Subject: a note on judging From: quiltarkmvyahoo.com Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 10:21:42 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Some quilt contest rules actually state that an entry "must be clean". If that means it must be clean without soil marks or pet hair or cigarette smoke, then the officials running the show are really the ones who determine what "clean" means. One show official told me that entries covered in pet hair or reeking of cigarette smoke could be judged but that they wanted the judge to make a comment about the hair / smoke potentially spreading to other entries (about which they had received numerous complaints). As a quilter, I would prefer that my entry NOT be next to one covered in pet hair that the owner never bothered to brush off or hanging in close proximity to a quilt that reeked with smoke. There are simple cleaning remedies for those problems and they should be addressed by the owner before the item is taken to a show.

And speaking of judging comments, I am still mulling over the comment made by a judge that a certain color "made them sick". After watching 2 quilts of that color (& of very good workmanship / quality) passed over for ribbons when there were NO negative comments made about the quilts and when the quilts in the same category that received ribbonswhen several negative comments were made about them.........I am still wondering about the judge's objectivity.

Just musing..... C. Ark in a balmy Ohio. -\

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Subject: Re: a note on judging From: Dale Drake <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 08:46:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

All:

My favorite notion is a pet hair roller - the one with the sticky paper sheets. I always give my quilts a going over with it before they go off for judging. It's also great for cleaning the little threads off of the ironing board, and for removing extra threads off of the back of the quilt before sandwiching.

And I also don't want my quilts hanging next to those with cat hair (I'm allergic) or those that smell like smoke (ick). I sympathize with quilt show volunteers and judges who have to deal with these issues. And I'd expect the judging of the quilt to be affected by its detritus (great word, Teddy!). Come on, folks, how hard is it to air and clean the quilt before sending it in? It's simple courtesy.

Dale Drake in Indiana

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Subject: Re: on judging.... From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 09:26:20 EDT X-Message-Number: 3

Great email - do it more often (I have really learned a lot these past few days from judges with everyone help[ful. Thanks again for the comments. I'd love to send you some rain (and if all of TV is correct this morning, we will be getting a lot from Irene this weekend).but can't find a way to send it your way. Mitzi from VT

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Subject: Re: a note on judging From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 11:29:50 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

I've got to admit, I'd have a hard time judging an orange quilt. I've had alife-long aversion to orange; called it 'headache orange' as a kindergartener. I do have orange fabrics in the stash, but I can't imagine looking at a quilt that's entirely orange!Anyone else have color problems? Jocelyn________________________________ --0-1268678006-1314383390=:28449--

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Subject: Re: a note on judging From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 11:39:09 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

>>>Come on, folks, how hard is it to air and clean the quilt before sendingit in? It's simple courtesy.It can be danged near impossible, if you have a home with pets or smoke. I find cat hair in my office keyboard...which HAS to have fallen off my clothes, because all my office cats are ceramic. ;) I'm not sure how I'd get a quilt completely cat-hair free, but itwould involve washing, drying and packing the quilt in a pet-free premises. Make that several washes. Ditto for a smoker: what smells smoke-free to them may still be smokey to those of us who live and work in smoke-free places. I agree that the densely pethair- or smoke-covered quilt should be cleaned up...but removing all traces is pretty difficult.Jocelyn

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Subject: UGRR at VQM From: BunJordan <bunjordaaol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 16:49:41 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Mary in Virginia wrote that she was dismayed to find HIPV and UGRR patterns in the Virginia Quilt Museum gift shop. Their presence does not mean the museum supports the myth. There is a very clear sign posted near the patterns with a quote from Barbara Brackman (and her book, "Unraveling the History of Quilts and Slavery) dispelling the story and stating the museum's understanding that this is just a myth and not to be taken seriously. As Candace Perry stated (thank you Candace), small museums must maximize profits in their gift shops. As many qhl posters have mentioned, quilters areaware of the story and, whether they believe it or not, want to make quilts associated with it. I'm glad to hear previous experience with the museum was consistent with solid quilt history and hope everyone continues to find it so. I would encourage anyone to ask questions when you find something that doesn't seem right. I think staff would have been happy to address the concerns on the spot. It is my understanding that the one remaining pattern has since been removed. I hope anyone who finds themselves in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley will come visit VQM. www.virginaquiltmuseum.org

 

Bunnie Member of VQM BoD www.bunniejordan.com

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Subject: Textile Exhibitions in NY? From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 17:19:37 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

A lady from France has just emailed me asking if I can recommend any textile exhibitions for a forthcoming trip to NY. If anyone has suggestions I'll pass them on to her. What a tangled web the internet sometimes weaves...

Sally Ward In UK, not NY=

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Subject: Visits to Alabama and Vermont From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2011 14:25:28 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

