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Subject: Re: [Spam] Re: Questions beget questions From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2011 01:28:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Many Irish women knitted while walking. After I saw a period photo of such a village woman in a history of knitting, I bought a ball holder that fits on, hangs on your waistband. Not that I ever walked much while knitting. But it was a wonderful historic gadget and I had to have it.

Judy Grow

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Subject: AQSG Seminar -- Quilt Walkers Wanted From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2011 07:53:56 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 2

I'm in charge of Show and Tell and we still need more volunteers. We need 2-4 more people to walk the quilts around so people can get a closer look.

In addition to my gratitude, you'll also receive a gift of reproduction fabric

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: Re:Men Knitting From: LinusDonnaaol.com Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2011 07:22:12 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Re: Men knitting

Knitting (and crocheting) males seems to be more acceptable in the twenty-first century world than in the twentieth century. Everything old is new again.

I was at a book signing party recently for a quilt designer, and several male friends were knitting away furiously while chatting. They compared yarns and stitches and embellishments, and they made quite good progress in just one afternoon. They only stopped for tea and biscuits. I was impressed.

And there's a trio of young men who crochet and who are putting their craft to a different purpose. They envisioned crochet as a way to empower women in Africa, and now also in Peru, to get some money into their hands and improve their living conditions without taking them away from their children. They sell hats that these women knit and crochet. _http://www.krochetkids.org/_ (http://www.krochetkids.org/)

I have no affiliation, just admiration for their effort.

Bright blessings! Donna Laing _www.northstarqualityquilting.com_ (http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com)

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Subject: Men Knitting From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2011 08:07:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

My youngest son was taught to knit by his grandmother when he was about eight. He surprised the church one morning during the children's sermon when they were talking about not being able to do everything. My son was handed some knitting on needles and promptly to illustrate the theme. Imagine the laughter when he promptly began knitting! He eventually gave it up for other endeavors, but told me recently he was thinking of knitting again!. On a recent visit his wife asked me to teach her to knit which I did. When I had to leave to return home he told her if she had any problems he would help her out! Judy Knorr

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Subject: Yay - I am back! From: kmoore81austin.rr.com Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2011 23:04:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Finally, I got back on QHL. Ive missed your posts.

I have new location and a new email address. For those who are interested, my new email address is KMoore81Austin.rr.com

If you still have the old address (kathymooreneb.rr.com) you should delete it from you address list. Sadly, we moved from Lincoln, NE to central Texas in the midst of the hottest and driest summer on record. I miss the quilt study center and all my friends and associates there, but am hoping to find interesting quilt studies to keep me going.

Keep those posts coming. Theyre always interesting.

Best to all, Kathy Moore KMoore81Austin.rr.com

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Subject: Re: Yay - I am back! From: Laura Syler <texasquiltcoairmail.net> Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2011 09:54:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi Kathy, Welcome back!!Be sure to hook up with Marcia Kaylakie!!! She'll steer you in the right direction. And ...Welcome to Texas. We should be enjoying some cooler weather in ....say....November! :)

Laura Syler Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles Teacher, Lecturer, Judge Richardson, TX 972-345-2787 hi-spiritairmail.net

 

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Subject: men with needles From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2011 10:31:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

--875173132-136759571-1316367085=:2689 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

The NYState quilt project book NY Beauties has a spectacular log cabin variation quilt made by a tailor for his dauighter (book is inmy store 'library' so I can't cite the page. The Kentucky quilt book has a man-made one with over 60,000 pieces as I recall. (Here's where that term truly applies, wonder if the Shelburne willgive that title tol its exhibition!)The intarsia quilts made by or for British soldiers of military uniformssince the time of theCrimean War mid 19th centuryare featured in the books about quilts of the British Isles. The American Folk Art Museum has one (now on its site I think) -a recent acquistion with many patterns, quite fabulous. Barbara Brackman's blog has great info and examples.And inthe nextissue of The Quilt Life magazine I discussmy intarsia quiltprobably made in India from British colonial uniformsthat has mulitple pieced patterns, metallic applique, the works. All the best are incredible featsof precision piecing These are definitely worthpaying attention to, particularly as I have seen some at antiques show mis-characterized as Amish or Mennonite by sellers unaware of their true origins and history. And don'tforget sailors' 'macrame' work doneon shipboard by men familiar with mending nets with fids (crochet type tools); this took the form of trinket baskets and containers madefor loved ones usually, but also Victorian style valances, bags, even picture frames.  Laura  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --875173132-136759571-1316367085=:2689--

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Subject: RE: men with needles From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2011 18:52:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Must share a timely story with the 'men' theme. Just back from appraising in Wisconsin where a woman brought in two quilts made by her father who is 80+ years old. He started when he was 'laid up' with some injury around 1990 and tried it and just kept on. One was made of fabric leftovers sent to him from a family member who worked at a mill in North Carolina according to family - a huge broken star with perfectly aligned seams. The other was a 'hankie' quilt and before you guffaw....he used to go to what his wife "hankie auctions'....( she had no time for this!) He bought so many hankies at farm auctions he began making them in color themes. This one was purples and yellows - really lovely textiles- he had done one completely with Christmas hankies, one in blues, and one of Harley Davidson kerchiefs. This quilt drew quite an admiring crowd when spread out on the table. He would not go into a quilt shop or fabric store....His wife would get the backings or other supplies. I was delighted with the story and encouraged her to schedule him to speak to her guild. She said he would love it! I also encouraged her to have him sign his quilts. He is already keeping a photo album. jean

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Subject: RE: Men Knitting From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2011 19:04:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I taught my 5th grade class to knit in the early 1970's...the boys loved it as much as the girls. We made squares which were sewn together into afghans. Then I had two sons of my own. Seeing me do it, of course they wanted to learn. I taught them both - and a neighbor boy - I have a photo of the three of them on the couch in a row, knitting and grinning! None continued to knit but they did learn how and had fun doing it. Has Kaffe Fassett been mentioned? jean

>

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Subject: AQSG Seminar Show and Tell Friday From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2011 04:05:49 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 10

Thanks. I believe I have enough volunteers for Show and Tell and so now I want to remind everyone to bring a wonderful quilt to share with the group.

