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Subject: RE: reshuffling the stuff! From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 04:31:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

My dearly beloved husband died last week after a battle with cancer that lasted only 10 weeks on our radar. I put everything in my life on hold during the time we were seeking help and going through treatments. It was heartbreaking, but being with him was all I wanted to do. I hand pieced at least two thirds of a quilt while I kept him company.

Now, as I start gradually to determine my new life style, I realize I have this whole house to myself. We built this house 39 years ago. The remodeling/redecorating we were finally going to get to this summer was put on hold as Dave went through treatments. I have his permission to do something that will include reordering how I have my studios (yes, plural --- I have a cutting room, a sewing room, a fabric room, and then there's the attic). And a new kitchen.

I've already started with our closet, and in the spirit of fairness, for every piece of his clothing that I gathered to send to Goodwill, I purged something of my own. Double whammy to the good.

I, too, have stored my quilts on spare beds and have to pile them aside when the kids come home for a weekend. I'm thinking of building shelving in one or more of the spare closets to store the quilts. And it would be wonderful to have a library room.

For guests, if there is no closet space, I can offer hanging space with a top-of-the-door extender. Guests shouldn't need more than that, should they? They're guests afterall, not housemates!

Dave had tons (almost literally) of paper stuff including electronics magazines, catalogs and reference books. His survivors have no clue what all this is for, and since there is no line outside the front door looking for a reference library (when all this information is either too old to be technologically viable but may be historical or is online for easier retrieval), I can purge that collection. Then I've looked around at my quilting magazine library. I will keep my QN issues that I proudly have collected from issue #1 to the present. But other quilt magazines can go --- AFTER I look through them and glean what I need. My local guild sells old magazines at their quilt show, so they have recycling value.

I've learned that if I had just tossed something and it turns out later to be just what someone is looking for, I keep my mouth shut. Nothing worse than to say, Oh, I just threw one away!"

To make this at all history related, that quilt I=92m handpiecing was started by my mom several years ago. I found her September, 1988, issue of LCPQ that had the pattern stored with blocks she had started. It's an 8-point star quilt that is scrappy stars set with a lot of white space, so it is traditional, airy and quite lovely. LCPQ was one of the more popular quilt magazines of that time, and I am amazed at how little information it offered for how to make a quilt. Here is this 8-point star block and what they offer are three templates (you add the seam allowance). The instructions go something like: cut it out, sew it together. No block size given. No quilt size given. No special tips for inset piecing. Just Do it." The magazine seems to assume that if you're interested in their patterns you already know how to assemble a quilt. I am and I do, but it surprises me how little instruction was offered back then.

Barb

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org

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Subject: RE: reshuffling the stuff! From: Jeanne Henry <jeannehenry55gmail.com> Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 08:56:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Dear Barbara, my heart hurts or you at this time. I know that losing your best friend, husband, soulmate and sidekick is incredibly painful. I've beenthere.... and quilting and closet-cleaning kept me sane. My prayers and thoughts are with you.

Jeanne Henry Austin, TX

Jeanne

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Subject: Re: Fw: reshuffling the stuff! From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 10:20:03 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

How nice to have others that have the same problem - too much stuff! When one asks me 'Doesn't Bill get upset at all that stuff in that room that once housed our two sons? My answer is 'No, not when he has about 40 antique snowmobiles all over our property and at our Lake Champlain camp!'.....It is not good when a collector marries a collector... Mitzi from poor old devastated Vermont BTW - Today is the day collector married me - 56 years!

In a message dated 9/2/2011 10:24:49 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, Quiltsappraisedaol.com writes:

Marcia, Marcia, Marcia! (I always wanted to say that)

I now feel better...I was thinking how bad it is that most free time is spent trying to reorganize my "stuff" to make order around here again. And now a Holiday devoted to doing just that. Nine years ago my DH built me a studio that I planned out right down to the front porch swing. It took me 3 weeks to get all the fabrics re-ironed and placed on the shelves and everything in it's place after it was completed. I had so much space in that room. Unfortunately it did not take me long to fill it up. One year ago I thinned things out and hauled so much fabric, books, magazines, quilt frames etc. away that everyone was saying "NO MORE!". Now I'm back to a little space to walk through, the attic of the studio is

packed with who remembers what and the closets in the two bedrooms of our house my, which Grandchildren use to call theirs when they stayed overnight, are all full of old quilts and quilt tops. My Granddaughter spent the night last week and came into the Family room asking 'What happened to my closet!" She said she quickly closed it and was so relieved the mountain of quilts did not fall out on her. I am determined to fill my SUV with a lot of things Monday to pass around to others this coming week. I recently starting watching the TV show "Hoarders" and although I am no where near that stage I definitely feel the urge to make some improvements. We also remodeled the living room and devoted a wall to built in book shelves for my quilt books and they only hold about half of them, we will not talk about the magazines or articles in 3-ring notebooks! So, I am so glad to hear that I'm not the only one! And tomorrow I'll kick

myself for letting everyone know just how bad my collecting has got! We will not discuss other collections!

Wish I could send you some of the rain we're being blessed with. We went through a 4 month drought this year and know the feeling. I will never complain about rain again!

Here's wishing everyone a safe and happy Labor Day and many successes in cleaning and organizing your "stash"!

Alma Moates AQS Certified Appraiser-Quilted Textiles Pensacola, Florida

In a message dated 9/1/2011 9:15:09 P.M. Central Daylight Time, marciarkearthlink.net writes:

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Subject: Re: Fw: reshuffling the stuff! From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 09:23:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Ladies, I don't think you need to apologize. Especially in the case of a certified appraiser, you're talking about your profession, not "just" a hobby. Think how much room men take up with boats if they fish, with guns if they hunt (as in with a good dog) .... and those are just hobbies. Are much square footage does their work space at the office take up?

I realize there is a limit, but it seems to me if we are running a business out of our home, we don't need to feel bad that it takes up some square footage.

I should tell you, too, that I'm not a "keeper" by nature, and I do "eliminate and simplify" pretty much on a regular basis, but my quilt history/writing life takes up half my finished basement AND a walk-in-closet ... and I don't feel one bit apologetic about it. My husband has a garage full of tools and saws he never uses but won't part with and an entire portion of our home is dedicated to his massage therapy clinic. So ... it equals out.

That being said, when we did have to downsize, I put all my new fabric atop a table and made my quilt group pick through it and take it. I realized I was never going to use it all and I just didn't want it hanging around in my way. I'd finally realized my "thing" is the old quilts ... so now my space is dedicated to the part of the quilt world I am passionate about ... old quilts and quilt history books. And women's history. And history. And research. And .... ahem.

Steph Whitson

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Subject: RE: reshuffling the stuff! From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 10:25:49 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Thank you, thank you, thank you. My DH (of 56 years today) is going thru Alzheimers - it is the most horrible thing a family can watch...I grieve for your loss also. I do know if it wasn't for my quilts and quilt friends I would not make it thru the upcoming future. Mitzi from Vermont ps - Irene missed our part of the state, but I have many friends who have lost everything - including their stashes......   In a message dated 9/3/2011 5:32:06 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  cptvdeosbcglobal.net writes:

My dearly beloved husband died last week after a battle with cancer that lasted only 10 weeks on our radar. I put everything in my life on hold during the time we were seeking help and going through treatments. It was heartbreaking, but being with him was all I wanted to do. I hand pieced at least two thirds of a quilt while I kept him company.

Now, as I start gradually to determine my new life style, I realize I have this whole house to myself. We built this house 39 years ago. The remodeling/redecorating we were finally going to get to this summer was put on hold as Dave went through treatments. I have his permission to do something that will include reordering how I have my studios (yes, plural --- I have a cutting room, a sewing room, a fabric room, and then there's the attic). And a new kitchen.

I've already started with our closet, and in the spirit of fairness, for every piece of his clothing that I gathered to send to Goodwill, I purged something of my own. Double whammy to the good.

I, too, have stored my quilts on spare beds and have to pile them aside when the kids come home for a weekend. I'm thinking of building shelving in one or more of the spare closets to store the quilts. And it would be wonderful to have a library room.

For guests, if there is no closet space, I can offer hanging space with a top-of-the-door extender. Guests shouldn't need more than that, should they? They're guests afterall, not housemates!

Dave had tons (almost literally) of paper stuff including electronics magazines, catalogs and reference books. His survivors have no clue what all this is for, and since there is no line outside the front door looking for a reference library (when all this information is either too old to be technologically viable but may be historical or is online for easier retrieval), I can purge that collection. Then I've looked around at my quilting magazine library. I will keep my QN issues that I proudly have collected from issue #1 to the present. But other quilt magazines can go --- AFTER I look through them and glean what I need. My local guild sells old magazines at their quilt show, so they have recycling value.

I've learned that if I had just tossed something and it turns out later to be just what someone is looking for, I keep my mouth shut. Nothing worse than to say, Oh, I just threw one away!"