To Pat Kyser from Huntsville and Mitzi Oakes from Vermont, Thank you for the kind words. The pleasure of visiting your areas is all mine. I hope you will get to see the WWII quilts in Huntsville. They look awesome in an Art Museum setting. You just can't beat Southern hospitality. My first experience with a true Southern welcome, Huntsville-style, was four years ago at the Southern Quilt Conference. That quilt history weekend is still on my top ten list of all-time favorites. Two weeks ago, I was also treated to a showing of Susie Braund's antique and reproduction quilt collection, and 30 years of Pat Kyser's Art quilts. I am thrilled to be headed back there on October 20, 2011 to speak to The Heritage Quilters of Huntsville. On October 8 and 9, come to Burlington, VT to see the collection of floral quilts on display earlier this year at the Rotary in Paducah, KY. The Champlain Valley Quilt Guild is hosting the exhibit at their annual show. This group of quilters is the Northern version of the Huntsville Heritage Quilters with their warmth and hospitality. This past week, I was fortunate to be at the Crawford County Fair, in Northwestern PA. My ties to that area go back to childhood summers on my Grandmother's farm. Going to this true agricultural fair was always a highlight of the summer. Little has changed to alter my excitement in the past 50 years. Plus, I was able to share the experience with my four year old grandson. The quilts were beautiful! You can't go any where without connecting with great people who are also quilters. I was able to meet up with Jill Meszaros and her Quilt Study Group for some tea and talk about quilts. Lastly, I would like to express my gratitude to all who emailed me privately after the devastating Seal Team loss in Afghanistan. It is always a very sobering moment when news of another crash crosses the wires. Even after 6 years, flashback to our own loss becomes very familiar once again. Fortunately three weeks ago, our family was all together on vacation. Our hearts go out to the families who have suffered greatly. Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut

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Subject: Re: Hurricane From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 07:10:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Concerned about Laura Fisher and her business in Manhattan. Pictures of flooding in NYC are on CNN this morning. Pat Kyser in Huntsville, AL

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Subject: Re: a note on judging From: Dale Drake <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 08:46:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Jocelyn and all:

I know ... and I apologize for the snarky comment, which I regretted as soon as I'd hit SEND. I lived with a wonderful Sheltie for many years and Lord knows, we saw (and still see) dog hair everywhere. But the roller DOES take it off of quilts before shows. Cat hair might work differently (no cats - allergic).

Dale in still-dry Indiana, wishing there were a way all that Irene water could be shipped 1000 miles west.

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Subject: Re: a note on judging From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 07:57:28 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Dale,Cat hair can be a whole 'nuther breed of horse. :)Some breeds have very fluffy lightweight hair that floats forever. I had a friend who hada Scottish Fold cat...she had to keep her black blazer at the office as there was nowhere in her house she could keep it where Flyer's hair couldn't reach it. After Flyer died, she brought the blazer home...first time she got it out of the closet to wear it, it had Flyer-hair on it. How he did that, we don't know. Jocelyn

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Subject: RE: a note on judging From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 12:15:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I'd like to offer a couple of opinions.

Laura offered: **Judges are employees of the organization putting on the quilt show. They must abide by the judging criteria given to them by that organization. They must complete the task - regardless of how many quilts they are to examine - within the alloted time period. This usually doesn't give you more than 5-10 minutes tops to examine the quilt and complete the form. It is the organizations responsibility to develop the judging form, set forth the categories and rules and give these guidelines to the judges to abide by. Some don't always make sense, and make the task of the judge a tough one, but that's  the way it works! I have heard of one person that required their  personal "copywrited" form be used or they wouldn't consider  judging....whatever!!! The guild pays me for my services, and I am -  for that time period - their employee. I do as I'm instructed, using  their tools and guidelines...for better or worse!

My response: Under these described circumstances, you wouldn't need a judge but rather a robot. Program it by setting all guidelines, wind it up by giving it absolute deadlines, and push the button to assess the data. No skill needed here beyond.

5-10 minutes to _judge_ a quilt is an eternity.

Working with a form provided by the hiring organization would be very restricting and diminishing of any personal qualities anyone would offer as a professional judge (certified or experienced).

An alternative method I have used successfully as a professional judge (meaning, I got paid to do my job and I got respect from the employer that I knew what I was doing) was to organize my own check list of most frequently used comments for judging. A check list makes the scribing go more quickly, and with experience, I noted what I might comment about the most. There was also a line for writing one positive and one needs improvement comment. Half page max, and there was a lot of negative space.

If a judge wants to use his/her personal form (copyrighted or not), I applaud that idea. You could ask for a copy in advance to see what it covers and make the choice about whether this is the right judge for your show. That wouldn't violate the copyright and even if criteria for judging were exposed, that might help to set the bar for competition. I see nothing wrong in that: here's the goal/expectation --- can you reach it?

There is a major difference between judging and critiquing a quilt. Too often entrants expect a full critique from a judge, and there just isn't that much time to do that. 2 minutes (average) per quilt to decide 1st, 2nd, 3rd is plenty, especially in a local guild show.

If the entrant wants a CRITIQUE, that's different and should be offered on a different pay scale. A critique would take more time to construct and should involve serious study of the quilt and the techniques used to construct it. Quality would be evaluated. Artistic merit would be assessed. I think a personal verbal consultation could be helpful. It could be serious business. That may be why many who want this kind of feedback form special groups to help each other.

Barb

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org

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Subject: RE: A note on judging --- "clean" From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 12:15:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Regarding quilts covered with pet hair and/or reeking of cigarette smoke ---

We live in a world where we are becoming more sensitive to others' needs, especially if there are circumstances that can be controlled to make everyone more comfortable and healthy. Our smoking bans are the most obvious, and I totally applaud them!

They don't serve peanuts on many airlines because some have severe allergies. How nice that we respect that what we might do for instant pleasure might be a health issue for someone else, so we take correctional measures.

Don't bring into a public place a quilt that is full of pet hair that you can't or don't want to eliminate. Love my quilt so love my cat hair doesn't work for someone who needs Benadryl in order to survive the quilt show experience.

