Subject: Oregon State Fair - July 7, 1880 From: suereich@charter.net Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 09:27:47 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Morning Oregonian Portland, Oregon July 6, 1880 Page 1

Twentieth Annual Exhibition of the Or- egon State Agricultural Society. Sunday of the Fair Grounds--The Sab- bath Kept and Broken. {REGULAR CORRESPONDENCE OF THE OREGONIAN} Sunday the trains coming from both the north and the south brought quite large crowds of visi- tors to the grounds and hundreds of people in wagons and carriages and on horseback came in from the surrounding country but all this was but as The first low wash of waves Where so should roll a human sea. For yesterday at an early hour a throng began to come from every direction and before either of the trains arrived there was a crowd in numbers exceeding any on these grounds before for several years. To these the trains added many hundreds more so that by noon the largest crowd ever on the ground was gathered the number be ing estimated {???} way 12,000 to 25,000 people...... In quilts, Mrs. S. C. Adams shows a "log cabin" in silk, and Mrs. Miriam Sutton and Mrs. Jennie Buster each one of like pattern in worsted, the lat ter showing taste and skill in the arrangement of colors that is quite attractive. Miss E. Riggs ex- hibits a white quilt upon which the work shows to good advantage, making a really handsome bed spread. Mrs. C. H. Work shows a quilt in white and crimson, which shows the finest sample of the old-fashioned art of quilting that is displayed. Mrs. E. Rebey comes in with a patchwork quilt that discounts the one of 4942 pieces, before no (???) by 2038 pieces. The work is also much more neatly executed, perhaps by more mature hands, and if the two compete the blue ribbon will doubt- less ornament the one of 7000 pieces. Mrs. G. Lawrence shows a quilt in colors gorgeous enough to stare one out of countenance, and re- minds one of the traditional pride of the Arkansaw neighborhood--"The Yellow Rose of the Prairie" or the "Roarin 'Eagle of Brazil" For those, how ever, who delight in gaudy bed drapery this is doubtless considered fine.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: GFG From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 09:28:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

<<The flower centers are all the samesolid yellow the inner rings are all solids in various pastels and theouter rings are prints of the same coloras their inner ring i.e. a bluesolid ring is surrounded by a blue print. The garden path is solid white.>>You have just described 80 % of the GFGs I've appraised in 20 years. I'm pretty confident they were hand cut.Manufacturing processes just dont allow for that much precision - as someone said too costly. Whereas it is actually fun and a challenge to selectively cut those pieces at home. Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies

but I don't believe I deserved my friends."

Walt Whitman

 

www.teddypruett.com

 

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Subject: fussy cut hexagons in kits From: Rose Werner <erwerner3104@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2011 15:12:31 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

There were certainly many quilt kits with die-cut hexagons. Grandmother's Flower Garden was a pattern that nearly every kit company that sold die-cuts had in their catalogs. Unfortunately, the catalog pictures were not large enough to see what the fabrics were like. But fussy-cutting die-cut hexagons would be a waste of fabric (not to mention the time it would take to line up all the fabrics), so I agree with Dale. The companies would have lost profit and would be unlikely to do this. Grandmother Clark (W.L.M. Clark Co.) sold a kit in the 30s that had strips of 18 different fabrics, along with templates for 3 or 4 different quilt designs - including the hexagon. A buyer could fussy cut these, but most of the fabrics were small prints and wouldn't lend themselves to this technique. Rosie Werner www.quiltkitid.com --0-314484568-1312323151=:44393--

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Subject: Re: fussy cut hexagons in kits From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 08:00:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Perhaps in an attempt to make a kit quilt her own, the quilter fussy cut just some of the hexagons and used the precuts for the rest?Mary Anne

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Subject: Something to think about From: <kathymoore@neb.rr.com> Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 11:40:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Here I go starting trouble, again.

A couple of weeks ago I read an article in our local paper that I just cannot get out of my mind. It relates to the cost of cotton, something we all have an interest in. It was written by Alan Katz and Cam Simpson for Bloomberg News and had the title, Cotton Boom is no Boon on African Farms.

The article detailed the dilemma cotton farmers in Africa are caught up in. On March 7 the price of cotton hit a record of $2.197 a pound, the highest price since our post-Civil War reconstruction era. It should have delighted and amazed those African cotton farmers. Their cotton is of higher quality than that grown on the North Carolina coast and they consider this crop to be =E2=80=9Cwhite gold.=E2=80=9D

BUT, the government and regional cotton monopolies to which these farmers must sell announced =E2=80=9Cthey would charge growers 38 percent more for fertilizer =E2=80=93 and pay them as little as 39 percent of the world price at the time for their crop.=E2=80=9D These farmers are contemplating a boycott and not planting cotton, the =E2=80=9Ctop cash crop in one of the world=E2=80=99s poorest countries.=E2=80=9D

All the while, a cotton farmer in North Carolina is planning on planting as much cotton as he can on his 5,000 acres and have locked in a price of $1.25 a pound for his crop. he expects to make $1 million profit, enough to add 300 more acres to his holdings.

Here=E2=80=99s the kicker: The African farmers =E2=80=9Chave no choice but to sell to government-sanctioned monopolies whose shareholders include such trading firms as Paris-based Geocoton and Paul Reinhart of Winterthur, Switzerland,=E2=80=9D both of which declined to respond to reporters requests for comments or interviews. =E2=80=9CThis should have been a year =E2=80=98when people can finally get a few dollars and put a metal roof on their house,=E2=80=99 said Thomas Bassett, a geography professor at the Univ. of Illinois who has been studying and writing about west African cotton farmers for more than 20 years. These mechanisms result in poverty for producers and wealth for companies and traders. It=E2=80=99s subtle, and it=E2=80=99s dasterdly. Among the biggest shareholders in SOCOMA and Faso Coton are closely held international commodities trading firms. They enjoy privileged positions, according to an unpublished April 2010 report done for the United Nations=E2=80=99 Food and Agriculture Organization, sitting in the middle of a supply chain stretching from African cotton fields to factories that make blue jeans, T-shirts and other clothing. And, I might add, cotton fabrics we use to quilt with.

My quotation marks indicate direct quotes from the article.

I am befuddled and concerned. I cannot not buy cotton fabrics, but the relationships between growers and commodities traders is very out of balance and unfair the the growers. And I contribute to that imbalance every time I buy a quarter yard of cotton fabric.

What to do, what to do, what to do...

I think we all need to think about this and be prudent in our purchasing habits. What else can we do? Your comments and ideas would be welcome.

