________________________

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Subject: Mennonite Quilts From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 10:39:25 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

Dear QHLers, Can anyone suggest titles of books dealing with 19th Century Mennonite quilts? You were a fund of knowledge when I asked about Pennsyvania quilts a few months ago. Thanks in advance. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: [SPAM] Mennonite Quilts From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 11:24:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

For reading on Mennonite quilts, try these:

Tomlonson, Judy Schroeder. Mennonite Quilts and Pieces. Intercourse, PA: Good Books, 1985. ISBN 0-934672-27-X (paper)

Pellman, Rachel and Kenneth. A Treasury of Mennonite Quilts. Intercourse, PA: Good Books, 1992. ISBN 1-56148-059-2 (paper)

Siegrist, Joanne Hess. Mennonite Women of Lancaster County, a story in photographs from 1855-1935. Intercourse, PA: Good Books, 1996. ISBN 1-56148-205-6

And try:

mennonitequiltcenter.com/blog/

Xenia --Apple-Mail-1-600616472--

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Mennonite Quilts From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 11:29:43 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

 

Dear Xenia, I knew I could count on you to come up with help in my search. Thank you so much. Janet H ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Frame and Hoops From: sgmunseycomcast.net Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 21:40:43 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 5

-

In checking my old quilting books I have found the following comment about hoops. "If you have one of the individual frames that are like large embroidery hoops, begin quilting in the center and work outward. The same is true of a square embroidery frame." The quote is found on page 63in Elizabeth King, "Quilting", 1934, Leisure League of American, New York, The Maple Press. This is the oldest actual quote that I found in my collection of old needlework/quilting books. A number of other slightly later books including Florence Peto's "American Quilts and Coverlets" (1949, Chanticleer Press, New York) states "There have been excellent quilting jobs done on hoops." going on to say "One secret for successful quilting done in the lap or on hoops is basting and more basting . . . ."  In the "Dictionary of Needlework", S. F. A. Caulfeild and B. C. Saward ((from an 1989 reprint of the 1885 second edition)do not specifically referencequilting frames. However, their discussion of embroidery frames discuss Tambour Hoops "made of two circular wooden hoops . . . . and exactly fit within another." Although square embroidery, quilt and rug frames are often recommended (usually) as the preferred configuration, the reason seems to be that "One could improvise one easily enough out of ordinary strips of wood, the important part is to have the corners at right angles. . . .", a task readily performed by anyone with simple woodworking tools. (King, pg. 64) A very old (undated) "New Edition" of Therese de Dillmont's Encyclopedia of Needlework refers to the round embroidery hoopfastened to a clamp to be attached to a table as a Swiss hoop. De Dillmont does not address quilting.  Rereading the de Dillmont Encyclopedia and Caulfeild and Saward Dictionary quickly reminds us how much needlework from the 19th Century and before areunknown now or practiced by very few stitchers today.  Sandra on Cape Cod  ------=_Part_163769_2094457479.1309642843705--

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Subject: Hoops & Frames From: Karan Flanscha <sadierosecfu.net> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 22:07:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

 

I looked up the text in Ruby McKim's "101 Patchwork Patterns" copyright 1931, and she describes 'apartment quilting' which was later renamed 'quilt as you go'. Ruby says you can do single blocks to larger sections up to a quarter of the quilt, held 'on the table or even in your lap'. She explains how to join the sections and even cover the back seams with bias tape! She goes on to say 'The authentic way to quilt is to have a large frame into which the entire coverlet is stretched...' and gives details on quilting with a frame. No mention of hoops. My Dover reproduction edition was the first quilt book I purchased, wish I had dated it but it was 1971 or 72. I remembered reading the part about 'apartment quilting', so I was curious if she mentioned hoops. This doesn't mean others weren't using hoops for quilting at the time, but Ruby didn't recommend it. Happy Independence Day! Karan from sunny Iowa

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Subject: Re: Mennonite Quilts From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2011 11:05:28 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Trish, Thank you for your reply. I already have your book in my collection. I will look into the Hess book as well. Thanks again, Janet H ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: June 29, 2011 From: CRantquiltaol.com Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2011 14:09:28 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

HI,,, Regarding Laura's note about black cotton sateen,,, I have one and have had the Roosevelt's Rose quilt that is on a black cotton sateen ground and always felt that quilt was from the 20's- 30's. Can't answer the question about when it came about,, but seems like the right time period. Would love to know for sure though. I never washed one of those quilts, so not sure if the color would bleed,,, as it sure might have. Maybe that's why we don't see it in more quilts. Anyone know about that black fabric stability ,, as I have some red sateen fabric yardage that the color is still coming out every time I wash it. Wanted to use it for some binding,, but afraid to put it on something and have it leach out. Happy 4th to all,,, Cindy Rennels

_http://www.cindysantiquequilts.com_ (http://www.cindysantiquequilts.com/)

Cindy Rennels Cindy's Antique Quilts PO BOX 1212 Clinton, Ok. 73601 Phone: 580.323.1174

--part1_65989.47e4581f.3b420a58_boundary--

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Subject: Re:Frames and Hoops From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Sun, 03 Jul 2011 13:37:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the conversation about quilting hoops! Your information is very helpful! And yes, indeed, Xenia--the decline of cooperative quilting certainly did not mean the demise of the large quilting frame. I was just saying that the quilting hoop would not have become common until the time when women were more inclined to quilt on their own than in groups. And certainly, some women continued to quilt alone at a frame...or without any frame or hoop...they did whatever suited them.