Ditto cigarette smoke. If you can't smell it yourself and you know it's there, please take care of it anyway. There are products you may use to take the odor away. You might not appreciate how awful that smell might be to some of us. I can't stay in a hotel room that isn't smoke free and I know pretty quickly when someone has broken the rule for keeping a room smoke free. I'm not allergic, but I can be uncomfortable.

I do tend to think that those who impose a problem situation with smoke or pet hair should be the ones responsible for minimizing or eliminating its effects. Those of us who do NOT introduce such effects into the environment should have the right to expect to be free of such things.

If you CANNOT rid your quilt of these irritants to a minimal acceptable level, you could decide that this quilt should not be exhibited. No one says that every quilt we make should go into a show. It is not a right but a privilege.

Barb

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org

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Subject: Fwd: Sully Quilt & Textile Show From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 19:57:12 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 6

This is a great show in a beautiful historic venue. If you have never come to Sully, come and have a wonderful day. If you haven't come recently, comeback. If, like me, you come every year, I will see you there.

Polly Mello

In now sunny Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: a note on judging From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 16:23:23 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

There is a difference between cat and dog hair. First, the dog can't make it to the highest, remotest spot in the house, where you've just placed your newly acquired historic textile so

the cat can't get to it, but the cat can. If you've ever owned a cat, you know they can read your mind. (One of my dear departed felines opened doors in the house by turning the door knob.) The shaft of a cat hair also has more "barbs" and is generally finer than that of a dog so it can more easily work down into tight weaves. Dog hair shafts are actually smoother than human hair. Once, I spent hours vacuuming a beautiful woven Indiana coverlet and when 'finished', I gave it a check under my computerized microscope. There were thousands of tiny white cat hairs embedded in the wool that would only come out with tweezers but were invisible in the eye's view of the blue and white woven design. None of the families in the provenance had owned a cat except for the original purchaser of the coverlet. It seems she had written a lot in her diary about her delightful white puss. So, the discussion then became about original evidence and its removal. It was an interesting episode.

Jan Thomas

...the roller DOES take it off of quilts before shows. Cat hair might work differently (no cats - allergic).

 

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Subject: New question From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 13:38:56 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Jan, I read your note with heightened interest when you mentioned your computerized microscope. Could you tell us about it? I've been wanting a practical, affordable way to get microscopic looks at fibers, (and other interesting bits of things) and had wondered about this technology. Susan

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Subject: More judging From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 11:23:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

One of my first judging experiences was one of the most heartbreaking. In the late 80's when folks around the hometown began to associate my name with quilts I did quite a bit of judging.

One of our first local shows was at the Stephen FOster Folk LIfe Center a state park on the Suwannee River a few miles north of here. A lovely serene setting. However the judging sheet I had to use was set up on a point system - so many points for a perfect this or that. It left absolutely no room for innovation fascination wondrous color choices or a personal voice. I remember that my favorite quilt in the show - and GREATLY deserving of an award of some type - was the maker's first quilt. I was smitten - it was quite traditional just lovely and stood out head and shoulders among the run of the mill quilts hung around it. The ribbons all went to 8 pointed star quilts made by the strip pieced method - and all by one maker. The other judge and I were literally in PAINwhen we were finished. The strip pieced stars were technically spot onthough not very special. ANd my favorite quilt by the first time maker was ignored completely. That was over 20 years ago and it still bothers me. There were no ribbons for Judge's Choice or anything like that way back then but I think I put a note with her judging sheet indicating what a great quilt she had made and encouraging her to continue. Sure put a bad taste in my mouth right off the bat. I've NEVER again used one of those forms. I judged for a few more years insisting that the organization let me judge and award by elimination. A much more wonderful experience for myself and for the quiltmakers. If you still use a point sheet please do the world a favor and throw the $#%$# thing in the garbage. And yes I do expect to hear retribution from this. It's okay - I can take it. Teddy Pruett

"I no doubt deserved my enemies

but I don't believe I deserved my friends."

Walt Whitman

 

www.teddypruett.com

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Subject: Re: More judging From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 11:34:57 EDT X-Message-Number: 2

Teddy - I may have started all this judging 'stuff' by just commenting that I had points taken off by a judge for pet hair (I do not hold grudges or anything and I am always happy to hear what judges find wrong with my entries - then I can correct them. I have been on the Judging Committee for some years now for my guild and we have always used the point system for judging. In fact I did not know of other ways (even the well known VT Quilt Festival is judged by point. Is there any way you can forward to me the system you go by, or tell me more about it? I too have seen wonderful quilts ignored because of the point system and am always open for new methods. I sure would love to know a bit more about other methods (since this will be spread around on QHL). Have a show coming up in October and it would be great to do something different for the first time. Mitzi - From VT where I survived well but many others didn't when irene decided to hit us.

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Subject: List Mom and flood From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 10:51:12 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I don't know the geography of upstate New York that well. Did Kris and family escape the flooding? Esperance looks as if it is on a river.

I know we have members in New England. I hope they report in.