To make this at all history related, that quilt I=99m handpiecing was started by my mom several years ago. I found her September, 1988, issue of LCPQ that had the pattern stored with blocks she had started. It's an 8-point star quilt that is scrappy stars set with a lot of white space, so it is traditional, airy and quite lovely. LCPQ was one of the more popular quilt magazines of that time, and I am amazed at how little information it offered for how to make a quilt. Here is this 8-point star block and what they offer are three templates (you add the seam allowance). The instructions go something like: cut it out, sew it together. No block size given. No quilt size given. No special tips for inset piecing. Just Do it." The magazine seems to assume that if you're interested in their patterns you already know how to assemble a quilt. I am and I do, but it surprises me how little instruction was offered back then.

Barb

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org 

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Subject: Moth advice From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 16:22:12 +0100 X-Message-Number: 6

My DS has just found moth infestation in his (knitting) wool stash and asked my advice.

I think freezing is the answer, but I am not sure about the details. If anyone could advise off list I would be very grateful.

Sally Ward

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Subject: Quilt Hobby Storage From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 11:44:21 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

I am happy to hear I am not the only one with too much quilt stuff! Thank you to all who have shared. In return may I offer a suggestion that has worked well for me after we moved from 2,500 square feet to a very cozy 1,300 sf.

Since the beginning of my obsession with quilts (oh, about 40+ years ago give or take) I had collected massive numbers of magazine articles and various clippings in binders using archival sheet protectors. As my collection grew I sorted them into binders by topic, i.e. inspirational photos, quilt history articles by time period, etc. A few years ago I figured out I could save 4 feet of shelf space by scanning all of the information saved in binders into my computer. I set up an electronic filing system that allows me to search for items by topic, title or author. I maintain backups on DVDs (which takes up a lot less space the binders) and an off-site service to avoid losing all those wonderful tidbits of information and inspiration. I even repurposed a few of the binders with archival pages to store collected pieces of ephemera like trade cards and other goodies.

Greta VanDenBerg-Nestle Lancaster, PA

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Subject: revolutionary war era quilts, to Candace Perry From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 13:05:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Candace,

A good reference with references is the book put out by Old Sturbridge Village, 1998, "Northern Comfort, New England's Early Quilts, 1780 -1850", first two chapters. It was written by Lynne Z. Bassett and Jack Larkin and is a paperback. It states that the earlier quilts were imports from England. Maybe this will help if you can get your hands on it.

Barbara Woodford

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Subject: Re: Quilt Hobby Storage From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 16:47:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Although the topic was discussed before, I would love to know which electronic filing system you used as it might prove helpful to me shortly! My hubby is pounding and sawing away in the upstairs closets (bwa-ahaahahaha!)as we sit here and type and I am getting excited about the possible transformation! Marcia Kaylakie in hot. hot, dry Austin, TX

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Subject: Something else quilty to do at Seminar From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 18:12:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

The wonderful Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street, in Doylestown, Bucks County PA call 215-345-9800 is hosting a quilt exhibition September 10 - December 31. Called "QUILT ART: International Expressions" the show brings together 35 contemporary quilts crafted by members of Quilt Art, Europe's leading advocacy group for innovative quilt making. 35 artists. This is the first US tour for Quilt Art. There is a lovely color catalog.

Doylestown is 40 miles and less than one hour from Philadelpha or from Cherry HIll. www.MichenerArtMuseum.org . The Michener Museum is partially built in the old 19th century Bucks County jail.

While there, if you have the time, take in the Mercer Museum directly across the street. The building alone is worth the trip. And with even more time, go across town to see Fonthill, the home of Henry Chapman Mercer, collector for and builder of the Mercer Museum, and owner of the famous Mercer Tile Works. Unusual to say the least! http://www.mercermuseum.org/ Mercer Museum/ Bucks County Historical Society 215-345-0210 x127 84 South Pine Street Doylestown, PA 18901

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 03, 2011 From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 07:51:49 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

On Sep 3, 2011, at 11:01 PM, Quilt History List digest wrote:

> Barb Vlack: reshuffling the stuff!

Oh Barb, I am so sorry. I have walked that path, though my Jim lived through treatments for two years. One is never ready to say goodbye to a helpmeet, lover, friend. We were building my present home which includes a fabulous quilt studio when Jim died. It was very hard to finish it, but it has been a haven ever since, and I am constantly reminded of his attention to some of the details. May you find comfort in your stitches and your friends, Pat Kyser, Huntsville, AL

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Subject: Studios, loss, being organized From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 08:36:27 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

I have organized and reorganized studio space more times than I care to remember. When I stopped working for others and began my current life, Itook over the largest bedroom in the house as my studio. First, I removed everything in there, and "reloaded" with space designated for cutting, sewing, and hand work. But, the room was more than full before I was finished!! So, knitting yarns were evicted to another guest room, along withsome books, embellishments, and quilts. Vintage fabrics, incomplete projects and miscellany to another guest room, along with more books.

While my business is called Memory Patch, in my mind I have a picture of the maiden in the story "Rumpelstiltskin". Remember her? Spinning strawinto gold?? In my mind, I am happily sewing away at the piles and pilesof fabric straw, turning them into beautiful, useful, fun objects. Never mind that somehow the ideas come faster than snow, piling up in drifts, or, as my father used to say, vast plans with half-vast ideas. So, to keep things light, I describe my space as "Rump's Room" - cross-referencing myworking position, anatomy, and the fun of a romp through the colors. Noway around the many ironies. THEY are all over the house, covering the work tables, beds, and dining room table!!!

To Barb Vlack, and the others who have had such great loss, I extend my deep sympathy, and admiration for your enterprise in sorting, purging and organizing through your sadness. When our oldest son died in 2006, I was completely immobilized for what seemed forever. It took a long time for my imagination to see what my life should look like in the "new normal", and then to feel as if it would be ok to live it. I am so very gratefulto all my friends, including and especially my new quilt/fiber friends, who encouraged me to do so.

But being organized and having a steel trap memory seem to be the goals of a past life, and not especially a distinguishing feature of "our lady of intermittancy" who is now working on all that straw in "Rumps". The piles sometimes make me feel a little crazy, but not so much anyone can tell the difference.

Right now, I am camping in beautiful Maine, right next to Penobscot Bay.Fresh air, fresh seafood, cooler temps!! Fiber College is next weekend. I have knitting and sewing with me (yes, and my sewing machine, too!). Unfortunately, the fabric that I was going to use to sew some covers for the camper cushions seems not to have made it into the truck. I'll work on other things. That fabric will show up soon, and I have other tripsplanned. See you at seminar!!! Smiling, Susan Schreurs

--0-76784715-1315150587=:91491--

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Subject: prerevolutionary quilts From: QUILTMOOREaol.com Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2011 09:18:31 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

I am not an expert by any means, but a couple things come to mind. Style- the style of the Indian palampore ie Tree of Life/Medallion was mimicked in American and British quilts. Fabric was precious, ( and either imported or home srun and woven) thus the cutting of the flowers, birds from "chintz" and placing on a larger field by means of Broderie Perse. Patterns and styles were traded (or copied) among friends and neighbors and were area specific. Am sure others will have much more to add. Nan Moore in FL --part1_3e2d6.ce4adc4.3b938327_boundary--

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Subject: Re: prerevolutionary quilts From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 21:49:19 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 4

Most of what you would see on beds in the eighteenth century would bewholecloth wool quilts, crewel embroidered coverlets, whole cloth toiles, cut out chintz applique, silk quilts such as one seen in the Salem museum, wool blankets such as the compass rose blankets, overshot coverlets, bed rugs in New England. and whole cloth linen quilts such as the "May Flower quilt" at the Maryland historical Society. I would think that animal hides might have been used in some early homes. AQSG's seminar in Connecticut was the place that I saw these very early bed covers "in person". It was wonderful.

http://www.mthoodmayflower.com/links/html/textiles.html

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: A Different Kind of Help Needed From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 18:08:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I hope I offend no one by asking that those members who pray or otherwise implore protection for themselves and others, spend a few minutes remembering Karey Bresenhan right now. Karey just received notice to evacuate her place north of Houston because of fast-moving wildfires.

The fires are being fanned by winds on the western side of this tropical depression that is moving southeast from Gulf. They carry no rain and East Texas is a tinderbox right now. Karey said the old cedars that are everywhere there are exploding into cloud-tall sheets of fire, thus spreading it.

