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Subject: museum donations From: Jo Morton <joquiltsmac.com> Date: Mon, 11 Jul 11 07:10:49 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Annually I receive many requests from Quilt Guilds, Quilting Events, Shop Hops, etc for door prize donations, items for goodie bags, etc. Perhaps some others on this List that get these type of request, can use my reply below.

"I literally get dozens and dozens of worthy requests each year for donations for quilting events. A few years ago I decided to give a very nice donation to the International Quilt Study Center each year instead of shipping books to worthy events across the USA. The International Quilt Study Center is a Quilt Museum located at the University of Nebraska, in Lincoln, Nebraska, my back yard so to speak. Museums are always in need of funds and I think that a nice annual donation to them is a worthy alternative as it is toward the care and preservation of our quilting history. A win/win so to speak. I'm sure your committee will understand my decision."

Best, Jo in Nebraska

Jo Morton joquiltsmac.com http://www.jomortonquilts.com http://web.me.com/jomorton/Jo_Blog Andover Fabrics Designer

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Subject: Re: Museum funding From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 11 Jul 11 07:54:42 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Hello all,Susan has a very valid point regarding small donations from lots of supporters. According to the 09 Quilting in America Survey, there are 16.38 million quilting households in the US. If each quilter contributed just one dollar to the quilting institution of their choice, it would make a HUGE difference.One of the issues is a disconnect between quilters who do not live anywhere near a quilt museum such as the American Folk Art Museum and the collections of those institutions; they feel it is not important to them. Yet any time a quilt from such collections is published in a magazine or date book or calendar, EVERYONE loves it.I am biased,being the curator at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, Kentucky. However, quilt museums aren't just for quilters- we want to preach to more than the choir! And I suspect that the choir is tickled when non-quilters are gob smacked when they see what is inside these buildings.So, the next time you spend $10 for a yard of fabric, consider giving a dollar to a quilt museum, evern if you don't live near one.Judy SchwenderFrom: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>Sent: Sunday, July 10, 11 8:12 PMSubject: [qhl] Re: Museum fundingMuseum funding is only one place in which the funding situation has been dire. Since the great economic debacle of 08, many arts and humanities organizations, not to mention service charities, have been under incredible pressure to continue on despite tanking investments, lagging donations, and weakening real estate values.It does not take malfeasance or inept leadership for resources to have become severely stretched. It does take careful, creative and very expert leadership to survive. On this list, we are concerned with the textiles and historical resources; regional theater, music and other arts programs are still struggling, not to mention schools, charities, and other institutions.Most of us don't have resources to make great big donations, but it is worth keeping in mind that small donations from lots of supporters make a big statement to the big funders who look to see what support an organization has. Help where you can! Susan---You are currently subscribed to qhl as: sister3603yahoo.com.To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442697Glyris.quiltropolis.com --0-7945856-1310396082=:56946--

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Subject: Re: Museum funding From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 11 Jul 11 11:05:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

That's a wonderful pro active idea. Also, our local quilt guilds sometimes give us small donations -- but even $50 can buy either archival tissue or the long boxes I use for quilt storage, and I always need both! So no amount is too small, honestly. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: museum donations From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 11 Jul 11 11:46:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Jo, you've given me something to think about in another realm of that kind of request. I get many requests for free copies of my novels for all kinds of worthy events (writer's conference door prizes, fledgling church libraries, silent auctions, etc.). It's nice to establish a policy after a bit of thought and prayer, and then come up with a cordial reply to the many requests. It synchs with the Baptist practice of "tithing," in which I was brought up as well.

I've done that with my lecture series, offering at least 2 gratis a year to "give back" to the community, but the book requests is something I Haven't thought through well enough.

Most people who ask for free books from novelists probably don't realize that we have to buy our own books (after a small initial stash that is provided for us to use for promotional purposes), and by the time I buy a book and pay to ship it, I could spend a lot of money I don't have giving things away to worthy causes. I like to think of myself as a generous person, but the idea of coming up with a policy and a cordially worded reply is something I should have done long ago. Thanks for the tip! Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: Museum funding From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 11 Jul 11 11:55:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Perhaps one thing that would help people see personal relevance is to somehow publicize the increasing availability of collections online. I am so thankful for the idea that I can look into the national archives via the Library of Congress .... view the quilts through the Michigan quilt index.... search the collection in Lincoln .... and so on. Digital access means they feel like they are "mine" as well. . . of course that doesn't help the smaller museums which desperately need funding and don't have the kinds of grants funds that enable digital efforts. Still, it would be a beginning. Let people know they don't have to GO to Michigan or Nebraska or Washington D.C. & etc. to have wonderful access to a lifetime of information and joy. Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: Museum funding From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 11 Jul 11 13:08:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

It's interesting that you bring that up, Stephanie, as my institution (in tandem with the very fine Mennonite Heritage Center in Harleysville, PA) are currently applying for two grants for collaborative cataloging and digitizing to get our most prominent collections online and accessible -- our textiles and our fraktur. I should add that we have to prove that our collections are nationally significant (harder than it sounds) and that funding is actually going to be in place in the future (who knows). Here's another way of supporting museums -- unless you "fund"amentally cannot agree with government funding going to cultural organizations, it is imperative that you ensure the folks being voted in support the NEH, the NEA, and the IMLS. None of these organizations give general operating funds any longer, meaning we must have a viable project that we argue for -- and competition is stiff and selective. And you can also be sure that government funds aren't going to keep someone's lights on when they are running themselves into the ground otherwise. The cultural agencies also serve as advocates in DC and the guardians of the best practices in cultural institutions. It's not frivolous stuff! Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center (my opinions -- not necessarily those of my employer)

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Subject: Re: Museum funding From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 11 Jul 11 12:08:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I appreciate knowing that small amounts are appreciated, too.

I recently got a request from a small local archive requesting a donation. The beginning level on the "boxes to be checked" was $0. Well, it happened to arrive on a day when an electric bill arrived that I honestly did not know how I was going to pay. I have to admit to sort of resenting the implication that I gathered from that request. "Only the rich need reply."

For someone who was raised in a lower middle class family, someone who did not grow up among the social class that serves on boards and runs non-profits, I've had a huge learning curve as I've tried to step up into donating time to different organizations I care about.

I do understand that that "only the rich need bother" was not the intention of whoever designed the fund-raising materials, but thought I'd mention it here in the interest of helping those in the decision-making positions understand that those of us who at the moment are struggling to pay light bills might still give bits and pieces to make a patchwork top, but not when the way things are worded make us fill like we're raw edges ... and incidental.

This was a small organization which does worthy work and I spent an entire year serving on the board gratis and did a presentation for them gratis, so I have supported them in ways that I can ... but still, that letter stung.

One of the great things about America is that truck-drivers' daughter who grew up in the ghetto can gain education and take an interest in the arts. But it has been my experience that we have not as a soceiety yet learned how to "welcome the educated masses" to participate as equals in things like this.

I remember being appalled not long ago that I was expected to pay $30 to get in the door at an event I would have loved to attend in order to have the privilege to spend more money at a silent auction. I understand that this is the way it is done. I'm just saying that in days of shrinking support, museum boards & etc. might want to re-think the way they seek to raise money. Perhaps the less well off would give small amounts if policies were changed to reflect a hurting economy.

Oh, goodness, now that I've proven I'm the trailer trash on the QHL, I'll go away.

Steph Whitson (who does, believe it or not, support many non-profits in the small ways she can)

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Subject: Re: Museum funding From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Mon, 11 Jul 11 13:24:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Stephanie, you are absolutely right about organizations expecting impossibly high "minimal" donations! I couldn't agree more.

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Supporting Museums and historical societies From: suereichcharter.net Date: Mon, 11 Jul 11 15:33:22 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 10

Thanks Judy for putting even a small donation in appreciated terms. AQSG instituted "A-Dime-Day for AQSG" a few years ago. Members could add that amount to their annual dues payment. It turned out to be $36.50/per donor but it actually raised thousands of dollars for AQSG. Because I have another income besides my passion for quilts, another way I chosen to give in with "in kind services." For the past several years, I have been able to donate consultant services to museums and historical societies within my state planning quilt exhibits. The donation is often a win, win experience for me also. Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: easy donations From: "Gale Slagle" <glslagcox.net> Date: Tue, 12 Jul 11 10:34:13 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

If you made it easy for people to donate a $1 (or even a little more), I'm sure they would. I live in CA, so I'm not sure if this is done in other states. Many of our grocery stores, pet stores, and some discount stores, ask for a $1 donation to assist charities at check out. In exchange you get to sign a piece of paper that they hang in the window. If they ask me I always say yes, so... this suggestion could be made to quilt stores to ask for similar donations to help support local museums. Perhaps during quilt runs...

Gale Slagle So. CA > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > http://QuiltHistory.com.

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Subject: Ardis James Memorial From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 12 Jul 11 14:06:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I pass along this message from Dr. Pat Crews, director of the International Quilt Study Center & Museum. I know the family will appreciate any memorial gift.

Xenia

We are all saddened by the passing of Ardis James on July 7. Some of you have asked about sending flowers to the family. The family has requested that in lieu of flowers, memorial gifts be made to the International Quilt Study Center & Museum in honor of Ardis.