Mary (worried in dry Valparaiso IN)

-- Mary G. Persyn mary.persynvalpo.edu Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 27, 2011 From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 09:08:22 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

The City Quilter has opened a textile gallery next door to its store on west 25th Street, so check them out.  Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts

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Subject: Hurricane NYC From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 09:25:11 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Hi and thanks Pat Kyser for your concern about my NYC business. After a devestating pipe break that flooded out my store and destroyed too many antique quilts and hooked rugs whenI was previouslylocatedin the antiques center, the prospect of one more drop of water in my current textile environment is of course sooooo stressful in anticipation. So nowI am on the5th floor in an arts warehouse, where they have been repairing the100 year old roof! I'll find out tomorrow how the building fared afterI getbackfrom a long weekend at a blues music festival on Hunter Mountain in Tannersville NY in the Catskills whereIrene (my middle name, coincidentally) has causedunimaginable destruction--floods, dam breaks, bridges out, roads destroyed, homes destroyed -- amazing, as I thought hurricanes came only at the shore with such destructive impact.  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1350791274-1314721511=:34203--

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Subject: Re: List Mom and flood From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 14:19:02 EDT X-Message-Number: 6

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Many parts of Vermont were devastated by Irene (one quilter friend lost her home from its foundation). Most damage was in the southern section of the state tho every stream and river went over its banks. Was not a nice weekend in New England. All, thank God, we lost was the top of a bird feeder. But, us staid old Vermonters are already getting cleaned up. Mitzi from Northern Vermont

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Subject: Re: New question From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 18:36:34 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Susan,

I should have written 'digital' microscope. Mine was very inexpensive (under $100) and can be held in my hand. I like the fact that I can see the image on the computer screen and then capture it in a photograph with the snapshot feature. It hooks to the computer via a usb cord.  The program comes with it on a cd but the instructions were minimal and of little help. I relied more for help from my sister and son, both techies, and some online video camera tech sites because it will record moving images too - 30 fps. It is perfect for surveying damage or any of the other hundreds of questions we can think of to ask an old quilt. :

I have a standard scope with higher magnification but I like this so much, I'm thinking of paying the extra - and its a lot - to get higher magnification on the computer. 

It is fussy though. I have some pieces removed from a quilt owned by Bill Volkening that I'm trying to photograph for him and a Firefox update stopped it in mid-stream. 

I used one we had gotten for my grandchildren as a 'toy' for years but the OS, as we upgraded computers, outgrew it. 

I think Amazon sells them but be sure you can return it if you don't like what you order.

Hope this helps.

Jan Thomas

10X -> 300X magnification, 300K Pixel CMOS, 640 x 480 Pixels resolution, still image format jpg and has a 4 step 6 light LED for illumination. Mine is a BARSKA.

Jan, I read your note with heightened interest when you mentioned your computerized microscope. Could you tell us about it? I've been wanting a practical, affordable way to get microscopic looks at fibers, (and other interesting bits of things) and had wondered about this technology. Susan

 

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Subject: Re: digital microscope From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 18:39:42 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Jan, thanks so much for taking the time to write so much useful info. Very helpful, and something to think seriously about. I do have techie help available, especially with new toys. I'm also thinking about an Android tablet, but that's a whole 'nother ball of wax!  Susan

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Subject: Making Quilts presentable for the Show From: lfrihartcox.net Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 12:21:53 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Rejection is a sore spot. And some quilts have been rejected from our local quilt show because of odor. One of our members developed a solution that has worked for more than one entry. Place the quilt in a large black bag, tie a strip of Odor Eater into the opening (not touching quilt), rearrange the quilt daily and in less than a week the odor is gone. The owner should take this action before entering the quilt.

Our guild quilt show states on the entry form that we have the right to reject a quilt. Animal and human hair certainly are at the top of the list along with odor. No one wants you to share hair or odor with their precious quilt. If you have ever been an assistant to a quilt judge, you would notice that stray threads and other objects just might mean your quilt misses that coveted ribbon. Linda Frihart Pittsburg, KS ----

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Subject: Re: List Mom and flood From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 21:43:35 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Yes, thanks for asking. But I am suffering greatly from survivors guilt. Just about everyone I know and everyone I talk to has either lost everything or knows someone who lost everything.

Roads are closed, power/phone/cable lines are down everywhere. They have closed and rerouted two major highways because they don't trust the bridges, sending traffic everywhere... it's almost impossible to get simple amenities like ice, water or gasoline in Schoharie County. There *are* ways to get out now, (there wasn't Sunday and Monday) so there is light at the end of the tunnel. But it is a very long tunnel!

So many areas look like a bomb went off - houses literally exploded by the water, or being pushed off their foundations and relocated to a new address, propane tanks in trees, vehicles and mobile homes in places they just should not be. And the stench! It's not just the rotting farm animals, it's the raw sewage and crude oil.

And it is everywhere. You can't drive a single mile without seeing something, um, disquieting. There is no escape. No one expected this and there was no preparation at all. Everyone is still shell shocked and there is a pervasive atmosphere of despair.

I know it will get better and my whole family is involved in the emergency response, but I will admit to just feeling overwhelmed. BUT!! No one died, which is an incredible miracle. We are counting our blessings minute by minute.

And if anyone has any charity quilts they want to send my way, I will gladly take them! I had about 20 in the shop when this happened - when I brought them to the shelter, you would think I brought gold. I have never thought as charity quilts as anything other than an obligation before, but let me tell you! There is nothing like the look on someones face when you give them something that belongs just to them after they have lost everything. Holy cow.

Go hug your family tonight, and don't neglect the furry and feathered ones:-))

Kris

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Subject: Red Cross Signature Quilt From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 22:34:13 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/1657-red-cross-signature-quilt--1917 -dorcus

Wonderful quilt! Wonder who wound up with it!

Karen in the Islands

PS: I stumbled across some more info on the history of the acanthus design today in the Wall Street Journal! Check out my blog at karenquilt.blogspot.com.