Thanks again, everyone! I knew you'd have great information on the topic!

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Folk Art Museum date change From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Mon, 04 Jul 2011 08:43:53 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Happy July 4th to All -

According to their website, the quilt exhibit at the Folk Art Museum in NYC is ending this Friday, July 8, and not the originally scheduled October date. A friend and I had planned to go in August, and are grateful we learned about this change, and have been able to change our plans to go this week.

“Quilts: Masterworks from the American Folk Art Museum” Part II American Folk Art Museum http://folkartmuseum.org 45 West 53rd Street New York, New York 10019 Tel: (212) 265-1045 Fax: (212) 265-2350

Check the exhibits, and then current exhibits page on their website.

Barb in sunny southeastern PA

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Subject: does anyone have this book? From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2011 12:40:05 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Hello all,Does anyone have this book: Romance of the Village Quilt (Walworth, WI: Mary McElwain Quilt Shop, 1936). I have a colleague here inKentucky who needs an image of the cover for a talk she is giving. If you do have this book, please email me off list.Thanks!Judy SchwenderPaducah, KYsister3603yahoo.com --0-1902430799-1309808405=:32948--

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Subject: Folk art museum From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 06:58:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Barb posted:

Barb posted: Subject: Folk Art Museum date change From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> According to their website, the quilt exhibit at the Folk Art Museum in NYC is ending this Friday, July 8, and not the originally scheduled October date. A friend and I had planned to go in August, and are grateful we learned about this change, and have been able to change our plans to go this week.

Her post reminded me that I purchased this book: http://www.amazon.com/Quilts-Masterworks-American-Folk-Museum/dp/0847833739/ref=3Dsr_1_1?ie=3DUTF8&qid=3D1309859874&sr=3D8-1

I have found it to be just wonderful and wanted to share that with you all. It's a much treasured member of my quilt book collection now. It's the only one I keep out, nowadays, and do not put away. : ) That is saying something for me, as if you could see the number of books on quilting, I

own, you would be wondering... tee he.

At any rate, I want to highly recommend it.

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: vintage dresses From: "Debbie Welch" <debquiltingposs.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 07:13:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

This may not be the best place to ask this but here goes anyway! I'm cleaning out Mom's house and came across two girls dresses from the 1940s I'm guessing. Dressy, dropped waist, one in excellent shape, one ripped. They're soiled but not unsalvageable. Is there a site that would tell me how to clean these or should I leave them alone? I'd like to sell them since I don't have enough room for my quilt collection, never mind start collecting dresses! Any advice?

Debbie Welch Bayville, NJ

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Subject: RE: Folk Art Museum date change From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 09:29:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

And very importantly, the new end date is due to the moving of the museum back to 2 Lincoln Square and sale of the building to MOMA: http://folkartmuseum.org/?p=folk&id=8703

Candace Perry -----

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Subject: Re: vintage dresses From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 09:34:41 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

The Shelburne Museum (Shelburne, VT) 1-802-985-3346 might be able to help or lead you to places that could. Made me feel a bit old as I wore those dresses of the '40s and now they are called vintage. (course I'd rather be called vintage than old lady). Mitzi from Vermont Former New Jersey girl (North Arlington) and born in Newark.

I

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Subject: Re:Frames and Hoops From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 11:22:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Just read through an 1899 leaflet I have on embroidery and find reference to a "corticelli hoop" for sale, but no mention of quilting in this leaflet, although it is packed with patterns for flowers and stitches that surely ended up on more than one crazy quilt. Stunning floral designs and two pages of step-by-step "how to" affix cloth to a frame before embroidery for stellar results .... even to a discussion of chair height, etc. Fascinating.

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: Mennonite Quilts From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 11:19:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I often use "iris" at the University of Nebraska to look for book titles on various historical topics, quilts among them.. It's available online at http://libraries.unl.edu/

A Search with the phrase "Mennonite Quilt" brought up these titles. Inter-library loan would surely locate them "at large" for anyone who doesn't want to buy them but is doing research.