Here are the details: Checks should be made payable to the University of Nebraska Foundation with a notation that they are for the IQSCM Ardis James Memorial. The address is: University of Nebraska Foundation 1010 Lincoln Mall; Suite 300 Lincoln, NE 68508-2886 --Apple-Mail-3--673156140--

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Subject: Re: easy donations From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 12 Jul 11 13:08:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I love that $1 idea. If only there were a way to contribute to a museum via something like itunes ... I bet a lot of people would do more if it were easier. Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: easy donations From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 12 Jul 11 14:18:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

What about a quilt block with a name on it? It could even be a paper block, or a color print out. That does seem to be a clever way to get some dollars -- sort of a visitor sponsored exhibit. Candace Perry

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Subject: More...Museums, quilts, and charitable giving From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Tue, 12 Jul 11 15:28:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

I am so glad my posting regarding the need to support museums - especially those museums that have quilt collections and quilt-related programs - has generated more awareness on this list. I especially appreciate the points several have made that small gifts add up - the Michigan State University Museum's quilt activities are utterly dependent on both large and small gifts.

Stephanie Whitson's posting about increasing the availability of collections online, Candace Perry's posting about her museum's effort to digitize and get her collections online, and the recent discovery of two signature potholder quilts, one in the Brick Store Museum in Kennebunk, Maine, and the other from Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut, made by the Portland Ladies Soldiers Society prompt me to say a bit more. Each of these postings relate to the need to support the Quilt Index and its efforts to work with all quilt documentation projects and museums to create a tool for making quilts, quilt-related ephemera, and information on the makers of these quilts accessible and searchable.

What if the quilts of the Brick Store Museum and the Mystic Seaport Museum had been entered in the Index - either through the Signature Quilt Project OR through the Maine or CT quilt documentation projects OR through the efforts of the Brick Store Museum or the Mystic Seaport Museum? If those collections had both been in the Index, this discovery might have been made by using the search, compare, and contrast functions of the Quilt Index.

What if the Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center, Mennonite Heritage Center, and any museum pursuing grants to digitize their collections also built in the very modest additional funding it would take to add that digitized information into the Quilt Index? That way, the collections would not only be accessible but, importantly, the collections could be compared and contrasted with other collections.

What if all of the quilt museums banded together to submit a proposal to make their collections accessible on the Quilt Index? What if some of the museums with major quilt collections had funding to add their collections to the Index? Imagine the new discoveries of quilt stories, histories, and trends that could be made.

The QI team has been working diligently with heads of state quilt documentation projects (or with the institutions that hold those records) to get those records preserved and made accessible in the Index. When all of the quilt documentation projects in the US are finally in the Index, imagine the studies that will be enabled.

The Index also offers a mechanism to preserve and make accessible private collections - as well as to document the role of individual collectors in quilt preservation and education. With grant support, the QI team added one private collection (the Gasperik Collection) as a test and is currently working on adding two private collections of ephemera. Again, it would be fabulous to add more private collections and the QI team would love to work with collectors and others to make that happen.

The QI team has also been working to internationalize the Index. The University of Alberta in Canada is the first institution outside the US to approach the QI about adding their collection and by the end of this year their collections will be accessible in the Index and it will be great to be able to compare and contrast US and Canadian quilts. Meanwhile, the Quilt Index has begun work with museums in South Africa and the national South African Quilt Guild to add South African quilts. Already the holdings of two South African museums have been added to the Index and, again, it is wonderful to be able to compare and contrast quilts from collections in two countries.

However, it takes funding to do these projects. Some of the funding has come from the institutions or organizations who have worked with the QI team to put their collections into the Index; the Index is always accepting applications and for more info, go to http://www.quiltindex.org/contributors.php and look for "Become a Contributor." Michigan State University Museum and MSU's MATRIX: Center for Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences Online have provided a decade of substantial in-kind support for the Index as part of the university's commitment to research. The MSU Museum and MATRIX have also written and received many US government grants to build the Index but, as Candace points out, federal funding for the arts is greatly diminished. The ability of universities to provide in-kind support has also become diminished.

The QI team increasingly is relying on innovative partnerships with other organizations who want to make their collections available on the Index and on donations - large and small - for its operations and for new initiatives.

So, please, consider ways you can help to support the efforts of museums and the Quilt Index to preserve and make accessible this vast and amazing cultural legacy.

Marsha MacDowell Michigan State University Museum The Quilt Index (a partnership project of the MSU Museum, MSU's MATRIX, and The Alliance for American Quilts)

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Subject: Anti code quilt From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Wed, 13 Jul 11 03:53:36 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 6

Has anyone heard what happened with the blocks we made for a quilt to help educate the public about the UGRR code myth?

I have the perfect place to share the quilt now. I'm doing a presentation at a civil war quilt day and the person before is doing a lecture on the slave code, albeit as folklore (rather than the truth). -- Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: announcement to all From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Wed, 13 Jul 11 14:15:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Barbara Woodford to everyone

I am sad to announce that I will be closing up my dealership shortly. Time has caught up with me.

I will have an antique Quilt Auction in Galena, Illinois on July 30 at 6 PM, viewing on July 29 from 4-6 PM at the Galena Convention Center on US RT  W, next to the Stoney Ceek Inn. This will be in conjunction with the Northern Illinois Quilt Fest which will occur throughout northern Illinois from July to September www.northernillinoisquiltfest.com .

I am offering at least 80 quilts of my 1840 to 1950 quilt collection, some quilt racks and quilt books. Pictures of quilts possibly offered are at my website www.historic-american.com. See Lobdell Auction Service www.lobdellauctionservice.com for more auction details.

I hope you can come and help me close out my stock. Sadly, all good things come to an end.

Barbara --Apple-Mail-5--582647242--

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Subject: coverlets like quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 13 Jul 11 22:58:46 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Hi all- re coverlets resemblance to quilts, also think about double cloth/double weave coverlets, in addition to the overshotgeometrics and to the jacquards with their curvalinear florals. I see so many Irish Chain variationsand groupings of squares in these typically indigo and white double cloth coverlets; they are soooo handsome and substantial and beautifully loomed. I have an unusualonein red and white eight point stars from PA that I think is on my still-incomplete website. (Slowly I am having every item rephoto'd, can you believe, to suit the pixellimits of this host; it is an endless process, but bear with us; if you want photos, I can email privately. Alsoof note vis-a-vis coverlet/quilt geometric patterns are thetwo (can youbelieve) crochet king size bedspreads I found that emulate those graphics in blue and white; there must have been an instruction book,probably in the 1950s, that told how to make such ana pattern transition to crochet. I think both are now uploaded!

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1594494070-1310623126=:73153--

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Subject: Quilt Index From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 10:10:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

(This message is from Lynn Lancaster Gorges)

In addition to Marsha comments about getting quilts listed on the Quilt Index, I am sure that many museums could use the expertise and TIME of many of you on the list. If you would volunteer a few hours each year to put the info on the QI. The Signature Quilt forms are time consuming, so volunteers would be a big help to many museums who are understaffed. This could be a great non-profit volunteer project for quilt guilds.

Just thinking..... I still need to list MY signature quilts. I just haven't had the time, but I will!

Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

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Subject: RE: Quilt Index From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 13::02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I know this is a little nutty, but I want to try put this out there anyway -- we, as small museums, are very concerned that our collections will lose their unique identity when put into these large databases. There has been some discussion, for example, for sometime about having a vast Fraktur (German-language decorated manuscript) database, but we -- the Schwenkfelders and the Mennonites (in our specific section of Montgomery County, PA)-- have decided to strike out on our own and seek funding for our own database that will also be accessible through a larger portal. We are doing the same thing with our textiles in order to preserve the identity, continuity and context. It's a very real concern we have. We even feel the need to preserve our identity outside of the larger Pennsylvania German cultural community -- that's how fragile it seems sometimes. Candace Perry

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Subject: Washing Quilts From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 14:51:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

A friend told me recently that she heard an appraiser on Antiques Roadshow tell the owner of an antique quilt that the value of the quilt was higher because it had never been washed. I have also heard this opinion expressed by appraisers. Her question to me was "What about the quilts we are making right now? Will their value be less if they are washed?" I'm interested in your professional opinions as I know from experience that quilt judges lower the rating of a quilt that has any markings shown, leading most quiltmakers to wash the quilt before submitting it for judging. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Judy Knorr

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Washing Quilts From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 16:33:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Because I don't sell new quilts, I have no opinion on whether washing new quilts will affect their value.

But for antique quilts, given the difficulty of washing quilts by hand, in a tub or wringer washer, and drying them on a line or over a fence or bush, some quilts (especially in the 19th century) remained unwashed. They might have been used lightly and aired, but not subjected to the rigors of lye soap and wringing by hand etc.

So an antique quilt that appears to be unwashed suggests that the quilt was only gently used, if at all, and that being in that condition suggests the "bias or survival." In other words, quilts less valued in the household might have been used more constantly, and perhaps worn out, while the 'best" quilts were only laid on the bed when the doctor or the preacher came, and folded away afterwards, so they survive in unwashed condition. It's a visible part of their history. And obviously, the better the condition, the "better" the price.

Xenia

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Subject: RE: Washing Quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 18:50:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Re: the comment from a Roadshow appraiser - > the value of the quilt was higher because it had never been washed"... That's sounds a little too simplistic if it was made as a general statement. Higher than what? Supposedly one that HAS been washed but other factors play into it. It could be unwashed but very soiled, smelly etc... Soil left in a quilt does it no good over time - a clean well made quilt, used, washed but in very good condition, (there are many) is more appealing to some buyers than a dirty one....Evidence of pencil markings for quilting are supposedly not a negative to a collector because they indicate 'the real thing'- the hand of the maker and authenticity. But I have seen quilts with very distracting markings and they don't seem to appeal to many buyers. It's a matter of degree. Some people are afraid to wash quilts, strip grandmas' old dresser etc - because of Antique Roadshow. I've had clients with very soiled 'used' family quilts from the 1940's feel that they should NOT wash it - it would devalue it....Granted, one can't be sure what the result of wet cleaning will be but with some of the dirty ones I see, I think taking a chance it worth it! Every 'old' item is not historically important but it surely makes sense to find out what you have before you make any decisions. jean

Jean Carlton AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Minnesota QuiltsEtccomcast.net

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Subject: "Vintage" Sampler probably an import From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 18:40:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

E-Bay Item number: 350476189532 Applique Quilted SAMPLER Quilt 81" Square.