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Subject: Re: List Mom and flood From: ag32040 <ag3204ol.com> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 10:33:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

From: "Kris Driessen" <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Subject: [qhl] Re: List Mom and flood Date: August 31, 2011 12:43:35 AM EDT To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>

Yes, thanks for asking. But I am suffering greatly from survivors guilt.Just about everyone I know and everyone I talk to has either lost everything or knows someone who lost everything.

Roads are closed, power/phone/cable lines are down everywhere. They haveclosed and rerouted two major highways because they don't trust the bridges, sending traffic everywhere... it's almost impossible to get simpleamenities like ice, water or gasoline in Schoharie County. There *are* ways to get out now, (there wasn't Sunday and Monday) so there is light at the end of the tunnel. But it is a very long tunnel!

So many areas look like a bomb went off - houses literally exploded by the water, or being pushed off their foundations and relocated to a new address, propane tanks in trees, vehicles and mobile homes in places theyjust should not be. And the stench! It's not just the rotting farm animals, it's the raw sewage and crude oil.

And it is everywhere. You can't drive a single mile without seeing something, um, disquieting. There is no escape. No one expected this and there was no preparation at all. Everyone is still shell shocked and there is a pervasive atmosphere of despair.

I know it will get better and my whole family is involved in the emergency response, but I will admit to just feeling overwhelmed. BUT!! No one died, which is an incredible miracle. We are counting our blessings minute by minute.

And if anyone has any charity quilts they want to send my way, I will gladly take them! I had about 20 in the shop when this happened - when I brought them to the shelter, you would think I brought gold. I have neverthought as charity quilts as anything other than an obligation before, but let me tell you! There is nothing like the look on someones face when you give them something that belongs just to them after they have losteverything. Holy cow.

Go hug your family tonight, and don't neglect the furry and feathered ones:-))

Kris

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Subject: Civil War Era Quilt Exhibit in Illinois From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 12:09:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

My sister and I stopped at the Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center to see this exhibit. I loved it and wanted to encourage attendance. The exhibit is up until October. Four quilts by Mary Elizabeth Byrod Fortenbaugh are jaw-droppingly exquisite (well, 3 of the 4 are :-)). You can "see" the quilts on the quilt index if interested, but of course "in real life" is so much more impressive. Is anyone on the list studying this quiltmaker? I find myself wanting to know more-more-more.

There is an album quilt from "Abraham Lincoln's neighbors in Springfield," and a Seven Stars (which I know as Seven Sisters) with diamonds probably only an inch long. "Following the Civil War, injured veteran George W. James created a tempolate and cut out the 14,320 pieces of this quilt for his wife...."

Ah ... the stories!

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: Civil War Era Quilt Exhibit in Illinois From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 10:42:53 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

You can see a bit more of some of the quilts at:http://agosiaarts.blogspot.com/2011/05/visiting-il-artisans-shop.htmlhttp://www.museum.state.il.us/ismsites/so-il/exhibitions.htmlYou're only about 1 1/4 hours from the National Quilt Museum in Paducah when you are at the Artisan Center,so I hope you'll come visit us too.Judy SchwenderCurator, National Quilt MuseumFrom: Stephanie Grace Whitson <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>

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Subject: Announcing a new Quilts and Health blog From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 14:08:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

This summer a group of researchers representing the Great Lakes Quilt Center/Michigan State University Museum, the MSU College of Human Medicine, and other university partners launched a new blog to build a wider community of individuals who make, use, and study health-related quilts.

Please take a moment and check out Quilts and Health http://quiltsandhealth.wordpress.com/

We would love for you to subscribe for feeds, link us to your blogs and websites, tweet about our blog content, and send us ideas for news and notes.

-- Gratefully, Dr. Marsha MacDowell (macdowelmsu.edu), MSU Museum and Department of Art, Art History, and Design; Beth Donaldson, MSU Museum, Mary Worrall, MSU Museum, and Dr. Clare Luz, College of Human Medicine. --============_-897308401==_ma============--

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Subject: A query about quilts and health research From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 14:09:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

A multi-disciplinary cluster of individuals representing the Great Lakes Quilt Center (Michigan State University Museum), the MSU College of Human Medicine, and other university partners have begun to examine the intersection of quilts and quiltmaking and health. Although we have done literature searches, we have uncovered precious few academic or general articles related to quilts and health. We would greatly appreciate input from list members about any published -- or unpublished - research related to this topic. We are aware of the recent article by Jacqueline Atkinson in The Quilter (issue 127, summer 2011) and a few that relate to the NAMES Project quilt. Given the thousands and thousands of quilts that have been made, historically and currently, that are tied to individual well-being, health, patient advocacy, fundraising, education, and memorializing or honoring loved ones, we thought there would be a stronger body of scientific literature from humanistic, social science, educational, and medical perspectives BUT we are not finding much. We welcome any assistance in identifying related research.

-- Gratefully, Dr. Marsha MacDowell (macdowelmsu.edu), MSU Museum and Department of Art, Art History, and Design; Dr. Clare Luz, College of Human Medicine; Mary Worrall, MSU Museum, and Beth Donaldson, MSU Museum

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Subject: judging From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 12:24:34 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

Interesting discussion about judging. I have been asked to judge new quilt competitions a few times but decline because I consider the visual impact of the composition of primary importance, and then attend to workmanship issues, whereas precision may be the foremost criterion when evaluating contemporary quilts. I recall that the grand prize winner of the 1933 (1934)Chicago World's Fair competition was (to me) an well-made but booooooooring traditional stars quilt in green and yellow, albeit with some stuffed work. It was chosen from 30,000 + entries, some of which (see Merikay's enchanting book on the competition) were so imaginative, creative and expressive that many others should have been selected as champion quilts instead.

p.s. The roof in my building is OK, no water damage, non coastal NYC got spared. Not so in NJ, where towns in 'flood plains' are so damaged.