Just a thought. Stephanie Whitson Mennonite Quilts : CYT, Quilt Center, Special Collections ; A treasury of Mennonite quilts / Rachel and Kenneth Pellman; c1992 1 2 Mennonite Quilts Kansas : CYT, Quilt Center ; Mennonite quilts and pieces / Judy Schroeder Tomlonson; c1985 1 3 Mennonite Quilts Shenandoah River Valley Va And W Va : CYT, Quilt Center ; Quilts from two valleys : Amish quilts from the Big Valley and Mennonite quilts from the Shenandoah Valley / Phyllis Pellman Good;

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Subject: New from the DAR Museum, posted by Deb Cooney From: resmarcomcast.net Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 17:29:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Announcing a new quilt book, Historic Quilts of the DAR Museum! This beautiful book features over 60 of the DAR Museum collection of 18th and 19th century quilts, with descriptions and history of each quilt in addition to full-page photos and written by the quilt collections curator, Alden O=92Brien, and published by Martha Pullen Co. The book can be ordered from the DAR Museum gift shop and from the publisher, www.marthapullen.com. It is not now and never will be available on amazon.com or at a discount and while we hope to distribute it more widely, for the foreseeable future it will only be available from the DAR and the Pullen Co. Buying it from the DAR supports the DAR=92s collection more than buying it from the Pullen Co. Plenty of copies in stock, shipping available: $29.95 per copy, plus $6.95 shipping for up to two copies. Email museumshopdar.org to place an order, or call 202-879-3208 between 9:30-4pm M-F, 9-5 Saturdays. (closed Sundays and federal holidays) If you are in the DC area, a selection of 7 quilts from the book are on display in the Museum gallery, along with 3 other quilts (1860s pieced, c1850 princess feather, and a c 1860 strippy); three more quilts are on display in period rooms. Alden O'Brien, Curator of Costume and Textiles at the DAR Museum and author of the book, will be at the Sully Quilt Show in Chantilly, Virginia, on September 11 for a lecture and book-signing Check fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/sully or SullyQuiltShow on Facebook

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Subject: RE: Folk Art Museum date change From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 19:42:03 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

In a message dated 7/5/2011 8:29:47 AM Central Daylight Time, candaceschwenkfelder.com writes:

http://folkartmuseum.org/?p=folk&id=8703

What sad news. It has been well known that the museum was in financial trouble and that the curator had resigned. I hope that the museum can survive in its smaller space and that eventually we will be able to see all of the ambitious quilt exhibits that were planned previously. Janet H in Fort Worth

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Subject: Re: Mennonite Quilts From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 19:48:27 EDT X-Message-Number: 10

Many thanks, Stephanie, my list is growing thanks to knowledgeable members like you. Best regards, Janet H in sweltering Fort Worth

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Subject: British Textiles Book From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Wed, 6 Jul 2011 12:08:19 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

Has anyone seen the new V&A museum book- British Textiles, 1700 to the Present? http://www.amazon.com/British-Textiles-Present-Natalie-Rothstein/dp/1851776184/ref=pd_rhf_p_t_3

The description says it is based on the V&A British Textiles Series with a new introduction--so I'm wondering if there is much new from the earlier dated series?

I have V&A Printed Textiles 1750-1850,BT 1850-1900 and BT 1900-1937 so I guess fabrics from 1940 to present would be new but would the rest be duplicative or do they show different selections? Thanks.

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: 19th Century Quilts From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net> Date: Wed, 6 Jul 2011 09:55:20 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

A friend and I traveled recently to North Carolina and one of our stops was the Bentonville Battlefield. A few days ago I received a copy of the Bentonville Battlefield newsletter and one of the articles discusses an upcoming visit by Lynn Gorges. Her presentation will be on 19th century quilts. There are several photos of the quilts on display at this North Carolina Civil War battlefield (where General Sherman and General Joe Johnston met as adversaries).

A link is not yet available for the document, but if you are interested, contact me and I will forward a copy of the newsletter.

By the way, North Carolina is a lovely state. Lots to see, lots to do, lots of Cracker Barrels. I would like to go back one day soon.

Regards, Carol Berry Merced, CA

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Subject: Bentonville Battlefield Newsletter Link From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net> Date: Wed, 6 Jul 2011 12:07:03 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

I now have a link for the Bentonville Battlefield newsletter:

http://www.nchistoricsites.org/bentonvi/From%20the%20Trenches%20July%202011. pdf

or

http://tinyurl.com/5r9hhjj

The article about Lynn Gorges is on page 5.