I know many of you work with Karey at Houston or Cincinnati. She is a faithful reader of this list, though she seldom comments. Please remember her and her neighbors now.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: prerevolutionary quilts From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 23:12:20 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 6

I forgot to say palampores

Polly Mello

Many still without power in Maryland

My daughter only got hers back on yesterday after 1 week. ------=_Part_145927_1993925438.1315177940840--

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Subject: Thanks Gaye From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 19:55:58 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Prayers and positive thoughts have helped many of us on this list over the years. These disastrous weather conditions seem to be overwhelming so many parts of our country and affecting so many on this list. There is nothing more frightening than fire. Thank you for sharing.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: A Different Kind of Help Needed From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 20:22:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

As one sitting in a cedar forest, with no less than 3 wildfires at the moment, in the area, I can understand how everyone here in Texas is feeling. We are packing in advance of possible evacuation; there is one fire fairly close by in anothr subdivision. Pics, family papers, the dogs' supplies, and musical instruments go first, then and only then the quilts. I do keep backups on everything. We will be sitting up all night with binoculars watching, watching with the wind still blowing........Marcia Kaylakie, in bone dry Austin

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Subject: Re: A Different Kind of Help Needed From: Jeanne Henry <jeannehenry55gmail.com> Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 22:35:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Marcia, I'm watching the coverage on TV. It seems all of the county is on fire. I hope and pray that you are free from harm and that the fires will stay far away from your home!

Jeanne Henry Austin On a greenbelt, but luckily no fires in my area.

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Subject: Re: A Different Kind of Help Needed From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 23:09:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Marcia K, you're on my list----as is all of Texas. I was shocked when I pulled up a map of current wildfires: they are everywhere. I had so hoped this little tropical system would make it to Houston and hill country. As it is, Texas just got the high winds from its back side.

Lately, I've thought of books and films like Key Largo (?), where the weather becomes a character in the drama. That's what this summer has been like. Temperatures 105F on thermometer for months and not even a thunder shower. In teaching fiction, we teach the kinds of conflicts that typically constitute the heart of stories. One is man against nature. If you live in Vermont or East Texas-western Louisiana, you can understand that one better. We had a 15-minute rain two weeks ago and I got my camera out to record the event.

gaye

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Subject: Re: A Different Kind of Help Needed From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 09:48:35 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Just got back from a retreat where we were commenting on how odd it was that we were praying for a hurricane to come our way. I did notice while driving to and from the retreat all of the dead and dying trees and shrubs. So sorry to hear that Marcia and Karey are in harms way. Will keep them in my prayers.

Warm regards, Sharron.........................in Spring, TX where at least we're out of triple digit temperatures for a while..............

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Subject: Re: A Different Kind of Help Needed From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 09:57:17 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Marcia,

My thoughts and prayers are with you. I had so hoped the tropical storm would go your way.

All my best, Alma

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Subject: Re: A Different Kind of Help Needed From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 10:27:11 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

My fingers are crossed for those in fire areas - Vermont is bracing for more rain - something we do not need after Irene......there is something wrong with our weather - what I don't know, but I keep looking for it all to stop. Mitzi from too wet VT

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Subject: Re: A Different Kind of Help Needed From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 10:34:15 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Don't I wish I could package up some 'water' and sent it to you! We don't need it - not after what Irene did to our little state of Vermont. But, as usual, we Vermonters are already working on getting the damages done and are rebuilding. Very strange weather indeed. Mitzi from VT (where it is now raining - again!).

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Subject: Re: Studios, loss, being organized From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 10:31:20 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

"Organized" is highly overrated imho. As loing as I can find what I need when I need it, I feel organized. This doesn't mean there aren't piles of stuff around me. But I know what's in those piles and they don't hamper my creativity. In fact, sometimes the piles enhance my creative bent.

I tend to have this conversation about organization and accumulation with other novelists who sometimes share photos of their offices. When I'm in the middle of a historical novel, my office is a morass of non-fiction books, historical photographs, etc. etc. You can barely see the top of my desk. But that's how I create. The same can be said for my fabric & etc. when I'm creating quiltwork. I'm not a "she who dies with the most fabric wins" woman, but my children and husband would likely think I'm in a "she who dies with the most history books and women's history ephemera wins" contest somewhere. At the moment I have two pairs of women's shoes on my desk. Why? Because the juxtaposition gets my creative juices flowing. An pair of Balmoral Victorian lace-ups ... and a pair of orange stilletos. And, of course a quilt that speaks more to the Balmorals than the stilletos :-).

Happy studios, folks. I've loved reading these posts. Steph Whitson www.stephaniegracewhitson.com www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: prerevolutionary quilts From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 10:42:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Is there a different term for a "quilt" if you're looking at a piece purported to have been created in the latter part of the 18th century in Ireland? Know of any books on the topic? Thanks! Steph Whitson

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Subject: Texas fires From: Kaytriplet <kaytripletaol.com> Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 12:03:17 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 8

 

http://ticc.tamu.edu/Documents/Home/tx_sitrep.pdf

It is hard to figure out the best way to see what is going on with the fires in Texas. The one near to Karey B is the Bastrop fire which I understand has already burned 300 homes. This is probably the one near Marcia K as well, though I have never been to her home. 3,500,000 acres have burned in Texas this summer. To put that in perspective, the internet tells me that Vermont has 6,100,000 acres if you include water. The link above is the Texas A&M fire report with the resources being put to use to try to put out these fires. Ironically, the hurricane which just put ashore in LA is making it worse in TX with strong winds and very dry air fanning the flames. Part of my interest here is that I am a Texan when I am not in Africa, and my husband, house and quilts are there without me. All is well with me for now. Justthought others would be interested in what is happening there.

Kay Triplett

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Subject: Ireland quilts From: Sarah Hough <dougandsarah1gmail.com> Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 11:15:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Don't know about pre-revolutionary quilts but I found out before I went to Ireland this spring from Pat Lyons on this list that quilts are referred to Patchwork. Sure makes a different when looking for information.

Sarah Hough

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Subject: overloaded From: Polly Greene <pjgreeneeastlink.ca> Date: Mon, 05 Sep 2011 13:58:13 -0300 X-Message-Number: 10

All this talk about organizing and "having too much stuff"! I once complained to a friend that if I lived to be 300 I'd never be able to use up all my fabric. Her reply was to ask if artists ever worried about using up all their paint! Polly Greene Nova Scotia

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Subject: Re: overloaded From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 18:06:10 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 11

Just think what lovely stashes of antique fabric we'll be leaving to our heirs!Jocelyn________________________________From: Polly Greene <pjgreeneeastlink.ca>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>Sent: Monday, September 5, 2011 11:58 AMSubject: [qhl] overloadedAll this talk about organizing and "having too much stuff"! I once complained to a friend that if I lived to be 300 I'd never be able to use up all my fabric. Her reply was to ask if artists ever worriedabout using up all their paint!          Polly Greene           Nova Scotia

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Subject: KAY-Texas Fires From: Sherry Cook <sas.cookgmail.com> Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 16:00:52 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Kay, I understand totally how you feel. I am in WA STATE and my house & quilts are in the Stone Oak area of San Antonio. My daughter tried to check on our house this afternoon & the area was closed off & being evacuated. The floods & fires have been so sad this year in many areas.

On another thought, I need advice on fading from anyone with good luck or bad luck trying to wash old fabric for the first time! I have a couple of red, white, & blue tops from c1900 that are beautifully hand stitched. The "turkey red" has rubbed off on the white so I know there will be fading when washed. CAN ANYONE GIVE ME ANY IDEAS ON WASHING THESE TOPS? I thought I would try one top at a time in a tub of water with lots of "color catchers". Than blot it between old white sheets. I tried steaming the red between layers of white fabric with the iron in a small spot & it barely faded. The red thread faded more than the fabric!

THANKS, Sherry

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Subject: Texas Wildfires From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Tue, 06 Sep 2011 09:20:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Has anyone heard from Karey or Marcia?

I keep thinking about them and saying a prayer.

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn mary.persynvalpo.edu Associate Dean for Library Services School of Law Library Valparaiso University 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 219-465-7830 FAX 219-465-7917

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Subject: a gentle reminder From: "Virginia Berger" <cifbanetins.net> Date: Tue, 06 Sep 2011 10:05:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Well, actually more like a desperate plea!

Please, please, please don't just hit reply to a QHL message!! Please take the time and go down the page and delete all but the pertinent part of the message to which your are replying. When you don't do this, those of us on digest end up having to scroll thru pages of messages from previous days. (It has been especially frustrating recently as I've been trying to keep up with QHL via my smart phone!)

Those of us on the digest version thank you for your attention to this matter!!!

Virginia Berger

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Subject: Re: overloaded From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2011 14:07:41 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

I like this! Sounds right to me! By the way, I spent all day yesterday doing appraisals on my computer. It's always feast or famine in this area. SO, the organizing was put off and we had tropical storm Lee hovering overhead with lot of rain and wind so it would have been impossible to be out in the studio anyway.

And, I would rather be typing up appraisals than cleaning! I do have 3-4 hours this afternoon with that task on my "to do" list.

I only wish I could have had the rain sent to Texas. My thoughts and prayers are with all of you in the drought areas in Texas and other states. And, I hope the storm does not take rain to the flooded areas of the East that were hit so hard recently.