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts

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Subject: question about a book From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 13:44:18 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 10

Hi all,Long ago (probably in the early 1990s)and far away (I was living in Montana at the time), there was abook about quilting designs thathad pictures of the same pieced top quilted three different ways. Thebook had about eightdifferent quilts done this way. If anyone has that book, would you please email me the title and author off-list?Thank you.Judy Schwendersister3603yahoo.com --0-2120997966-1314823458=:95322--

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Subject: The Modern Quilt Guild From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 10:50:48 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

How many on this list list are familiar with the Modern Quilt Guild? I think I discovered them January of 2010 and wrote a post about them in August 2010. http://tinyurl.com/4ycwqy7 Have any of you visited one of their meetings or actually joined one of their chapters??

As a quilt historian, I am very interested--from a couple of different perspectives--of the impact this new group is having on today's younger generation of quilters. I think they are attracting a whole new generation of quilters. At the very least, I suspect their sudden appearance on the national scene as a bonafide feet-on-the-ground guild network will make it very easy to document the beginning of a new chapter in quilt history.

Now, can we lure some of them into the quilt history camp?!

Here is a Challenge they launched several months ago. The deadline is today. Anyone in this group participating?

http://themodernquiltguild.com/2011/07/26/100-days-of-modern-quilting-call-f or-submissions/

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Re: judging From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 19:31:29 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 12

Hey, was that the quilt that was presented to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and has never been seen since? Seems like I remember reading it was in greens and yellows (No, I wasn't there, but i was born in 1934!) Mitzi from devastated Vermont (our area is ok, but the state is in a mess).

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Subject: RE: The Modern Quilt Guild From: Gloria Hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 16:36:44 -0800 (AKDT) X-Message-Number: 13

I joined our local group, but haven't had a chance to make it to one of the local meetings.

Looking at the ages of the members listed on the site, I'll be the oldest there, which is fine with me. I am not sure it really serves a new purpose. The quilts that I see on blogs are definitely fun and colorful, but not needing much in the way of workmanship.

I think this is a good way to get they younger women interested in quilts and our local regular guild was overloaded with the older group for many years. I tried the evening group when I first moved to town, but didn't find it welcoming. Long time ago and things may have changed.

Once the younger group gets some introduction to some of the history, I think they find that creativity and wonderful quilts have been made forever.

Gloria

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Subject: Re: The Modern Quilt Guild From: QUILTMOOREaol.com Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 20:24:21 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Karen, I am glad you mentioned The Modern Quilt Guild. I have found this movement fascinating! I have been learning about it by reading some of their many blogs, with their "tutorials", looking at their quilt pictures from their "quilt alongs" they have posted on Flickr, a photo sharing website, and especially drooling over all the new modern designer fabrics they are using. I have to admit I am hooked on modern fabric designer, Heather Ross. She has dozens of conversational type prints in lines which include Munki Munki, Lightening Bugs, and Far Far Away I, II, and III. Some of her already out of print fabrics like the mermaid prints in her Mendicino line are going for as much as $60 a yard on eBay. I think designers like Denyse Schmidt and Amy Butler had a lot to do with the start of the movement. Nan Moore in FL --part1_512d7.24b279ff.3b902ab5_boundary--

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Subject: RE: question about a book From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2011 09:40:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

It may be Quilting Makes the Quilt by Lee Cleland. Patchwork Place 1994 Jean

Jean http://quiltsetcetera.blogspot.com/

abook about quilting designs thathad pictures of the same pieced top quilted > three different ways. The book had about eightdifferent quilts done this way.

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Subject: Re: question about a book From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2011 08:31:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Thank you to all who responded to my question. The book is Quilting Makes the Quilt by Lee Cleland.Judy SchwenderFrom: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 3:44 PMSubject: [qhl] question about a bookHi all,Long ago (probably in the early 1990s)and far away (I was living in Montana at the time), there was abook about quilting designs thathad pictures of the same pieced top quilted three different ways. The book had about eightdifferent quilts done this way. If anyone has that book, would you please email me the title and author off-list?Thank you.Judy Schwendersister3603yahoo.com---You are currently subscribed to qhl as: sister3603yahoo.com.To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442697Glyris.quiltropolis.com --0-599923243-1314891076=:30043--

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Subject: New BB blog From: Karan Flanscha <sadierosecfu.net> Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2011 11:05:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Barbara Brackman has started a new blog about "War and Piecing" at: http://quilt1812warandpiecing.blogspot.com/ Today is the first installment... looks like a wonderful opportunity to learn more about the early 1800s and quilt history. Karan