Carol Berry Merced, CA

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Subject: Sally Palmer Field - A New England Quilt Icon From: suereichcharter.net Date: Thu, 7 Jul 2011 13:50:12 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

On July 1, Sally Palmer Field, a quilting icon in New England, passed away. Below are some links about her contribution to quilt history and her life. Sally was one of the experts who trained our Connecticut Quilt Search Project team back in the early 90s. She constantly shared her vast knowledge of quilt history and her collection of historic textiles. She was responsible for the construction of the 1976 Bicentennial quilt in her hometown of Chelmsford, MA. A few years ago, I visited Sally in her home. We spent hours viewing her collection. She was a master at recreating new 'vintage' quilts from antique and reproduction fabrics. Sally will always be fondly remembered for her incredible quilts and her willingness to share her with those of us coming up in the world of quilt history.

http://www.massfolkarts.org/object_detail.asp?ObjectID20059 http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/tag/sally-palmer-field/

http://www.blakefuneralhome.com/fh/obituaries/obituary.cfm?o_id=1199595&fh_id=11689

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: =?ISO-8859-1?B?s1RocmVhZA==?Tails and Vapor =?ISO-8859-1?B?VHJhaWxzsg==?Naval Aviation Quilt collection From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 07 Jul 2011 21:54:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Has anyone seen this collection? Unfortunately, there are no photos with this article. The article says this Indiana venue (which closes on July 10th!) is the only venue outside of Pensacola and Washington DC where the whole collection can be seen at once. The nationwide challenge was announced in 2010, with completed 40-by-40-inch quilts due Oct. 1, 2010. Hoffman Fabrics, a sponsor for the challenge, contributed by creating patriotic and military fabric collections such as Red, White and Blue, Patriots and America the Beautiful.

http://www.news-sentinel.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=3D/20110630/ENT/1063003 09

Or

http://tinyurl.com/5w5sufu

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Historical costume advice From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 08:05:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

A close friend of mine has moved and in the move found a box of what she calls "old dresses." She doesn't know anything about them (who/when/why), but is wondering if there is any monetary value involved and where would be a good place to possibly sell them. I told her I would ask my "historical textile" people. She's not greedy, but she doesn't want to give something to goodwill that could help her pay a bill.

Other than ebay, does anyone know of a source who might help her establish value and find a new home? There are several dresses, a wrapper, a hat, gloves, etc. in with them. This one caught my fancy, so I'm attaching it as a representative.

Thanks for any insights. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: RE: Historical costume advice From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 09:11:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Staephanie -- I think you have to post the pictures to the eboard thingy as they don't come thru in your message. If you'd like, I can take a look, as I know enough about costume to be dangerous -- email them to me at candaceschwenkfelder.com

Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: Thread Tails and Vapor Trails Naval Aviation Quilt collection From: Dale Drake <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Fri, 08 Jul 2011 09:42:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Karen and all:

The news article has a link to the exhibit site:

http://www.navyquilts.com/index

But I'm sorry I missed the exhibit - my father was a Navy pilot in WWII and through the early 1960s. Flew seaplanes in search and rescue missions in WWII, Constellations (Connies) flying barrier patrol in pre-satellite days (big radar planes flying up and down the Atlantic and Pacific oceans watching for Russians) and ended his career working in the aerospace industry. I didn't know it was here in my own state.

Dale Drake in muggy central Indiana

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Subject: Re: Thread Tails and Vapor Trails Naval Aviation Quilt collection From: Dale Drake <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Fri, 08 Jul 2011 09:43:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Aha! Karen, it looks as though one of the trunks is traveling to

Whidbey Island on July 22nd ... your chance to see a part of the exhibit! (and one of our duty stations - Dad was flying between Adak Alaska and Midway Island).

Dale

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Subject: Re: Thread Tails and Vapor Trails Naval Aviation Quilt collection From: Kathy <deschuitcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 15:03:04 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 6

Thanks for that link. It will be at Maine Quilts the end of this month for those of us in the New England area.

Kathy in NH Families are like quilts, lives pieced together,stitched with smiles and tears, colored with memories, bound with LOVE. Check out Amoskeag Quilters Guild website www.amoskeagqg.org

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Subject: Civil War "sister" quilts in Boston Globe article From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com> Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 15:31:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

--20cf305643ade1a35204a793e0d8 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Dear all,

What fun it's been to curate a potholder quilt exhibition at the New England Quilt Museum, but the following article explains the best fun of all! Shortly after the exhibition opened, Tora Sterregaard contacted me about a quilt in the collection of the Mystic Museum which turned out to be made by the same Ladies Soldier's Aid Society in Portland, ME who made a quilt in the collection of the Brick Store Museum in Kennebunk, ME. My research continues, but already I've determined that neighbors, sisters, mothers, and daughters signed the quilts. Four women made blocks for both quilts!

Here's the story (all pretty correct except the date--the quilts were made in 1864).