Kathy Moore Lincoln, NE ------=_NextPart_000_0015_01CC51D2.2EEBA940--

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Subject: fussy cut hexagons in kits From: erwerner3104@yahoo.com Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 08:15:46 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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Perhaps in an attempt to make a kit quilt her own, the quilter fussy cut just some of the hexagons and used the precuts for the rest AMary Ann That would certainly be a possiblilty. Rosie Werner

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Subject: NQR -- job posting From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 12:55:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

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I'm passing this textile related job posting along from another listserv, just in case someone may be interested or know someone who is interested. I'm only the messenger! Candace Perry

The North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, NC is seeking an individual to help dress mannequins for a major upcoming exhibit. Applicants should have substantial experience mounting historic garments on a variety of mannequins (custom-made ethafoam, Dorfman, etc.) and excellent sewing skills. The position will last no longer than two months. The successful candidate will be expected to start August 15.

Please direct applications (resume, letter of interest, and references) to Jennifer French at jennifer.french@ncdcr.gov. If you have questions about this temporary, short-term position, please do not hesitate to contact me at camille.hunt@ncdcr.gov or (919)807-7861.

Thanks,

Camille Hunt

Museum Registrar

North Carolina Museum of History

5 East Edenton Street

Raleigh, NC 27601

Mailing Address: 4650 Mail Service Center

Raleigh, NC 27699-4650

(919) 807-7861 Fax (919) 715-6628

camille.hunt@ncdcr.gov

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Subject: RE: Something to think about From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 15:06:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Very interesting story, Kathy. and sadly believable. I, for one, can go a LONG time without buying another inch...Would most likely yield some more interesting quilts - using what we have instead of buying everything to coordinate! A REAL chance to be creative!

Jean

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Subject: Re: Something to think about From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 14:16:35 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

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Makes you think.Unfortunately, when a bolt of fabric says "Madein Korea" it means that the finishing occurred in Korea. Who knows where the greige goods cotton came from? So, I did a little googling and found this site: http://www.ina.gr/cotton_producing_countries.htm. This lists countries that produce cotton with output in thousands ofbales. Consider that China produces 25,500 thousand bales andMali (the first African country on the list) produces 1,050. If you add up all the output of all the African countries on the list, it totals 5,625, one quarter of China's production.That really doesn't help the farmer though- he still sells at a lower price than he could get selling elsewhere. He is still cheated. BUT, my guess is that most ofthe African cotton doesn't end up in OTC goods here. Our bolt goods are likely made from greige goods from China.Another website http://unctad.org/infocomm/anglais/cotton/market.htmhas a section whichreads "80% of West African [cotton] exports are sent to Asia (inc. China (36%), Indonesia (21%), Thailand (10%) and,18% are traded in Africa (16% in the West African region and 12% to Morocco)." (I think that must be 2% to Morocco.) So, it is possible that some African cotton might end up in our bolt goods.I am no researcher for this type of thing. So, how to find out? You are right, Kathy. It IS a dilemma.Judy Schwender\

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Subject: Re: #2 - Fair quilts From: suereich@charter.net Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 17:33:57 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 10

Thanks, so good to see you a few weeks ago.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

On Sun, Jul 31, 2011 at 7:58 AM, michele mclaughlin wrote:

> Hi Sally, Here in Allentown, Pennsylvania we have the Greater Allentown Fair. Although we are a small city, we are bordered by farmland and competitions are still held for livestock, produce, baking, sewing and crafts, displays made by the children (usually of 4-H). There are even entries for antiques. It is a fun fair to attend during the day and Ialways entered sewing when my son was young (you also get free tickets to the fair if you do entries).  There is a web page with information if you want to review the contests and premiums: http://www.allentownfairpa.org/index.php/contests <http://www.allentownfairpa.org/index.php/contests>  <http://www.allentownfairpa.org/index.php/contests>  Best wishes, Michele McLaughlin Allentown PA

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Subject: Re: Something to think about From: "Debbie Welch" <deb@quiltingposs.com> Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 18:38:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

First let me say right off I've owned a quilt shop in NJ for 15 years so I'm coming at this from a different perspective probably but here goes anyway.

If the American farmer can plant that much cotton and make that much money - more power to them! It's made in America, grown in America, supports the local economy around his farm, pays American taxes and adds to our national independence of foreign goods.

Also having a BS in Environmental science - more power to the American farmer who must follow strict EPA and DOA rules and regulations. The cotton is probably shipped overseas to be milled but I would imagine American grown cotton leaves less of a carbon footprint than cotton grown in China, Pakistan or Africa.

Think globally, act locally. I can't do much about the African government's monopoly of their cotton trade and I try not to buy things made in China if there is a choice, but America no longer produces the quality cotton goods that quilters demand. I'd love to see America produce quality cotton goods again and here's hoping that NC farmer is a step in that direction! Until then most of the fabric in my shop comes from Japan, Korea and yes, China and the cotton used in it comes mostly from Pakistan and China.

Debbie Quilting Possibilities Forked River, NJ

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Subject: re: something to think about From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net> Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2011 23:53:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

It's so hot here in Louisiana that I doubt the wisdom of anything I or anyone else in these parts says, but......

Because of the complexities of the commodity-to-market process, it's hard for us to do anything about what goes on in Africa or other places. We may talk about globalism, but globalism simply puts more distance between producer and product, makes the individual more powerless to bring about change.

In his little novel "Candide," Voltaire finally concluded that perhaps the best one can do is cultivate his own garden. Focus on the local. I think he was right in that.

All of us need to be better informed about domestic commodities, their production, and their processing. And I believe we need to do all in our power to encourage our farm crops' being brought to production within our own national boundaries. I've studied economics and understand many of the reasons manufacturing has moved away. But I also understand it was not self-propelled and it is not an unmixed blessing. Our choices created the current situation, and while we can, I think we ought to consider whether we like the results of those choices.

Living in a section of the country that became victim to the same cash crop, cotton, and that did not develop the means of bringing that crop to market as a textile, I shudder at our nation's growing dependence on world commodity markets and our having relinquished the means of manufacturing. In the South we paid dearly for that imbalance, both in the social degradation that accompanied human slavery and the economic impotence that resulted from the lack of manufacturing resources.

In terms of economy and a number of other things, the northern and southern states operated like independent entities in 1860. Our touted economic interdependence did not forestall war. It created war.

One thing we can address, it seems to me, is how to create a more balanced economy in the U.S. Even if we had a sound educational system---and the socially-driven agenda in education in the past 50 years makes that problematic---we will always have a large group of people who are best equipped for blue-collar jobs and we will always need the work of that group.