Before closing I'll share something a shop owner told me about 25 yrs. ago when I voiced feelings of guilt spending so much on quilt and history books...she said even if you never make a thing that's in the quilt books, you get enjoyment from reading them and you can pass on information gleaned from reading books to others. I know she loved my business but she did have a point.

After all I read these books instead of Romance Novels and I'd rather read a quilt history book than go to most movies that are out today. Just like I buy fabrics and quilts instead of other things that would mean nothing to me in a few years (or weeks).

I have a lot of friends that think I'm off my rocker with all the collecting but they always love coming to my home and looking at everything, especially at Christmas with the red and white antique quilts and antique Santas and bears everywhere.

I will hush for now, I'm just putting off some hard work ahead in the studio!

Alma Moates AQS Certified Appraiser-Quilted Textiles Pensacola, Florida _quiltsappraisedaol.com_ (mailto:quiltsappraisedaol.com)

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Subject: American Folk Art Museum From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2011 14:06:45 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Hi all - fyi, here is the latest from the newsletter of the American Folk Art Museum......."We are aware of recent reports in the media about the future of the Museum. There has been no decision to dissolve the Museum or transfer its collection to another institution. Like any institution, the Museum is actively engaged in planning for its future and is considering a variety of alternatives, all aimed at the paramount objective of preserving its collection for the benefit of the public. If the planning process results in a new direction or structure for the Museum, a public announcement will be made.

Sincerely,

Linda Dunne Acting Director Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --0-1943022193-1315343205=:49902--

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Subject: RE: a gentle reminder From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2011 09:15:02 +1000 X-Message-Number: 6

Some of my recent posts in relation to the judging topic have not appeared at all. They did not include copied text that seemed to be the problem previously, but were made in plain text using the Reply button. Cyberspace gremlins at work?

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Re: Texas Wildfires From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 8 Sep 2011 3:16:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Mary, Karey B has trouble sending mail to QHL and asked me to post this forher.

Thanks to all of you who have expressed concern and support for Marcia and for me during this wildfire fright. Marcia will have to answer for herself,although I did hear that she was still fine this morning. I am still at the ranch in Fayette County, and the fire is still rampaging through Bastrop County. It is totally out of control, has burned over 500 homes and well over 20,000 acres, is jumping back and forth over highways and the Colorado River (so much for fire breaks) so that its direction keeps changing. It is a monster fire--over 16 miles long and 20 miles wide. These have not been happy days in Central Texas. We need rain desperately. I don=99t know what else will stop this wildfire. Karey Bresenhan

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Subject: Newark Museum exhibition and special day Sept 27th From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2011 00:41:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

September 26th is the American Quilt Study Group day with the quilt collection -- on a day when the museum is closed to all outside visitors. If you are not on the AQSG tour, you have another opportunity for the same program the very next day............... Sign up information is at the bottom of this press release.........

Patchwork Art Form Dazzles as Newark Museum Turns Spotlight on its Renowned Quilt Collection American Masterpieces Featured in Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art; The Global Art of Patchwork: Asia and Africa also Exhibited Comprehensive Programs Scheduled to Complement Exhibitions Exhibitions on view September 14 to December 31

NEWARK, NJ -- Quilts are considered by many to be one of America's great indigenous folk-art forms, but patchwork also has a rich and important place in other parts of the world as demonstrated in a pair of exhibitions opening September 14 at the Newark Museum.

Since purchasing its first quilt in 1918, the Newark Museum has amassed one of the most comprehensive quilt collections in the nation. Drawing 30 magnificent quilts, half by New Jersey artisans, from its rich holdings of more than 150 works, the Museum will showcase the art form in its upcoming feature exhibition, Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art, September 14 through December 31, 2011. A broader world view of the art form is examined in a small accompanying exhibition entitled The Global Art of Patchwork: Asia and Africa. As is traditional with all major Newark Museum exhibitions, a rich and diverse schedule of educational programs and activities are planned throughout the run of the exhibition.

Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art explores the evolution of quilts from those created for functional use in the 19th century to breathtaking works of art intended only for display. Woven throughout the exhibition are the stories associated with each quilt, reminding the visitor of the all-important human connection. The exhibition also demonstrates the historical importance of quilts as an "acceptable" means of creative and communal expression during times when women had no public voice and few legal rights.

Patchwork quilts, many of which have never been on public view, range from simple graphic designs pieced together from small geometric patches of silk, wool or cotton, to complex narratives filled with appliqué motifs and embroidered enrichment.

"Patchwork offers a rare opportunity for museum goers to view these stylistically and historically important works," said Ulysses Grant Dietz, Senior Curator and Curator of Decorative Arts Collection, and Curator of Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art. "This exhibition is a must for those who love textiles, both for their artistic beauty and exquisite craftsmanship. The accompanying exhibition, which takes a global look at the art of patchwork, provides an enriching perspective made possible by the significant global holdings of the Newark Museum."

Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art is presented in four sections: Making Quilts, The Social Fabric of Quilts, Quilted Memories, and Contemporary Quilts / Cultural Adaptations.

Making Quilts traces the evolution of quilt making from the early 19th century, when they were made by hand, through the Industrial Revolution and the advent of the sewing machine, to present day. Featured in this section is Wild Goose Chase (1800-1830), the initial acquisition of the Museum's collection. Produced from homespun wool, this popular pattern of triangular patches evokes the image of flying geese.

The long-standing tradition of quilting requires patience, creativity and skill and usually takes place at a communal or family gathering. The Social Fabric of Quilts section explores the familial and communal occasions at which quilts are often created. During the 19th century, quilts were created as part of a new bride's hope chest. Often, women also created quilts as a means of expressing their political views.

From the 19th century to the present day, a handmade quilt is a highly-valued and cherished gift. Quilted Memories exhibits examples of quilts that uniquely memorialize historic and family events for posterity. During the 19th century, the desire to commemorate and memorialize major events influenced the popularity of album quilts. Each block in the album quilt reflected a memory and was signed by one or more people who helped create the block.

The Hurley Family Album, exhibited publically for the first time, is one of the Museum's most important recent acquisitions. Made in 1867 in Wall Township, New Jersey, by the members of a prominent farming family, this is the finest example of its type known today, according to Dietz.

The final section of the exhibition, Contemporary Quilts / Cultural Adaptation, showcases the modern day quiltings that are often created and viewed as works of art. The most recent acquisition, from 2006, is entitled Midtown Direct, made by Teresa Barkley, a Maplewood resident, who started working on the quilt in 1998. This quilt commemorated the introduction of direct New Jersey Transit train service into Manhattan, an event that transformed New Jersey's suburbs and had a great impact on the artist's own daily commute into New York. Since the events of September 11, 2001, the quilt has taken on a darker aspect, becoming a memorial to the World Trade Center towers that had formed part of every New Jersey Transit commuter's daily life.

Significant contributions and influences made by African-Americans are now being documented as part of the development of the quilt as a distinctly American folk expression, Dietz said. Research shows that some quilt patterns can be traced back to ancestral African textile design. For example, the striking syncopated design in Tied Center Medallion quilt made by an unknown African-American woman in Kansas in the 1920s bears an uncanny similarity of modern geometric painting of the same period and comes from a quilting tradition largely outside of the Euro-American aesthetic.

The accompanying exhibition, The Global Art of Patchwork: Africa and Asia features textile-related patchwork traditions outside the world of quilts, including works from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Japan, Korea, India, Nigeria, Sudan and Tibet. Drawn from the Newark Museum's broad collections, the exhibition offers a global perspective for the art of patchwork textiles.

September 27, 10:30-4 pm

The Great Newark Quilt Turning

Fee: $35 Members; $50 for non-members. To register for the event, call 973-596-6613 or register on-line at www.newarkmuseum.org. $15 optional box lunch available (must be ordered by September 23).

Don't miss this rare opportunity to study and explore 32 quilts from the Museum's collection brought out of storage for this event. With four experts present to reflect upon and discuss the unique pieces, visitors will gain a familiarity with what lies behind the stitches and patterns of these rare masterpieces. For quilters of any caliber and also, for those who simply appreciate impeccable craftsmanship, this occasion is guaranteed to inspire all who attend.

Beginning at 10:3m Ulysses Dietz, Senior Curator and Curator of Decorative Arts will lecture on Quilts Uncovered at the Newark Museum. Attendees will then tour the exhibitions, Patchwork from Folk Art to Fine Art and The Global Art of Patchwork from 11:30-1 pm. After a lunch break the Quilt Turning segment will take place in the Engelhard Court from 2-4 pm.