*http://tinyurl.com/6dl6ovc*

Best,

Pam

--

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 603-661-2245 Quilt Historian, Teacher AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles PO Box 123 Durham, NH 03824

--20cf305643ade1a35204a793e0d8--

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Subject: Exhibit turns up a mate for rare Civil War quilt From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 08 Jul 2011 13:36:36 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

Our very own Pam Weeks hits the jackpot! Way to go, Pam!

http://tinyurl.com/6dl6ovc

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: English translation of The Guicciardini Quilt now available From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 08 Jul 2011 17:30:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

I heard from Kathryn Berenson today about an important new book for those of us interested in the earliest quilting. I have cut and pasted passages from Kathryn's message below:

There is a new English-language title/, The Guicciardini Quilt: Conservation of the deeds of Tristan/, released December 2010 by Edifir, a publishing house in Florence, Italy. Editors are Rosanna Caterina Proto Pisani, Marco Ciatti, Susanna Conti, and Maria Grazia Vaccari. Translator: Diane Kunzelman.

In brief, the Guicciardini Quilt, in the collection of the National Museum of the Bargello, Florence, and its sister piece in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, are two white linen quilted works that illustrate episodes from the Tristan legend.They are the sole surviving quilted works in public institutions that date circa 1360-1400 and are attributed to an atelier in southern Italy.As such, they are key pieces in understanding medieval interpretations of the quilted textile arts.

/The Guicciardini Quilt/ monograph includes a full study of the Bargello piece, information that is equally pertinent to the one in London.

/The Guicciardini "Quilt" /is a high quality 138 page paperback with 20 color and 40 black and white images, 150 pound interior stock and 300 pound cover stock; size 11 x 8.25 inches (ISBN 978-7970-493-9).

...The monograph is available through several Italian internet book providers including www.unilibro.it <http://www.unilibro.it/>, www.wuz.it <http://www.wuz.it/> , www.libroco.it <http://www.libroco.it/>, and www.albatroscart.com. However, I pre-ordered a number of the books to support the project.Those who would like to obtain a copy may contact me at kwberensonaol.com <mailto:kwberensonaol.com>. The price is 30EUR (or 25 £ or US$45) plus shipping.

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Subject: And another book you may not yet know about... From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 08 Jul 2011 17:38:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

A few months ago, I also heard from Clare Rose, a quilt and costume scholar in England, about her latest publication--an essay in the book, /Inlaid Patchwork in Europe from 1500 to the Present/, The book is published in German, with English translation. I ordered my copy from amazon.com, and I can tell you that it's a beautiful book! (I hope to actually have time to read it someday... So many books, so little time!)

The full information is: /Tuchintarsien in Europa von 1500 bis heute / Inlaid Patchwork in Europe from 1500 to the Present/. Berlin: Museum Europaischer Kulturen Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, 2009. (At least I hope that's right--I don't read German.)

All best, Lynne

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Subject: American Folk Art Museum closed From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 19:40:26 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 11

HI all - by some strange twist of fate, it turns out thatIbecame the next to last member of the public to cross the threshold of the American Folk Art Museum building on 53rd Street tonight, as this was its final day to be open. Thoughannouncementshadsaid the last day was July 9,in fact itclosed after this evening'sFriday evening free music program. So that's all folks. Friday evenings it is open to 8, and despite news of the imminent closing, there were a lotmore people going through than usual, but hardly a drop in the bucket compared to the crowds that attend other evening museum programs in NYC. I wonder what could help increase public affection for this material, that would translate into a viable folk art museum in NYC.In all the years the new building was open to much publicity and acclaim, membership hovered around 5,000 people. Are folk art museums elsewhere doing better? Would be interesting if they could all pool their ideas or join together across the countryto offer joint membership nationwide or something like that. Send good ideas to them, please!  When thunder and rain came over NYC earlier today, I thought I would changeplans and go Saturday instead, but luckily I pushed myselfand went tonight, as I got to see again part 2 of the quilt show,as well the lovely show about the figure in folk art, and the works of Eugene Bruckenheimer or however it is spelled, a versatile self taught artist.  Marie DiManno head of gift shop was there, looking at the exhibits with tears in her eyes over this turn of events. I asked if the Museum was going torehang part 2 of the quilt exhibit at the Lincoln Square facility, in place of the Stars display which has been up for some time now, but she thoughtthat was not going to happen because 'It takes money to do that' which evidently they don't have. It would be nice if they could get a $$$ donor to make that happen. It is all too sad.  I looked around andsaw names above the doors of families whose contributions enabled the various exhibition spaces and rooms, and wonder how they feel about all this, and also theplaques inscribed with donors' names, all gone to dust soon.Rumor has it that MOMA will take the building down anderect a better facilityfor its own needs,something they had wanted to do originally, but AFAM chose not to sell them the plot and instead built that pricey building that turned out to be too costly for them to operate and to repay the construction loan.  Among the quilts were some real favorites of mine, which I was allowed to photo.Part 2had many gloious quilts that quite franklyI preferred to part 1. I willtry to posta little newsblurb on my Facebook page over the weekend with pictures of some of the quilts (today we were allowed tophoto anything!) and of the museum interior, for those of you who will never get to see the controversial building. My businesspage isLaura Fisher Quilts  Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1612616697-1310179226=:27280--

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Subject: The American Folk Art Museum closing From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2011 07:27:09 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Laura and all, What a sad commentary this closing reflects on our current times! If something like this can happen to an institution as sacrosanct as the American Folk Art Museum, just how can less prestigious organizations continue to succeed! I understand the move back to the Lincoln Center building and fiscal responsibility. Hopefully, this measure will secure a stronger future for the museum. I am mostly saddened by the questionable status of the museum's vast collections and archives. It was not too long ago we were heralding the transfer of the Cuesta Benberry collection to the museum. If I am correct Cuesta's collection was never cataloged for access to public research. What will happen to it now! This closing should give all of us pause in considering our own stash and what to do with it "when the time comes."