I assume this is an Import. The colors strike me as late 1980s early 1990s. What say you?

The seller is NOT claiming it is "American made"; only that it is "vintage" and that she has "not cleaned this" because she doesn't "want to risk damaging the delicate stitching - so I will leave the cleaning to it's new owner."

http://tinyurl.com/5wzbrgs

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: RE: "Vintage" Sampler probably an import From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 :57:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I'm finding it harder and harder to be sure of imports - I say this after picking up a quilt in an antique store recently (previously thought I could spot an import from across the room) but it didn't send me any signals.... It was nice - it was well quilted. The fabrics didn't look 'odd' or cheap- you know how unidentifiable the fabrics in some imports are? they just don't look right? - and as I looked more I found a commercial label on the back - made in China. I was really surprised. I've appraised thousands of quilts and studied thousands more ---This one had me until I saw the label. Primitive stitching isn't even a good clue - many hand made in USA quilts are done that way.... It had a separate binding - applied by hand.......not knife edge. The finer imports have quality stitching.....I think it isjust going to become harder and harder to tell what's what - certainly not easy via a computer screen- all the more reason to be diligent... label all quilts you make and all you own for which the authenticity is known. jean

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 14, 11 From: CRantquiltaol.com Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 01:26:26 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

HI, In regards to washing quilts and those being more valuable,, as an antique dealer, I find that one with ,say an old yellow fold line or yellowed that is gently washed or even rinsed and getting rid of that line ,, will make the quilt more valuable, fresh and definitely more appealing to my customers. I have had customers that will not buy a quilt due to soiling, fold lines, and after removing them, make the quilt sellable and in the long run gets the "age soil" out of the quilt fibers. Of course, we all like the nice unwashed quilt that doesn't need any "help", but I think it really depends on the quilt. I feel value doesn't necessarily increase just because it wasn't washed... I would agree with Jean,, Sometimes "grandmas" quilts really need a good bath,,, It depends on the quilt and what it's purpose is to the owner. Cindy Rennels

.

_http://www.cindysantiquequilts.com_ (http://www.cindysantiquequilts.com/)

Cindy Rennels Cindy's Antique Quilts PO BOX 1212 Clinton, Ok. 73601 Phone: 580.323.1174

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Subject: Hollywood/Movie Star Quilt From: Barbara254aol.com Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 02:07:54 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I found a very interesting quilt at an estate sale recently. It has 30 signature blocks, each with the name of a 1930's-40's movie star embroidered on it. The surrounding scrap fabrics appear to be of that era. It is hand- quilted with medium-sized stitches but done very evenly. The embroidery is also very nice. I don't believe the quilt was ever used or washed...looks almost "new". Has anyone seen a quilt like this before? I have it listed on eBay. I'd like to learn more about it. _http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=270780475081&ssPageNameSTRK:MESELX:IT_ (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=270780475081&ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT)

Barbara in California

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Subject: Quilt Index and collection identity From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 09:28:08 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Hi Candace and all QHL members who work at or with collections,

The Quilt Index team is very aware of the concern about maintaining identity for any collection entered into the Index and that is why we have built into the structure of the Index the basic concept of "Contributors" so that collections - be they state quilt projects, private collections, museum or archive collections, research project collections - can have a unique presence. Currently, those contributors can provide a direct link off of their own personal or institutional websites to "their" contributor spot on the Index, see http://www.quiltindex.org/contributors.php. Contributors also have the opportunity to create online galleries and essays that enable them to share interpretive materials about their collections with the Quilt Index's audience. Another way that the identity of collections is maintained is through the search tools where one can search the Index by collections.

-- Marsha Marsha MacDowell Michigan State University Museum The Quilt Index

Subject: RE: Quilt Index From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 13::02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I know this is a little nutty, but I want to try put this out there anyway -- we, as small museums, are very concerned that our collections will lose their unique identity when put into these large databases. There has been some discussion, for example, for sometime about having a vast Fraktur (German-language decorated manuscript) database, but we -- the Schwenkfelders and the Mennonites (in our specific section of Montgomery County, PA)-- have decided to strike out on our own and seek funding for our own database that will also be accessible through a larger portal. We are doing the same thing with our textiles in order to preserve the identity, continuity and context. It's a very real concern we have. We even feel the need to preserve our identity outside of the larger Pennsylvania German cultural community -- that's how fragile it seems sometimes. Candace Perry

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Subject: washing quilts From: <kathymooreneb.rr.com> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 09:13:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

The discussion of washing quilts has got me going. Ive been conflicted over this question for some time and cant quite settle on the right answer. It strikes me that, just as responses from Xenia and Jean indicate, there is no one good answer.

Most of the time, I tell people who ask me that washing is not recommended because of unknown chemicals in their water and the danger to the fabrics and construction of the piece. BUT, all too often there are examples of quilt tops or old quilts that are so soiled that there is no way to keep and maintain them unless they are laundered.

I personally know of several antique beauties from the mid-nineteenth century that are, in my opinion, priceless gems, but they are so stained and soiled that their value for exhibition is somewhat diminished. These are quilts in museum collections. They badly need careful cleaning and conservation available from trained conservators, an expensive procedure. It occurs to me that extensive photography and detailed descriptive narratives based on close inspection and microscopic examination of these quilts before and after cleaning could help mitigate concerns about damaging the historic importance of these pieces. But, I have to say that even this suggestion gives me pause, and a slight case of the heebee jeebies! But, it could be one of several possible solutions to this nettlesome question. Of course, finding the funds to make this happen is so difficult that it probably mitigates the possibility of this happening very often.

We need so much more thought and discussion about this, not only for our own peace of mind and practice, but for those who follow us. Lets keep the conversation going.

Thanks for the thought provoking question and comments so far.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE

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Subject: Harrison Log Cabin fabric From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 15:01:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi all,

We are studying a quilt, c. 1840, with log cabins, cut from a roller print, applied to light backgrounds. They are very similar to the prints found in "Threads of History," in fact, one of the blocks features cannons cut from one of these prints. BUT, there is one log cabin different from all the rest.

Are any of you aware of other Harrison era log cabin prints other than those found in the above named reference, p. 105, 106? Do any of you have in your collections, larger pieces of these prints that might show an entire repeat, as these photos do not.

Thanks!

Pam Weeks ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 603-661-2245 Quilt Historian, Teacher AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles PO Box 123 Durham, NH 03824

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 14, 11 From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 12:44:53 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

I think what the Antiques Roadshow people are trying to say is that if a quilt SHOWS that it has been washed, that's the problem- not that the quilt is washed, but that the washing process shows some sort of damage to the quilt. As someone said earlier, antique washing techniques were hard on quilts- but it's a stretch that a modern gentle washing would be damaging. And of course, once a child or pet has a whoopsie on the quilt, itpretty much demands washing. :)Jocelyn_______________________________

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Subject: 1844 presentation quilt sells for $40,000 From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 14:46:12 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Quoting from finals sales article from their website:

<<April 13, Freemans American Furniture, Folk & Decorative Arts Auction proved itself a fine finale to the 11 Philadelphia Antiques Week....Chinese export porcelain, silver, and modern pieces also proved successful, but one of the most memorable moments of the auction came when a fine appliqu=E9d and pieced cotton presentation quilt, dating from 1844, sky-rocketed past its $4,000-6,000 estimate to realize $40,000.

The next American Furniture, Folk & Decorative sale will take place in November. For further results and inquiries, please contact Lynda Cain  267.414.1237>>

http://www.freemansauction.com/pdf_catalogues.asp

I haven't had any success downloading the pdf file of the catalogue yet but the e-catalogue is readable. I just can't capture any photos from it for my research file.

Karen in the Islands where my raspberry patch is finally ripening!!!

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Subject: Are Island quilters different? From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 23:44:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I am slowly piecing together the history of quilting here on Lopez Island. I had big dreams of doing ALL of the San Juan Islands. Sheeeesh. Dream on, girl. I'm doing good to catch up with this island! Eventually I hope to add some of the quilts from the Lopez Historical Society to the EQ blog with their permission. Here is the quilt history blog I started for Lopez Island quilters.

http://enchantedquiltersoflopezisland.blogspot.com/

The history of the group is in my April 09 post http://tinyurl.com/6fbaae7. So is the history of the Quilt Shop. Yes, we once had a quilt shop on the island. It closed after 30+ years ---- the year after I moved here!

Fortunately, Anne Dawson opened a small notions shop about a year after the quilt shop closed. She also teaches quilt classes. She is also a quilt conservator! And best of all, she is a fellow member of AQSG! But after 7 years, I still sorely miss the Vintage Fabric and Quilt Dating Club of Northern Virginia! I rarely get to see old quilts anymore except on the Internet. Ok, enough whining.