Much is written today about the need to redress our current imbalance and the means by which we might undertake that. Maybe we could read some of that material and use what we learn to cultivate our own national garden---in our own backyard.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: [AQSG2] re: something to think about From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2011 02:11:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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For a more complete understanding of cotton in the world marketplace (beginning with its importance to the economy of West Texas) read, "The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy" by Pietra Rivoli. Be sure to buy the second edition, which is revised and updated. The chapter on the African famer's plight reinforces what Judy Schwender posted.Speaking of textile manufacturing in Africa, Rivoli writes, "..The moribund textile industry in East Africa is testament not so much to mitumba {used clothing markets} but to the handicaps faced by African manufacturing in general. which are in turn similar to the handicaps faced by the African cotton farmers. While some of the blame must be borne by rich-country policies such as subsidies and trade barriers, textile factories are in trouble in Africa for the same reasons that factories of any kind are in trouble in "Africa" corruption, political risk, low education levels, insecure property rights, macroeconomic instability and ineffective commercial codes -- in a phrase, bad governance."

"In West Africa cotton is a principal cash crop and export, and provides more than one-quarter of export earnings for 11 countries. While decades behind the United Sattes in technology, productivity, and yields, because of low-prices or even free family labor, African cotton farmers can produce cotton at significantly lower cost than 'Texas growers. 'Though West Afriuca has many more players -- 18 million cotton farmers to Anerica's 25,000 -- the US government's deep pockets virtually assure the continued dominance of the United States. On average, US cotton farms produce more than 400 times the cotton that the typical African farm. " Corruption is rife at every stop. A truck carrying cotton might be stopped for bribes 48 times per trip.

Not a dry book with just facts ane numbers,"Travels" is an easy read,

Judy Grow Flemington NJ

----- Original Message ----- From: Gaye Ingram To: quilt History List ; AQSG2@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2011 12:53 AM Subject: [AQSG2] re: something to think about

 It's so hot here in Louisiana that I doubt the wisdom of anything I or anyone else in these parts says, but......

Because of the complexities of the commodity-to-market process, it's hard for us to do anything about what goes on in Africa or other places. We may talk about globalism, but globalism simply puts more distance between producer and product, makes the individual more powerless to bring about change.

In his little novel "Candide," Voltaire finally concluded that perhaps the best one can do is cultivate his own garden. Focus on the local. I think he was right in that.

All of us need to be better informed about domestic commodities, their production, and their processing. And I believe we need to do all in our power to encourage our farm crops' being brought to production within our own national boundaries. I've studied economics and understand many of the reasons manufacturing has moved away. But I also understand it was not self-propelled and it is not an unmixed blessing. Our choices created the current situation, and while we can, I think we ought to consider whether we like the results of those choices.

Living in a section of the country that became victim to the same cash crop, cotton, and that did not develop the means of bringing that crop to market as a textile, I shudder at our nation's growing dependence on world commodity markets and our having relinquished the means of manufacturing. In the South we paid dearly for that imbalance, both in the social degradation that accompanied human slavery and the economic impotence that resulted from the lack of manufacturing resources.

In terms of economy and a number of other things, the northern and southern states operated like independent entities in 1860. Our touted economic interdependence did not forestall war. It created war.

One thing we can address, it seems to me, is how to create a more balanced economy in the U.S. Even if we had a sound educational system---and the socially-driven agenda in education in the past 50 years makes that problematic---we will always have a large group of people who are best equipped for blue-collar jobs and we will always need the work of that group.

Much is written today about the need to redress our current imbalance and the means by which we might undertake that. Maybe we could read some of that material and use what we learn to cultivate our own national garden---in our own backyard.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: RE: Something to think about From: karenquilt@rockisland.com Date: Wed, 03 Aug 2011 23:31:26 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

The irony to me in this whole discussion is that cotton growing and production in the Old World started in India and Pakistan some 7,000 years ago. The Indus cotton industry was well developed and some methods used in cotton spinning and fabrication continued to be used until the modern industrialization of India. Well before the first century C.E., the USE of cotton textiles had spread from India to the Mediterranean and beyond. BUT India managed to hold on to cotton growing and production.

It wasnt until British expansion in India and the establishment of colonial rule almost 2,000 years later, i.e. 17th and 18th centuries, that cotton production in India gradually declined. This was largely due to colonialist mercantile policies of the British East India Company, which made cotton processing and manufacturing workshops in India uncompetitive. New inventions and the Industrial Revolution added to this suppression of cottonproduction in its native country. So oppressive did these mercantile policies become that eventually Indian markets were forced to supply only raw cotton and were forced, by British-imposed law, to purchase manufactured textiles from Britain.

But what goes around, comes around, some say. Once again cotton production in the world has relocated. But different reasons brought about the re-location of production this time around. And this time it took only 350 years, not 1,700. Cotton production has gone back to where it came from, India and Pakistan, with some additional Asian countries such as China, Korea and Japan added to the list. Pretty amazing IMHO. We may think this is bad for America, but it is creating new jobs elsewhere in the world, though far fewer than cotton production used to create simply because of the on-going change in the technology of production. Such changes are always hard on somebody. This time around it is the USA and the U.K. But I have to admit, the loss of so many manufacturing jobs in the USA does make me a uneasy, even while I am glad for others around the world who are climbing out of poverty. It's a real conundrum.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: test From: Mitzioakes@aol.com Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2011 09:32:00 EDT X-Message-Number: 4

You are coming thru loud and clear (if that is a term still used for the computer world) here is little old Vermont, USA (we do have more than cows and maple syrup you know!). Mitzi Oakes

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Subject: Re: test From: quiltnsharron@charter.net Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2011 10:59:47 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

 

This is interesting. I emailed Janet as well and simply replied to her email just as you did. My message like yours was simply "you're coming in clear here in Texas" - and yet yours went through but mine came back saying I copied too much of Janet's original message. Hmmmm. Atmospheric disturbance, solar flairs, something out of this world??????????????

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: Re: #2 - Fair quilts From: Cindy Claycamp <muddyforkfarms@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2011 11:11:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

 

Sally and All I just judged at the Indiana State Fair in the antique department. I was very disappointed in the entries. There were only about 12 quilts all in one category ( pre-1960) . There were 4 woven coverletsone was in excellant condition. There was an( other) category and it's entries were sub-standard. We've had excessive heat here in IndianaI think that may have prevented people from bring their pieces. The highlight of the entries was the samplers. I choose one dated 1841second place was dated 1832 and was made by an adult. Prize money awards are 1-$10 2-$8 3-$6 4-$4. There appeared to be many quilts to judge in the new categoriesthere were several racks of clothing being judged also. Cindy ClaycampAQS certified appraiser in very hot and muggy southern Indiana

P.S. As a grandmaI hold bragging rights for a precious grand-daughter whose 4-H sewing project won our county fair's top modeling award and top construction award ( a Bernina sewing machine) She is going to state fair tomorrow to model her outfit. She made a ski-jacket and bib style ski pants. Yesthe building will be air conditioned! Thanks for indulging me this little boast.