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Subject: Article on Denyse Schmidt in the Wall Street Journal From: megmaxcaol.com Date: Sun, 11 Sep 2011 13:26:19 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE3EBF0DA686DB_255C_91F3_webmail-m160.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I think people on this list will be interested in the way Denyse Schmidt studies old quilts to create new work This is an ongoing series in the Journal called Creating, about the creative process whether the creator is making novels, beer, pastry... or quilts! Just fyi, the Journal is not calling DS a hillbilly, but quoting her own tongue-in-cheek name for her style. Here is the link. You can enlarge the color photo, which is of a quilt in her book coming out next spring. Sadly, the Journal didn't do a slideshow online, but you can see more of her work at her website, www.dsquilts.com.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904537404576555050324870040.html Enjoy! Meg Cox

www.megcox.com Latest book: The Quilter's Catalog: A Comprehensive Resource Guide President, Alliance for American Quilts Read the latest issue of Quilt Journalist Tells All!

Find me on FaceBook

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Subject: Cinda Cawley's collection From: resmarcomcast.net Date: Sun, 11 Sep 2011 10:31:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

A heads up for those of you attending the AQSG Seminar this year : Quilts, textiles, and books from Cinda Cawley's collection will be offered for sale in the vendor room at the upcoming AQSG Seminar in Cherry Hill, NJ. Cinda collected Pennsylvania quilts and presented a paper on PA fraktur quilts at the Vancouver, WA, seminar in 2004. Cinda's personal collection of fraktur quilts is now located at IQSC. Cinda isremembered on QHLfor her online descriptions of quilts she saw at regional study groups.

See you all at Cherry Hill. Julie Hardy & Debby Cooney

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Subject: Please vote again for 'Unfolding the Quits' From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sun, 11 Sep 2011 16:44:39 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

It's time for the 2nd round of voting!

Anyone in the world can vote in this lottery to fund the York Quilt Museum and Gallery in the U.K. Here is the latest news from my friend Val Shields in Wales.

I highly recommend watching the video that Val mentions below.

<<The project at the Quilt Museum and Gallery in York has made it through into the finals of the Lottery Awards 2011 and the plea has gone out again to ask quilt-lovers everywhere once more to consider voting to assist our cause. Even better, encourage family and friends also to cast a vote for us. The profile of quilting is riding quite high at present in the UK but if this project were to win its category the resultant publicity would do this hobby of ours so much good and help to ensure the future of the Quilt Museum in York which currently is by no means certain. You can go to the Quilt Museum website or direct to www.lotterygoodcauses.org.uk/awards and click on Heritage Projects. There is a short video there featuring some of the work done during the project. The closing date for casting your vote is September 26th - noon, I think. Don't leave it until the last minute, please. Why not do it now? Val Shields.>>

I hope you will take the time to vote and encourage all your family and friends to vote as well! If you have a blog, post the news there too.

Looking forward to seeing many of you soon!

Karen Alexander Quilt History Reports karenquilt.blogspot.com

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Subject: QHF Honoree Amy Emms From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sun, 11 Sep 2011 16:53:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

I forgot to mention in my last post that if you go to the lottery voting website and watch the video, you will be able to see the wedding dress that Amy Emms made for her daughter.

www.lotterygoodcauses.org.uk/awards and click on Heritage Projects.

Then click on the video.

There is a short post about Amy Emms here on the TQHF website:

http://tinyurl.com/3rg9mzc

Karen Alexander

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Subject: New TQHF Honoree announced for 2012 From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2011 12:50:47 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Dear QHLers,

Would you kindly consider passing this TQHF announcement-link of the new 2012 Inductee to your quilt friends and guilds?

http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

Also, check out Barbara Brackman's latest post, "Strike-Offs and AQSG Donation".

There is some very exciting news about an item she helped make for the upcoming AQSG auction!!

http://barbarabrackman.blogspot.com/

Cheers!

Karen Alexander

New blog post at Quilt History Reports:

"Life Before Quilting - Part I"

http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/

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Subject: seen in an upcoming auction listing... From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2011 11:47:46 -0400

http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/book-on-maryland-quilts:-old-quilts-by-du nton-230-c-034ed9e924

"Old Quilts" by Dunton

Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: seen in an upcoming auction listing... From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2011 11:07:31 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

In the picture provided,the cover looks moldy.http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/book-on-maryland-quilts:-old-quilts-by-dunton-230-c-034ed9e924"Old Quilts" by Dunton

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Subject: Sanitary Commission Quilts From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2011 17:31:58 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Bill recently posted a photo of a Sanitary Commission Quilt on display in California. Are there photos available of any of the other known SCQs? I am co-teaching a Civil War Quilt Class at a local shop better known for its batiks and brights. So far the class has been amazed at the two Civil War era antique quilts I own. I would like to make a replica of a SCQ for the next class. If anyone knows of accessable photos of the other four or so SCQ's I would appreciate your help. Regards, Janet H in Fort Worth --part1_faba6.390fc490.3b9fd44e_boundary--

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Subject: New Regional Study Group From: castle99centurylink.net Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2011 07:06:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Merikay Waldvogel, Linda Claussen, Joan Wass (and others?) are starting a regional study group in East Tennessee. The first meeting will be October 19, although future meetings will probably not be during the week. The second meeting is scheduled for February 16. The first meeting will be at the Choto Recreation Center at Tellico Village, 145 Awohili, Loudon, TN, from 10 AM to 2 PM. (Bring your own lunch) For full particulars, please email Candace St. Lawrence at castle99centurylink.net or Merikay at quiltaliveaol.com. RSVP to Joyce Knauff golfwidow115yahoo.com.

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Subject: Re: seen in an upcoming auction listing... From: Quilltraol.com Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2011 20:53:43 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Mildewed, anyway. And the cover is green. Mine is orange. I didn't know it came in different colors.

Lisa

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Subject: Re: seen in an upcoming auction listing... From: "Gloria Nixon" <rgnixonoct.net> Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2011 02:41:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

The green cover on the Old Quilts by Dunton appears to be a library binding (library grade vinyl--tough stuff).

Gloria ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: seen in an upcoming auction listing... From: "Laura Syler" <texasquiltcoairmail.net> Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2011 07:07:13 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

The copy that I have seen has a green cover. Laura Syler AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles Richardson, Texas

Mildewed, anyway. And the cover is green. Mine is orange. I didn't know it came in different colors.

Lisa

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Subject: blue and white tops for sale From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2011 07:07:01

My daughter is having a garage sale today with 3 blue and white calico tops for sale. All are probably 1890-1920s blues Some cadet blues in the mix. If interested, e-mail me and I can send photos.

"Strippy" about 40 x 60 $60

Square/in/square 8" blocks set with blue and white calico and shirtings ... I'll have to measure it ... I think she's asking about $100

5 inch 9-patch blocks. The authentic 9-patches are set with a 5" square of various of those Harriet Hargrave (I think) reproduction. I did that for her about 20 years ago. (The 9-patch blocks were originally mine). Again I think she has $100 on it. This one is 80" square. And yes, I'm a bit sad she's selling it but these things happen :-). And I am trying to "take myself in hand" about acquiring any more quilt tops. Plus, I'm a madder girl not a blue and white girl.

Email me for photos if interested.

Oh--there's also a blue and white basket block with name and date (1926) pencilled inside the handle ready to be embroidered. The fun thing about this is the pattern pieces are still pinned to the block. $20 for that

Stephanie Whitson -

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Subject: Question RE quilts in America in 1770 From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2011 10:26:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

A writer friend has asked me a question and I'm being lazy because I'm fairly certain someone on this loop knows the answer without my spending hours to research it:

In 1770, what kind of "filler" i.e. batting would American women have been using? The writer is having her people make a whole cloth quilt.

Also, what kind of batting would have been put into a quilted petticoat in that era?

Thank you for sharing your wisdom ... Stephanie Whitson ------=_NextPart_000_0098_01CC7391.F6BDFC80--

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Subject: Re: Question RE quilts in America in 1770 From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2011 11:44:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Carded wool. Could have been natural white or dark sheep's wool, or it could have been dyed to blend with the color of the top of the quilt. I have seen blue and yellow dyed wool batting in 18th-century quilts and quilted petticoats.

All best, Lynne

> In 1770, what kind of "filler" i.e. batting would American women have been using? > > Also, what kind of batting would have been put into a quilted petticoat in that era? >

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Subject: "Why Quilts Matter: History, Art&Politics" DVDs available at AQSG in Cherry Hill next week. From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2011 15:14:11 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4 \

The series is getting rave reviews across the country from libraries, universities, quilt makers and all others.. For those of you attending the AQSG seminar in Cherry Hill next week, I have sent 100 copies that will be for sale. Quilts historians will want to have a copy and this is a great opportunity. 20% of the $39.95 price goes to AQSG and you will pay no shipping if you pick one up there. Visit www.whyquiltsmatter.org and on the homepage are clips and descriptions of every episode...

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

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Subject: Cotton and the production of textiles during the Civil War From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2011 18:14:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

I am hoping this will get to you folks. I have been out of commission with my palamporeaol.comaddress on QHL. I will begin to use this gmail address. Now to remember to check it!!