Meanwhile, three of us have just completed a community-wide Signature Quilt. It will be officially presented to the community on July 23 during the Historical Society's annual Big Event. I guess that is what got me started writing THIS post to you. Can't wait for the unveiling! That will be in the next new post for EQ ----plus another post about the quilt we made in two weeks for the Epilepsy Foundation Northern California after one of our members approached us with a very special request. EQ was founded to make raffle quilts to help raise funds to help keep a roof over the Senior Center here on Lopez. We are still making quilts for them 27 years later. The quilt for the Epilepsy Foundation Northern California was the first Raffle quilt we made for a non-Lopez Island not-profit. You can see it here: http://cafarmersmkts.com/quiltingforacure

Enjoy the blog and then decide for yourself if islanders are any different from mainlanders!

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: RE: Washing Quilts From: "Monika Jones" <monikaj1earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 19:22:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Who are the "Gods" that make all these rules????LOL......When I finished one of my hand quilted appliqué quilts, it was always washed right away, because I like the "crinkled" look of antique quilts.

Monika http://www.folkartlanding.com

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Subject: Quilt Washing or not From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 09:40:04 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

In response to Xenia's comments:

The Amish of Ohio, possibly other areas as well, used certain quilts only when they held church in their homes and referred to these as "Sunday Quilts"

These were usually in unwashed condition but unfortunately and sadly, it wasn't uncommon for visitors to lay a baby on these quilts while services were going on. The baby would wet itself and the quilt as well. The quilt would be put away in this condition and, well you can guess the rest of the story...

Darwin

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Subject: Re: washing quilts From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 16 Jul 11 08:34:12 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

(This message is from Lynn Lancaster Gorges, who is having trouble posting)Kathy Moore's suggestion about wet cleaning quilts is correct. Unfortunately most people do not want to pay for wet cleaning their quilt in aproper conservation type manner. It will often cost more than their quilt is valued by an appraiser or near it at least. And often it doesn't CHANGE the visual appearance very much, but the dirt if out of it. It is expensive because it is very very time consuming and the personhas to have also been trained, which isn'tfree,so it can't be done by someone who gets paid minimum wage. It is also done in their facility where the electricity, water, taxes on the building, mortgage, equipment,etc. have to be paid for. To wet clean a quilt in a conservation manner these are the steps..... (All of this is done on a quilt that is only stained and not in need of restoration.) 1) Evaluation report of basic treatmentadvised & proposed cost of treatment & Liability Release sent to client 2) Photography of staining, overall condition, etc. Research the individual types of stains if necessary.3) Testing of each and every fabric in the quilt with water, with water andsoap/detergent and water/stain remover (if discussed with client) (To do this a chart has to also be drawn up prior to thetesting.)4) The dye testing is also photographed if there is any dye transfer to theQ-tips (Time varies on this. I think I did a quilt once that had over 50 fabrics in it. Not sure if I will do that again.) Note that much of this requires 2 people because moving around a quilt for photography, etc. is not an easy task alone. Wet cleaning, which takes an entire day, is definitely done with a hired helper. Photography is done for each process as well as note taking. 5) Wet-cleaning is done using a deionized water system that is rented monthlyand a specially constructed custom tank. 6) Wet-cleaning involves many testings of water, changing of water, and constant monitoring,moving, etc. 7)Next we move theheavy wet (sometimes fragile) quilt to drying rack that is covered with toweling fabric the size of a quilt. The quilt is covered with the same.8) Because the quilt cannot be spun in a washer or SQUEEZED to get out the water the toweling will have to be changed every 30 minutes for at least 3 times. (Fans are set up under the speciallymade frame and over the frame to also help remove moisture quickly.)9) About 1.5-2 hourslater it is putto rest on the rack. It is coveredwith cotton sheeting on top and bottom and allowed to dry. 10) Now do about 3/-4 loads of laundry cleaning all of the toweling used in the process. Will wash the cotton sheeting in a couple of days.11) Next day check the quilt. Allow to dry for at least a couple of more days so that it is truly dry before shipping. Do final photography.12) Review photos and finish writing the report. Prepare invoice.13) Pack the quilt inacid free paper or sheeting. Print out report and either send photos digitally to client or prepare a folder. 14) Place items in box and prepare for shipping.15) Arrange for UPS pick up or drive to Fed Ex. 16)Hope to get happy email from client as soon as it arrives. Boy,I betthat makes you all want to just throw your quilt in a front load washer. OK, ignore that I said that, but you get the idea. Think aboutwhat you pay your plumber, your mechanic, your electrician and other skilled trades people. I love quilts and I love the work I do, but I do wonder at times if I should have gone to school for a different trade. I justcan't climb under a house.........spiders and mice creep me out!! Hope I didn't bore you too death........ I think I will go take a nap..........Lynn Lancaster Gorges, Textile Conservator, New Bern, NC www.textilepreservation.com 

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Subject: Washing From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Sat, 16 Jul 11 12:10:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

As an appraiser for nearly  years now I've heard so many washing stories with both good and disastrous results. As a writer and journaler my first instinct was to record all my interesting/hysterical/sad/questionable and otherwise fascinating stories and experiences. Lawd don't I wish I hadda! Alas I did not. We are real people with real obligations when we return home and best intentions are often left to dissipate into the atmosphere like a delicate little fart. ("Puffs" I prefer to call them....)  One story I remember very distinctly involved a magnificent indigo and white quilt a repeat block feathered star. It was absolutely breathtaking with dense lush quilting. Truly a mid 19th c. masterpiece. I normally ask clients if they have any information on the quilt. "Oh yes." the lady answered. "It was found on the bank of the Arkansas river after a flood - it was stored in a metal barrel and was filthy."  Both horrified and fascinated I asked how it came to be so pristine at the present time. "Oh. I soaked it in Stanley Degreaser for three days then threw it in the washing machine." I didnt have to write that story down - one could hardly forget it!  There is a terrific book on writing "Bird by Bird" by Anne Lamott. She relates a story of a woman who was forever trying to drag her drunken husband out of the yard and into the house so no one would know what was going on. An elderly black woman told the wife to just "Leave him where Jesus flang him." SOme things should be dealt with - others should be left as is.  Making that call is like pulling a thread in a sweater - you pull the rightthread you've fixed your sticky-outey thread problem. Pull the wrong thread and you can be left wearing a halter top before you know it.  Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies

but I don't believe I deserved my friends."

Walt Whitman

 www.teddypruett.com

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Subject: Re: Washing From: maggmaloneaol.com Date: Sat, 16 Jul 11 12:29:11 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

I've been qiulting for about 30 years and have never tried to make a masterpiece quilt. Mine were made to be used and with three small children when I started they got a lot of use. I threw them in the washing machine at least once a week. However, those early quilts were made from cotton/polyester blends and they washed beautifully. I have found with the advent of allcotton fabrics that the quilts begin to show wear after about seven washings. I have some that all the cotton fabrics have disappeared, but the cotton blends are as bright as the day I made the quilt. I don't understand the fascination with cotton fabric. Course, I do all my quiltmaking on the sewing machine so feel of the fabric doesn't come into play.

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Subject: Re: Washing From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 16 Jul 11 10:30:46 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

I once recieved an E-mail from a woman who wanted to wash a quilt that had been tied over one of those big cotton battings. I told her the only thing she could do would be to take it apart, wash the front and the back separately, then tie it together again over washable batting. (There is more to the story, I am summarizng.) She decided she would rather rent a rug cleaner and wash it that way. And... it worked! At leastaccording to her somewhat triumphant E-mail. I've always wondered how she kept the quilt from being sucked into the machine. Kris

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Subject: Subject: 1844 presentation quilt sells for $40,000 From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com> Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 12:25:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi QHLers,

Per Karen Alexander's post on 7/15/11 regarding the sale of the dated 1844 signature album quilt by Freemans Auction on April 13, 11,I wanted to point out that this quilt has the familiar "Urn and Flowers" motif as cutout applique, showing 2X on the quilt.We have discussed this motif before on the list - you know, the wonderful vase with the tantalizing initials "AR" on it and luscious, large drooping roses(or peonies)falling from the rim.I now have another "sighting" of this printed pattern to add to my archives.

I posted about this fabric last year when our Oregon quilt study group visited the Benton County Historical Museum in Philomath, Oregon, to view the Susan Cockrell collection of historic quilts. One of the quilts in this collection has this fabric yardage as whole, wide borders and the fabric is in excellent condition.

BTW - love New Egypt, NJ as an historic town! Went through there this past June while visiting family and holding services at St. Mary's Russian Orthodox Church in Cassville, NJ.

Martha Spark former Oregonian, now in Edmond, OK) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Washing Humorous but Disastrous results... From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 10:02:54 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Way, way back in the mid 70"s I bought 3 tied quilts or comforters at a farm auction. The were very musty and smelled of mildew. At the time, I didn't know squat about cleaning anything, let alone quilts.

I didn't have my own washing machine so I decided to take them to the local laundromat to wash.

I put all three in the "big"machine, added the detergent, loaded it up with quarters and left to do something else.

When I returned  minutes later, I opened the machine only to find that the quilts had exploded and there was wet batting everywhere. What a mess!

I can't remember for sure but I think I just put everything in the trash can and left...

Happy Washing...

Darwin

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Subject: Re: "Vintage" Sampler probably an import From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 11:48:51 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Totally 1980's. Lk at those colors!....(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR_

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Subject: Yankton Yellowbone Indian Family Photo, c.1908 From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 15:42:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

This is a delayed response re. Yankton Yellowbone Indian Family photo

There is much documentation (diaries, oral histories, photographs, etc.) about the historical use - dating back to early 19th century - of quilts by Native Americans. You might want to read To Honor and Comfort: Native Quilting Traditions (Museum of New Mexico Press, 1997)

-- Marsha MacDowell

At 12:01 AM -0400 6/27/11, you wrote:

QHL Digest for Sunday, June 26, 11.