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Subject: Re: #2 - Fair quilts From: Dale Drake <ddrake@ccrtc.com> Date: Thu, 04 Aug 2011 13:05:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Cindy:

Tell your granddaughter congratulations - you're raising her up right!

To me, the $30 entry fee is a discouragement to placing anything in the Indiana State Fair. It DOES cover multiple entries, and it DOES include some admission tickets, but the fee could be part of the issue.

Our local county fair has no entry fee and has a pretty good turnout every year. Prizes: $1.00, $.75 and $.50. Someone apparently didn't tell the Fair Board it's no longer the 1860s and they should up the prize amounts. :-) But we enter anyway because we're nosy and like to see what our neighbors are up to. And yes, I entered a quilted wall hanging (to keep this on topic).

Dale Drake in Morgan County Indiana

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Subject: Fair Quilts - a typical listing. From: suereich@charter.net Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2011 13:40:50 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 9

Fairs of our childhood bring back the best memories. Growing up, we spent summers on our Grandmother's farm in Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Going to the Crawford County Fair in August was a tradition my siblings keep to this day. I plan to return there in three weeks with my four year old grandson. This is a another typical listing. The article gives us few clues about quiltmaking in Nevada in the early 1880s.

Weekly Nevada State Journal Reno, Nevada October 21, 1882 Page 4 QUILTS Best silk, Mrs. C. Thrall, premium. Best silk, Mrs. Rosenberg, premium recommended. Worsted patchwork, Mrs. Ketton, premium. Best cotton patchwork, Miss Ruff, premium. Crocheted bed spread, Louise Beck- er, premium. Crocheted bed spread, Mrs. Win- termantle, Loomis' special. Knit bed spread, Mrs. J. C. Harlow, premium. Darned lace curtains, Mrs. J. C. Harlow, premium recommended. Charm quilt patchwork, Mrs. J. C. Haynes, premium recommended.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: Fair Quilts - a typical listing. From: Laurie Magee and Tom Blajeski <lamlib47@gmail.com> Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2011 13:54:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

I and fellow members of Lakeside Quilters, Oshkosh Wisconsin are currently involved in a quilt show at the Winnebago Co. Fair. We have about 75 items with the oldest dating C1820 and the newest finished in July. We consider it an opportunity to expose the community to our passion. We are also making charity quilts on site AND selling items to support our charity quilt efforts!

Laurie in FINALLY sightly cooler Wisconsin

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Subject: Cotton Prices From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2011 12:06:22 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 11

Another article on the subject: http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/02/us-cotton-quilting-idUSTRE77145G20110802

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Subject: RE: test From: "Janet O'Dell" <janet@techinfo.com.au> Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2011 08:40:10 +1000 X-Message-Number: 12

Thank you Sharron, this may be the key. I had copied part of a word .doc into my email and it failed to appear yet again this morning. I always send in plain text. "You quoted 14 lines, and this mailing list is set to reject messages which quote more than 8 continuous lines of a previous message. Please resubmit your message, this time quoting fewer lines of the previous message."

Anyway, I just wanted to include a quote from Mahatma Ghandi on British colonialism from Beverly Lemire's new book Cotton. I heard her speak at the Lincoln Symposium this year, bought the book and heartily recommend it.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: RE: those ubiqutious 1930s GFG's From: "Mary Waller" <mwaller@vyn.midco.net> Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2011 22:14:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 13

Thanks for all the comments on my question about the GFG. The thing about this one is the how extremely uniform and consistently coordinated all the fabrics are, like we see when today's fabrics are all from one "line", and how uniform the size of the hexagons is, while we suspected no company could fussy cut hexagons for kits. Rosie Werner's response about Grandmother Clark kits containing strips of 18 different fabrics sounds very plausible. A kit with that many fabrics sounded like our "pre-cuts" of today of fat quarter bundles and jelly rolls.

Mary Waller Vermillion, South Dakota, USA

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Subject: The County fair From: suereich@charter.net Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2011 07:59:16 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Weekly News Frederick, Maryland October 23, 1884 Page 6 THE COUNTY FAIR. A Pleasant Retrospective of the Four Day's Carnival. {Special Correspondence Daily News.} In the records of Frederick there is an annual event which rouses the slumbering city into more than usual vigor and life, viz., its County Fair, whose reputation is spread far and wide. This week has been one of marked interest, the whole city threw open its hospitable doors, and all the "sisters, cousins, and aunts" flocked to the abodes of their respective rela- tives. It truly has been a gala week, everybody and his grandmother has taken in the twenty-fourth annual fair of Frederick County.... Needlework.--For the best fancy hair work, Mrs. Dr. G. Hoffman; second best, Miss Ginnie Goff. Best afghans, Miss Aida Herring; second best, Miss A. M. Brunner. Best silk quilt, Miss Helen Jones; second best, Mrs. H. A. Siligson. Best worsted tidy, Miss H. Triscott; second best, Miss Mollie Swain. Best thread tidy Miss Maggie Ramsburg; second best Mrs. A. C. Mcbride. Best silk needlework , Miss Min- nie Markey; second best, Miss Gussie Snouffer. Best worsted work, Mrs. Archie Snouffer, sec- ond best, Miss Emma Beongie. Best hearth rug, Miss Sue Jamison. Best pillow shams, Miss M. S. Ramsburg; second best, Miss Belle Stewart. Best lace needlework, Miss Sallie Angel; second best, Miss Ida Hillary. Best counterpane, Miss Ella Anderson; second best, Mrs. Charles Mantz. Best home made hose, Miss Georgia Steiner. Best short hose, Miss Mantz. Best made lady's dress, Miss Irene Ruse, second best, Miss Cora Bradenburg. Best infant's dress, Miss Emma Sinn; second best, Mrs. Dr. D. E. Stone. Best tablecloth, home- made, Miss S. E. Gault. Best quilt, Miss Clara Worthington; second best, Mrs. W. H. Lease. Discretionary--Fancy work, Mrs. H. Landauer; toilet set, Mrs. Chas. H. Baughman.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Worsted Tidy From: Judy Knorr <jknorr@optonline.net> Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2011 08:32:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I was reading the account of the Frederick Co. Fair that Sue posted. Among the prizes awarded was best and second best for a "worsted tidy and a thread tidy". I'm curious to know what a "tidy" is! Judy Knorr