I did a presentation this past Saturday at the old State Capitol in Raleigh, NC. The topic was on "What Type of Quilts Would the Soldiers Have Carried?" And with that I also talked about the Home of the Brave Project and the Quilts of Valor Project. This is in hopes that people will make quilts for these causes and then have them on hand at an event in the spring on the Capitol grounds. I certainly find that I fit the old adage........ " the more I know, the less I know". I researched this presentation as hard as any I have ever done and I have been researching this topic for over 20 years. Why had I never thought of HOW did the north get their cotton to continue production of fabric during the war. I had been told that they had a stoke pile of cotton due to a bumper crop of cotton in 1859 and 1860. Yes, there was some of that but not enough to produce all they needed for clothing fabric and to supply the army. When I began to research it I was amazed to find that the South SOLD cotton to the North during the war. Unionist sympathizers in the south sold it. The North captured it and auctioned it. And then it was allowed to be sold for materials/supplies rather than money in some cases. On and on and on....This seems a bit odd, however, it is very interesting to know how the northern mills were able to continue to make cotton print yardage for quilts and clothing during that time. (I couldn't figure out how the Sanitary Commission got enough fabric to make 125,000 quilts for the soldiers if they couldn't buy cotton from the south.) In the south the few mills that existed were making osnaberg and drill and woolen and thread/yarn. The southern mills didn't have the capability to produce printed cottons as far as I can tell.They only had the ability to make woven plaids and that was probably minimal if at all. Vicki Betts has wonderful articles on the selling of and production of textiles in the South during the war. If any of you have info to the contrary please let me know. Here are just a few articles on the subject and there are many many more if you search google for "Cotton production during the Civil War" "Textile Production During the Civil War" etc. etc.

http://www.uttyler.edu/vbetts/textile_factories.htm (V. Betts' research on Southern Textile Mills - long but very interesting)

http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/articles/291/cotton-and-the-civil-war

http://www.americancivilwarforum.com/maine-in-the-civil-war-textile-mills-of-lewiston-195.html http://www.abrahamlincolnsclassroom.org/Library/newsletter.asp?ID=132&CRLI=180

Lynn Lynn Lancaster Gorges, Historic Textiles Studio, New Bern, NC & www.civilwarshop.com

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Subject: Winterthur Museum Thursday From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2011 18:21:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

I know that this has been discussed but I didn't need to know this then....plans change. Are there carpools going to Winterthur on Thurs. separate from the "official" touring group? Do we need to get an advanced ticket to do the general tour on Thurs.?

I am trying to decide if I will drive to Cherry Hill on Wed. and go with a group on Thurs. or just drive straight there and see y'all in Cherry Hill on Thurs. afternoon late. Please email me if you are going. My car will be crammed packed with stuff for my son who has just moved to NYC so I can't use my car for carpooling. (I will do a delivery to him on Sunday. And get to hug him. Haven't seen him in weeks!) Please respond to me at my palamporeaol.com email address. Thanks, Lynn Gorges in New Bern, NC

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Subject: Re: "Why Quilts Matter: History, Art&Politics" DVDs available at AQSG in Cherry Hill next week. From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2011 15:51:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Terrific! Can't wait to get my own copy!

Congratulations, Shelly!

All best, Lynne

On 9/15/2011 3:14 PM, Shelly Zegart wrote: > The series is getting rave reviews across the country from libraries, > universities, quilt makers and all others..

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Subject: RE: Winterthur Museum Thursday From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 08:39:18 +1000 X-Message-Number: 8

Lynn's post reminded me that I had heard nothing further about the 'unofficial' tour car pooling/travel arrangements. I will be leaving Melbourne on Sunday night, arriving Cherry Hill Tuesday afternoon via NYC. I will not have internet access during that time.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: false knitting alert From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 06:32:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

This is off-topic since it's about knitting, not quilting, but I think several on this list can relate...

In the episode "Dead to Rights" in the "Cheyenne" series, I was happy to see a man shown knitting -- until I saw that the yarn wasn't moving and his fingers were just playing at the needle tips. Does anyone know how prevalent men making textiles really was in the 19th century? Knitting, weaving, quilting, etc.? My apologies if this has been covered before.

Andi in Paducah, KY

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Subject: Re: Cotton and the production of textiles during the Civil War From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 08:47:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Re: Lynn's request for information about cotton in the Civil War era--

From what I have read, few quilts were actually carried by Civil War soldiers--they were too heavy and too slow to dry if they got wet. In fact, there's a wonderful passage in a diary where a soldier says he cut up his quilt and stomped it into the ground, because his mother had made it and he didn't want any Confederate soldier to pick it up when he had to leave it behind. Quilts were most commonly used by Civil War soldiers recuperating in a hospital or while they were encamped.

Northern consumption of cotton dropped from 800,000 bales annually before the war to 300,000 bales annually during the war. They used up stockpiled cotton, purchased cotton legally through government channels and illegally from blockade runners, and they imported cotton from India, Egypt, and Brazil--countries which increased their production during the war to help make up for the shortage of southern cotton (which before the war accounted for 75% of the world's supply). You're right--the southern mills produced rough goods like osnaburg, and also woven stripes and plaids, but not prints. This has led to confusion over the term "homespun"--which was the name for those stripes and plaids used by the /manufacturers/. So, don't assume that when a fabric is called "homespun" that it was actually spun and woven in the home. Those mills were so valuable to the Confederacy, that they were targeted for destruction by Federal forces, and the female weavers were sent north. Some northern mills converted to wool production in order to stay in business--wool was in increased demand for uniforms and blankets. Some mills just closed their doors, forcing many men into the army because they couldn't find work. The Sanitary Commission was able to make so many quilts, because women used up their own stashes at home for a couple of years before they were forced to start purchasing fabric.

Our book on Civil War quilts and textiles, called /Homefront & Battlefield: Civil War Quilts and Context/, will be out--we hope!--late next spring. It's being published by the American Textile History Museum in Lowell, MA. My co-author, Madelyn Shaw, is the real expert on cotton manufacturing during the war. Our exhibition by the same name opens at ATHM in late July, 2012, and will travel to the Kentucky History Museum and the Atlanta History Center.

Please come see my Civil War exhibition, "Colts & Quilts: The Civil War Remembered," at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, CT, opening November 16 and running through May 6, 2012. Fair warning--there's only one actual Civil War quilt in it--stamped by the Sanitary Commission--but the name of the exhibit got changed by the marketing department when the original name we chose wouldn't fit nicely on a rack card. (groan!)

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: false knitting alert From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 08:05:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

You're probably going to have to hear from a number of us on this topic, because it varied region by region (and I'm sure family by family, too) how involved men were in textile processes. For instance, over the course of the 18th century, weaving in New England transitioned from a male-dominated activity to being a woman's job--but in the Mid-Atlantic states, it stayed a man's job. While others have mentioned seeing occasions where men were involved in quilting, personally, I have never seen it in the documents I've read--again, focusing on New England. Same thing with knitting--though I believe that Irish and Scottish fishermen on the coast were knitters. Now that I am focusing on the Civil War, I can tell you that necessity forced a lot of soldiers to learn how to sew, because they had to take care of their own clothes.

I look forward to hearing what others have to say on this topic.

All best, Lynne

> Does anyone know how prevalent men making textiles really was in the 19th century? Knitting, weaving, quilting, etc.?

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Subject: Cotton in the North during the Civil War From: suereichcharter.net Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 10:05:56 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Lynne,

Very interesting. Can't wait to see you exhibit and read your book. There is a published journal "A View from the Inn: The Journal of Anna Marie Resseguie, 1851-1867. Anna was the daughter of the owner of the Keeler Tavern in Ridgefield, CT.

On March 11th, 1861, she wrote: Cotton seed planted.

On November 24th, 1862, she wrote: Kerosene has advanced from 50 cts to $1.25 on account of the foreign demand. Paper is 50 percent more than last year. Rags sell for 10 cts cash. Old newspapers sell for four to five cents a pound. The editor of the Spectator desires his patrons to use no more newspapers for kindlings and to save every scrap of rags. Coffee is 30 cents a pound. Unbleached muslins are 25 cts and more per yard, calicoes 20 cts.

On March 14th, 1863, she wrote: Fine sleighing still. Unbleached muslin 45 and 50 cts per yd. Coffee 45 and 50 cts per lb. Flour $11.50 per bl. Many manufacture their own coffee from burnt rye and wheat.

On April 27th, 1864, she wrote: The high prices are alarming. Crushed sugar 26 cts per lb. Hay has been twenty dollars a ton. Pigs 5 weeks old $5 a piece. Good calico, 40 cts per yd. Brown sugar 20 cts per lb. and its expected will be 25 cts. Molasses $1.10 per gall., soon to be $1.25. On June 4th, 1864, she wrote: Dry goods constantly advancing.

On January 20th, 1865, she wrote: A good overcoat for a man cost $70.00, $80, some $100. Ladies cloaks, $50, 75, and $80. Muslins, 60 cts per yd, calicoes, 40 per yd. Gold has fallen to $208.

My question is =93 Did you find any other references to Northerners planting cotton?