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: American Folk Art Museum closed From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2011 08:31:48 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

That's awful - what's going to happen to the collections? Especially the quilts?

Lisa Evans \

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Subject: Museum Closing From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2011 09:03:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

It is so sad to know that the American Folk Art Museum is closing. I have many fond memories of sitting and quilting and talking to patrons during their Quilt Day in October, as well as many "field trips" with my Long Island Guild to view their quilt displays. The Lincoln Square area is so much smaller but any displays they hang I'm sure we will be there. Judy Knorr

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Subject: RE: The American Folk Art Museum closing From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2011

I need to comment on this. Not every museum gets in over their heads. Many museums are slow and steady turtles that continue to exist even in dire financial times, due to conservative leadership, careful investments, and good financial oversight. I work for one if these. No, we often aren't the glam places with buildings that win awards, and supporters who are billionaires. We don't often have to play politics and exhibit objects just 'cause we want Mrs. McMansion's cash and prizes someday. But we will continue to care for, and treasure the collections with which we are entrusted, quietly, for a few more centuries down the road. A pal of mine always says "You're just jealous"...that may be true...but when you're little and on the bottom you don't have far to fall. Candace Perry

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Subject: book on Guicciardini From: <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2011 11:00:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I have a copy of this new book and highly recommend it if you are at all interested in the quilt fragment. The book is technical, but well illustrated and it=99s not difficult to grasp what they=99ve done to conserve and preserve the quilt. You will be amazed at the before and after results.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Re: English translation of The Guicciardini Quilt now available From: <bearspawcox.net> Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2011 17:32:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Dear Lynne,

I would like a copy of this book if you still have any left. Please send me the total cost and I will get a check in the mail to you ASAP. My contact information for the summer is

Donna Skvarla 32015 Elk Trail Lane, C 5 Creede, CO 81130

Thanks!

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Subject: museums ... support them From: "Julie Silber" <quiltcomplexhughes.net> Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2011 21:33:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Thank you, Candace -- for your work and for speaking up.

Julie Silber

You wrote:

I need to comment on this. Not every museum gets in over their heads.

Many museums are slow and steady turtles that continue to exist even in dire financial times, due to conservative leadership, careful investments, and good financial oversight. I work for one if these.

No, we often aren't the glam places with buildings that win awards, and supporters who are billionaires. We don't often have to play politics and exhibit objects just 'cause we want Mrs. McMansion's cash and prizes someday.

But we will continue to care for, and treasure the collections with which we are entrusted, quietly, for a few more centuries down the road.

A pal of mine always says "You're just jealous"...that may be true ... but when you're little and on the bottom you don't have far to fall.

Candace Perry

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Subject: Another great generational quilting story! From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2011 22:18:40 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

http://www.aarp.org/entertainment/arts-leisure/info-05-2011/life-in-the-fast -slow-lane-video-mygen.html

Or

http://tinyurl.com/66vt3d9

An 11 year old boy who drag races and quilts, taught by his mother and grandmother.

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: The Cuesta Benberry Collection From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2011 22:46:53 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

The Cuesta Benberry Collection was transferred from AMFA to Michigan State University Museum about two years ago about two years ago. I had the privilege of spending 5 days at the MSU last fall helping unpack a portion of this collection before the AQSG Seminar in Minneapolis. It is a gold mine! If you want to do research, contact them and set a date. As most of you know, Cuesta was inducted into The Quilters Hall of Fame in 1983.

Here is a post I did for the TQHF blog about the Benberry collection going to MSUM.

http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/search/label/Cuesta%20Benberry

Here is YouTube footage about the unpacking of Cuesta's collection.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXA9r2MzbXQ

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuesta_Benberry

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Re: book on Guicciardini From: lynnelynnezwoolsey.com Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2011 16:06:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

A bit more information from Kathryn Berenson:

The /Guicciardini Quilt/monograph can be sent by Media Mail, which costs $2.77 and takes an average of 5 days or Priority Mail at a cost of $4.95. If you wish to order the monograph please send your address by email to kwberensonaol,com and indicate preferred delivery method, and send a check made out to K. Berenson in the amount of $47.77 or $49.95, depending on your delivery choice, to her at 3453 Newark St NW, Washington DC 20016.

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Subject: Re: English translation of The Guicciardini Quilt now available From: lynnelynnezwoolsey.com Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2011

I'm sorry for any confusion about the availability of the Guicciardini Quilt. I do not have any copies. You will have to order it from Kathryn Berenson.

Here's the information:

The /Guicciardini Quilt/monograph can be sent by Media Mail, which costs $2.77 and takes an average of 5 days or Priority Mail at a cost of $4.95. If you wish to order the monograph please send your address by email to *kwberensonaol,com *and indicate preferred delivery method, and *send a check made out to K. Berenson* in the amount of $47.77 or $49.95, depending on your delivery choice, to her at *3453 Newark St NW, Washington DC 20016. *

All best, Lynne

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Subject: The Cuesta Benberry collection From: DrMAZ4WCQNaol.com Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 01:21:07 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Cuesta Benberry's collection was transferred to Michigan State University Museum.

Dr. Carolyn L. Mazloomi Independent Curator, Author, Artist 5481 Oldgate Drive West Chester, OH 45069 PH: (513) 755.3414 Cell: (513) 766.1165 _www.carolynlmazloomi.com_ (http://www.carolynlmazloomi.com/) _www.papermoonpublishing.com_ (http://www.papermoonpublishing.com/) _www.wcqn.org_ (http://www.wcqn.org/) _www.saqa.com_ (http://www.saqa.com/)

a

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Subject: quilt book From: lynnelynnezwoolsey.com Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 11:31:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

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Well, I can't explain why two blank messages from me just appeared on the QHL. What I was trying to say is that there seems to have been some confusion about the availability of the Guicciardini quilt. If you'd like a copy, please let Kathryn Berenson know. I do not have any copies. Here is the information:

The /Guicciardini Quilt/monograph can be sent by Media Mail, which costs $2.77 and takes an average of 5 days or Priority Mail at a cost of $4.95. If you wish to order the monograph please send your address by email to kwberensonaol,com and indicate preferred delivery method, and send a check made out to K. Berenson in the amount of $47.77 or $49.95, depending on your delivery choice, to her at 3453 Newark St NW, Washington DC 20016.

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: quilt book From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 11:52:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Lynne, your emial messages are coming through blankto my email. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, July 10, 2011 10:31 AM Subject: [qhl] quilt book

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Subject: RE: museums ... support them From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 13:33:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Awww, thanks Julie. I admit I do have an ax to grind at this moment -- even though we're small, because of our collection we have some interaction with the "big boys" and it always leaves a bad taste for months afterwards, and I am afraid I am still feeling a bit of it now! Best, Candace

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Subject: AFAM's Cuesta collection now at MSU Museum From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 14:24:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

Dear Sue and all QHL list members,

Re. the American Folk Art Museum and their Cuesta Benberry Collection.

In 2009, per Cuesta's family's request, the American Folk Art Museum transferred ownership of the American Folk Art Museum Cuesta Benberry Collection from a warehouse in NYC to the Michigan State University Museum. See http://museum.msu.edu/glqc/collections_special_benberry.html for a description and to see some examples of the quilts from the collection. It has already taken a team of MSU Museum staff, students, and volunteers two years but we have done a basic sort of all of her research papers, rehoused the papers into protective archival boxes, set up a study room for the collection, and mounted an exhibition of a selection of her quilts and quilt-related ephemera. We are now in the process of digitizing some materials from her collection under an Institute for Museum and Library Services grant and those materials will soon be accessible on the Quilt Index site. The MSU Museum and MSU's MATRIX have also just submitted a grant application to NEH to digitize even more of her ephemera and, should we get the grant (or can find funding elsewhere), it will create a tremendous accessible resource for future research.

As to funding museums - I can't help but make a plea to all of you to consider annual giving to museums, planned gifts, setting up endowments and other ways of philanthropically supporting museums - especially those with major quilt collections and even more importantly those with demonstrated commitment to ongoing care and use of quilt collections and to making those collections accessible to the public for research and education. The small endowments that the MSU Museum has for quilt-related activities makes all of the difference to us and with additional funds we could do even more. I am sure that any museum with quilts and a commitment to quilt-related activities will tell you the same.

I also would urge everyone to consider giving to the Quilt Index when they are thinking about making charitable gifts. Go to http://www.quiltindex.org/ and select "Donate" on the blue navigation bar at top or contact me off list about possible ways to support. The more support we have to grow the Index by adding collections and tools, the better tool it will be for quilt research.

Thanks for considering my plea.

Marsha

Marsha MacDowell Curator, Michigan State University Museum Co-Director, The Quilt Index (www.quiltindex.org)

At 12:01 AM -0400 7/10/11, you wrote:

QHL Digest for Saturday, July 09, 2011.