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Subject: Re: Worsted Tidy From: michele mclaughlin <mickiemclaug58@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2011 05:56:46 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Judy...Not sure if this is what they are referring to or not but....  My Nana and great Grandma made what they calledTidies for the arm rests and the top of the chair to protect the furniture (mostly I think from dirty hands and men with stuff like vitalis in their hair). I still have a lot of them here, some crocheted and some embroidered. At least that is what our family called a Tidy. I'm assuming a worsted one is crochetedbut I am not a crochet person.  Michele McLaughlin Allentown PA

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Subject: Re: Worsted Tidy From: KJB139@aol.com Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2011 09:35:49 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

Here is a link to a picture of crocheted and embroidered tidy that is for sale on etsy. a Tidy is a chair protector:

_http://www.etsy.com/listing/77517791/embroidered-and-crocheted-french-tidy_ (http://www.etsy.com/listing/77517791/embroidered-and-crochete d-french-tidy)

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Subject: RE: Sue's county fair reports From: "Mary Waller" <mwaller@vyn.midco.net> Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2011 09:25:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Sue, thanks for all the fair reports. What is a "tidy", and what would the "home made hose" and "short hose" mentioned in the 1884 Frederick, MD county fair results look like? BTW, our cousin lives in Frederick and is interested in history and antiques, so I will forward this to her. Our county fair is this week, and yes, I'm entering.

Years ago, I wondered what were so many Americans who 'made things in America' would do when our manufacturing jobs were all outsourced overseas. Now we know. Gaye, would you run for public office? PLEASE?

Mary Waller Vermillion, South Dakota, USA

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Subject: RE: Something to think about From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net> Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2011 11:17:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Karen wrote, "I have to admit, the loss of so many manufacturing jobs in the USA does make me a uneasy, even while I am glad for others around the world who are climbing out of poverty. It's a real conundrum. " --------------- Hey Karen,

I think the loss of so many manufacturing jobs in the USA should make us more than uneasy. It should alarm us.

And to imagine that the USA must give up manufacturing in order to help other nations climb out of poverty is a faulty dilemma---a logical fallacy characterized by offering only two choices when more than two choices actually exist. So don't buy into that kind of reasoning.

Since Lyndon Johnson's nationalized wars (on poverty, on Vietnam, on nearly anything that raised its head), we've come to believe we can change anything anywhere with American government's cash infusions. We've become Promethean, hubristic.

And we've come to doubt the accuracy of the analogy between our personal experience and the affairs of the state. Too simplistic, we're told by talking heads and lazy elected officials. It's all too complex for us to understand, they tell us. And we seem to agree.

And so we believe we are powerless. We rely on technocrats, on ivory-tower and gutter economists to decide things for us that should be considered and discussed in public bodies, with constituencies.

What else besides the conviction that we are ignorant and powerless would make a nation permit such a dangerous financial vehicle as derivatives without discussion, for instance? Personally, most of us want to invest our money in something specific and observable, something we can monitor. Bonds with entities whose financial records are on the books, a start-up that is likely to create value in the future, real estate we know, stocks in companies whose histories we know---these are the things in which we invest our own bucks.

Who among us would tell her financial advisor, "I don't have any idea where to invest my retirement funds. I leave that entirely up to you"? And then just toss the reports on our investments?

In our personal lives, most of us know we cannot afford to support everyone in our community or city who is needy. We might be able to help one family---temporarily or in limited ways. But we want to help the millions, our domestic population as well as people in faraway places with the strange-sounding names. Government does not have our limitations, we tacitly reason.

The minute we declare ourselves in a situation too complex for us to understand is the minute we should do all in our power to get out of it, whether it is in our personal lives or in the government which we must oversee.

It is our duty to inform ourselves about government, and it's our elected officials' duty to inform us, to explain situations and choices--- not in political rhetoric, but in factual terms.

From the time I was four or five years old, my parents saw that I gave up some of my own time and ability to help others. Christians were commanded to love their neighbors. Charity. Acts of charity don't always feel good at first, my mother assured me, because we are naturally selfish. But that's okay: they awaken empathy, which awakens love. And love helps overcome a lot of our selfishness.

Charity, I was taught, begins at home, in the neighborhood, with the temperamental old lady down the street or the child in a polio center iron lung. We must love those nigh to us---our neighbors---if we are to acquire real charity.

That does not mean, however, that we must neglect our own valid interests. The worldview that produced the US was rooted in commandments that instructed us to love others as we love ourselves.

My experience and study of history make me believe that nations must look to their own interests first because in many things, those are the only ones over which they have any real control.

Moreover, the U.S. position in the world makes realism in its economy and international politics the best course for the peace-loving world.

Americans once discussed the limits of power, but post WW II, we seem to believe we can do anything we want, that we can change anything and everything---everywhere. We love sharing our national, impersonal wealth, but we do not wish to pay for the act as individuals. We assign that task to those we deem "rich," which, we are sure, does not include us.

That's not charity. It's selfishness. It assumes, as Scott Fitzgerald once wrote, "the very rich are different from you and I [sic]." They cannot be trusted to use their earnings wisely and well. Their work does not earn them the right to manage their earnings. The foundation of charity is empathy, the sense of identity. It is required in our dealings both with those poorer than ourselves and those who are wealthier.

Moreover, as a nation we have not bothered to follow up on our investments. Thus, a program like Head Start, which has always had abysmal results, lives for fifty years without revision or public outcry. If we bothered to look at our local program, we would know the funds are doled out politically, with minimal or no regard for professional qualifications of those who run the program and the classrooms. We would recognize it was not even a part of the Education Department. Had we paid the Head Start agencies locally, out of local tax revenues, we would have noticed its documented poor performance early. Its continuance would have been linked to its effectiveness---because we would have had to make choices about where we put our revenues, we would have had to justify the program on some ground other than a sort of national brother-in-law pay-out, a political means to keep a constituency in our political camp.

So as quilters maybe we can start by looking at cotton and its manufacture into cloth, whether we really want to support off-shore processing or we want to find ways to return that particular industry to our shores, to provide Americans jobs.The artificial manipulation of prices and production costs of cotton and other commodities is a fact often neglected. A complex system of subsidies, planting limitations, and often baseless EPA regulations often work against our national interests. We should learn how these affect real farmers, real textile producers.

You are in a good position to identify ways we might act in this matter. It would be a good deed for the day. Or month.

My position teaches me this: if we are to be a nation of good stewards of our gifts, we need to attend to our educational system, because we have produced a generation or two that lacks the means to frame a question or reason about the validity of proposed answers. We should be demanding not that school boards put more "technology" in classrooms, but that they require more and more rigorous homework. We should stop using texts and curricula to indoctrinate private agendas and try to inculcate the civic values on which our national survival depends by rewarding achievement and good citizenship.

We might fail, but then again, we might not.

Gaye

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Subject: Re: Worsted Tidy From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2011 13:41:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

This is interesting, because in my museum world we called them "antimacassars" -- macassar being the hair oil. Nasty fellows. They are also responsible for destroying coverlets and quilts with their big old beards! Candace perry

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Subject: Re: Worsted Tidy From: Sally Ward <sallytatters@fastmail.co.uk> Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2011 18:48:29 +0100 X-Message-Number: 7

Is it a British interpretation that I would think of a 'tidy' as a small bag, like a hussif, or a receptacle like a glass dish, for putting things in? I seem to remember a 'hair tidy' being an essential part of a Victorian lady's personal grooming kit, a place to put all the nightly combings from her lovely locks so that it could be collected to fill out hair up-dos.

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: Worsted Tidy From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net> Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2011 16:10:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Is "tidy" a regional usage? I'm like Candace,knew "antimacassars" and sometimes "doilies."

Gaye

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Subject: THANK YOU KRIS From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2011 10:30:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

This is essentially a list about quilts quilt history and various andsundry related subjects. Politics is not one of those subjects and as such our list mom has every right to either reject/delete such posts or gently request that we not make unrelated posts. It happens regularly on other lists. Because Kris allows it and because we do not experience enraged outcriesof protest from one another we are able to enjoy and process the gems of wisdom from Gaye and others. Gaye being foremost in my mind because I love her dearly and anything she writes is poetic. I think I could readher grocery lists and find them lyrical. SO thank you all for not raising indignant heads. I am very guilty of being one of those Americans (God I love that word!) who is confused by the political process I feel helpless hopeless and endlessly annoyed with the entire thing. Gaye helps me sort out my thoughts. Perhaps we should all print out Gaye's last post and send it to every politician on everylevel that we can.  Again thanks for being a tolerant list. We are among friends methinks.

Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies

but I don't believe I deserved my friends."

Walt Whitman

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Subject: Worsted tidy From: Judy Knorr <jknorr@optonline.net> Date: Sun, 07 Aug 2011 11:36:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

It's great that we learn so much on this list. I had never heard the term "tidy" used for these items although my grandmother had lots of them on her furniture. We called them doilies or antimaccassars. Thanks for sharing. Judy Knorr

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Subject: Hair receivers From: linda laird <clproducts@gmail.com> Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2011 11:15:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Small decorated ceramic bowls with lids that had holes in the top to receive the hair combings that were used to fill out hairdos and to make decorative flowered wreaths around death photos. The wreath and photo were often placed in a frame to protect the hair. The entire object was often photographed as a remembrance of the person. Sometimes the death photos had open eyes to look more "alive." 

Linda Laird

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Subject: Re: Worsted Tidy From: michele mclaughlin <mickiemclaug58@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2011 10:51:59 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Not sure "Tidy" is a regional word........however....  That portion of the family are from the coal regions of Pennsylvania and dohave a variety of words they use that are different than the PA Dutch herein the Lehigh Valley.   However I did find this: http://www.alleyroselinens.com/item_228/Pkg-of-36-Vintage-Antimacassar-Pins-Still-in-original-unopened-package.htm

Stay cool, Michele in Allentown PA --- --

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Subject: Re: OT postings, thanks From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ss@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2011 11:09:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

"Again, thanks for being a tolerant list. We are among friends, methinks. "

My thoughts, exactly. I agree, Teddy. Gaye, I am not sure I agree wholly, but that is largely because your piece deserves a deeper and more thoughtful reading than I have the spirit for this week. But, I have printedit out that I might do that.

A great relief to read a thoughtful point of view. The last weeks of chatter from the political parrots in my backyard has been worse than the noise from the cicada outbreak. And certainly more damaging. Susan

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Subject: Re: OT postings, thanks From: Mitzioakes@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2011 15:50:07 EDT X-Message-Number: 7

'Political Parrots' - LOVE IT!!!!!! I am sure I will use that phrase, if it ok with you all, for the three kooks we have in Congress at this time ......(tho Bernie Sanders is not all that bad and that is saying something from me, the conservative who asked Mr. Sanders, aka Flea Head in the early '70s to leave a meeting I was chairing.........) Gaye, your piece has been printed out and being read by family here and it has been forwarded to Ohio to my brother. I will be sure to forward his comments and I bet you will get roses from him on that piece. Mitzi - from still hot Vermont

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Subject: Tidies From: sgmunsey@comcast.net Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 03:27:27 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 8

Gaye and others:

Indeed, "tidy" may be a regional term, but I think the region may be fairlylarge, if it included Maryland, becausemy Nova Scotian born and a New Hampshire wed grandmother always called the crocheted pieces for the backs and arms of chairs "tidies". Antimacassar seemed to be "outmoded" and "Victorian"to her. Some of the crocheted tidies could be fairly large to cover more than just the head area of a chair back, too.

Chair tidies could be lace trimmed embroidered cotton of some kind, fancy for the front room (parlor, some years earlier), with less formal fabric forthe sitting room (family room in today's parlance).

I am wondering of the "worsted tidies" might have been made from a light weight wool, although I seem to remember there once was cotton worsted, too. Wool worsted would stick to the plush upholstery better than the crocheted or some cotton fabrics. Knitted, perhaps, instead of crochetedor stitched??

I am afraid "tidies" and "doilies", the similarly crocheted or embroidered pieces to place under items on display on table tops, et al, mostly havegone the way of many Victorian "covers" by now, a century later.

Just my thoughts on the subject.

Sandra on Cape Cod in Seacoast New Hampshire this weekend, my geographic roots to which I am now mostly a stranger.

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Subject: Tidies From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 09:49:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

<<<I am afraid "tidies" and "doilies" the similarly crocheted or embroidered =3Dpieces to place under items on display on table tops et al mostly have=3DC2=3D=3DA0gone the way of many Victorian "covers" by now a century later.=3D20>>> A great many of them have made their way into my quilts! As a matter of fact I'm working on a commission quilt now a life story memory quiltand using bits and pieces and trims of old needlework that are generally of no use. Even if the center of a piece is unsavory the trim is usuallysalvageable. Not news to anyone here surely. Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies

but I don't believe I deserved my friends."

Walt Whitman

 

www.teddypruett.com

 

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Subject: RE: Hair receivers From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 10:27:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

The hairwork is not always just for mourning -- the gals made them for sentimental purposes also, I believe, out of living loved ones' hair! This is an interesting tradition you describe Linda, and can't say I've heard of one quite like that. Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: Tidies From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 10:35:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I know a gal who is using these things and making aprons out of the lace and other pieces -- they are quite grand...she also makes little girl dresses out of the old fancy pillow cases. From a curatorial point of view, I hate this stuff, and am very careful what I keep for the collection -- it has to have good provenance. Right no since folks of a certain age are breaking up households to downsize I am getting a ton of it -- and I more frequently than not have to say no to it. It's sad -- someone went to all that trouble and time to make these things and there's not much use for them, or love for them in 2011. In the interest of politics, perhaps the tea partiers would adopt the doilies and anti-macassars for use at, well, the tea parties! Candace Perry

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Subject: from Shelly Zegart: 19th Century Hexagon Quilts From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 10:38:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Looking for EARLY 19th Century Hexagon Pattern Quilts ONLY

Hexagon Quilt Exhibition

Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival, January 2012

The response from all of you to my first email was just terrific. I have a lot of great Hexagon examples to choose from.

Originally I queried for quilts up to the present, but the decision was made in Tokyo that the present day Hexagon quilts would be made by Japanese quilt makers so I do not need any present day ones, sadly.

What I do still need for the exhibition are some 1st and 2nd quarter 19th century examples. (In good condition for travel and hanging), no tops though.

Please send images to me as soon as possible.

If you know of another person or institution that might have examples, please send me the information for your contacts. We are limited to borrowing in North America only

For your quilts to be considered, please let me know pertinent details about the quilt and send a photograph (preferably jpeg) to zegartquilt@gmail.com or mail to Shelly Zegart, 300 Penruth Avenue, Louisville, KY 40207 (landline 502-897-7566).

The quilts will initially be sent to my home in Louisville to be photographed and processed. They will be sent together from Louisville to Tokyo. NHK, the sponsor, will pay a $300.00 honorarium to borrow each quilt and will cover all insurance, all shipping, and photography. I will do condition reports at both ends of the trip. I will also be in Tokyo for the installation and the take down to supervise. At the festival the quilts are handled as they would be at a museum.

I will need the quilts in Louisville on December 1, 2011 and they will be returned to you no later than March 31, 2012.

With many thanks in advance for your help,

Shelly Zegart

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Subject: From Shelly Zegart: Why Quilts Matter Documentary From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 10:39:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

About the 9-part documentary Why Quilts Matter: History, Art and Politics -some words from Executive Producer Shelly Zegart

Dear all,

For almost three years I have been solely focused on producing this documentary about the passion of my life: quilts and quiltmaking. Through the not-for-profit Kentucky Quilt Project and with a lot of great help, we have created the first documentary series to air on PBS stations that reveals the centrality of the quilt to American culture. We take viewers on an unprecedented journey with a host of collectors, artists, quilt makers, scholars and dealers to go beyond the "how to" and history of quilts, to capture the interest of a broad audience, and to change preconceived notions about quilts. We also do something else unprecedented. We provide our viewers with Image Resource Guides for every episode, available at no cost online at our website. These guides contain information about every image in order of appearance in each episode!

I am thrilled to share the series announcement with all of you.

Our website has launched . The address is www.whyquiltsmatter.org <http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/> . The DVDs are available.

Please join me in spreading the word! Our goal is to break through the barriers we have all experienced in our work with quilts, whether as a maker, scholar, collector or other.

Contact me with any ideas and thoughts you have about ways to expand the reach of our work with quilts, using the series wholly or as single episodes. I am open to lots of great ideas and spin-off projects!

Visit our Contributions page to see how else you might become involved and what kinds of projects we envision for the future.

The word is REALLY out as our facebook page launched today! So, let me clarify a few things for you because rolling out this large of a project always has some parts we haven't yet dealt with or communicated well enough. A couple of those include:

1. Shipping to Canada and outside the U.S. We want to get our systems up and running before we take on international shipping. We have a virtually non-existent staff dealing with ALL of this and to let you in on a little secret. My dear husband Kenny, a retired ob-gyn, is our business manager-shipper person. This is a steep learning curve for him and certainly not what he has been used to doing all day every day. He has spent the last few months becoming best friends with Paypal, stamps.com and other shipping decisions. So be patient and we will work all this out in the near future. 2.

PBS clarification: The series is being distributed to PBS stations through the National Educational Telecommunications Association. What this means is that it was not produced by PBS and therefore will not have a predetermined national airing schedule. Stations that belong to NETA will have access to the series and they can choose to air it if they wish. We have hired a stations relations manager to work to get it aired in as many of the top markets as possible.

Passionately and with lots of excitement, Shelly Zegart

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Subject: Newark Museum quilts -- another opportunity From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 11:17:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Hi friends. As you know the bus tour from the AQSG Seminar has been full for quite some time, and many of you were diappointed that you did not win the lottery for a seat .

I hope it is not too late for you to make plans to stay in the area yet another day. The Newark Museum has decided that since so many of the quilts will be out of storage and the exhibition will be up, that they will run another special quilt day, this one on Tuesday, September 27th. The day will include a lecture from Ulysses S. Dietz, Senior Curator, a tour of the exhibition AND a quilt turning!

You will have to make arrangements on your own for transportation, but this will be an opportunity probably not available again, ever. Spaces are limited, so make arrangements SOON.

http://www.newarkmuseum.org/quiltturning.html

Newark Museum's Great Newark Quilt Turning on Tuesday, September 27, 10:30 am - 4 p.m.

a.. 9:30-10:30 am - Sign-in and coffee reception b.. 10:30 am -- Ulysses Grant Dietz Introductory Lecture c.. 11:00 am - Additional Lectures/roundtable discussion with guests -- names to be announced shortly d.. Q & A e.. 12: 30 pm - 2 pm Lunch & Guided Tours of Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art f.. 2 pm - The Quilt turning -Comprised of four separate tables featuring eight quilts at each table -- each table will be overseen by an assigned moderator/facilitator , who will guide the audience members (minimum15- maximum 25) assigned to that particular table through their examination and exploration of the quilts on display g.. At half-four intervals each audience group will rotate to another table until each group has studied each group of quilts h.. 4 pm - Closing reception with light refreshments Judy Grow

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Subject: Re: THANK YOU KRIS From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net> Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 11:44:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I've been making tee-ninesy buttonhole stitches lately and have not kept up with the list really well. But seeing "Thank You Kris" and Teddy's name made me think maybe all of us were getting a gift or that something had occurred in Teddy's life to which Kris had responded and which I'd missed.

Then I saw my name.

Then I read everything, trying to make out whether someone had protested my remarks about cotton.

I really did not intend them to be partisan and upon rereading them don't think they were partisan. Maybe unclear, but not partisan.

Some background. I had just read Shelly Z's mailing and looked at the brief introduction to her film. That made me think about how many commercial enterprises the most recent quilt revival had generated and continues to support. One of those moments when you squint and see the forest and not just the trees.

Then I opened my email account, which I'd not read in a day or so, and read Karen's response to a discussion about the textile industry's having gone off shore. I know Karen is specially atuned to economics. She said she felt torn between wanting to help poor nations and yet wanting to retain manufacturing jobs in U.S. I thought that was a faulty dilemma, one most of us resort to at some time or other. Having discussed issues with Karen before, I hit the "reply" button, erased the QHL address (or thought I had, at least), and meant to say, "Don't think that way, lady. I just looked at Shelly's email and realize quilters constitute a significant part of the textile economy. What can we do to try to reverse this trend?"

Looking at it just now, I noted that good old Suddenlink had erased my erasure, sent the message to the list, and according to my "out" box had sent it multiple times as well.

All this and steady 103F temps too. (But only 90F at 1AM!)

I believe the production of textiles and refusing to think "there's nothing anyone can do, it's too complex for us to understand" is relevant to quiltmaking and the quilts we study. Our nation's economic situation affects our disposable income, the incomes of those among us who own quilt shops or teach or appraise, the funds available to museums to house and maintain these quilts----well, know this.

As a Southerner, I'm particularly sensitive to the danger of depending on others for manufactured goods. The nation as a whole was not served well by the concentration of manufacturing in a single section of a growing nation and agriculture in another. Such imbalance breeds sectionalism because the interests of agriculture and industry are often at variance. It does the same thing internationally.

There are so many things about which we have little influence. But this seemed to be one where we have influence. And I wondered how we might mobilize that---for the good of our common cause.

HOWEVER, I agree with Teddy re Kris' broadly construed notion of community on our list. I think that is one reason QHL has endured and grown. We really do become a community, we care about one another as people as well as students of quilt history. How civilized.

Now, I'm going back to my wee-tiny stitches.

Gaye

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Subject: RE: Hair receivers From: textique@aol.com Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 14:18:34 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 9

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE240EB803D693_2734_ABA4F_webmail-m144.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Linda,  Hair receivers were made in many mediums and were often included in sets that matched combs, mirrors and covered dresser boxes. While I haven't seen the specific item of momento mori thatyou've described, I don't doubt it exists.  There are many examples of the type described by Candace, with hair from living loved ones, that do have small pictures of the contributors in the background.  I remember one really intricate piece that came into Warren County Historical, without glass, when I was there. It took nearly a week with a pick, my tiny brush and little vacuum tip to clean it.It got new glass right away! 

I documented a very interesting Ohio Schoolgirl Sampler recently with hairwork on it. I know some conservators use hair today for certain types of work.  Jan Thomas  

The hairwork is not always just for mourning -- the gals made them for

sentimental purposes also, I believe, out of living loved ones' hair!

Candace Perry

 

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Subject: Looking for EARLY 19th Century Hexagon Pattern Quilts ONLY From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquilt@gmail.com> Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2011 09:16:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

*Hexagon Quilt Exhibition-Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival, January 2012*

The response from all of you to my first email was just terrific. I have a lot of great Hexagon examples to choose from.Thank you for sending images.

Originally I queried for quilts up to the present, but the decision was made in Tokyo that the present day Hexagon quilts would be made by Japanese quilt makers so I do not need any present day ones, sadly.

*What I do still need for the exhibition are some 1st and 2nd quarter 19thcentury examples. (In good condition for travel and hanging), no tops though. *

Please send images to me as soon as possible.

If you know of another person or institution that might have examples, please send me the information for your contacts. We are limited to borrowing in North America only

For your quilts to be considered, please let me know pertinent details about the quilt and send a photograph (preferably jpeg) to zegartquilt@gmail.comor mail to Shelly Zegart, 300 Penruth Avenue, Louisville, KY 40207 (landline 502-897-7566).

The quilts will initially be sent to my home in Louisville to be photographed and processed. They will be sent together from Louisville to Tokyo. NHK, the sponsor, will pay a $300.00 honorarium to borrow each quilt and will cover all insurance, all shipping, and photography. I will do condition reports at both ends of the trip. I will also be in Tokyo for the installation and the take down to supervise. At the festival the quilts are handled as they would be at a museum.

I will need the quilts in Louisville on December 1, 2011 and they will be returned to you no later than March 31, 2012.

With many thanks in advance for your help,

Shelly Zegart

Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contact@whyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

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Subject: Anyone documenting quilts about presidents? From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Sun, 07 Aug 2011 23:16:16 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

Here is a good candidate to add to your research about quilts that document American presidents.

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2011/08/07/2501623/quilt-lands-in-museum.ht ml

or

http://tinyurl.com/3lnlemd

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Re: Newark Museum quilts -- another opportunity From: JLHfw@aol.com Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 12:04:12 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 12

Dear Judy and Sister QHL members, I would love to stay another day and enjoy seeing the quilts at the Newark Museum on Tuesday. I do not have any transportation available, but would gladly pay someone with a car to cover the extra gas costs. If I could ride to Newark and back to Cherry Hills with anyone of you, please let me know. Then I can change my return flight arrangements. Janet Henderson enjoying an extra day in Santa Fe --part1_dd53.5f5e4bd.3b7162fc_boundary--

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Subject: RE: Hair receivers From: "Barb" <barb.whitehead@roadrunner.com> Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 15:28:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Thank you for this info. I always knew those containers were for dressers but never knew their purpose. Barb in Maine http://quilts-etc.blogspot.com ----- Original Message ----- From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, August 08, 2011 10:27 AM Subject: [qhl] RE: Hair receivers

> The hairwork is not always just for mourning -- the gals made them for > sentimental purposes also, I believe, out of living loved ones' hair! This > is an interesting tradition you describe Linda, and can't say I've heard > of > one quite like that. > Candace Perry > > s.com

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Subject: Re: THANK YOU KRIS From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 18:47:56 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

Well, truth is, that I would love to take credit but I have been away for a few days:-))

Seriously, we can't learn if we deny our past - or our future!. I have had long e-mails from people upset that we talked about sensitive topics in the past. (I would like to give an example, but I know that would generate more E-mails I would have to answer.)

Right now, we may be discussing events that will affect the future of quilting. We need to be listening to each other and, if we don't agree, posting a polite rebuttal to the list. We are here to learn from each other and if we all mindlessly agree with each other, we really won't learn anything.

Kris