Thanks,

Sue Reich

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Subject: Re: false knitting alert - OT From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 07:30:59 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

There was a man knitting in 1972. I knew him. See: http://winnowings.blogspot.com/2008/04/flashback-friday-manly-art-of-knitting.html

Christine on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog and http://www.winnowing.com <-- website

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Subject: Re: Cotton in the North during the Civil War From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 11:05:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Sue, that's a great passage! No, I have not heard of other northerners trying to grow cotton. Shows how desperate they were, that they'd try it in Connecticut! I can't imagine that it was successful--is there any follow up in that diary to how it turned out?

All best, Lynne

> There is a published journal "A View from the Inn: The Journal of Anna Marie Resseguie, 1851-1867. Anna was the daughter of the owner of the Keeler Tavern in Ridgefield, CT. > On March 11th, 1861, she wrote: Cotton seed planted. >

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Subject: Re: Cotton in the North during the Civil War From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 11:16:51 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

 

How we wish she had reported on her success or failure with her cotton seed planting. Janet H in Fort Worth --part1_123db.206a9b0c.3ba4c263_boundary--

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Subject: Re: False Knitting/Men Knitting From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 07:11:13 +1000 X-Message-Number: 8

I don't know about the 19th century but men were knitters well before that time. It is also known that knitting guilds, exclusively male and with structured apprenticeship systems, were formed in Europe in the 1400s. Women were allowed to spin yarn but not to knit it. http://delsandeen.hubpages.com/hub/Men_Who_Knit

Male shepherds in Scotland were known to knit while watching their flock - illustrated from 1855 in this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_knitting

I know several contemporary male knitters through my connection with a local hand knitting guild here in Melbourne.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Women's History Sources and the changing times. From: suereichcharter.net Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 17:28:06 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 9

In the process of shuffling stuff in my quilt room I came across a copy of a resource found at the Connecticut State Library years ago. "Women's History Sources: A Guide to Archives and Manuscript Collections in the United States" is filled with sites and sources for journals, diaries, sermons, accounts, minutes of women's group, archives of female foundations. It is now available online. Take a look.

http://www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul/libs/scua/womens_fa/womenhomepage.shtml#1

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Re: False Knitting/Men Knitting From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 17:30:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

--Apple-Mail-1-746515016 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

Part of the original query asked about men quilting - I assume this also means quilt making as well as plying a quilting needle. Averil Colby, in her English book Patchwork, mentions several men in the 19th century who made quilts. She refers generally to men and boys in the 19th century "contributing to the work of the family" by cutting templates and helping with the sewing. "Joe the Quilter," famous for having been murdered for his supposed wealth and celebrated in a very long ballad, designed and marked quilts for quilters, and was known to make patchwork as well. He was more formally known as Joe Hedley of Northumbria, and his murder took place in 1825.

In 1855 Queen Victoria, visiting wounded soldiers in hospital, met Private Thomas Walker as he was making a quilt ( an artist rendering of this activity by Thomas Wood hangs in the royal College of Surgeons at lincoln's Inn Fields, London). The intaglio quilts made from uniform wools in 19th century England and elsewhere in the British Empire were made by men - either soldiers, tailors, or men who were both.

Colby's book has many examples of men involved with quiltmaking - especially see pages 127-29.

Xenia --Apple-Mail-1-746515016--

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Subject: Cotton Planting in the North during the Civil War. From: suereichcharter.net Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 17:35:57 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 11

No, I have searched and searched the transcription of her journal published by the Keeler Tavern. There may be more info at the Keeler Tavern which is the Historical Society in Ridgefield.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: [SPAM] Re: False Knitting/Men Knitting From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 15:21:17 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 12

I remember reading in a quilt history book (sorry, I can't remember which one!) of a rancher who would sit at the front window to quilt with his wife...so he could keep an eye out to make sure none of his cronies dropped by and caught him sewing! :) I've read in several sources about men who designed a new quilt block for a wife or sister. I suspect there were a lot of menwho helped out with the quilt-making, whether it was cutting out pieces togive a wife a break (yes, my first quilt was cut out with scissors, and I remember the red marks on my thumb!), or out of desperation to have SOMETHING to do while snowed in. And maybe some enjoyed the artistic gratificationof making quilts of their own design. Even if they'd rather die than let the other guys know. ;)Jocelyn

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Subject: whining for good reasons From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 20:55:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 13

Oh Lord Anita! My heart is with you. Times like your situation make us well and truly earn the badge of 'road warrior.' Am here to tell you about an act of unlooked-for kindness today. Now in PA teaching at the Mancusos' show and did not sleep well last night. Up at all the 30s (2:30, 3:30 etc etc) and when I dozed, went back into a reoccurring nightmare--not a common dream--all about being lost, being late to class, and letting people down--all the worst fears of a usually hyper-responsible person. Finally got up, started the day and made it over to the convention center (2 miles away) only to discover-horrors!--I had indeed forgotten the box with my hand-outs! Peter Mancuso, head of the show, must have seen I was about to lose it because he volunteered to drive me back. Back we go, in morning rush hour traffic, as Peter tries to entertain me (or possibly peel me off the ceiling) by relating how he once lost his wallet. Made it back, hand-outs given to one and all, and my BP returned to normal. No one berated me and I may have, by this afternoon, have stopped kicking myself. His kindness was much appreciated. So maybe, for every ditz and thoughtless program chair, there's another person who helps us along the way. I hope you all meet someone who steps up like Peter did today. Yawning all the way to an early bedtime Pepper

-- Pepper Cory

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Subject: Cotton production during the Civil War From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 22:34:58 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Another consequence of the Civil War was the impact of the drop in cotton production in the American south on British workers. They called it the <cotton famine of 1861-1865>.

<<by October 1861 mills in Lancashire began to run on short time, or to close altogether and applications for help to the poor law unions began to flood in. By the beginning of 1862 soup kitchens were being set up. By July the enormity of the situation was becoming apparent. By the end of the year one third of the population of Blackburn was dependent on assistance from Relief Committees.>>

http://www.cottontown.org/page.cfm?LANGUAGE=eng&pageID=885

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lancashire_Cotton_Famine

http://gerald-massey.org.uk/waugh/b_cotton_famine.htm

Another slightly different interpretation of the economic conditions of the time of the cotton famine:

http://www.amielandmelburn.org.uk/collections/shs/pdf/cotton.pdf

At this link political activist write about The Cotton Famine Road

http://www.dingquarry.co.uk/location--geography/cotton-famine-road.asp

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Cotton production and slavery From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 23:01:29 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

More interesting websites on this subject:

http://www.revealinghistories.org.uk/why-was-cotton-so-important-in-north-we st-england.html

Or http://tinyurl.com/5s3dgl5

http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/England-History/LancashireCottonFamine. htm

Or http://tinyurl.com/5wforos

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Subject: Patriotic quilts and Odd Fellows symbols From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 00:10:22 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Here are three links to patriotic quilts that that I found on line recently, each one quite special in its own way. The Union Shield one is pretty neat. I just enjoy searching for study purposes. No affiliation.

Karen Alexander

1- http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Fireman-48-Star-Flag-Quilt-AMERICANA-/130488 040562?pt=Quilts&hash=item1e61b17c72#

Or http://tinyurl.com/3lontnx

2- http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/9841196

3- http://caseantiques.com/item/lot-678-patriotic-hand-stitched-quilt-with-unio n-shield/

4-page way down to see Odd Fellows symbols woven into a carpet

http://www.rockymountainquilts.com/files/antique_quilts_unusual.php#aquilts

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Subject: questions beget questions From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 05:34:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I'm on digest so it takes a while to catch up with responses. I'm loving and appreciating what everyone has sent publicly and privately re; false knitting alert, i.e., men's involvement in textile-making. I know some of the quilting history, thanks in part to Joe Cunningham's performances as Joe the Quilter -- always a good thing to see if you can. Meanwhile, the link Janet sent about a shepherd knitting as he watches his flock prompts this question: What in the world is he sitting on?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_knitting

Andi in Paducah, KY

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Subject: Re: questions beget questions From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 07:59:06 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

Hm. It looks like some sort of pole with a seat on it, possibly to go with his stilts. Elevation, and all that.

Lisa Evans

In a message dated 9/17/2011 6:34:32 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, areynolds220comcast.net writes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_knitting

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Subject: Cotton production during the Civil War From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 09:29:12 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Last night, I was checking out some newspapers for cotton growing during the Civil War. So far, I found production in Kansas and Illinois. Then I stumbled across this poem. It is not quilty but it is pre-Civil War and very funny.

Hornellsville Tribune Hornell, NY July 10, 1856 Page 1

ON HOOPS.

To Paris once the Devil came On any mischief bent; He set the fashionists at work To see what they'd invent.

They fought with pride and many had With decency a tussle; But 'twas no use;--at last they made A montrous, full grown "bustle!"