Subject: Yankton Yellowbone Indian Family Photo, c.1908 From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Sun, 26 Jun 11 07:03:46 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

I posted a photo on eboards the other day along with the info on this list and have never seen it posted and the eboard picture has disappeared so I'm trying again

It is an old photo from 1908 that shows a Yankton Yellowbone Indian Family and the baby is wrapped in a quilt.

The photo is fantastic but I was curious about what members would say about the quilt and the fact that it was being used by this Native American Family

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Subject: RE: Yankton Yellowbone Indian Family Photo, c.1908 From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 17:56:15 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

This is too weird! I was just transcribing a 1931 signature quilt from South Dakota for my newest book and found a block with "Crazy Yankton." As a New Englander, I was needing to resort to the Internet to find a source for the word "Yankton" and here is the QHL reference! Amazing. I'll let you know more about the quilt. Sue Reich

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Subject: volunteering at Lincoln National Boyhood Memorial From: "cjsp70" <cjsp70insightbb.com> Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 21:31:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Just returned from our family's volunteering week at the memorial's farm. I made copies of Barbara Brackman's Fact sheet, "The Quilt Code". Left them on the quilt that I was working on and several of them were picked up by the visitors to the farm. At least two were school principals. Maybe the best we can do is one person at a time. Thanks to the list and Barbara I reached at least a few. Pat Sauer

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Subject: Re: Some posts are weird From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 23:25:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

> Kathy Kansier - I have no explanation for those weird posts with all the inserted capital letters, but they do happen from time to time. I either try to decipher them or just delete them and don't worry about it. Don't know if someone else will respond more positively. Pat Kyser

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Subject: cuious markins on emails From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 21:39:40 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

As to the AO and  signs, I was told to send emails in plain text bujt this has not eliminated the problem, so I will try to switch to the other text on my new laptopand see if that change finally eliminates the interference.  I attended a presentation today at the Pollack Jackson house museum in EastHampton where qhl member Tracy Jamar is a docent, and..........there's a photo of Jackson Pollack using his "mother's quilting frame" (according to the caption) to stretch his canvas on the floor as he makes a poured painting (not drip, that was anincorrect term) As soon as I upload my weekend photos of the glorious East End of L.I. will post it on eboard. Would love to see some of his mother's quilt to see how they relate to/influenced his art.  Laura  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts

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Subject: Re: Some posts are weird From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net> Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 21:43:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Kathy, I have the same issue: some posts are littered with extra letters, numbers, etc., while others are free of extraneous characters. Like you, I receive the digest. Do the non-digest posts have this problem also?

Carol Berry Merced, CA (Gateway to Yosemite)

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Subject: NY Times obituary for Ardis James cofounder of the International Quilt Study Cen From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sun, 17 Jul 11 21:34:38 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

_http://www.nytimes.com/11/07/17/arts/ardis-butler-james-quilt-collector-d ies-at-85.html?_r=1&hpw_ (http://www.nytimes.com/11/07/17/arts/ardis-butler-james-quilt-collector-dies-at-85.html?_r=1&hpw) A fitting tribute to a special visionary woman. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth

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Subject: Re: 1844 presentation quilt sells for $40,000 From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 11 09:45:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I have managed to download the PDF file, as well as capture a photo of the quilt. Please email me privately if you would like a copy of either.

Laura Syler Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles Teacher, Lecturer, Judge Richardson, TX 972-345-2787 hi-spiritairmail.net

> > I haven't had any success downloading the pdf file of the catalogue > yet but > the e-catalogue is readable. I just can't capture any photos from > it for my > research file.

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Subject: Square in a Square - Southern Scrappy? From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 11 08:09:53 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

This reminds me so much of the tied comforters that were so ubiquitous in my great grandfathers house in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. The Seller is saying this is 1800s. He sells a lot of used imports plus a view American vintage quilts. Were there ever any <tied> imports?

Style-wise it looks turn of the century but the come of the fabrics throw me. They look to be from the 30s and 40s. And look at the fading of that <purple> in the solid blocks.

http://tinyurl.com/3tzzmfx

tem number: 3729909589 Item location: Piney Woods Texas

So what is your take?

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: RE: Square in a Square - Southern Scrappy? From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 11 10:16:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Karen- It looks like early th century to me, I've seen lots of similar ones around here. I would consider paying $ for it, myself. Kim in ND

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Subject: Another link between quilts and race cars From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 11 08:59:01 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

If you like to make Quilt blocks for special causes, here is another opportunity.

http://www.jsonline.com/sponsoredarticles/articles/?id56400101&categoryId =217

Or

http://tinyurl.com/3w4va9g

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Re: "Vintage" Sampler probably an import From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 11 12:08:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

It looks like a cheater cloth to me. (whole cloth with a printed design)

Lonnie Schlough www.fixquilts.com

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Subject: RE: Square in a Square - Southern Scrappy? From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Tue, 19 Jul 11 08:46:05 +1000 X-Message-Number: 10

I believe that the fabrics in this quilt reflect the late 1890s/early 1900s (mourning prints, claret, cadet blue, indigo, shirtings). To my eye the floral prints used also look to come from the era stated. I am thinking of the floral smocks that my grandmother wore. The purple solid is a lot darker than any generally used with pastel 1930s prints.

I would say that the seller's statement is reasonably accurate but the opening price is on the high side. While it is now for sale in Texas it could have been made in another part of the US.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Re: Yankton Yellowbone Indian Family Photo, c.1908 From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Mon, 18 Jul 11 19:12:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

WHAT is a "Yellowbone Indian"?

Hoping I'm wrong, gaye

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Subject: Presentation Quilt From: OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com Date: Tue, 19 Jul 11 04:19:47 EDT X-Message-Number: 1

Laura:

I would love to get the PDF file and photo of the presentation quilt. You should be able to send tjese as an email attachment to my email address. You can send them with your goofy extra letters. I don't mind. Next time take me along to East Hampton.

I think my emails are set up to send in HTML (whatever that is.) I remember having a choice about that. I grew up with typewriters and even though I'm on the computer at least 8 hours most days, I don't have a clue what I am doing when it comes to the tech stuff.

Kathy Kansier AQS Certified Appraiser Ozark, Missouri _www.kathykansier.com_ (http://www.kathykansier.com)

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: July 16, 11 From: nancykunstsmithcharter.net Date: Mon, 18 Jul 11 21:49:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

The Wisconsin Quilt Study Group, WQSG, is hosting a weekend retreat with beloved Merikay Waldvogel, author and expert quilt historian, to learn more about quilts, their history, and how to identify their fabrics. Sylvia Adair, Quilt Documentation Coordinator and Quilt Index Trainer at the WI Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts will also be giving presentations on how we can help with some of the museum work as well as the fun.

The retreat is September 16-18, 11 and will be held at the Cedar Valley Retreat Center, West Bend, WI. The deadline to sign up is the end of the month. Please contact Maribeth Schmit with any questions you may have. materialgirlwi.rr.com

Feel free to share this information with all of your friends. More information on the retreat can be seen at www.wqsg.org. We hope you can join us.

Nancy Kunst Smith AQS Certified Quilted Textile Appraiser 3725 Simonis Street Stevens Point, WI 54481 (715)340-1029 nancykunstsmithcharter.net -

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Subject: Are Island quilters different? From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 23:44:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I am slowly piecing together the history of quilting here on Lopez Island. I had big dreams of doing ALL of the San Juan Islands. Sheeeesh. Dream on, girl. I'm doing good to catch up with this island! Eventually I hope to add some of the quilts from the Lopez Historical Society to the EQ blog with their permission. Here is the quilt history blog I started for Lopez Island quilters.

http://enchantedquiltersoflopezisland.blogspot.com/

The history of the group is in my April 09 post http://tinyurl.com/6fbaae7. So is the history of the Quilt Shop. Yes, we once had a quilt shop on the island. It closed after 30+ years ---- the year after I moved here!

Fortunately, Anne Dawson opened a small notions shop about a year after the quilt shop closed. She also teaches quilt classes. She is also a quilt conservator! And best of all, she is a fellow member of AQSG! But after 7 years, I still sorely miss the Vintage Fabric and Quilt Dating Club of Northern Virginia! I rarely get to see old quilts anymore except on the Internet. Ok, enough whining.

Meanwhile, three of us have just completed a community-wide Signature Quilt. It will be officially presented to the community on July 23 during the Historical Society's annual Big Event. I guess that is what got me started writing THIS post to you. Can't wait for the unveiling! That will be in the next new post for EQ ----plus another post about the quilt we made in two weeks for the Epilepsy Foundation Northern California after one of our members approached us with a very special request. EQ was founded to make raffle quilts to help raise funds to help keep a roof over the Senior Center here on Lopez. We are still making quilts for them 27 years later. The quilt for the Epilepsy Foundation Northern California was the first Raffle quilt we made for a non-Lopez Island not-profit. You can see it here: http://cafarmersmkts.com/quiltingforacure

Enjoy the blog and then decide for yourself if islanders are any different from mainlanders!

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: RE: Washing Quilts From: "Monika Jones" <monikaj1earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 11 19:22:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Who are the "Gods" that make all these rules????LOL......When I finished one of my hand quilted appliqu=E9 quilts, it was always washed right away, because I like the "crinkled" look of antique quilts.

Monika http://www.folkartlanding.com

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Subject: Quilt Washing or not From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Fri, 15 Jul 11 09:40:04 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

In response to Xenia's comments:

The Amish of Ohio, possibly other areas as well, used certain quilts only when they held church in their homes and referred to these as "Sunday Quilts"

These were usually in unwashed condition but unfortunately and sadly, it wasn't uncommon for visitors to lay a baby on these quilts while services were going on. The baby would wet itself and the quilt as well. The quilt would be put away in this condition and, well you can guess the rest of the story...