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

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Subject: RE: Men Knitting From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2011 09:43:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

In my little strange world knitting, quilting and embroidery has often been done by men who had some sort of physical limitation that did not allow them to participate in traditionally male work and or leisure pursuits. I have two examples that bear this out -- one, a fellow who had polio as a child and lost the use of his legs. Amazingly he went to college and taught school, transporting himself hither and yon while lying chest down in a make shift wheelchair constructed of old wagon wheels and a captain's type armchair. In his later years he knitted small objects as gifts and to sell. I presently have a set of his mittens and an adorable little pincushion on exhibit -- he even knit the name of the young lady into the side of the piece. Another example is a fellow who was quilting and embroidering as an older man, and we have a few of works. The family believes he too had some affliction that kept him out of the fields, but they can't recall what it is. On a non-disabled note, I have an amazing group of rather crazy knit/crocheted wall hangings by a lovely man who died a couple of years ago. He called it crocheting, but I think it must have another name as the pieces end up having a rug-like quality. The pieces can be ginormous --we have a 15' (approx) Lords Prayer wall hanging that is based on the old Victorian embroidered mottos. He used acrylic yarn so the pieces are generally quite vivid and if you didn't know the man and his motivation, you might think they were in terrible taste (some of them are pretty scary). He illustrated Bible stories and patriotic themes in his pieces, and even made a huge fraktur tulip that we have hanging in our stair well. They kind of defy description -- probably a form of outsider art, frankly, as I've never seen anything like them anywhere and his motivations were frequently spiritual. Such a sweet man. Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: men with needles From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu> Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2011 09:26:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

My daughter-in-law's father quilts, and my son-in-law's father quilted whenhe was alive, so in the parent/in-law generation there are 3 of us who arequilters with the men outnumbering the woman (me) 2 to 1. Whenever Otis and I know we're going to see each other we gather up our show and tell and have a great time -- and the rest of the family with us! There was no way out of it -- all three common grandchildren learned to sew by machine and hand by 4 years old. The two older ones have each made several quilts (now 9 and 12), one of which was awarded a special on-the-spot prize by Nancy Zieman when she saw it in her children's show...talk about motivation! Don'ttell her younger sister, but Elena is working on a quilt now for her for Christmas.

Another story to note is the family quilt I made to commemorate our annual Reeves family reunions. One year I took fabric with prepared stamped frames for each attendee of the reunion to sign their name and record their birthday. The following year I took the quilt top made from those signed fabrics, layered and ready for quilting, and requested EVERY attendee to put in at least one quilt stitch. And they did, with many people (men, women, andchildren) putting in many stitches! Okay...some kinda grumbled, but I think they liked the idea of being included in the family. : )

Maretta In cool, drizzly southern Wisconsin where we're very happy with the Packers, Brewers, Badgers, and Warhawks (okay...Division III -- but that's where Iwork!).

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: millermkuww.edu. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1718012Olyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Folk Art Museum From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2011 13:14:23 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE4506B5CE223B_4DC_E878D_webmail-m150.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

This is from one of my folk art lists. Doesn't sound good, and I do take issue with the editor's use of the word 'threatening' on the Reader's Comments page intro.

http://tinyurl.com/6k5mutb

Jan Thomas

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Subject: RE: Folk Art Museum From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2011 13:26:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

I am more than a little upset by this, especially at the thought of some of our Pennsylvania German masterpieces ending up in the Brooklyn Museum, or even the Smithsonian, for that matter. They were already out of context (in my humble and aggravated opinion that as soon as you remove fraktur -- PA German decorated manuscripts -- from their context the works lose a great deal of their meaning)in NYC. There is a Schwenkfelder piece in that collection about which I am particularly aggrieved and have been for years -- and now, to think of it possibly cast out again into the wilderness is extremely painful. Holding a grudge, Candace Perry

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Subject: Lancaaster County, PA, fabric store closing From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2011 15:34:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi All -

I know many people come to Lancaster County to shop for fabric, so it is with great sadness that I'm reporting the closing of "my" fabric store -- Hayloft Fabrics in Morgantown, PA. I've been shopping there, and watching them grow and evolve into a great quilting fabric store, since about 1972.

The building that houses Martin's Country Market and Hayloft Fabrics was sold last week. Hayloft is owned by the owner of Martin's and both businesses are closing Nov 7, according to the newspaper.

I was there this morning and it was very crowded -- because they are having a 25% off sale. They have had a wonderful selection of reproduction fabrics -- both 1800s and 1930s, and their novelties area is legendary. If you want fabric with a particular object on it, they probably have it.

25% off everything -- books, patterns, fabric, etc

There's much sadness in the local quilting community.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: movie quilt alert From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2011 21:03:57 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

HI all - I finally saw The Help, which I highly recommend. Thereis one quilt--an Hourglass or Broken Dishes weathered narrow quilt laid across a bed well into the movie, not what might be expected given all the discussion aboutwhat constitutesAfrican American quilts in the South, it's aconventional pattern, nicely weathered to reflect the hardships of its household. All period details in terms of textiles seemed accurate, down to the 1950s tablecloth on the line and the crochet bedspreads.