Subject: The American Folk Art Museum closing From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2011 07:27:09 -0400 (EDT)

Laura and all, What a sad commentary this closing reflects on our current times! If something like this can happen to an institution as sacrosanct as the American Folk Art Museum, just how can less prestigious organizations continue to succeed! I understand the move back to the Lincoln Center building and fiscal responsibility. Hopefully, this measure will secure a stronger future for the museum. I am mostly saddened by the questionable status of the museum's vast collections and archives. It was not too long ago we were heralding the transfer of the Cuesta Benberry collection to the museum. If I am correct Cuesta's collection was never cataloged for access to public research. What will happen to it now! This closing should give all of us pause in considering our own stash and what to do with it "when the time comes."

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: American Folk Art Museum isssues From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 11:50:09 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 11

Hi all - as Candace pointed out, not every museum gets itself into financial difficulty as did the American Folk Art Museum in NYC.  Its majorproblems, as I understand the various articles and information from staff, stemmed from building a costly building incurring a huge construction loan that they were never able torepay through anticipated incomelikevisitor fees. The latest note came due andunable to meet it,rather than go into foreclosure, they sold the building to MOMA,for a bitunder their $32 million debt.They also never planned for or anticipatedthe huge expense of running the building--AC,guards, etc. Also, former museum chairman Ralph Esmerianwas convicted of fraud involving his ownjewelry business; he had promised financial support and folk artto the museumthat he was ultimately unable to deliver, and his problemspiledmore negativesonthe museum's plight.And I heard the trusteeswere not as generous (or savvy) as needed.  The collections have always been in storage and will remain so until any exhibition isorganized that incorporates some of thepieces. The library, including I guess Cuesta's materials, has been more the administrative part of the museum and will remain intact I am sure, with access by appointment as it has been.  As to cataloguing Cuesta's collection; I wonder if qhl'ers with library experience could organize a volunteereffort to doit, or advisethe museum on howto obtain one of the grants I've occasionallyread aboutthatother institutions gotthat would help pay for AFAM's archival efforts. Isn't there something new about putting all museum collections on line? Wish I had a sharper memory about all this, surely someone out there in qhl'land knows the details, and could maybe offer this information to the museum administration. There is an interim chairperson, and Stacy Hollanderis still curator

Laura  FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1510686969-1310323809=:23560--

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Subject: Cuesta Benberry Collection is Safe From: MegMaxCaol.com Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 13:58:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Dear QHL List: There seems to be some concern about the wonderful collection of the late Cuesta Benberry, and I want to reassure you on that point. Thought the collection was going to the Folk Art Museum at one time, it instead went to the Michigan State University Museum. Here is a link to a press release about a symposium at MSU a year ago that was built around Cuesta's legacy and collection: http://quiltersmuse.com/blog/tag/cuesta-benberry-collection/ Like everyone else who has written about this sad closing of AFAM, I am hoping the museum can rebound now that it is debt-free. We can help that process by attending and supporting current and future exhibits at the Lincoln Center gallery. Meg Cox

www.megcox.com Latest book: The Quilter's Catalog: A Comprehensive Resource Guide President, Alliance for American Quilts Read the Latest issue of Quilt Journalist Tells All!

Find me on FaceBook

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Subject: trying one more time! From: "Lynne Z. Bassett" <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 15:51:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Argh! Sorry for all the blank emails. I'm guessing they got stripped because I had cut and pasted information from Kathryn Berenson's message.

So, here's one more try.

There's been some confusion about how to purchase the Guicciardini quilt book. I do not have it. Kathryn Berenson has a limited number of copies so you don't have to go through an Italian dealer. Here's the information:

The Guicciardini Quilt monograph can be sent by Media Mail, which costs $2.77 and takes an average of 5 days, or Priority Mail at a cost of $4.95. If you wish to order the monograph please send your address by email to kwberensonaol,com and indicate preferred delivery method, and send a check made out to K. Berenson in the amount of $47.77 or $49.95, depending on your delivery choice, to her at 3453 Newark St. NW, Washington, DC 20016.

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Cuesta's collections From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net> Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 19:33:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 14

Dear List -

Check me to confirm, but I think Cuesta Benberry's documents are now with the Quilt Index folks in Michigan. Neva Hart AQS Appraiser in Virginia

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Subject: Re: Museum funding From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 18:12:15 -0700 (PDT) X-

Museum funding is only one place in which the funding situation has been dire. Since the great economic debacle of 2008, many arts and humanities organizations, not to mention service charities, have been under incredible pressure to continue on despite tanking investments, lagging donations, andweakening real estate values. It does not take malfeasance or inept leadership for resources to have become severely stretched. It does take careful, creative and very expert leadership to survive. On this list, we are concerned with the textiles and historical resources; regional theater,music and other arts programs are still struggling, not to mention schools, charities, and other institutions.

Most of us don't have resources to make great big donations, but it is worth keeping in mind that small donations from lots of supporters make a big statement to the big funders who look to see what support an organization has. Help where you can! Susan