Darwin 

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Subject: Re: washing quilts From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 16 Jul 11 08:34:12 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

(This message is from Lynn Lancaster Gorges, who is having trouble posting) Kathy Moore's suggestion about wet cleaning quilts is correct. Unfort unately most people do not want to pay for wet cleaning their quilt in a proper conservation type manner. It will often cost more than their qui lt is valued by an appraiser or near it at least. And often it doesn't C HANGE the visual appearance very much, but the dirt if out of it.  A0It is expensive because it is very very time consuming and the person has to have also been trained, which isn'tA0free,A0so it can't be don e by someone who gets paid minimum wage. It is also done in their facili ty where the electricity, water, taxes on the building, mortgage, equipm ent,etc. have to be paid for. To wet clean a quilt in a conservati on manner these are the steps..... (All of this is done on a quilt th at is only stained and not in need of restoration.) 1) Evaluati on report of basic treatmentAdvised & proposed cost of treatment A0&  Liability Release sent to client 2) Photography of staining, overa ll condition, etc. Research the individual types of stains if necessary. 3) Testing of each and every fabric in the quilt with water, with wa ter andA0soap/detergent and water/stain remover (if discussed with clie nt)A0 (To do this a chart has to also be drawn up prior to the testing.)4) The dye testing is also photographed if there is any dye tr ansfer to theA0Q-tips (Time varies on this. I think I did a quilt once  that had over 50 fabrics in it. Not sure if I will do that again.)  Note that much of this requires 2 people because moving around a quilt f or photography, etc. is not an easy task alone. Wet cleaning, which take s an entire day, is definitely done with a hired helper. Photography is  done for each process as well as note taking. 5) Wet-cleaning is d one using a deionized water system that is rented monthlyAnd a specia lly constructed custom tank. 6) Wet-cleaning involves many testings o f water, changing of water, and constant monitoring,moving, etc. 7 )A0Next we move theA0heavy wet (sometimes fragile) quilt to drying rack t hat is covered with toweling fabric the size of a quilt. The quilt is co vered with the same.8) Because the quilt cannot be spun in a washer o r SQUEEZED to get out the water the toweling will have to be changed eve ry 30 minutes for at least 3 times. (Fans are set up under the specially made frame and over the frame to also help remove moisture quickly.) 9) About 1.5-2 hoursA0later it is putA0to rest on the rack. It is covered with cotton sheeting on top and bottom and allowed to dry. 10) No w do about 3/-4 loads of laundry cleaning all of the toweling used in the  process. Will wash the cotton sheeting in a couple of days.11) Next d ay check the quilt. Allow to dry for at least a couple of more days so t hat it is truly dry before shipping. Do final photography.12) Review pho tos and finish writing the report. Prepare invoice.13) Pack the quilt in acid free paper or sheeting. Print out report and either send photos di gitally to client or prepare a folder. 14) Place items in box and pre pare for shipping.15) Arrange for UPS pick up or drive to Fed Ex. 16) Hope to get happy email from client as soon as it arrives. Boy,I bet A0that makes you all want to just throw your quilt in a front load wash er. OK, ignore that I said that, but you get the idea. Think about what you pay your plumber, your mechanic, your electrician and other sk illed trades people. I love quilts and I love the work I do, but I do wonde r at times if I should have gone to school for a different trade. I just can't climb under a house.........spiders and mice creep me out!!  Hope I didn't bore you too death........ I think I will go take a nap ..........Lynn Lancaster Gorges, Textile Conservator, New Bern, NC ww w.textilepreservation.com 

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Subject: Washing From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Sat, 16 Jul 11 12:10:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

As an appraiser for nearly  years now I've heard so many washing stori es with both good and disastrous results. As a writer and journaler  my first instinct was to record all my interesting/hysterical/sad/questiona ble and otherwise fascinating stories and experiences. Lawd don't I wish I hadda! Alas I did not. We are real people with real obligations when we return home and best intentions are often left to dissipate into the atmosphere like a delicate little fart. ("Puffs" I prefer to call the m....)  One story I remember very distinctly involved a magnificent indigo and white quilt a repeat block feathered star. It was absolutely breathtaking  with dense lush quilting. Truly a mid 19th c. masterpiece. I normally ask clients if they have any information on the quilt. "Oh yes." the lady answered. "It was found on the bank of the Arkansas river after a  flood - it was stored in a metal barrel and was filthy."  Both horrified and fascinated I asked how it came to be so pristine at the present time. "Oh. I soaked it in Stanley Degreaser for three days then threw it in the washing machine." I didnt have to write that story down - one could hardly forget it!  There is a terrific book on writing "Bird by Bird" by Anne Lamott. She  relates a story of a woman who was forever trying to drag her drunken husband out of the yard and into the house so no one would know what was going on. An elderly black woman told the wife to just "Leave him where Jesus flang him." SOme things should be dealt with - others should be left as is.  Making that call is like pulling a thread in a sweater - you pull the right thread you've fixed your sticky-outey thread problem. Pull the wrong  thread and you can be left wearing a halter top before you know it.  Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies

but I don't believe I deserved my friends."

Walt Whitman

 

www.teddypruett.com

 

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Subject: Re: Washing From: maggmaloneaol.com Date: Sat, 16 Jul 11 12:29:11 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

I've been quilting for about 30 years and have never tried to make a masterpiece quilt. Mine were made to be used and with three small children when I started they got a lot of use. I threw them in the washing machine at least once a week. However, those early quilts were made from cotton/polyester blends and they washed beautifully. I have found with the advent of all cotton fabrics that the quilts begin to show wear after about seven washings. I have some that all the cotton fabrics have disappeared, but the cotton blends are as bright as the day I made the quilt. I don't understand the fascination with cotton fabric. Course, I do all my quiltmaking on the sewing machine so feel of the fabric doesn't come into play ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: That Texas tied quilt From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Tue, 19 Jul 11 09:55:45 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

http://tinyurl.com/3tzzmfx Thanks for posting this. As usual, the seller is only half right. Some of the fabrics in the pieced blocks are indeed late, late 19th century so his '1800s' label is technically correct. But I recognize that fabric in the faded blue alternate squares--I'd be willing to bet those are over-dyed sugar sacks. The almost-obsessive placement of the multitude of ties also tips me off--I think the quilt was made in the Depression or even 1940s, the older patchwork blocks found, and some new made with feedsack prints of the time, the alternate block fabric home-dyed, and the whole mess tied over another ratty old quilt. Take a look at the lumps and bumps and then the shipping details. He says 'heavy batting' but this mama must weigh in at about 15 lbs! I'd be more interested in what's INSIDE the quilt! JMHO Pepper (who has taken apart many a 'mystery quilt' in her time)

Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 3 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: Odd characters in posts From: ElaineKelly63verizon.net Date: Tue, 19 Jul 11 08:43:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Those odd characters are the translation of formatting into alphanumeric text. Sometimes it's clear that the strange characters are marking ends of lines; other times, I have no clue what's happening. Outlook is notorious for not understanding lots of formatting in emails (despite being the most popular email client, it's also ancient technology); AOLmail is also renowned for its email issues.

I use Outlook and the posts often include those strange characters. My guess is that QHL's email system is translating certain formatting commands (like hitting the hard return/enter key, using bold) from a member's submission into the appropriate code, but when it sends it back out to readers, some (all?) email clients are not translating the codes correctly. It's also possible that there is a defined line length set somewhere in some members' email settings and Laura (et al.) don't actually need to hit the ENTER key to get the junk; the email client supplies it for them automatically. That might account for the " =" that sometimes break up words.

(An interesting question: does anyone get to see Laura Fisher's posts without the gobbledygook? If not, Lyris is definitely doing something with posts that email systems are not able to translate.)

The suggestion to use PLAIN text vs. RICH TEXT (rtf) or HTML should help. But, the best solution I've found for stripping all invisible junk from text is to copy it all and paste it into Notepad. Then copy and paste it into the email you wish to send. And never copy and paste from somewhere else (the web, a document, etc.) and paste it directly into the email; you'd be amazed at how much invisible formatting is buried in text just waiting to mess up display.

Would be nice if we could figure this out; some posts are just too hard to read with all the junk in them.

Elaine Kelly Not a techie; I just know enough to pass for one in a dark place

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: July 18, 11 From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Tue, 19 Jul 11 08:06:14 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Here is a link with good information on the Yankton Indian Tribe, a group related to the Sioux

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/siouan/yanktonhist.htm

Not sure where "Yellowbone" comes from

Regards,

Darwin

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Subject: Pollock's Mother's Quilts From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Thu, 21 Jul 11 07:37:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Laura, Did you think to ask at the museum about his Mother's quilts? I would think if he had his mother's quilt frame he would have some of her quilts. They might be right there. I have my Great grandmother's quilt frame and also some of her quilts. Judy Knorr

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Subject: Merry Silber From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Fri, 22 Jul 11 11:38:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I thought many of you would want to know this.

Merry Silber died just after midnight today.

She had broken a hip a little over a week ago, but was recovering nicely from that. Then last night night she took a sudden turn for the worse and slipped away quietly. She was, of course, in Detroit, where she had lived her entire life, and she was surrounded by family and love.

There will be a graveside service, then in a month or two a memorial service in Detroit.

Julie had been with her since her fall.