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Subject: Interesting quilt lectures and exhibit in Caldwell, KS From: Kaytripletaol.com Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2011 14:32:12 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Common Threads (photo deleted for posting) Kansas ladies make a quilt, c. 1930. Photo courtesy of Kansas Historical Society. "It was a cold blustering day, but we moved into our new house...we nailed up quilts to make it more comfortable..." -Chestina Bowker Allen, settler in Kansas Territory, March 26, 1855 To early Kansas settlers, a quilt represented much more than a blanket. Pieced together from available fabric, quilts provided comfort and security in uncertain conditions and served as tangible reminders of homes and loved ones left behind. _Threads of Our Kansas Quilting Heritage_ (http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=hqve 66cab&et=1107378824119&s=485&e=001XvIH-Ctned4W6xYsOXVn5xjfDLhRSzshYReXrp6LgMv4R2jFKLtfWTKAkJnV8z9RYmNxHK8-hrrtw1Cn7lUhGV570QsBmwviywnLoXP_1rlbm9YmEA74 XhgZdxODexIlcpl_RLP-UG-bvopFWe1Eerk1zVWx-85jeUly_aLfRE50OI5H8x2QjfWOBe57Xgyx eyaNAOcG3f-zc3lWFMiXtPaSpm4eDEWFnmfT3l98lN9IiBTG9IVesw==) , a quilt exhibition and companion programs presented by the Caldwell Chamber of Commerce, looks at Kansas history through quilters and their quilts. On September 3, Jeananne Wright, a quilt historian, will present two lectures in Caldwell: _ "Quilts of the Kansas Frontier,"_ (http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=hqve66cab&et=1107378824119&s=485&e=001XvIH-Ctned59JqD-ggDisOiyYNbcd25XTNNhv7DVmnlpsK6bu MeuK6LoEbtCV2_4JcK-FhS4OmLIsnpPMSizMARcV5MpWOotzPHP873loMxGnwzFftLdSgQGEZ7DQ AsMtb11eUMoeSrd6hYBx_zpJ8wcOQEPI7jxFpoLBUV0fO_Z1Ju4Rr1U5o_4Wbep1lP2WaHzo0KRz tjra0gvcyQBNE_gHL9IKSpe) a look at Kansas pioneers and their quilts from the 1850s through the 1910s, and _"Gather Up the Fragments...Civil War Era Quilts,"_ (http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=hqve66cab&et=1107378824119&s=485&e=001XvIH-Ctned5r7qvz0YPi3EbmfSBVghF9xOhapq8VJAR7v1-JXsbKI_EMfAJiHnPRwYtsBtvJy ZzcG8b1HcyYMxEbYCunNP6cj2L7EbWDmTRfdZU8dIf6iB9dz9Tx_yE-DVhk3RQXDLC354oZE7dWF -_imm8CzZ4KE4xDVnIMnG_taQ5iU6uH9szcRYBY3rakTJhE2HddQ9Rgy4_1mWFhjQ==) an exploration of Civil War quilts and Kansans' involvement in the war.

Threads of Our Kansas Quilting Heritage is part of Caldwell's commemoration of both Kansas 150 and Caldwell's 140th anniversary. Visit the Caldwell Chamber of Commerce's _website_ (http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=hqve66cab&et=1107378824119&s=485&e=001XvIH-Ctned4ycAj6CwC9tfgomgXAP-SY4KeIx1YMmqs6EOyCN9F0 -hdU0Vs3oAv-Y-lz9Kg3ugb0buS6PCHm5p20CyoJKae5_2r_-k0DR1NVFyuo55KMPXaZXsfFyswy moL245F8mm0=) for more information about these events.

The exhibition and programs are supported by a _KHC Mini Grant_ (http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=hqve66cab&et=1107378824119&s=485&e=001XvIH-Ctned5mTKLRr i3oH5Eq8jbJBJazKI5r4DoKdAaBa14XBdbXUGWrs1DuOFYqW4ZN38Kfetj_x4BA1peRvPxNxCfDn vEyYEcTVoE1sTaNYN7gC6gB9sKB0JEstEMF8aY4D9PZ4jkG0I4iP04rjtzieVBXCuZ6D_-lxR1qx vE=) .

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Subject: American Folk Art Museum From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2011 16:36:44 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Don't know if I emailed this already, but in case not, in response to the inquiry about why the museum doesn't charge admission -- the remaining location of the American Folk Art Museum is a public space owned by NYC and rented to the Museum for $1 per year. A condition ofthat bargainis that admission would be free in that location. I don't if the policy could be changed now, given the financial crisis at the museum. Without a director, don't know what quite might happen there, or if they are seeking a permanent one, given the published prospect of the museum closing (gasp!)

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1826479965-1314920204=:29521--

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Subject: Disaster recovery resources From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2011 21:05:53 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

Good evening, QHLers - Here is a link to disaster recovery resources for those of us that have damaged family treasures:

http://www.heritagepreservation.org/programs/TFPublic.html

Lots of information, links and contacts.

Regards,

Meg

. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney

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Subject: Re: American Folk Art Museum From: Quilltraol.com Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2011 20:31:39 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Thanks for the answer Laura.

Lisa

In a message dated 9/1/2011 7:37:11 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com writes:

Don't know if I emailed this already, but in case not, in response to the inquiry about why the museum doesn't charge admission -- the remaining location of the American Folk Art Museum is a public space owned by NYC and rented to the Museum for $1 per year.

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Subject: RE: question about a book From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2011 21:48:25 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I have this book also. It is the one you are looking for. Check Bookfinders.com or Amazon. Janet H in scorching Fort Worth --part1_7e359.20d1942.3b918fe9_boundary--

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Subject: RE: reshuffling the stuff! From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 01 Sep 2011 23:14:44 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

I am like Marcia. My STUFF has taken over the back part of our house where guests are supposed to dwell in peace. I have to move stacks of quilts from all the beds to make room for guests. It is an enormous struggle to make room for the kids each time they visit. And I refuse to invite anyone but family to stay over as long as the house is in the state of affairs! No wants to have a stack of books, files or quilts falling on them!