The Devil was fully satisfied With what they then had done; Yet marveled much that woman might So easily be won.

But now, alas! in these sad times, Worse things our minds engage; The bustle lies in shade, forgot, Now hoops are all the rage!

With awe I view the wondrous thing, In shape so vast and grand;-- No one would think this odd machine, Was made by human hand.

Unwieldy, monstrous, clumsy hoop! (My tongue of language lacks!) 'Tis far beyond what ladies' used To put behind their backs!

I think that it at first was framed In pieces separate, And when it all was done, they then Did raise it up in State.

I fear if I like this go on I'll spin too long a yarn; But half the skill that builds a hoop Would make a common barn.

There's one good thing about these hoops And half that battle's won, In these a woman is as safe As if she were a nun!

I'd like to have my wife wear one, If I now married were For then, at least, no man could come Within ten feet of her!

Ye whales that in the ocean sport, Your fate is sad, I ween;-- For half your bones at best, must go To stiffen crinoline!

And ye, O looms, your skillful might Must exercise full well, For half your fabrics now must help The ladies' make a swell."

If I were hunting for a wife All oe'r the world I'd look, For one who'd walk with ease and grace, Without a horrid hoop.

Our ladies now are queerly made, Their forms are ill-begotten; One half you'll find is whalebone stiff, The other half is--cotton.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts.com http://coveringquilthistory.shutterfly.com/ http://www.majorreichaward.com/

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Subject: Re: False Knitting/Men Knitting From: lynnelynnezwoolsey.com Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 17:37:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

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I can't believe I have such a short memory! There are two 19th-century quilts made by boys/men in /Massachusetts Quilts: Our Common Wealth/! (Duh!) And I believe there's at least one more in the database that's not in the book.

And next summer, the Shelburne Museum in Vermont will have an exhibit of quilts made by men! (I've been talking to the curator about it. I can't believe I didn't think of that. Mind like a steel sieve, that's what I've got.)

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: whining for good reasons From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 09:06:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Ah, Pepper ... I still have dreams of being lost, can't find my locker at school, can't remember my schedule but know I'm late to be somewhere ... often. I never connected it to those being a result of being a "hyper-responsible person." But it makes so much sense. And "hyper-responsible" is an interesting tag. You've given me something to think about.

I'd say that with a night of no-sleep like that, your students were blessed that you were able to form a complete sentence!

So glad that Mr. Mancuso is such a good guy and stepped up ... what a nice thing to hear! Steph Whitson www.stephaniegracewhitson.com www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re: Poetry about textiles From: xenia cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 10:08:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Reprinted in a rare volume titled Two Centuries of English Chintz 1750-1950, as Exemplified by the Productions of Stead, McAlpin & Co. (1957), 14-15, are these verses from the early 18th century in England, from "The Spittlefields Ballads or the Weaver's Complaints against the Callico [sic] Madams":

Our trade is so bad that the weavers run mad Through the want of both work and provisions, That some hungry poor rogues feed on grains like our hogs, They're reduced to such wretched conditions.

Then well may they tayre [tear] what our ladies now wear And as foes to our country upbraid 'em, Till none shall be thought a more scandalous slut Than a tawdry Callico Madam.

When our trade was in wealth our women had health, We'd silks, rich embroideries and satins Fine stuffs and good crapes for each ord'nary trapes [one who walks with untidy, trailing dress] That is destin'd to hobble in pattens [wooden clogs for wear in dirty streets].

But now we've a Chince [chintz] for the wife of a prince And a butterfly gown for a gay dame, Thin painted old sheets for each trull in the streets To appear like a Callico Madam.

& etc. for many more verses, some expressing anger at men who'd allow the wearing of chintzes (and not included in the book).

Before the ban on chintz was enacted in England, the silk weavers became so enraged at the competition that they on occasion tore the offending garments from the backs of women in the streets, the volume reports. Dangerous times for fashion!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: questions beget questions From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 10:20:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

That shepherd on stilts and sitting on a stilt/seat is great -- getting above the flock --. I'll bet he had great "core" muscles.

Judy G.

> the link Janet sent about a shepherd knitting as he watches his flock > prompts this question: What in the world is he sitting on? > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_knitting >

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Subject: Re: questions beget questions From: textiqueaol.com Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 12:22:11 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 11

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Try this.

http://www.illustratedpast.com/people/Stilt-Walkers/index.html

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Re: questions beget questions From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 10:03:32 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 12

--part1_13df2.378f80cb.3ba602b4_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 9/17/2011 5:34:32 AM Central Daylight Time, areynolds220comcast.net writes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_knitting

It looks like one of those seats golfers take along to watch golf tournaments. He seems to be wearing stilts on his legs. Janet H in Fort Worth --part1_13df2.378f80cb.3ba602b4_boundary--

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Subject: RE: New England Area From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 11:59:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 13

Hi all -

 

From October 1 - 9th my family is lucky enough to be going to the East Coast - flying into Providence RI and having a stay in the area to say goodbye to my son (who was just activated from his Navy Reserve Unit in Portsmouth NH and will be going to Guantanamo Bay Cuba with Army Bravo Company.) We are going to combine our farewells with a vacation for our two teen girls that will focus on American History (our junior is in AP US History this year). 

 

So - OFF LIST PLEASE so as not to clog up the airways - I wonder if any of you locals to the areas could suggest great places to Eat/Stay/See in Providence RI, Boston MA, Dover NH, Philadelphia, DC area, Baltimore MD. Specifically my hubby is looking for a great lobster dinner (of course). We plan on the Freedom trail in Boston but other than that we are at a bit of a loss. Our AAA has given tons of books and maps, but honestly everything looks so good it could take a lifetime to see everything we want to see - so I am looking for the "must see" places and 'must eat here" joints expensive or inexpensive. 

 

We will be going to Sturbridge for an over night stay (driving from Barrington NH in a round about way through Deerfield to Sturbridge.)

 

We will also be driving to Philly for a day visit and then to DC and Baltimore for more fun from the 7-9 then flying out of Baltimore late on the 9th. While our time is somewhat limited - we are also very flexible and if there is something we must see we will forgo other places to see it.

 

My plan is to stay out of New York this trip. I promises - we will wave as we drive by - but that is a vacation unto itself.

 

SO ... If you have any great ideas for us please email me privately or speak with me at seminar - I'm excited to be having two such fun trips so close to one another - seminar with quilt friends and the East Coast with family! Lucky Me! 

 

Thanks so much

Leah Zieber

Temecula CA

Leah.zieberverizon.net

951-440-4808

 

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Subject: Re: Questions beget questions From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2011 07:49:40 +1000 X-Message-Number: 14

Well I have to say I am impressed with a man able to balance on stilts and a shooting stick and knit at the same time!

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Re: knitting men From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 17:08:50 -0500 X-Message-Number: 15

This is Barbara Woodford.

My son, at the age of about 20 decided if a woman could knit an afghan so could he, and he did---a very nice one, thank you. Since he is a Renaissance man, now 54, I was not too surprised. But he has not picked up knitting needles since. We still use the afghan.

Barb

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Subject: Re: knitting men From: Jeanne Henry <jeannehenry55gmail.com> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 18:22:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 16

A past boyfriend, who spent his Air Force years in Lakenheath, England, learned how to crochet from a local granny there. He and some buddies were verybored in rainy England, and wanted to go to Vietnam (this was late 60s). Instead, they befriended this kindly woman who taught them all how to crochet. I didn't believe his story, so for Christmas that year he gave me a hand-crocheted afghan! Sadly, I finally sent the afghan to Goodwill a few yearsago. Of course, now I wish I had it back. (The afghan.... not the boyfriend.)

Jeanne

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Subject: Re: Cotton and the production of textiles during the Civil War From: Laurie Woodard <Lwoodardhawaii.edu> Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 13:38:10 -1000 X-Message-Number: 17

Cotton from Hawaii also found its way to New England during the Civil War. "During this period, Hawaiian growers exported hundreds of bales of cotton to Boston."

The quote is from an article appearing in the Hawaiian Journal of History, by Rossie Moodie Frost, "King Cotton, The Spinning Wheel and Loom in The Sandwich Islands: The Story of a Missionary Spinster, An Ambitious, Wealthy Hawaiian Chief, and an Island Industry that Never Quite Made It."

Tantalizing title? <G> You can find it online in the Hawaiian Journal of History on the Hawaiian Historical Society web site.

Laurie Woodard

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Subject: RE: New England Area From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 21:25:43 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 18

Must see. Make a stop in Lowell, Mass and visit the quilt museum and the US National Park that includes a still functioning mill that manufactured fabric for decades using water power to run the looms. Janet H --part1_5153.47156a22.3ba6a297_boundary--

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Subject: Re: Questions beget questions From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 21:28:44 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 19

Don't you wonder how he kept his ball (skein) of yarn from falling off his lap and rolling away in the grass??? I suppose he might have had a sack or bag attached to his belt to hold the yarn. Janet H :-)))