Too many legends passing.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Deanna Mayer Vondrak miniature quilts From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 23 Jul 11 17:58:09 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Hello -

I'd like to learn more about the Deanna Mayer Vondrak miniature museum quilt series from the late 1970s. I understand she had kits for the quilts. Are the kits still available for sale? Is Mrs. Vondrak still quilting?

Thank you!

Kyra Hicks, trying to survive the 100 degree temps, like so many others! --0-1698443147-1311469089=:78263--

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Subject: more washing cleaning questions From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Sun, 24 Jul 11 06:02:37 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

I know the advice of lying down until the urge to wash a quilt passes but my friend has one that is going to be cleaned one way or another (by her, not me and not my idea) so she's got a few questions.

It is a dark Amish quilt from about 1910, solid (saturated home dye look) cottons, cotton or wool gabardines, cotton sateens, cotton chambrays and possibly wool challis. It has some sticky spills/stains and some color bleed from same. Extremely thin batting, home carded, probable cotton, but don't think will be any issue as it is so sparse. White cotton muslin backing.

She's thinking with the variety of weaves and fibers that having it dry cleaned may be the best bet ... with a cooperative dry cleaner who will use new solution and clean it alone.

The other options- wet washing in dry cleaner's front load machine or hand wash in bathtub.

Any words of wisdom, caution, etc. will be much appreciated.

Sandra Starley Moab, Utah http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

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Subject: Gobbledygook From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Sun, 24 Jul 11 09:33:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Laura my dear you are not alone out there. I carefully punctuate my posts to QHL only to have them appear on my scream so full of junk they aredifficult to read. However many times when someone responds to the post and copies the old post in the e-mail it is perfect. Go figger. Of course there are those discerning among us who would say my posts aregobbledygook without the strange symbols! Can't argue with it.

Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies

but I don't believe I deserved my friends."

Walt Whitman

 

www.teddypruett.com

 

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Subject: Re: more washing cleaning questions From: Bonnie Dwyer <bonniedwyer2mac.com> Date: Sun, 24 Jul 11 10:29:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

If it were MINE, and I couldn't live with it the way it is, I would hand wash it in bathtub, all the while realizing the various fabrics will react differently. Or, more likely, behave badly. Before anyone blasts me, remember, I said IF IT WERE MINE! Bonnie Dwyer in Maine, where it's below 90 degrees for the first time in several days. Phew!

On Jul 24, 11, at 2:02 AM, Sandra Starley wrote:

> I know the advice of lying down until the urge to wash a quilt passes but my friend has one that is going to be cleaned one way or another (by her, not me and not my idea) so she's got a few questions. > > It is a dark Amish quilt from about 1910, solid (saturated home dye look) cottons, cotton or wool gabardines, cotton sateens, cotton chambrays and

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Subject: RE: more washing cleaning questions From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Sun, 24 Jul 11 13:53:35 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Hi Sandra. I hope your friend isn't partial to that white cotton backing.

Ok, now that I've got that sarcasm out of my system, can she possibly live with spot cleaning the sticky stains? Can she replace the sticky spots with new appropriate fabric? I guess it's a toss up. She's going to ruin the quilt either way, but I'm thinking it would be better to ruin just an area as opposed to the whole quilt.

Just a thought.

Warm regards, Sharron Evans........................apologizing to everyone north and east for blowing our hot temperatures your way. Could you possibly reciprocate by blowing rain our way.

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Subject: Re: gobbledygook etc From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 24 Jul 11 13:02:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I've never had a problem with Laura's posts coming through loud and clear. Steph Whitson Using Earthlink ... I think ... and Windows but e-mail comes through my web site, so what that does I have no idea.. Maybe it spontaneously heals e-mails. Ha!

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Subject: Julie Silber/Merry Silber From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sun, 24 Jul 11 13:22:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Several members of this list have asked about the address to which to mail Julie Silber condolence notes. Because of the uncertainty of her present stay in Detroit, Julie said her home address would be best.

That is Julie Silber, POB 729, Albion, CA 95410.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: RE: more washing cleaning questions From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Sun, 24 Jul 11 19:44:02 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

Good evening, QHLers - Assuming that the quilt is in excellent physical condition (no physical damage; all patches well connected to each other), she might want to locate a drycleaner that uses the GreenEarth solvent (modified liquid silicon solvent, D5). With these caveats: machine programmed to just rock back and forth (no tumbling action); quilt put in a soft mesh bag ONLY is the mesh bag is large enough not to squash the quilt; lowest possible heating; cleaned all by itself; no use of spotting chemicals on the sticky spots (especially if she has no idea what the spots are from); no detergent added to the solvent; no pressing, steaming or ironing. The GreenEarth solvent is not as aggressive as the perchloroethylene (perc) drycleaning solvent is on dyes.

The National Park Service's ConserveOGram series has one that does a pretty good job of outlining the process. The information is a bit dated (00) as it only talks about petroleum solvent and perchloroethylene solvent but gives good general advice:

http://tinyurl.com/ConserveOGram16-2

I think attempting to clean the quilt using water would be a poor 2nd choice - definitely do NOT try to wash it in a bathtub (you've got to be able to get all of that water/dirty water away from the quilt AND not ruin your back trying to get a sopping wet quilt out of the bathtub).

I'ld be happy to clarify further off line if needed. Regards,  Meg  . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________  Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney  Textile/Costume Conservator &  Collections Management Consultant  Professional Associate - AIC  707-763-8694  mgmooneymoonware.net 

...a dark Amish quilt from about 1910, solid (saturated home dye look) cottons, cotton or wool gabardines, cotton sateens, cotton chambrays and possibly wool challis. It has some sticky spills/stains and some color bleed from same. Extremely thin batting, home carded, probable cotton, but don't think will be any issue as it is so sparse. White cotton muslin backing.

She's thinking with the variety of weaves and fibers that having it dry cleaned may be the best bet ... with a cooperative dry cleaner who will use new solution and clean it alone.

The other options- wet washing in dry cleaner's front load machine or hand wash in bathtub...

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Subject: Washing cleaning questions From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Mon, 25 Jul 11 07:38:06 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

In regards to the cleaning of the Amish Quilt;

First of all, I know all you are going to roll your eyes as soon as you read this but DON'T, this works>>>

Coleman Stove Fuel, that's right stove fuel.

This is a very clean solvent and will not leave residue.

Make sure it is Coleman Stove Fuel and not just alcohol.

Place the part of the quilt that has the spots, face down on a folded up towel or other absorbent fabric and pour the fuel slowly onto the back. This should dissolve the sticky substance and it will be absorbed by the towel. You may need to do this a couple of times but it should work and will completely evaporate ,leaving no residue.

If you don't believe this will work, take an old piece of fabric, pour some oil onto it and try it.

I learned this trick from an oriental rug collector who told me about it when I had a rug with a large oil stain.

I have used it on quilts to remove oil and grease with success.

Now, I will say this, since we don't know what the "sticky substance" is, I can't guarantee it will dissolve it but it won't harm the quilt.

One thing to remember, NO SMOKING while doing this!!!

Regards,

Darwin D. Bearley

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Subject: question from the Peanut Gallery From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 25 Jul 11 16:54:47 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Someone E-mailed me with this question, and I have to admit that I don't know. I know that coverlets were manufactured to commemorate fairs (I have one) but were quilts exhibited along with the vegetables and other home crafts? Did they even do that sort of thing?

As far a museums collecting art quilts, the earliest reference I can recollect was 1970's. Any docents here care to correct me?

"I am interested in learning when quilts were first exhibited. I know that they were displayed in county fairs, probably in the 19th century, but would you think they would have been shown in world's fairs in the late 19th century? When did art museums start buying and displaying quilts?"

Kris

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Subject: RE: Washing cleaning questions From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Mon, 25 Jul 11 18:07:34 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

Good evening, QHLers - YIKES!!! Please please do NOT use the Coleman Camp Fuel for cleaning as it is not safe for YOUR health! Read over the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) put out by Coleman:

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/msds/lantern.pdf

Don't expose yourself to this stuff!

Rubbing alcohol (the 99% isopropyl alcohol stuff) or ethanol (190 proof EverClear) would be much safer choices as a spotting solution. You must first check the stability of any dyed areas before you swab on the alcohol and blot with clean towels (paper or fabric). Also use the alcohol in a well ventilated area and wear nitrile gloves. And no smoking.

I would be happy to provide further clarification off-line. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator & Collections Management Consultant Professional Associate - AIC 707-763-8694 mgmooneymoonware.net

...Coleman Stove Fuel, that's right stove fuel. This is a very clean solvent and will not leave residue. Make sure it is Coleman Stove Fuel and not just alcohol.

Place the part of the quilt that has the spots, face down on a folded up towel or other absorbent fabric and pour the fuel slowly onto the back. This should dissolve the sticky substance and it will be absorbed by the towel. You may need to do this a couple of times but it should work and will completely evaporate ,leaving no residue.

If you don't believe this will work, take an old piece of fabric, pour some oil onto it and try it.

I learned this trick from an oriental rug collector who told me about it when I had a rug with a large oil stain.

I have used it on quilts to remove oil and grease with success.

Now, I will say this, since we don't know what the "sticky substance" is, I can't guarantee it will dissolve it but it won't harm the quilt.

One thing to remember, NO SMOKING while doing this!!!...

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Subject: Re: question from the Peanut Gallery From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 25 Jul 11 22:30:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Kris asked if quilts were exhibited along with vegetables and other home crafts at fairs. Here is proof from 1886. Kathy Moore and I featured this photograph in Home on the Plains: Quilts and the Sod House Experience. We also have references to other quilts in other period county fairs in Nebraska (but haven't found other photos). I Hope the link works. If it doesnt: go to www.loc.gov. Click on American Memory. Enter Solomon Butcher 13214 in the search space.Click on the photo. Then click on the "larger reference image" and enjoy. You can also see a log cabin in the shadows above the veggies.

Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: question from the Peanut Gallery From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 04:14:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

What a marvelous picture!

Kris

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Subject: Killing an Amish quilt From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 14:54:52 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Yep, I did that. Years ago, I thought that the deep indigo and white Indiana Amish quilt with the very suspicious yellow stain dead center could use a bath so put it in my wringer washer---aaaaahhhh! First I didn't check for color-fastness (the 'indigo' was some sort of cheap overdye and the water turned dark grey) and second, started the washer and went up the basement stairs. Never *never *leave a wringer unsupervised. I hadn't set the brakes on the legs and the machine chugged all around the floor. Third, I panicked when I realized the machine was running wild, snatched the plug out, and started to stuff the wet bundle through the wringer to get the awful dirty water out of the quilt. And it got completely snarled up and the wringer tore a whopping big hole in the quilt.That's why I listen to Xenia when she says if you want to wash an antique quilt, lay down until the notion passes. Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 3 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

 

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Subject: Quilts in fairs From: "J Perkins" <qltrstoreharlannet.com> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 14:32:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I appraised a quilt that had a blue ribbon on it from a fair that was dated 1830. The ribbon was pinned to the quilt, not pieced into it like a crazy quilt. The quilt was made of large 11" squares of chintz, many different kinds, some in various color ways, almost like salesman's samples.

I wonder when fairs started in the US?

Jennifer Perkins

AQS Certified Appraiser

NQA Certified Judge

Harlan, IA

Subject: question from the Peanut Gallery

From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>

Date: Mon, 25 Jul 11 16:54:47 -0700 (PDT)

X-Message-Number: 4

Someone E-mailed me with this question, and I have to admit that I don't know. I know that coverlets were manufactured to commemorate fairs (I have one) but were quilts exhibited along with the vegetables and other home crafts? Did they even do that sort of thing?

As far a museums collecting art quilts, the earliest reference I can recollect was 1970's. Any docents here care to correct me?

"I am interested in learning when quilts were first exhibited. I know that

they were displayed in county fairs, probably in the 19th century, but would

you think they would have been shown in world's fairs in the late 19th

century? When did art museums start buying and displaying quilts?"

Kris

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Subject: Re: Killing an Amish quilt From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 15:38:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

OMG - did you bring back memories of wringer washers......I wish my Mom was alive to read your email, she would have enjoyed it so much. Hopefully we have learned a thing or two over the years, huh? Thanks for sharing your story. Mitzi from Vermont (where the heat wave has finally passed on!).

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Quilts in fairs From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 15:41:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

From http://www.history.iastate.edu/agprimer/Page18.html :

Agricultural fairs celebrated human progress, science, education, and the agrarian ideal. Before there were state and county fairs, however, most agricultural fairs were held by private individuals and organizations, or agricultural societies. In 1807, Elkanah Watson of Pittsfield, Massachusetts held one of the first agricultural fairs by holding sheep shearing demonstrations in conjunction with traditional market fairs. By the fall of 1811, Watson's sheep shearing had evolved into the Berkshire County Fair, a major production, featuring a procession of "three or four thousand animals," a band, displays of local industries, and artisans. Watson also took careful steps to attract women by offering premiums on domestic products and by holding an annual ball.

Agricultural societies eagerly adopted Watson's model for agricultural fairs, but often faced financial difficulties. During the 18s and 1830's local agricultural exhibitions floundered because private donations fell short of the money required for premiums, fair grounds, judges, transportation, publicity, and entertainment. Beginning 1840, however, state legislatures across the country formed agricultural boards and allocated funds to agricultural societies, which in turn allowed for larger, more regular exhibitions. In 1841, the first state fair took place in Syracuse, New York. Sponsored by the New York Agricultural Society, the three-day event attracted more than 15,000 people.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Quilts in fairs From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 12:43:53 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Jennifer Perkins wrote: I appraised a quilt that had a blue ribbon on it from a fair that was dated 1830. The ribbon was pinned to the quilt ...

Jennifer, was the ribbon dated 1830 or the quilt? There have also been fairs that judged antique quilt entries. Barbara in Ellicott City MD

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Subject: RE: Cleaning that quilt From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 12:53:29 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Good afternoon, QHLers - Please be aware that you will need over a 100 gallons of distilled/deionized water for EACH wash/rinse cycle OR more if the quilt is at least twin size. And definitely more if the quilt is larger than twin size and/or really dirty. You need enough distilled/deionized water to submerge the quilt completely each cycle. Ideally, the distilled/deionized water is at least warm in temperature. It is VERY important to have more than one rinse cycle to get ALL of the detergent rinsed out. If you don't get all of the detergent rinsed out, the detergent left behind hastens the re-soiling of the quilt. If there is a chance that the quilt is made from any fabric that is wool or silk, do not use Orvus/sodium lauryl sulfate as the detergent. As an anionic detergent, the Orvus bonds with the wool fibres. You need to use a nonionic detergent instead (like fragrance free Dawn dishwashing detergent). Pick days that will be hot and dry so the quilt will dry naturally more quickly (unless you will be drying your quilt inside a home with functional air-conditioning). Do NOT put away a quilt that is still damp/not completely dry as this will set up a mould/mildew situation.

As a quilt conservator, I get around this problem of schlepping lots and lots of distilled/deionized water containers by renting a deionizing cylinder from my local Culligan dealer and using drinking water quality hoses to connect my tap water (excellent quality water to being with) to an activated charcoal filter first and then to the deionizing cylinder. Currently, my area is not under any kind of water quantity restriction due to drought conditions. I also have a grid work surface (made from polyethylene/polypropylene) that the quilt is laid out in in the bath so the water/detergent solution can flow freely under the quilt. I have always thought that a guild-run quilt wash might be a useful event.

I am happy to provide any needed clarification off-line. Regards, Meg .

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Subject: RE: more washing cleaning questions From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 15:10:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I agree with Susan about the tub. The weight of the qlt alone will pop the stitches.

I have washed many cotton qlts as below, but am afraid to try it on a wool one, but...if you must!! NO guarantees...........

Use a top loader AS A TUB, and soak only DO NOT AGITATE. Use Woolite, cool water, squeeze gently with hands, and soak, soak, soak. The water will discolor. Spin the water out and soak again until satisfied. The centrifuge will do no more harm than trying to lift that heavy thing.

Lay flat to dry. Lonnie Schlough....in hot and steamy Tex www.fixquilts.com

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Subject: RE: Cleaning that quilt From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 15:12:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Regarding Margaret Geiss-Monney's advice on drying quilts:

that means....bring'em all on down to Texas to dry! they'll be dry in 2 hours!! I am speaking from experience! today is 106 in Austin, yesterday 105 and we have had 42 (count'em) days over 100 degrees since June. but it is a great time to wash quilts Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, TX

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Subject: RE: Cleaning that quilt From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 15:25:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

"How to Kill a Quilt" would be a great title for a handout for teachers/appraisers. Steph Whitson

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Subject: FW: RE: more washing cleaning questions From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 16:29:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

What fun would life be if we didn't have these washing stories to tell!? I can just see the wringer washer dancing across the floor. In fact, my regular washer has busted some pretty amazing moves with an uneven load! I say, if you can't stand the quilt as it is - then pass it on to someone who will OR take your chances. I think reading every suggestion here and on every internet site you can find is a great idea and then...make up your own mind about how to proceed. You can wash it - it will dry -Other than that there are no guarantees. You have to be willing to say -" if it turns to pulp I'll be okay with it because it was my decision. I HAD to see what would happen ....and now I know." You will learn something either way to share next time someone asks about washing a quilt. I must say, I've had only good luck - fingers crossed - so far. I have a top loader. I leave the top up - soak with Orvus previously diluted, spin, rinse etc. Handle with care at all times. When I see the black water I feel I'm doing a good thing.... I'm not sure I'd try the quilt that prompted this discussion - I'd have to see it. Each quilt is its own individual project and each outcome is hard to predict. It's a good idea to take photos throughout the process and note what you are using - and details about the method. Jean

http://quiltsetcetera.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Re: FW: RE: more washing cleaning questions From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 17:50:01 EDT X-Message-Number: 12

Just being a butt-in-ski with some of this washing of quilts, but my daughter lived in New Orleans when Katrina swept thus in 05 - she had a pile of my wall hangings and such in her 1st floor of her home there - Katrina came thru, my daughter left for higher ground. After her return in about 10 days after the 6-8' water had left her home she found 99% of her/my quilts were not to be saved - they had just about rotted EXCEPT one small baby quilt I made for my grand daughter (who is now 29 yrs.old). It was made with polyester fabrics and batting. It survived!!. It has since been passed on to my GGreat daughters. Probably doesn't help all these emails about washing quilts, but I thought it might be fun to pass on some of the strange things that occur with our art....... Mitzi from Vermont ps. I love the stories about wringer washers, my Mom and myself had them for some years and they could walk themselves all over the basement(s) sometime. But they are wonderful memories of my Mom - she would have been in Heaven if she ever had an automatic washer and dryer........ Mitzi from Vermont

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Subject: Another Civil War quilt From: suereichcharter.net Date: Tue, 26 Jul 11 22:19:22 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 13

I hate to sound picky but the quilt in this article looks like an Ocean Waves quilt. Has anyone seen an Ocean Waves quilt as early as 1864? I thought the pattern dated to the 1880s on forward.

http://tinyurl.com/3dhq8w2

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut