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Subject: RE: Hair receivers From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeo@sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2011 06:03:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I like to re-purpose vintage or antique things. I have a vintage Bakelite hair receiver that sits next to my sewing machine when I do machine quilting to receive the safety pins I remove from the quilt sandwich as I quilt. It's kind of cute and keeps my pile of pins nice and tidy.

In my eclectic style of decorating, I rarely put an accessory onto a wood surface without putting a doily or something under it to protect the wood. The doily may also act as a base to tie together pieces I might display as a group. I've also used quilt blocks for this purpose, such as a GFG block under a bud vase.

The country/shabby chic style of decorating shown in magazines (and embraced by my eclecticity [I just made up that word and Spellcheck is going crazy]) often shows these vintage doilies as shelf trims. I think they dress up any display.

It's great to take these lace or cutwork pieces out of the drawer and use them! Then there's more room in the drawer for other stuff.

Barb

Barb Vlack barb@barbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org

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Subject: RE: Hair receivers From: Quilltr@aol.com Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 22:17:39 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I have a hairwork watch chain that a Mother made for her son out of her hair, and it has a locket on it with her picture and her son's baby picture in it. I also made a miniature hairwork arrangement using my own hair for one of the flowers. I have a small collection of hairwork jewelry, and really want a ring, but I can't find one in my size. It's a little easier to find pieces of hairwork, because a lot of people are turned off by the thought of it, but I find the history of it interesting. Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/)

In a message dated 8/8/2011 9:31:28 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, barb.whitehead@roadrunner.com writes:

> The hairwork is not always just for mourning -- the gals made them for > sentimental purposes also, I believe, out of living loved ones' hair!

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Subject: Inquiring mind From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2011 10:45:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Taking a coffee break and noticed this on Ancestry.com, listed among search ideas on the American list:

"Check Ellis Island For Non-Immigrant Ancestors Who May Have Traveled Abroad."

Let's see: who would that be? Pocahontas? She was non-immigrant and travelled (and died) in England?

Puzzled in Parched Louisiana hill country, Gaye

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Subject: Re: Inquiring mind From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2011 08:56:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Gaye, you really should have posted a beverage alert on this one. Now I have to clean tea off the keyboard. :) :) :)Mary AnneFrom: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net>Subject: [qhl] Inquiring mindTaking a coffee break and noticed this on Ancestry.com, listed among search ideas on the American list:"Check Ellis Island For Non-Immigrant Ancestors Who May Have Traveled Abroad."Let's see: who would that be? Pocahontas? She was non-immigrant and travelled (and died) in England? --0-1107446846-1312905409=:36363--

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Subject: RE: Hair receivers From: textique@aol.com Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2011 12:47:08 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE24CB1C9265D1_1A70_D8551_webmail-d173.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I think it was about two weeks ago on Antique's Roadshow, I caught part of an episode showing a wonderful collection of mourning rings. A couple had tiny caskets with miniature skeletons inside them on top of the rings but one had the entire skeleton, from the skull to the foot bones, over-layed around the shank. It was amazing. While I don't have a link to it, I've included the one below, which I read regularly. If you understand mourning items in context, they become less creepy. My personal favorites are mourning embroideries. I would love to see Elizabeth R's coffin quilt, in person. I talked to Linda Otto on several occasions about it.

http://artofmourning.wordpress.com/category/sentimental-jewellery/page/2/

Jan Thomas

really want a ring, but I can't find one in my size. It's a little easier to

find pieces of hairwork, because a lot of people are turned off by the 

thought of it, but I find the history of it interesting.

Lisa

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Subject: Cotton Prices From: Mary Persyn <mary.persyn@valpo.edu> Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2011 08:43:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

After our discussion about cotton production - Did any of you receive an email from commoditiesmerchant@gmail.com with prices for cotton futures? It seems to have come from Pakistan.

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn mary.persyn@valpo.edu Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917

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Subject: RE: Hair receivers From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephanie@stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2011 11:33:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Thanks for sharing that link. I'm fascinated by mourning "culture." I have a lovely hair brooch but I don't know if it's a mourning brooch or just a friendship/lovers thing.

I'm going ot have to find that skeleton episode because my mother-in-law had a tiny joined skeleton (probably ivory) and I've always wanted to know the rest of that story. This is a clue. My daughter has it now.

Saw a wonderful display of mourning material culture items years ago at the Lynchburg VA confederate cemetery ....

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Dear Inquiring Mind From: linda laird <clproducts@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 10 Aug 2011 18:10:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I fear your history dates may be a tad confused. Poor old Pocahantas left long before Ellis Island was a gleam in the settler's eye. Some of my ancestors went back and forth through Ellis though they arrived in the US in 1832. Ellis was only used for immigrants from 1892 to the early 1920s. My youngest ancestor to go through was 2 months, oldest 70. One fellow went back and forth many time in the same two years. Quite a few were listed as US citizens. I suspect that the immigrants were down below while some accommodations were more hospitable for wealthier travelers going back and forth. Perhaps the sailors on the ships were recorded.

Glad you made me look again because I've found a whole new Jewish line from Austria to research and connect and even a guy from Norway.

Thank goodness we've still got minds that are inquireable.

Linda Laird=

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Subject: Hair receivers From: Jean Lester <jeantomlester@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2011 01:04:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I know my grandmother used her hair receiver ( hand painted by her) to make rats(?) that were the color of her hair. She had very thin hair and she would make a roll, in a hair net, to be able to tuck her around it and look fuller. I figured that what they were always for. I never saw any of the art pieces around her house.

Jean

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Subject: RE: Tidies From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn@rocketmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2011 13:50:17 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

. Right no since folks of a certain age are breaking uphouseholds to downsize I am getting a ton of it -- and I more frequentlythan not have to say no to it. It's sad -- someone went to all that troubleand timeto make these things and there's not much use for them Candace,I collect them, as does my sister (although we collect slightly different items, which serves us well when antiquing together.) My latest 'use' is to applique doilies and dresser scarves to solid-colored pillows. (I fold the dresser scarves so that the embroidered ends just lap around the pillow, withthe blank middles doubled over on themselves.) We've long commented on howsad it was that women made these beautiful things, then didn't allow themselves to use them. I have a set of embroidered sheets my great-aunt (for whom I'm named) made, which my mother inherited in pristine condition, and rarely used for 'company'. OTOH, the embroidered sheets I did for my sister for a wedding present have disintegrated (the marriage is still doing nicely, 35 years later!). But I know my sister used those sheets, and enjoyed them, and I doubt there was much else I could have given her back then that she'd still have now, anyway. ;)  --0-744628557-1313095817=:81283--

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Subject: Re: THANK YOU KRIS From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn@rocketmail.com> Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2011 14:13:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Kris,>>I have had long e-mails from people upset that we talked about sensitive topics in the past. (I would like to give an example, but I knowthat would generate more E-mails I would have to answer.)Well. That's the beauty of the Internet...there is very literally something for everyone. And 'something' is increasing exponentially on a regular basis.It is a common experience to discover that a list, or community, that one thought was a comfy fit really isn't. Think about quilt shops or quilt guilds. I've quit going to certain quilt shops because the owner stocks fabric and pattern books that just aren't my style. I've left quilt guilds because they were designed for people on a vastly different skill level from myself. Obviously, they were meeting someone's needs, it just wasn't mine. And I've gone back to some shops, once my tastes changed, because I wanted those fabrics I'd eschewed three or four years earlier. :)IMO, a list owner has the right to set the parameters for their list- that someone else uses stricter or looser criteria makes as much sense as saying Frenchshould not be spoken in France because it's not the national language of America. France gets to set its own rules, America gets to set its rules, and they can be in agreement or in glorious contradiction. If it troubles someone that Kris allows 'sensitive topics', then there are other groups that stay rigidly on topic, or the troubled one can form her own. It's a free Internet. But what always boggles my mind is the person who, having observed others having a pleasant, collegial conversation on a topic not to her liking, tells them to stop discussing it. Would this happen at a quilt guild work day? Seriously? If we can tolerate topics of conversation that bore us in the real world, we should be able to tolerate them on a listserv. After all, it's a lot easier to ignore/delete on the Internet than it is when you're sitting next to someone who keeps telling you aboutsomething that doesn't rivet your attention.Jocelyn________________________________

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Subject: Re: THANK YOU KRIS From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larryw@greenhills.net> Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2011 21:02:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I usually am quiet on such things, but, I have enjoyed the posts discussing the price of cotton and all the trappings that come with it. I may or may not agree with everything said but it does give me food for thought. That is how I learn. Each of us have a different spot on the mountain to look out from, I like to glimpse what view you all have from time to time. Please, Please, do not stop the free exchange of ideas. As long as no one is being flamed (and they were not here) then bring on the hard topics and let's look them over.

Thanks for sharing everything quilt related!

Sherrie Wohlgemuth Missouri

-----Original Message----- From: Jocelyn Martin [mailto:martinjocelyn@rocketmail.com] Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2011 4:13 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: THANK YOU KRIS

Kris, >>I have had long e-mails from people upset that we talked about sensitive topics in the past. (I would like to give an example, but I know that

would generate more E-mails I would have to answer.)

Well. That's the beauty of the Internet...there is very literally something for everyone. And 'something' is increasing exponentially on a regular basis. It is a common experience to discover that a list, or community, that one thought was a comfy fit really isn't. Think about quilt shops or quilt guilds. I've quit going to certain quilt shops because the owner stocks fabric and pattern books that just aren't my style. I've left quilt guilds because they were designed for people on a vastly different skill level from myself. Obviously, they were meeting someone's needs, it just wasn't mine. And I've gone back to some shops, once my tastes changed, because I wanted those fabrics I'd eschewed three or four years earlier. :)

IMO, a list owner has the right to set the parameters for their list- that someone else uses stricter or looser criteria makes as much sense as saying French should not be spoken in France because it's not the national language of America. France gets to set its own rules, America gets to set its rules, and they can be in agreement or in glorious contradiction. If it troubles someone that Kris allows 'sensitive topics', then there are other groups that stay rigidly on topic, or the troubled one can form her own. It's a free Internet. But what always boggles my mind is the person who, having observed others having a pleasant, collegial conversation on a topic not to her liking, tells them to stop discussing it. Would this happen at a quilt guild work day? Seriously? If we can tolerate topics of conversation that bore us in the real world, we should be able to tolerate them on a listserv. After all, it's a lot easier to ignore/delete on the Internet than it is when you're sitting next to someone who keeps telling you about something that doesn't rivet your attention.

Jocelyn

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Subject: Quilted item at the Metropolitan Museum From: "Lisa Evans" <kittencat3@charter.net> Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2011 22:45:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Yesterday I paid a visit to the Ratti Textile Gallery at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I went specifically to see a rare item: a quilted "cope" from the early 17th century. The "cope," which can be seen here: http://www.metmuseum.org/Works_of_Art/collection_database/islamic_art/cope//objectview.aspx?OID=3D140004949&collID=3D14&dd1=3D14

is a rare example of Indian quilting exported to Europe in the late 16th/early 17th centuries, most likely through the Portuguese trade city of Goa. 

The piece itself was fascinating. It's 81" x 39.5", of cotton with a cotton backing and either no batting or a very thin cotton batt It's early Bengali export work and shows the typical mixture of European huntsmen in tall hats, doublets and trunk hose hunting gazelles, tigers, rabbits, lions, and what appear to be close kin to the Giant Rat of Sumatra. Servitors are in Indian costume, and some of the Europeans are riding elephants. It's in decent condition, although there are two matching stains that probably are the result of someone dumping a liquid on the piece when it was folded in half. The designs are worked in faded yellow silk, with motifs chain stitched (possibly on a tambour frame) through all layers and the background worked in a floreate pattern in extremely tiny backstitches. I was evidently the first person to ask about it in quite some time, and the costume technician at the Met was nodding up and down as I explained to my friend Barbara and some of her fellow lace enthusiasts about what the item was, where it had come from, and how similar items would have gotten to Europe.

I did have problems with the description at the Met, which states that the object is a cope, a half-circle Roman Catholic vestment. I question this for several reasons: first, it's only 39.5" long, which is about the right size for a cope if we're talking about General Tom Thumb, not an adult male (and yes, I know that people were a bit shorter in the 17th century, but they weren't *that* much shorter). 

Second, I seriously question whether it's actually a garment at all because there are no, repeat no signs of wear along the front where a clasp, ties, or a pinned band would have gone if it had been a cope or a half-circle man's cape. No pin marks, no buttonholes, no seams from a pair of ties - nothing. The technician at the Met agreed that I had a point, and believes that the work might have been cataloged incorrectly upon its accession by the Met in 1923, when textile scholarship was basically, well, nonexistent. I personally think it's a table cover of some sort...anyone know if early 17th century tables or sideboards were ever made in lunettes?

There are also two errors in the catalog description, both of which I mentioned to the staff member: there is no lining, of silk taffeta or otherwise, and there is no trace of any sort of red and gold braid along the outer edge, nor any stitch marks that might have indicated the former presence of such embellishment. The staffer thinks is once again due to staff error upon acquisition in 1923, and wondered if the item might have been cataloged at the same time as another piece that was lined and had a strip of braid along the edge.

Regardless, it was a real treat to see a quilted piece that old. I'm going to do some research to see if I can figure out just what it is, and where the donor acquired it before she gave it to the Met. Talk about hidden treasures!

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA

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Subject: Re: Quilted item at the Metropolitan Museum From: Dale Drake <ddrake@ccrtc.com> Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2011 08:28:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Lisa:

Thanks for posting this - it IS spectacular. But take a look at additional view #1 ... that looks like a red and gold braid border. None of the other views that show the edge have it - I'm wondering if maybe it's on the inside?

I agree that it doesn't look like a garment, and certainly not a religious garment - no religious symbolism that I can see on it. Wall hanging perhaps?

Here's the link again - and maybe Karen Alexander will make a tiny URL for us all:

http://www.metmuseum.org/Works_of_Art/collection_database/islamic_art/cope//objectview.aspx?OID=140004949&collID=14&dd1=14

Dale Drake in Indiana

Lisa said:

there is no lining, of silk taffeta or otherwise, and there is no trace of any sort of red and gold braid along the outer edge, nor any stitch marks that might have indicated the former presence of such embellishment.

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Subject: RE: Quilted item at the Metropolitan Museum From: "Kim Baird" <kbaird@cableone.net> Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2011 08:30:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Lisa- Very interesting! I wonder if it was made as a hanging. Could have been part of bed decorations, or more likely, meant to hang in a room somewhere. Kim

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Subject: Re: Quilted item at the Metropolitan Museum From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2011 08:17:03 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

It's not. Trust me, there is no trim, including on the underside of the piece. The staff and I checked the whole item carefully and what appears to be trim is an inch thick embroidered border in yellow tussah silk.

Lisa Evans

In a message dated 8/12/2011 8:28:10 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, ddrake@ccrtc.com writes:

Lisa:

Thanks for posting this - it IS spectacular. But take a look at additional view #1 ... that looks like a red and gold braid border. None of the other views that show the edge have it - I'm wondering if maybe it's on the inside?

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Subject: Holocaust Quilts From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net> Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2011 10:15:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

For those of you interested in the use of quilt making as therapy and records of history, I recommend the web site of the Holocaust Memorial Center and in particular the part devoted to the Kindertransport project. This was the project that permitted many European Jewish parents to send their children to the free world and thus spare their lives before and during WW II.

I am always touched to the core of my being when I look at these quilts and read the recollections of the children, most of them under seven years old. The quilt project was organized by the daughter of one of those children, who was a quilter in Michigan, where many of them located. She invited children like herself to make a block in memory of their parents and the experience and to write something explaining their blocks. The stories and the resulting quilt always remind me of the selflessness that co-exists with selfishness in man. In a time when selfishness seems more evident, this exhibition and book recall a little balance and remind me of what is possible to human beings. Thought some of you might need the reminder too.

While the full text that was available during the exhibition is not now available online, an inexpensive book that includes it can be purchased at the museum site.

See <http://www.holocaustcenter.org/kinderTransport/index.html>

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Correction From: Gaye Ingram <gingram@suddenlink.net> Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2011 11:11:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

In my preceding post, I wrote "She [the daughter of one of the Holocaust children] invited children like herself to make a block in memory of their parents and the experience and to write something explaining their blocks."

Wrong pronouns.

The quilt organizer invited members of her parent's generation to make the blocks. The heart is almost stopped by some of the things those people recorded.

I once had a friend and classmate who was one of those children and who found a home with a family in London. She said she felt so terribly alone, though people were exceptionally kind to her. There were speakers on utility poles at street corners that broadcast public safety announcements and also Winston Churchill's speeches, which seemed to occur fairly regular. She said that when she walked to her school a block or so from her home, Churchilloften addressed Londorners. At such moments, she said, traffic stopped, people on sidewalks stood still, everything grew quiet. She was a very young child and believed it was the voice of God she was hearing. She said that voice made her feel completely safe and loved and at home. She looked forward to those moments. When her English family read the story of Moses and theburning bush to her, she always responded, "Like Mr. Churchill," somethingthat puzzled them for years. She told me that even as an adult, Churchill's voice made her feel secure, part of a protected group.

Too soon we forget.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Crazy Patchwork kits? From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddy@btinternet.com> Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 16:02:09 +0100 (BST) X-Message-Number: 1

At an exhibition inCoventry, UK, acuratorial noteattached to an English Crazy Patchwork Quiltexplained the fashion for this style of patchwork in Victorian times and also stated that kits for making crazy patchwork had been available. I don't know of any such kits having been marketed in UK and wonder if anyone knows iftheymight have been availablein America? If so, I'd be interested to know who marketed them, what they comprised and even, if that were possible, if there are any known examples of the patchwork produced from them.Just in case any List members are currently in UK, the exhibition is called 'Stitch in Time'and is at the Herbert Museum and Gallery in Coventry until October. Definitely worth a detour to see it if you can make it. http://www.theherbert.org/index.php/home/whats-on/stitch-in-time-a-story-of-patchworkThanks in advance - I'm always confident that QHL will come up with something - even if the answer's in the negative!CeliaCelia EddyTheBrown HouseFleming PlaceMaryportCumbria CA15 6ESTel: 01900 814959 --0-1151906565-1313334129=:73738--

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Subject: museum intake records, hairwork From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 10:15:35 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Concerning recent postings about file notes at the Met when doing research in the Ratti textile collection, yesit is surprising to read the accession information that is sometimes all there is on file. When things were donated decades ago, the intake notes reflect the limited knowledge of the era. it would be a great project to undertake to go through the quilt ones at least and modernize the data, maybe this is a project that quilt historians could propose to them, or maybe a bunch of us could volunteer to do thetask. Anyone interested, I could approach them if they don;t already read the qhl.  Re using hair as a fiber in needlework, hair jewelry and three-dimensional hair shadowbox compositions are known and collected. There is a fascinatingdistinct subcategory ofhairwork in which it is used as the embroidery thread in the silkneedlework pictures from an Albany NY girls academy; they usually depict a particular church and its graveyard, with tombs, sometimes greiving mourners, and evenfreshly mounded graves done with french knots! It's called 'en grisaille" work and is typically black and ivory only. I don't think I have ever seen one with colors, I have a damaged one that was .  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage@yahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-486531134-1313342135=:15305--

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Crazy Patchwork kits? From: xenia cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 15:42:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Celia, I am not aware of any commercial kits for crazy patchwork, but it was possible for people to buy offcuts of silks, satins, and velvets from companies manufacturing the fabrics themselves, or items from these fabrics; during the height of popularity for this style, the back pages of magazines and publications from embroidery thread companies had advertisements for bags of scrap suitable for crazy quilt making. These were often businesses capitalizing on what would otherwise have been waste materials.

At the same time hatmakers and those who made men's ties and overcoats with silk or satin linings sold offcuts, tobacco companies offered premiums in silks (and later in cotton flannels) in series designs that could be collected by women who urged their men to smoke, and I am even aware of at least one casket company and one foundations factory (corsets) that allowed employees to take home offcuts that they might fashion into quilts.

But not kits...

Xenia

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Crazy Patchwork kits? From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddy@btinternet.com> Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 20:48:31 +0100 (BST) X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks, Xenia. That is very much what I suspected as we certainly didn't have any 'kits' marketed in UK. I don't know if even bags of scraps were offered over here, in the way that you describe in USA. Interesting.I do know that textile manufacturers and others were often willing to give, or sell for very little, offcuts and waste scraps which philanthropical middle-class ladies used to make quilts for poor people.Thanks again.Celia Celia EddyThe Brown House

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Subject: RE: Crazy Patchwork kits? From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbingham@att.net> Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 16:51:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

While these are not quite 'kits', the Ladies Art Co. catalog of 1898 offered:

"Silk remnants for Crazy Patch and Fancy work - Art Needlework is one of the most fascinating home employments. The making of pretty Crazy quilts, Sofa Pillows, etc., is one of the most pleasing forms of fancy work. The great difficulty has been to get the many and bright colored silks pieces. WE have overcome this difficulty for our lady friends, by buying up the silk remnants in a number of large necktie factories, silk mills, etc., where large quantities of silk are handled. We get them at very low prices, as these factories have no other way to dispose of them to better advantage, and our patrons will get the benefit, as have an immense quantity of pieces on hand. They are adapted to all kinds of Fancy, Art, and Needle Work. Many ladies make numerous fancy articles from these pieces, and sell them at good price, as they are very handsome and pleasing. The lots we send out could only be bought, if at all, in large fancy-goods stores in big cities, and would there cost you several times the price we sell them for. At the following prices we send them by mail or express, all charges paid by us: One-half pound $1.25 One pound $2.20 Three pounds $5.50."

They also offered plush & velvet pieces: "Box, Plush, and Velvet Pieces. We have put up a box of Plush and Velvet Pieces only, some very large, suitable for making Children's Caps, Pin Cushions, Bonnet Trimmings, and for Dress Trimmings, or any fancy work. With this box of Plush you can make a variety of articles for your own home or to sell at a good profit, as there is always a demand for the Beautiful, and when combined with the Useful it is doubly welcome. Price per box 50 cents, postpaid; or 12 Boxes by express for $5."

Quantity discounts plus free shipping - great marketing gimmicks even then!

Peg

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Subject: Re: museum intake records, hairwork From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn@rocketmail.com> Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 18:40:15 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

I had a friend who decided to test out the Arthurian legend about a nun whospun the hair that was cut off when she joined the nunnery to make a swordbelt for her brother who was questing for the Holy Grail.Her conclusion was that while it is indeed possible to spin human hair, ending up with a yarn that would make a swordbelt is, alas, fantasy. I suppose we've all had the experience in which some male informs us with his insight into the textile arts, but instead reveals his total ignorance of what he's talking about. :) I would guess some bard saw a blond woman spinning flax, and thought it was her own hair. Jocelyn________________________________ -

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Crazy Patchwork kits? From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn@rocketmail.com> Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 18:47:20 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

>>>Celia, I am not aware of any commercial kits for crazy patchwork, but it was possible for people to buy offcuts of silks, satins, and velvets from companies manufacturing the fabrics themselves, or items from these fabrics;

My mother says that in her youth, her mother would buy scraps from Sears for use in quilting. You never knew what you were going to get, but it was the scraps left over from cutting out garments of some sort. Once they got very large pieces of a peculiar shape, and my grandmother ended up designing a pattern that would use those odd pieces. Perhaps it was simply a time-saver, to use the big pieces rather than cutting them into traditional patterns, but I like to think that at least part of the choice was the artistic challenge.

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Subject: Quilted Item at the Met From: Patricia Lyons <patricialyons@cableone.net> Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2011 12:07:39 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

I am familiar with copes as religious vestments. The pictured one certainly has the right shape. It lacks the edging usually found on the long edge which, when worn, goes up the front and around the neck. What is surprising is the lack of a fastening tab across the front high on the chest.

Others have mentioned the lack of any religious theme to the decoration, which is unusual. As to the length, the ones in the Met collection range from 39 to 58 inches long. These are and were very expensive items and were in all likelihood custom made, so a shorter one was probably made for a shorter man.

Since this is of Indian origin, might it have been made on spec or as a gift? More expert eyes than mine could tell us if the themes depicted reflect ones from the Subcontinent.

Pat Lyons in Pocatello

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 13, 2011 From: Kaytriplet@aol.com Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 04:27:45 EDT X-Message-Number: 9

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I have been very interested in the discussion of the "cope" in the Metropolitan Museum. I thought you might like to compare it to a coronation robe / mantle for King Stephen (Hungary) originally from 1031, but updated for current fashion in perhaps 1200. There is a copy of the piece in the _Pannonhalma Monastery_ (www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&tbm=nws&sa=X&ei=9IVHTrmPBI6E-wb0-fTTDQ&ved=0CCIQBSgA&q=Pannonhalma+Monastery&spell=1) which was made in the middle ages. I was able to take some poor pictures of the detail there (poor light behind glass, etc.). I also viewed the original garment, but it was nearly dark in the room and no pictures were allowed. I am pretty sure I bought a book about the garment, but after 3 recent moves, I can't promise I can find it.

This is a great web site worth browsing if you haven't done so already:

_http://medieval.webcon.net.au/extant_st_stephen_mantle.html_ (http://medieval.webcon.net.au/extant_st_stephen_mantle.html)

German web site with the best pictures (double click for better detail), but Google toolbar translator did a good job for me:

_http://www.magyarkepek.hu/szelenyi/mantel.html_ (http://www.magyarkepek.hu/szelenyi/mantel.html)

Museum web sites:

_http://www.museum.hu/museum/permanent_en.php?IDP=1173&ID=55_ (http://www.museum.hu/museum/permanent_en.php?IDP=1173&ID=55)

_http://www.hnm.hu/en/kiall/MonthlyArchive.php?id=21478_ (http://www.hnm.hu/en/kiall/MonthlyArchive.php?id=21478)

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Subject: dark indigo fabric From: textique@aol.com Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 02:10:12 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Please excuse the cross-post. I am looking for about 3/4 to 1 yd of a 19th century dark indigo with a small white print. If anyone has some they'd be willing to sell, please contact me off-list. It will replace a very worn binding on a well-washed, circa 1880s blue and white, so it doesn't need to be crisp. I will be manipulating it to match the existing color and condition anyway.

Thank you so much for your consideration. 

Jan Thomas

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Subject: RE: dark indigo fabric From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooney@moonware.net> Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 23:47:34 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Good evening, QHLers - Have you checked the website for Reproduction Fabrics: www.reproductionfabrics.com

Yummy stuff - I always spend waaaay too much time browsing their site! <g>

Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator & Collections Management Consultant Professional Associate - AIC 707-763-8694 mgmooney@moonware.net

..looking for about 3/4 to 1 yd of a 19th century dark indigo with a small white print...It will replace a very worn binding on a well-washed, circa 1880s blue and white, so it doesn't need to be crisp. I will be manipulating it to match the existing color and condition anyway. ...

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Crazy Patchwork kits? From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 06:09:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

I belong to a couple of online crazy quilt groups and a couple of the Girlsin there sell "Kits" on ebay. small ones, mostly color co ordinated block kits. Those are the only ones I know of, hope that helps. Jeanne

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Subject: Crazy Patchwork Kits From: "Louise" <ltiemann@stny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 09:13:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Ladies Art company sold Silk Remnants for Crazy Patchwork and Fancy Work (1 lb for $1.25), Ready Embroidered Squares - 9x9 inches of silk done up with fancy stitches (3 for $1), and Box Plush and Velvet pieces (50 cents per box) in the 1898 catalog.

Bentley's aka (Chas E. Bentley's) of New York offered a crazy patchwork package in their 1885 Bentley's Catalogue of Novelties. For 50 cents, you got at least 15 pieces of silk plush, 6 pieces of satin, 1 piece of satin stamped and one piece of satin with an embroidered spray in silk floss. Two sheets of fancy stitches. Other packages are available that include additional silks, 25 skeins of silk, assorted gold and colored metal beads, spangles, tinsel, gold cord, etc.

Weldon's (UK) offered several series on patchwork - not sure if they offered materials to go along with them or not.

Brigg's & Co. (UK) offered iron on patterns for crazy stitches and sprays - again not sure of kits.

I have seen offers of pre-embroidered motifs - along with silks, plush and velvet pieces sold - but my mind can not place the source - I just know I read it somewhere. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: More on Crazy Patchwork Kits From: "Louise" <ltiemann@stny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 10:35:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Yale Silk Works (New Haven, Conn.) offered a dollar package that never contained less than 30 varieties (of bright silks, plain and fancy, brocades) and a package of Embroidery Silks, odds and ends – just what is wanted for Crazy Patchwork. Their two dollar packages contained double the quantity of silk, the embroidery silk, and a package of lace remnants. [1884-85 catalog and ads. Note the images used this catalog, are the same ones used by the 1884 Strawbridge and Clothier Crazy Patchwork booklet – that were also used by Weldon and others.] See my blog entry regarding ephemera dedicated to crazy stitches.

http://quiltpapers.blogspot.com/2008/08/ephemera-dedicated-to-ornamental.html

J.F. Ingalls (Lynn, Mass.) CRAZY Patchwork! 25 SKEINS Imported Embroidery Silk, assorted colors, for 13c. 25 skeins Imported Floss, assorted colors, for 17c. 25 skeins Shaded Embroidery Silk, assorted colors, for 20c. A package of Florence Waste Embroidery Silk, assorted colors, for 25c. A package of Plush and Velvet Pieces for Crazy Patchwork, for 30c. A package of Ribbon Remnants for '0c. A package of Satin and Silk Pieces, assorted colors, with Sprays of Flowers and Outline Designs stamped on them, for 40c. (1887 ad)

Brainerd & Armstrong (Philadelphia, PA) offered Waste Embroidery silk packages, along with crazy stitch patterns. You can see info on their ads and other company trade cards regarding crazy patchwork on my blog QuiltPapers.

http://quiltpapers.blogspot.com/2011/04/150-crazy-patch-work-stitches.html

http://quiltpapers.blogspot.com/2011/03/100-crazy-patchwork-stitches.html

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Subject: A bit more on Crazy Patchwork From: "Louise" <ltiemann@stny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 11:24:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Another company, J.L. Patten (of New York) also sold a 'kit' similar to Bentley's. Bentley's, Farnham and Patten all had very similar designs in there catalogs - and often used the term Home Beautiful. Similarly, T.E. Parker (Lynn, Mass.) had catalogs and offerings very similar to J.F. Ingalls.

Here is the J.L. Patten ad from 1884, clearly giving information for a block 'kit':

CRAZY PATCH WORK How to Make It; how to obtain the silk for it. We send Ten samples of elegant silk, all different and cut so as to make one 10-inch block of Crazy Patchwork, for 25cts.; 12-inch block, 35cts.; with diagram showing how it is put together. We send 20 perforated patterns, working size, of birds, butterflies, bugs, beetles, bees, spiders and webs, reptiles. Greenaway figures, etc., etc., and 10 sprays of flowers of various kinds, all for 60cts., with powder and distributing pad for transferring, to ornament the silk. These patterns can be instantly transferred to any material, and can be used a hundred times over. Our book, "How to Make Home Beautiful," has Instructions for making a variety of patchwork, with diagrams and Illustrations of many fancy stitches for Joining and ornamenting the silk. Also, has illustrations of all the Kensington and Arasene stitches, with instructions for doing this kind of embroidery and for making many beautiful and useful articles. It also contains a descriptive and Illustrated list of nearly 1,000 patterns for various kinds of embroidery. Price, 15cts. All the above, with ten varieties of silk for 10-Inch block, 90 cents: with silk for 12-lnch block, $1.00, with silk for both blocks $1.35. all post-paid. Silks In $1., $2. and $3. packages. J. L. PATTEN, 47 Barclay St. New York. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: A bit more... From: "Louise" <ltiemann@stny.rr.com> Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 11:26:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

their not there...

Another company, J.L. Patten (of New York) also sold a 'kit' similar to Bentley's. Bentley's, Farnham and Patten all had very similar designs in their catalogs - and often used the term Home Beautiful. Similarly, T.E. Parker (Lynn, Mass.) had catalogs and offerings very similar to J.F. Ingalls.

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Subject: RE: dark indigo fabric From: textique@aol.com Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 13:43:25 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 8

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Meg. It is a yummy site, isn't it. I will consider using reproduction fabric on a 20th century quilt, as long as it isn't an important piece (at which time, I do important soul- searching to determine if I'm the person to work on it or it should go to aconservator). But, on 19th century items, and this has a family signature on the back, I want 19th century fabric...and, same soul-searching applies here, any hesitation on my part and they get sent to the AIC website.

Thank you.

Jan

ave you checked the website for Reproduction Fabrics: www.reproductionfabrics.com

Yummy stuff - I always spend waaaay too much time browsing their site! <g>

Regards,  Meg 

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Subject: RE:Crazy Patchwork kits? From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 14:36:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Re: Celia's questions about kits for crazy quilts....According to Penny McMorris in her much respected book Crazy Quilts (1984) kits were available for making crazy quilts. p. 17 "When the 'fever' broke out, "competition forced firms to embellish their scraps a bit with the addition of offers of books on crazy patchwork, or even by creating prepackaged kits for crazy blocks." They were advertised in the Bentleys Catalogue of Novelties in 1884-1885. You were guaranteed to get =E2=80=9Cat least 15 pieces of silk plush, satins in different colors and a small embroidered spray.=E2=80=9D All for $.50! I've posted the scanned page on eboard under the Quilts tab entitled Kits for Crazy Quilts- the blocks at the bottom of the page are examples made from such a kit. You'll have to click to enlarge enough to read.

Jean http://quiltsetcetera.blogspot.com/

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Subject: RE: dark indigo fabric From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 14:14:39 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

Hi Jan,You should check with Margo at reproduchtionfabrics.com before deciding. Most of the DaGama indigo prints she carries are printed from rollers used in the 19th century, and if I am not mistaken, from the decade you seek. No, it wouldn't be true antique fabric. But it would probably be better than antique because it would have structural integrity plus bean actual 19th century print and real indigo.Just a thought...Judy Schwender

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Subject: crazy quilt kits From: Pepper Cory <pepcory@mail.clis.com> Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 17:18:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

Hello all, I knew I had seen kits, or something like a kit, for crazy quilts. Found it! In Designs Worth Doing, the Fall/Winter 1931-32 catalogue of McKim Studios, Ruby Short McKim's mail order company in Independence, Missouri that she ran with her husband Arthur.

On page 15 is an advert with a little illustration of a what looks like a flat box with a crazy quilt-like arrangement of patches on the top. At first glance it seems like it might be a kit for a crazy quilt. But the text is less-specific. It says:

*Quilt Patch Packet-Enough Colors for a Quilt* * * *This package will solve your quilt material problem if you want an assortment of bright prints to piece. We buy all the new cuttings from several large manufacturers of high quality dresses and in this way are able to give you this assortment at a fraction of the original cost per yard. These are the season's bright new prints and all of soft firm weave. There is a selected variety of patterns and all are absolutely color-fast. Each packet includes one exact cutting pattern of a popular quilt design and contains enough materials to cut the needed print portions of an average quilt. Of course larger quilts require two packages. * * * *If you send for a trial packet you will be ordering more.* * * *#371 Quilt Patch Packet.......30 cents.* * * Based on that seductive blurb, wouldn't you find 30 cents and send it off? I would! However, keep the 1931 price in perspective. That was also the year that unemployment in the United States soared to over 16%, an average yearly wage was less than $2000, hamburger meat was 11 cents a pound, and a gallon of gas cost 10 cents. The equivalent cost of this merry bundle of scraps would be about $4.50 to the 1931 purchaser--no small chunk of change. But, by appealing to women through well-worded verbiage (Arthur McKim was an advertising genius and wrote lots of product descriptions that to this day make me long for the items in the McKim Studios catalogue) and by pricing in cents, women could raid their egg money and find the money.

The crazy quilt connection here is that the illustration on the top of the box looked like a crazy quilt block.

Feeling quite proud of myself for having dredged up this arcane bit of quilt history!

Pepper in North Carolina

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--001517475b8806184f04aa91ce14--

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: August 14, 2011 From: "Elaine Kelly" <ElaineKelly63@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2011 09:53:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Re: Crazy Patchwork Kits I have a kit quilt that's not exactly "crazy" but was certainly inspired by those types of quilts. The kit contained satin, silk and (ombre!) velvet ribbons of varying widths, lots of gold embroidery thread wound on spools, muslin foundations printed with blue dots, a full-sized paper pattern (for placement? seemed unnecessary), instructions and a big piece of gold satin for the back. No manufacturer information except the title on the box: "Bloomcraft Quilt". No one on this list or recommended to me was able to provide any additional information. Best guesses were it was from the 20s or the 50s. I've posted a couple of pictures to the eBoard.

When I purchased it from eBAY, only a couple of blocks were complete. There was some water damage to some of the wide ribbons intended for the borders, so when I made up the quilt, I made it square rather than rectangular. After decades in pieces in a box, it now hangs in my dining room.

Elaine Kelly

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Subject: Silk Remnants From: joysbees@yahoo.com Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2011 21:36:01 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 13

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". . .by buying up the silk remnants in a number of large necktie factories. . ." In my sewing room is a bag of silk tie cutaways from Robert Talbott Carmel in amazing colors and jacquard designs. I bought the bag of scraps to make a crazy patchwork something: tea cozy, pillow top, purse Jackie in Reno

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Subject: Using the reproduction indigo From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltn@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2011 08:14:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Just adding my 2 cents. I purchased a great deal of the reproduction indigo several years ago. If what reproductionfabrics.com is selling is the same, it is just gorgeous stuff. But, I am unsure as to the quality and what company is now making this. What I purchased might have come from Nancy Kirk? I can't remember, it's been a very long time. It had a three tigers stamp on the back and it was probably the most exceptional fabric I have ever worked with in weight and beauty. Of course, I could have done better justice to it's beauty by completing the quilt that is still a UFO, but that is another story..... What I bought had a distinct scent of the indigo plants and I just loved it. It was intoxicating, when the fabric arrived the lovely scent filled my house. The fabric was very stiff, but was soft like butter after treating it. I found it ran tremendously and treated the fabric with Retain (sp?) and "crocked" it and treated as well with white vinegar as a final step. Please be careful if you do use this or some of the vintage fabrics as it does run like crazy and you need to be abolutely sure that you "crock" the fabric. Not sure what all you would call this, but I was told at the time that what I did was "crocking" the fabric. You take the fabric and put it in fresh, cool, water each day along with a few scraps. The white scraps took on a blueish color but after awhile, that stopped (I changed to fresh scraps each day). I would change the water each day until there was finally no color and the water was clear. I'm not an expert as many of you are, but I would like to hear other's opinions of this technique and what they also recommend when dealing with this kind of gorgeous fabric. Please know that the fabric I purchased was special. This purchase was probably about 12+ years ago and I believe, at the time, it was $14.00 a yard. A small group of quilters I was involved with all split about 10 or more yards of this beautiful fabric. I think we got a better price on shipping and yardage by buying a larger amount. I've just got to work on that quilt... it's a queen size reproduction of an antique doll quilt I saw in a book. So sweet and I tea died all the shirtings to go with it... a labor of love. Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Very Interesting Post From: Edwaquilt@aol.com Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2011 08:56:03 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

This appeared on another general quilting chat site today. Most interesting that it was posted to the general public

I've occasionally heard about Underground Railroad quilting. I never looked into it deeply, though it sounded a nice idea. I was therefore startled to learn that the entire thing was a hoax. Read this excellent article for more details: _http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/08/13/1006346/-Books-So-Bad-Theyre-Good:The-Making-of-a-Modern-Myth?via=blog_543539_ (http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/08/13/1006346/-Books-So-Bad-Theyre-Good:The-Making-of-a-Mod ern-Myth?via=blog_543539) . And please spread the word, as this myth should have died a death long ago. --part1_748e9.7fa9dfc4.3b7bc2e3_boundary--

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Subject: Indigo fabric From: audreycameron@madasafish.com Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2011 09:46:22 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Jan, The old Victorian indigo fabrics produced in England are now produced in Africa using the old patterns. Look at this site www.africanfabrica.co.uk under shwe fabrics. These were branded Three Cats here in England and are the same as the these new ones. Hope these are what you are looking for.

Audrey Cameron in Lincolnshire, England audreycameron@madasafish.com ------=_NextPart_000_004F_01CC5BF9.5B961AD0--

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Subject: Re: Using the reproduction indigo From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2011 07:56:27 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

 

Hi all,In textile terminology, crocking is when abrasion causes color totransfer to the abradant (Textiles, 8th Ed., Kandolph and Langford).Nancy Kirk retailed the fabrics; Margo Krager is the American importer from Africa.Three Tigers is one if the DaGama lines.The fabrics are stiff when you get them because purchasers in Africa want to be able to do the folding for the headwear they favor.And, yes, you have to rinse, and rinse, and rinse, and rinse, and rinse. Then rinse some more. But it has a wonderful soft hand when you are done.Judy Schwender

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Subject: Re: Very Interesting Post From: Mitzioakes@aol.com Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2011 14:14:49 EDT X-Message-Number: 5

Great read! Having been a volunteer at the Shelburne Museum (VT) for some years, I was asked daily about the 'guilt code and underground railroad'. HIPV is in my library and I use it quite a lot to discuss this myth. Will it end ever??? (but , be nice to Millard Fillmore, my husband is a direct relative to him!!!!!). Thanks also bringing back memories of my youth and embroidery, etc. I still do a lot of both embroidery and crewel along with my quilts. Mitzi from Vermont ps - Do not get me going on the ;Gee's Bend' explosiion.....I have a lot to say about that also.

In a message dated 8/16/2011 10:00:36 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, Edwaquilt@aol.com writes:

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/08/13/1006346/-Books-So-Bad-Theyre-Good:T he-Making-of-a-Modern-Myth?via=blog_543539_

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Subject: indigo fabric From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <pnhahn01@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2011 19:08:32 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 6

Hi Jan,

I think I can help you out once I get back to Maryland in a few days. I have been doing antique shows in NH and Maine and am still on the road. I think I have sold all the indigo prints I brought along with me but I know I have more back home and in my shop. If you want to send me a snippet of your piece, I can try and match it the best I can for pattern/shading. Then I can send along either what I think is best or a few for you to choose from.

Yes, repro fabric is only second best to the real thing, when you can get it. I find that I am working more and more with my antique yardage. Most times it isn't nearly as fragile as many people think!

Nancy Hahn, full of lobster and fresh Maine blueberry pie

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Subject: Re: Very Interesting Post From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2011 22:11:44 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

*waves hand*

That was me, and I freely admit that I laid this before the general public because they're the ones who need to hear it most. It's well meaning parents and teachers and sculptors and administrators and everyone else who reads HIPV and thinks that because it's a well written, charming little book, it must be true. I have a blogging platform at DKos and at a very small blog, Firefly Dreaming, so I decided it was time to devote my weekly column to this issue. It's about an inch from becoming accepted history despite the complete lack of evidence, and if this helps, I'm happy :)

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: Very Interesting Post From: Kittencat3@aol.com Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2011 22:12:25 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 8

*waves at Mitzi* Glad you liked it!

Lisa

In a message dated 8/16/2011 2:15:14 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, Mitzioakes@aol.com writes:

Great read! Having been a volunteer at the Shelburne Museum (VT) for some years, I was asked daily about the 'guilt code and underground railroad'. HIPV is in my library and I use it quite a lot to discuss this myth. Will it end ever??? (but , be nice to Millard Fillmore, my husband is a direct relative to him!!!!!). Thanks also bringing back memories of my youth and embroidery, etc. I still do a lot of both embroidery and crewel along with my quilts. Mitzi from Vermont ps - Do not get me going on the ;Gee's Bend' explosiion.....I have a lot to say about that also.