Well, my DH took a page from the Red & White exhibit. ...with a little encouragement from me. Don't spend all that pot of saved money on the kids after we kick the bucket. So...... for my 70th birthday...which is still a couple of years away....grin.....he is having a separate Quilt Studio built....i.e. climate controlled storage shed......THIS FALL.....to hold 90% of my STUFF in such a way that I can actually organize and access it! He is the second Blue Ribbon DH of the year following the NY gentleman!!!

You can partially thank your mother for this mess, I tell him, for she got me into quilting! And at least 1/3 of my collection I inherited from her! So DH is very accommodating of my quilt mania.

Has anyone heard of where we can send quilts to help those who lost everything in the flooding? Maybe it was mentioned earlier but I haven't caught up with all the Digests yet.

Thanks,

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: question regrading pre-revolutionary American quilts From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 2 Sep 2011 12:08:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Would one or more of our brilliant list members give me some quick and succinct thoughts on early American quilts -- what I am looking for is some ideas I can work with for an article I am writing, and though that era is not the focus of the article at all, the editor is asking me to " 'splaina myself" to paraphrase the great Ricky Ricardo. What I need to do is VERY briefly (a paragraph) encapsulate the early American quilt tradition - meaning probably from the 17th century to ca. 1800, more or less. I don't have a lot of time to find appropriate references, and why should I when I have the world's best quilt reference library here on the list??? (flattery I hope will get me somewhere)

Anyway - I guess I know these things: quilting evolved from Anglo roots in New England and Pennsylvania (which may have come first? I am guessing NE) and it was initially a pursuit of ladies of some means. I may know other things but am momentarily brain dead. Anything that anyone would like to add - you might get referenced in the article!

Best,

Candace Perry

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Subject: Quilt patterns set to music From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 02 Sep 2011 13:08:34 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

A wonderful combination of digitalized moving quilt blocks set to folk music.

http://www.nfb.ca/film/quilt

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: RE: reshuffling the stuff! From: "peter leate" <craftersbigpond.net.au> Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 08:22:46 +1000 X-Message-Number: 6

If I may be so bold as to warn DH that his intent, though well-meaning has a flaw- 90% This will not work!! I can testify to this from my own experience. Our house was taken over by Patchwork and when Frances became a full-time designer, maker, teacher....addict etc I built such a climate controlled, carpeted, kitchenette, tea area, 2 storey building with covered courtyard to get the house back, having no intent for gaining kudos of course! Some of you may have seen the article about it in Australian Patchwork & Quilting last year and there is probably something about it on Frances' blog www.quiltingowl.blogspot.com.

Let me assure you we are going the same way as Karen with an impending family visit which requires a major clearance of, not just the "spare Room",

but the rest of the place as well so I feel that a more rational Plan is worthy of consideration.

Please feel free to refer DH to me for comment on his decision I believe I can suggest a much more considered target.

Peter Leate Cairns Craft Centre Showground Shopping Centre 157 Mulgrave Rd Cairns QLD 4870 Phone 07 40313024, 1300 881 833 Fax 07 40313852 Hours: 9.00- 5.30 daily except 9.00-6.00 THU, 9.00-4.00 Sat Closed Sundays and Public Holidays

See Frances' BLOG- www.quiltingowl.blogspot.com

You are currently subscribed to qhl as: craftersbigpond.net.au. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1537841Nlyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: Fw: reshuffling the stuff! From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Fri, 2 Sep 2011 22:24:31 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Marcia, Marcia, Marcia! (I always wanted to say that)

I now feel better...I was thinking how bad it is that most free time is spent trying to reorganize my "stuff" to make order around here again. And now a Holiday devoted to doing just that. Nine years ago my DH built me a studio that I planned out right down to the front porch swing. It took me 3 weeks to get all the fabrics re-ironed and placed on the shelves and everything in it's place after it was completed. I had so much space in that room. Unfortunately it did not take me long to fill it up. One year ago I thinned things out and hauled so much fabric, books, magazines, quilt frames etc. away that everyone was saying "NO MORE!". Now I'm back to a little space to walk through, the attic of the studio is packed with who remembers what and the closets in the two bedrooms of our house my, which Grandchildren use to call theirs when they stayed overnight, are all full of old quilts and quilt tops. My Granddaughter spent the night last week and came into the Family room asking 'What happened to my closet!" She said she quickly closed it and was so relieved the mountain of quilts did not fall out on her. I am determined to fill my SUV with a lot of things Monday to pass around to others this coming week. I recently starting watching the TV show "Hoarders" and although I am no where near that stage I definitely feel the urge to make some improvements. We also remodeled the living room and devoted a wall to built in book shelves for my quilt books and they only hold about half of them, we will not talk about the magazines or articles in 3-ring notebooks! So, I am so glad to hear that I'm not the only one! And tomorrow I'll kick myself for letting everyone know just how bad my collecting has got! We will not discuss other collections!

Wish I could send you some of the rain we're being blessed with. We went through a 4 month drought this year and know the feeling. I will never complain about rain again!

Here's wishing everyone a safe and happy Labor Day and many successes in cleaning and organizing your "stash"!

Alma Moates AQS Certified Appraiser-Quilted Textiles Pensacola, Florida