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 19, 2011 From: "M. Chapple" <mem914yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2011 05:50:03 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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RE: Men KnittingMy father was taught to knit and crochet when he was young. The men would crochet rugs. He also braided rugs with mygrandmother. My PA-dutch family had the rule that "idle hands make devil's work" so all the kids learned crafts and no one sat still - even in their "golden years". That's probably why I have a hard time watching TV without keeping my hands busy.Mary in Va where it's raining and unseasonably cool ---1775181846-339942864-1316523003=:14494--

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Subject: movie alert From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2011 09:49:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

While no expert in this field, and having patterned/interpreted 9 of the Gees Bend improvisational quilts (with permissions, of course), I remember hearing once that during the slave era of this country, house slaves would do a lot of piecing for their mistresses. They were taught how to quilt and took pride in making patterns of that day. Why not make quilts like others were? Just because they were slaves or African descendants, not all of those women wanted to create unique quilts like the Gees Bend type we see today. In the same way that many of us quilters like to follow traditional patterns and take pride in sharp points, flat quilts, colors matching, ALL quilters, no matter their race or gender, can't be put into a box. I know a lot of plain vanilla white Americans who love to make one-of-a-kind improvisational quilts. Now, my problem is that I saw "The Help" and didn't notice the quilt on the bed!!! ARRRGGGHHHH! Debby Kratovil, who teaches a class on improvisational quilting (but still loves my EXACT patterns!)

> HI all - I finally saw The Help, which I highly recommend. ThereA0is one q > uilt--an Hourglass or Broken Dishes weathered narrow quilt laid across a be > d well into the movie, not what might be expected given all the discussion  > aboutA0what constitutesAfrican American quilts in the South, it's aA0c > onventional pattern, nicely weathered to reflect the hardships of its house

Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil Quilting Programs & Workshops www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: Re: movie alert From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2011 15:16:29 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

I have been a volunteer at the Shelburne Museum (VT) for quite a few years, and they do have a few, very traditional and beautiful quilts that have been recognized as being stitched and quilted by African Americans. I will probably get some bad comments on this, but I am NOT a Gee's Bend fan - I feel that all of the coverage of these quilts somehow was overblown or even scammed somehow by someone wanting to make a name for him/herself (and they were probably very, very white). Just my own thoughts... Mitzi from Vermont

In a message dated 9/20/2011 9:50:06 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, kratovilhis.com writes:

While no expert in this field, and having patterned/interpreted 9 of the Gees Bend improvisational quilts (with permissions, of course), I remember hearing once that during the slave era of this country, house slaves would do a lot of piecing for their mistresses. They were taught how to quilt and took pride in making patterns of that day. Why not make quilts like others were? Just because they were slaves or African descendants, not all of those women wanted to create unique quilts like the Gees Bend type we see today. In the same way that many of us quilters like to follow traditional patterns and take pride in sharp points, flat quilts, colors matching, ALL quilters, no matter their race or gender, can't be put into a box. I know a lot of plain vanilla white Americans who love to make one-of-a-kind improvisational quilts. Now, my problem is that I saw "The Help" and didn't notice the quilt on the bed!!! ARRRGGGHHHH! Debby Kratovil, who teaches a class on improvisational quilting (but still loves my EXACT patterns!)

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Subject: Announcing: A Passion for Quilts From: RBCochranaol.com Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2011 14:33:04 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

The Heritage Quilt Project of New Jersey is happy to announce that A Passion for Quilts: The Story of Florence Peto has just been published. Written by Barbara Schaffer, Natalie Hart, Rita Erickson, and Rachel Cochran--the four authors of New Jersey Quilts--this book is 174 pages with over 150 illustrations.

For those of you attending the AQSG seminar in Cherry Hill this week, 100 copies will be available for sale with 20% of the $32.95 price going to AQSG, and you will pay no shipping if you pick one up there. If you won't be going to seminar, copies can be ordered from our web site _www.newjerseyquilts.org_ (http://www.newjerseyquilts.org) .

Looking forward to seeing you at seminar!

Rachel Cochran

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Subject: Re: movie quilt alert From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2011 17:13:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

There an aster or dresden plate on the front porch at Aibileen's house too. It's across a couch or glider on the screened in porch.

Steph Whitson www.stephaniegracewhitson.com

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Subject: Gee's Bend Quilts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 07:18:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Mitzi said: > I have been a volunteer at the Shelburne Museum (VT) for quite a few > years, and they do have a few, very traditional and beautiful quilts that > have been recognized as being stitched and quilted by African Americans. > I will probably get some bad comments on this, but I am NOT a Gee's Bend > fan - I feel that all of the coverage of these quilts somehow was > overblown or even scammed somehow by someone wanting to make a name for > him/herself (and they were probably very, very white). Just my own thoughts... > Mitzi from Vermont

Mitzi, I couldn't agree more. I have never admired the appearance of these quilts and wondered what all the fuss was about. But, what I do admire about them is that there were people in an isolated community who were dirt poor and they used what they had to make something to keep them warm and tried to make them somewhat visually "friendly". Some are nicer than others.

I think it became what I would call politically correct to admire them and make a big deal about them. I am one who refuses to do the politically correct thing in some cases. I feel that the Underground Railroad quilt thing has gotten so out of proportion due to the politically correct aspect of it as well. You can't make a move to tell others that you think it is a made up story without first stopping and very very carefully wording your remarks.

As quilters, as historians, we must say the truth in all cases, or the truth as we know it to be. We have to be diplomatic about it, but it's OK to offer an educated opinion about the quilts and if you find them appealing or not. Or if a story about certain quilts was blown out of proportion and that there is no facts and true historical information to back it up.

I often have thought about that story, The Emperor's New Clothes" by Hans Christian Anderson about how he was swindled into paying a fortune for clothing that only the pure and good, etc. could see. He was paraded down the street buck naked while everyone exclaimed how amazing and wonderful his clothing was.... no one could see the clothing at all, it was all a lie. No one dared to speak up. Are we all seeing the emperor's clothes when it comes to Gee's Bend? Oooh and Aahhhh... they are unique, they are admirable, but beautiful? Art and beauty are in the eye of the beholder, I guess? Who am I to say that they are not "lovely" but that has been my feeling. Give me a red and white feathered star quilt, intricately quilted, any day.

No offense to anyone please, but just stating my personal view.

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: Gee's Bend Quilts From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 09:41:10 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Thank you - you made me feel better about airing my own feelings. Appreciate it. Mitzi

In a message dated 9/21/2011 7:18:46 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, ibquiltncomcast.net writes:

Mitzi said: > I have been a volunteer at the Shelburne Museum (VT) for quite a few > years, and they do have a few, very traditional and beautiful quilts that > have been recognized as being stitched and quilted by African Americans. > I will probably get some bad comments on this, but I am NOT a Gee's Bend > fan - I feel that all of the coverage of these quilts somehow was > overblown or even scammed somehow by someone wanting to make a name for > him/herself (and they were probably very, very white). Just my own thoughts... > Mitzi from Vermont

Mitzi, I couldn't agree more. I have never admired the appearance of these quilts and wondered what all the fuss was about. But, what I do admire about them is that there were people in an isolated community who were dirt poor and they used what they had to make something to keep them warm and tried to make them somewhat visually "friendly". Some are nicer than others.

I think it became what I would call politically correct to admire them and make a big deal about them. I am one who refuses to do the politically correct thing in some cases. I feel that the Underground Railroad quilt thing has gotten so out of proportion due to the politically correct aspect of it as well. You can't make a move to tell others that you think it is a made up story without first stopping and very very carefully wording your remarks.

As quilters, as historians, we must say the truth in all cases, or the truth as we know it to be. We have to be diplomatic about it, but it's OK to offer an educated opinion about the quilts and if you find them appealing or not. Or if a story about certain quilts was blown out of proportion and that there is no facts and true historical information to back it up.

I often have thought about that story, The Emperor's New Clothes" by Hans Christian Anderson about how he was swindled into paying a fortune for clothing that only the pure and good, etc. could see. He was paraded down the street buck naked while everyone exclaimed how amazing and wonderful his clothing was.... no one could see the clothing at all, it was all a lie. No one dared to speak up. Are we all seeing the emperor's clothes when it comes to Gee's Bend? Oooh and Aahhhh... they are unique, they are admirable, but beautiful? Art and beauty are in the eye of the beholder, I guess? Who am I to say that they are not "lovely" but that has been my feeling. Give me a red and white feathered star quilt, intricately quilted, any day.

No offense to anyone please, but just stating my personal view.

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mitzioakesaol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1714905Ilyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Gee's Bend From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 07:44:09 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

I think that quilting and music have a lot in common. We all have very specific preferences - mine is classical, but I love folk, rock, blues, too. Pop and hip hop, not so much.

Never bought anything from the Beatles or Michael Jackson.....but I've danced to 'em!!!!!

More power to the ladies of Gees Bend who make their quilts, and to the audience who gave them a dance. I was interested enough to have a good look, and it did me no harm. Can't say it influenced me, especially, but only the passage of time (a lot of time) will tell whether it has staying power as art. Susan

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Subject: Gee's Bend and more in "Why Quilts Matter:History,Art&Politics" From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 08:54:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

In the new 9 episode documentary- *Why Quilts Matter:History,Art& Politics- *Episode 4 is "Gee's Bend: The Most Famous Quilts in the World?" We do our best to present the viewer with all sides of the story.. It is an illuminating piece on the Gee's Bend project and I encourage you all to watch it. Note the ? at the end of the title. Our website www.whyquiltsmatter.org has clips from all the episodes and descriptions to help you decide about the series. The retail price is $39.95 for all 9 episodes and the bonus features. and can be ordered on the site at Buy It Now,. You can also get your copy at the AQSG seminar this weekend and in the SAQA Online Store. Both organizations are getting percentages of the DVD sales. .

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

--0015174c3830f574e604ad7314ec--

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Subject: Re: Gee's Bend Quilts From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 13:04:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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I'm not a Gee's Bend quilts fan, either...but then, the last year I was at Paducah, I wasn't a fan of the grand-prize-winning quilt, either. I can't dispute that it was skillfully made and took a lot of effort, but I wouldn'thave any interest in having it in my home even if the quilt museum didn't have first dibs. ;) I started off not being a fan of applique and machine quilting, and have definitely changed my opinions about THOSE two. But then,I'm not fond of Picasso, and I think music's gone downhill since Meister JS Bach quit composing. As for political correctness...it seems far, far worse to me to assume that the quilters of Gee's Bend would be unable to deal with the idea that some people don't much care for their work. Good mannerswould prevent me from saying so to their faces, but it would be infantalizing them to assume that we have to express admiration as if they were preschoolers scribbling on a page (OOH, can Gramma have this for her refrigerator?'). After all, do we worry about hurting Fons and Porter's feelings by not buying their magazines? Jocelyn________________________________=

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Subject: Re:Gees Bend Quilts From: Joe Cunningham <Joejoethequilter.com> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 22:37:19 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Really? Do we really have to dismiss quilts just because we do not like them? And do we really judge that a quilt is worthwhile by its geometry? As a long time student of and lover of quilts, I have developed my own particular taste in them, and I am sure that what I like is just as narrow as the other writers on this topic. But that does not mean that I need to dismiss as fraudulent or somehow insincere the quilts for which I do not care. The Gees Bend quilters have been making quilts all their lives, and they are as highly skilled as anyone who has ever made a quilt. They are simply indifferent to some of the aspects of modern quiltmaking that others think are supreme. So am I, for that matter. But they are not entering their quilts in shows where the judges are going to decide if the quilt fits in with a norm. They are entering their quilts in museums and quilt shows where they have been invited by people who love them.

I have studied the quilts at the Shelburne and loved them. I have spent time in Gees Bend quilting with the women there and I have loved them. I do not think loving one kind of quilt or quilter means putting down other kinds. And I realized a long time ago that I never loved a quilt because of the way it was made, only because of its character and liveliness.

One of the many brilliant aspects of American quiltmaking was that it took the European styles of quilted bed coverings and exploded them, making it possible for American women to make anything they could dream of. Not just ever more perfect geometric patterns, but anything, from the perfectly symmetrical and elegant to the wildly asymmetrical and even crude. All can have their own form of beauty. Not all Gees Bend quilts are masterpieces. Neither are all the quilts in the Shelburne. Neither are all the quilts in Paducah. Neither are all of my quilts. Therefore, I would like to judge each quilt on its own merits, instead of sweeping aside all the quilts of a particular class as fraudulent and unworthy of serious attention.

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Subject: RE: Gee's Bend Quilts From: "Maureen" <maureenbooksandoldlace.com> Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2011 07:00:55 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I love that there's such a history and narrative to these quilts. I love that the conversation has brought quilting again to the public eye. My mind opened when living in Birmingham, Alabama I read The Freedom Bee and my eyes popped at some of the bold, bright designs. I loved meeting the women of Gee's Bend when in 2009 they were here in Southern Oregon, seeing their quilts, hearing their songs. It was wonderful to talk with Matt Arnett and Loretta Bennett. I felt so close to all of you on QHL!

Maureen in Ashland, Oregon

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Subject: Gee's Bend Quilts From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 07:18:23 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Mitzi said: > I have been a volunteer at the Shelburne Museum (VT) for quite a few > years, and they do have a few, very traditional and beautiful quilts that > have been recognized as being stitched and quilted by African Americans. > I will probably get some bad comments on this, but I am NOT a Gee's Bend > fan - I feel that all of the coverage of these quilts somehow was > overblown or even scammed somehow by someone wanting to make a name for > him/herself (and they were probably very, very white). Just my own thoughts... > Mitzi from Vermont

Mitzi, I couldn't agree more. I have never admired the appearance of these quilts and wondered what all the fuss was about. But, what I do admire about them is that there were people in an isolated community who were dirt poor and they used what they had to make something to keep them warm and

tried to make them somewhat visually "friendly". Some are nicer than others.

I think it became what I would call politically correct to admire them and make a big deal about them. I am one who refuses to do the politically correct thing in some cases. I feel that the Underground Railroad quilt

thing has gotten so out of proportion due to the politically correct aspect of it as well. You can't make a move to tell others that you think it is a made up story without first stopping and very very carefully wording your remarks.

As quilters, as historians, we must say the truth in all cases, or the truth

as we know it to be. We have to be diplomatic about it, but it's OK to offer an educated opinion about the quilts and if you find them appealing or

not. Or if a story about certain quilts was blown out of proportion and

that there is no facts and true historical information to back it up.

I often have thought about that story, The Emperor's New Clothes" by Hans Christian Anderson about how he was swindled into paying a fortune for clothing that only the pure and good, etc. could see. He was paraded down the street buck naked while everyone exclaimed how amazing and wonderful his

clothing was.... no one could see the clothing at all, it was all a lie. No

one dared to speak up. Are we all seeing the emperor's clothes when it comes to Gee's Bend? Oooh and Aahhhh... they are unique, they are admirable, but beautiful? Art and beauty are in the eye of the beholder, I guess? Who am I to say that they are not "lovely" but that has been my feeling. Give me a red and white feathered star quilt, intricately quilted,

any day.

No offense to anyone please, but just stating my personal view.

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: Gee's Bend Quilts From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 09:41:10 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Thank you - you made me feel better about airing my own feelings.  Appreciate it. Mitzi   In a message dated 9/21/2011 7:18:46 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  ibquiltncomcast.net writes:

Mitzi said: > I have been a volunteer at the Shelburne Museum (VT) for quite a few > years, and they do have a few, very traditional and beautiful quilts that > have been recognized as being stitched and quilted by African > Americans. > I will probably get some bad comments on this, but I am NOT a Gee's Bend > fan - I feel that all of the coverage of these quilts somehow was > overblown or even scammed somehow by someone wanting to make a name > for > him/herself (and they were probably very, very white). Just my own thoughts... > Mitzi from Vermont

Mitzi, I couldn't agree more. I have never admired the appearance of these quilts and wondered what all the fuss was about. But, what I do admire

about them is that there were people in an isolated community who were dirt poor and they used what they had to make something to keep them warm and tried to make them somewhat visually "friendly". Some are nicer than  others.

I think it became what I would call politically correct to admire them and make a big deal about them. I am one who refuses to do the politically

correct thing in some cases. I feel that the Underground Railroad quilt thing has gotten so out of proportion due to the politically correct aspect of it as well. You can't make a move to tell others that you think it is a made up story without first stopping and very very carefully wording your remarks.

As quilters, as historians, we must say the truth in all cases, or the truth as we know it to be. We have to be diplomatic about it, but it's OK to

offer an educated opinion about the quilts and if you find them appealing or  not. Or if a story about certain quilts was blown out of proportion and that there is no facts and true historical information to back it up.

I often have thought about that story, The Emperor's New Clothes" by Hans Christian Anderson about how he was swindled into paying a fortune for clothing that only the pure and good, etc. could see. He was paraded down the street buck naked while everyone exclaimed how amazing and wonderful his clothing was.... no one could see the clothing at all, it was all a lie.  No one dared to speak up. Are we all seeing the emperor's clothes when it

comes to Gee's Bend? Oooh and Aahhhh... they are unique, they are admirable, but beautiful? Art and beauty are in the eye of the beholder, I guess? Who am I to say that they are not "lovely" but that has been my

feeling. Give me a red and white feathered star quilt, intricately quilted, any day.

No offense to anyone please, but just stating my personal view.

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mitzioakesaol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to  leave-qhl-1714905Ilyris.quiltropolis.com

--part1_4752.32fbce4e.3bab4376_boundary--

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Subject: Gee's Bend From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 07:44:09 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

---659239930-1381789146-1316616249:18856 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I think that quilting and music have a lot in common.A0 We all have very s pecific preferences - mine is classical, but I love folk, rock, blues, too. A0 Pop and hip hop, not so much.

Never bought anything from the Beatles or Michael Jackson.....but I've danc ed to 'em!!!!!

More power to the ladies of Gees Bend who make their quilts, and to the aud ience who gave them a dance.A0 I was interested enough to have a good look , and it did me no harm.A0 Can't say it influenced me, especially, but onl y the passage of time (a lot of time) will tell whether it has staying powe r as art.A0A0A0 Susan

---659239930-1381789146-1316616249:18856--

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Subject: Gee's Bend and more in "Why Quilts Matter:History,Art&Politics" From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 08:54:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

In the new 9 episode documentary- *Why Quilts Matter:History,Art& Politics- *Episode 4 is "Gee's Bend: The Most Famous Quilts in the World?" We do our best to present the viewer with all sides of the story.. It is an illuminating piece on the Gee's Bend project and I encourage you all to watch it. Note the ? at the end of the title. Our website www.whyquiltsmatter.org has clips from all the episodes and descriptions to help you decide about the series. The retail price is $39.95 for all 9 episodes and the bonus features. and can be ordered on the site at Buy It Now,. You can also get your copy at the AQSG seminar this weekend and in the SAQA Online Store. Both organizations are getting percentages of the DVD sales. .

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

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Subject: Re: Gee's Bend Quilts From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 13:04:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

I'm not a Gee's Bend quilts fan, either...but then, the last year I was at  Paducah, I wasn't a fan of the grand-prize-winning quilt, either. I can't d ispute that it was skillfully made and took a lot of effort, but I wouldn't have any interest in having it in my home even if the quilt museum didn't  have first dibs. ;) I started off not being a fan of applique and machine q uilting, and have definitely changed my opinions about THOSE two. But then, I'm not fond of Picasso, and I think music's gone downhill since Meister J S Bach quit composing. As for political correctness...it seems far, far wor se to me to assume that the quilters of Gee's Bend would be unable to deal  with the idea that some people don't much care for their work. Good manners would prevent me from saying so to their faces, but it would be infantaliz ing them to assume that we have to express admiration as if they were presc hoolers scribbling on a page (OOH, can Gramma have this for her refrigerator?'). After all, do we worry about hurting Fons and Porter's fe elings by not buying their magazines? A0Jocelyn_________

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Subject: Folk Art Museum - Good News From: textiqueaol.com Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2011 13:45:40 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

 

From the museum this morning. - Jan Thomas

Dear Members and Friends,

I am pleased to announce that the Board of Trustees of the American Folk Art Museum voted unanimously to continue the Museums programs and operations at its Two Lincoln Square home and keep its collection intact under its stewardship as an independent entity. The full press release is below.

We are touched by the outpouring of support in these past weeks and thank you for your continued enthusiasm. Please visit our website to join, renew your membership, or make a contribution. We look forward to welcoming each of you to our reinvigorated home at Lincoln Square.

Sincerely,

Linda Dunne Acting Director

For Immediate Release

September 22, 2011

AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM BOARD OF TRUSTEES ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR MUSEUMS FUTURE

Trustees Elect Laura Parsons as Board Chairman and Edward V. (Monty) Blanchard Jr. as Museum President

Collaborations with Cultural Institutions Will Increase Exposure of Museum Collections and Broaden Folk Art Programming across New York City

New York, NY - The Board of Trustees of the American Folk Art Museum today voted unanimously to continue the Museum s programs and operationsat its Two Lincoln Square home and keep its collection intact under its stewardship as an independent entity. The plan includes the election of Chairman Laura Parsons and President Edward V. (Monty) Blanchard Jr., a new financial strategy that ensures the Museums fiscal viability, and a dynamic future while continuing its exhibitions, research, and educational programs at Two Lincoln Square.

=9CAs president of the American Folk Art Museum for the past six years I have been privileged to work with a committed group of trustees and staff who have never lost sight of the purpose of a museum: to be stewards of art for the benefit of the public, said American Folk Art Museum Chairman Laura Parsons. =9CI am proud to be associated with this Museum and I can say without hesitation that we are working with the motto =98When one door closes another one is opened. I want to especially thank the Ford Foundation and the Department of Cultural Affairs of New York City for the faith they have shown in us and in the importance of our mission.

Under the leadership of Chairman Laura Parsons, the board voted unanimouslyto elect Monty Blanchard as the Museums new president. Mr. Blanchard is a passionate collector of contemporary and outsider art, and with his late wife Anne donated 75 works from their collection to the Museum in 1998. He has served on the Museums Board since 2003 and has acted asTreasurer and a member of the Executive Committee. Mr. Blanchard is a former investment banker and is currently an investor in distressed hotel properties. He is a graduate of Harvard College and has an MBA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

=9CI am honored and excited to be leading the Board as we enter our second 50 years, said Mr. Blanchard. =9CWe have such an outstanding collection, both traditional and contemporary, a great home at Lincoln Square and a base of loyal supporters, all of which position us well foran exciting future.

The Board has received significant pledges from Trustees and other donors, including a major gift from the Ford Foundation, toward its operating budget.

=9CThe American Folk Art Museum is an essential facet of New York Citys cultural heritage, said Darren Walker, Vice President for Education, Creativity and Free Expression at the Ford Foundation. =9CIts unparalleled collection of folk art, drawn from diverse and self-taught artists, is a powerful showcase of the American spirit and an important public treasure for the people of our city. We are pleased to support the Museums development of a new, highly collaborative strategy to ensure that this irreplaceable art reaches as many people as possible.

In addition to developing a financial plan, the Trustees are also creating a strategy that will increase the visibility of the Museums renowned collections and extend the American Folk Art Museum brand. The Museum will seek to establish a revitalized and expanded program of loans to collaborating New York City institutions, as well as packaging traveling exhibitions around the U.S., as ways of sharing folk art with wider audiences. The Brooklyn Museum, the New-York Historical Society, and the Museum of Arts andDesign have expressed interest in working with the American Folk Art Museum to identify potential exhibitions where the museums respective collections inform and excite one another. The Metropolitan Museum of Art will display approximately 15 major works of art from the collection in honor of the opening of the American Wing and The Henry R. Luce Center for the Study of American Art.

=9CWe are delighted to learn this news and look forward to continued collaboration with our distinguished sister institution, said Thomas Campbell, Executive Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

=9CThe Brooklyn Museum is fully in support of the exceptional collections of the American Folk Art Museum being as accessible as possible to thepeople of the City of New York, said Brooklyn Museum Director Arnold Lehman. =9CWe would be pleased to collaborate with other colleague museums in our city to make this happen.

=9CWe look forward to working with the Folk Art Museum on possible future exhibitions, said New-York Historical Society President Louise Mirrer. =9CTheir wonderful collection complements our own holdings and we would welcome the opportunity to help build a larger audience for this exciting work.

Museum trustees, President Blanchard, and the Museum curator and staff willcontinue to work together to refine the Museums strategy and identify opportunities for special exhibitions and educational programs.

Founded in 1961, the American Folk Art Museum is the premier institution devoted to the aesthetic appreciation of traditional folk art and creative expressions of contemporary self-taught artists from the United States and abroad. The museum preserves, conserves, and interprets a comprehensive collection of the highest quality, with objects dating from the eighteenth century to the present.

###

Contact:

Linda Dunne, Acting Director, (212) 265-1040, ldunnefolkartmuseum.org

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Subject: RE: Gee's Bend Quilts From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2011 07:15:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I agree with Joe about these quilts. Some I like better than others, but with any genre of quilts, there will be some that could be considered art and some not. And art is a subjective label.

Have you ever tried to MAKE a quilt similar to those of Gee's Bend? I find it difficult because of my training. It's difficult to break loose from what I consider to be proper or good' construction techniques and color theory. It's difficult because, as I'm making the quilt, I'm thinking utilitarian made from clothing scraps, and not folk art." The crux of folk art is that it is produced without professional training, so it's free form. That's one of the things that fascinates me about the Gee's Bend Quilts. They didn't know they shouldn't do certain things about combining different fabrics or cutting without measuring or pattern templates, so they did them. If you set out to make folk art, is it really folk art afterall?

Maybe Gee's Bend-type quilts need to be made without consideration of creating art and evaluated later, after the quilt is finished. Don't go for art, but it might show up anyway.

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org

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Subject: Gee's Bend quilts and other stuff From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2011 10:00:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hello friends-The dialogue about the Gee's Bend quilts has been illuminating. Myself I walk the middle path. When viewing the original Gee's Bend quilts, I loved them. They were so bold and sassy and almost crawled off the wall! Seeing them against the white background of an art gallery was a wonderful aha! moment. Here's what I didn't like: years after the fact, the Gees Bend quilters, the guys who wrote the book, and anyone else associated with the quilters still remain in contention and it's about-duh-money. And, I'm sorry, I hate the kits. Maybe one might argue buying a Gees Bend kit to make a similar quilt might be viewed as a creativity wake-up call and an uptight quilter could use it as an exercise. Maybe. Windham Fabrics say they 'share' the profits with the Gees Bend Quilt Collective. Wink, wink. Royalties on fabrics, as any designers on this list know, run about 5% a yard on the sold yardage----and that means when it sells anytime--to a distributor, a shop, or to a retail customer. Doing uber-simple math (my kind), this means that if fabric sells for retail for $10/yard, only if the yardage goes straight from the fabric company to the individual customer (not likely) GB makes 50 cents per yard. What's more likely is that the company sells to a distributor and their price is $3.50/yd (10 retail-5 wholesale minus another 25%). Now the GB profit per yard has shrunk to 17 and 1/2 cents per yard. C'mon. You'd have to sell thousands and thousands of yards to make any kind of meaningful income. But the hope of profit can be as insidious as any outright theft--Gee's Bend quilters are a mixed bag of personalities and depending on who you talk to, you'll get a different story. Everything that comes after the original quilts is suspect in my opinion. I think that we, as quilt lovers and historians, ought to embrace the Gee's Bend quilts in their original form and recognize their freedom from conventions and the maker's spirited use of the materials at hand. That's quilt art and I salute it. (climbing off soapbox now-) Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: wonderful quilts at auction in Pennsylvania From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2011 10:50:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

For those of you who can't get here for AQSG, there are some treats online that are upcoming at Pook & Pook's in Downingtown, PA:

Here's one:

http://www.pookandpook.com/cat/2011-10-01/331

But check the site for others. I haven't seen a group this nice in awhile. Wowza!

Candace Perry

 

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Subject: Re: Gee's Bend quilts and other stuff From: "Stephanie Grace Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2011 10:01:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

According to Pepper's math ... fabric design and fiction authors (c'est moi...my day job) ... have a lot in common. I used to be able to buy a cup of coffee for every book of mine that sold. But then the price of coffee went up ... and my royalties didn't. Imagine that.

May I just say that those of you in the quilt industry who do the books and the lectures and the fabric design & etc. have my utmost respect for how hard you work. I got a tiny taste of it when Kathy Moore and I did our book. And I stand amazed. Truly.

Steph Whitson www.stephaniegracewhitson.com www.footnotesfromhistory.blogspot.com

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Subject: bad ugrr stuff From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2011 15:31:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

http://nashvillecitypaper.com/content/city-news/underground-railroad-quilts- mark-28th31st-connector

really, really bad news.Candace Perry

 

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Subject: Re: bad ugrr stuff From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2011 15:53:56 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Will the UGRR/quilt fallacy ever end? Bad (and sad) news indeed. Mitzi from Vermont

In a message dated 9/23/2011 3:31:17 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, candaceschwenkfelder.com writes:

http://nashvillecitypaper.com/content/city-news/underground-railroad-quilts- mark-28th31st-connector

really, really bad news.Candace Perry

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Subject: thanks to so many From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2011 12:06:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Hi, I just returned from my moment in the spotlight where I was able to show and talk about my 9-11 quilts at the American Quilt Study Group Seminar in New Jersey; and I wanted to say "thank you" to all those who made this such a wonderful, once in a life-time experience for me.  Special thanks to the Mid-Atlantic Quilt Study Group who sponsored my talk and were so gracious and helpful--especially Judy Grow and Karen Dever who were the Co-Chairs for the Seminar, and Bonnie Dwyer who also is the Maine Coordinator for the Home of the Brave Quilt Project.  Special thanks to my new BF, Sue Reich, who is just a lovely, smartand humble as I had always pictured her. She remains one of my great heroes as does her son.  And thanks to all the individual members who had such kind comments about my quilts and my talk. I know some folks think I have better credentials than I really do--actually, I'm just a slightly above average quilter and amateur historian who loves his country. I see quilting and its history fo recording important American events and heroes as a way I can express myself in my old age and have more fun than I have any right to expect.  To have the opportunity to do so on a national level surpassed any dream I could every image. Thanks again to you all. best, Don --0-1376256699-1317063984=:1177--

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ubject: Donald's presentation From: deedadik <deedadikatt.net> Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2011 04:15:38 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Hi all, If you did not attend Donald's presentation, you missed an inspiring, heartfelt, moving presentation. A standing ovation was a just due to what we heard. Thanks, Donald. Dee

Dee Dadik Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles 5689 Concord Hill Dr. Columbus, Ohio 43213

614-861-0478

Web site: thequiltappraiser.com --0-1587331325-1317122138=:49626--

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Subject: Thanks to Don Beld From: Dale Drake <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2011 11:22:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Don:

It is us who owe you thanks - for all of your work on this truly meaningful project, and for coming to Seminar to share it with us. You're an inspiration.

Gratefully, Dale Drake, mother of a soldier who hopefully will NOT have another deployment

On 9/26/2011 3:06 PM, Donald Beld wrote:

Hi, I just returned from my moment in the spotlight where I was able to show and talk about my 9-11 quilts at the American Quilt Study Group Seminar in New Jersey; and I wanted to say "thank you" to all those who made this such a wonderful, once in a life-time experience for me.

-- "I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library." Jorge Luis Borges

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Subject: Don's presentation From: ibquiltncomcast.net Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2011 10:48:36 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

Just want to say that I wish I had been there to see/hear it. Miss you Don. <3

Linda Heminway ------=_Part_135617_1275553301.1317206916914--

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: September 26, 2011 From: cincyquiltaol.com Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2011 10:28:42 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE4B38E3EDA0F8_1EB0_1CFDFC_webmail-d039.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Thank you, Don, for helpiing us to remember and honor true heroes. You are a very special man.

Joyce Fisher in Ohio

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Subject: Re: bad ugrr stuff From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2011 15:06:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

 

You can register and post your thoughts about this. I did.Judy Schwender

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Subject: The Dublin, N.H. Sanitary Commission Quilt From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 08:36:30 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

One of the other great thrills for me at last week's AQSG Seminar was to see up close the Dublin, N.H. Sanitary Commission Quilt and hear Lorrie Chase's wonderful presentation and touching tribute to Jan Coor-Pendar Dodge.  In the past, I have poked fun at Jan as part of my sometimes strange sense of humor, referring to her as the "weird" pig tailed lady who kept her quilt in a box under her bed. That was extremely inappropriate of me; and I want to publicly apologize for those remarks.  The truth is that Jan was a worthy custodian of this priceless quilt for over 40 years and her tenure was truly special. She rescued the quilt fromobscurity, preserved it, cherished it, and passed it on to a new generation in far better condition than when she found it.Her enthusiasm for the Sanitary Commission Quilts probably far exceed my own. I always foundit interesting that two of the six surviving quilts had homes in California.  Hers and Lorrie's paper is well thought out and written and documents the wonderful history of this quilt for us all to read. If you do not get a copy of Uncoverings 2011, you should--just to learn more about this special quilt.  I enjoyed, tremendously, the sweet, knowledgeable presentation Lorrie made at the Seminar; and the tribute to Jan she made at the end. Thank you both for protecting and preserving this national treasure. best, Don  --0-1923816644-1317310590=:15142--

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Subject: Phyllis George Living with Quilts From: Wildemuth Susan <wildemuthsewgmail.com> Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 17:46:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Does anyone have the Phyllis George Book *Living with Quilts*? If you do, does it have an antique eagle quilt in it?

Thanks -- Sue in Illinois

 

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Subject: Re: Phyllis George Living with Quilts From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net> Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 18:05:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I have it but didn't see an eagle qlt. Lonnie Schlough Tx www.fixquilts.com

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Subject: Southern Antique Eagle Quilt From: Wildemuth Susan <wildemuthsewgmail.com> Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 19:08:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

-

I have posted an antique quilt to the vintage picture board - quilt section under the title Southern Antique Eagle Quilt. This is the URL for the vintage board http://vintagepictures.eboard.com Does anyone recognize this quilt? It is suppose to have been in a photograph in Southern Living Magazine, but I am not sure which issue/date. I don't believe the quilt was the focus of the article so it would be tucked in an article about something else - possibly the home it came from - not sure.

I have searched the Google, Google Image, Google News Archives search engines and also my usual sources so that has been covered. My hope is someone will remember seeing this quilt in a Southern Living Magazine article.

I guess I should add that I own this quilt.

Thanks

Sue in Illinois