Subject: Re: From the Eau Claire Leader, October 19, 1909 - "JACK FROST" GIVES A SURPRISE PARTY
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Nov 2011 08:59:18 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 1

--0-91671128-1320656358:79408
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Thanks for this, Sue. Fascinating. Interesting use of the word 'build', as
in 'build a quilt' - was that usage common in the early part of the C20th,
I wonder?Celia EddyThe Brown HouseFleming PlaceMarypor
tCumbria CA15 6ESTel: 01900 814959__________________________

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Another book recommendation
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Nov 2011 09:01:20 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 2

--0-12874800-1320656480:60941
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi, Stephanie. I'm quite excited to hear that Dr. Ulrich has turned her att
ention to quilts. I hope she publishes something on the subject, which is s
ure to be as lively and informative as The Age of Homespun.Celi
a EddyThe Brown HouseFleming PlaceMaryportCumbria CA15 6ESTe
l: 01900 814959_
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilt patterns/woven patterns
From: "Virginia Berger" <cifbanetins.net>
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2011 09:26:09 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

There are some interesting pictures of Welsh blankets that
might be inspired by quilts (or vice versa) on this blog:

http://welshquilts.blogspot.com/2011/10/welsh-woven-blankets-at-quilt-museum.html

or tiny url:

http://tinyurl.com/7asv3tk

Virginia Berger



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Directions in study of quilt history
From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net>
Date: Mon, 7 Nov 2011 10:36:20 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

Celia wrote:
"Although there is mention of quilts, they play a minor role. But thi
s
examination of textiles in general gives a broader context to the
history of patchwork and quilting and its development in America since the
early days settlement."

I have been editing books in the library of my study, and you know how that
goes: you pick up a book to move it and then you open it and then you sit
down and read....Slow going.

As I went through my quilt books, I was surprised at how many were primaril
y photographs and patterns, without significant commentary or placing the q
uilts in context. Don't get me wrong: I'm all for the photographs, and I th
ink for a long time, there simply were not enough of them.

But it strikes me the time is ripe to move in the direction of interpretati
on. And unfortunately this comes when publishers demand patterns. It appear
s that publication now is being driven by those primarily concerned with pr
oducing new quilts and patterns. For those of us interested equally or more
in the "whys," there are fewer and fewer publications like Ulrich's

I think of Xenia's note re coverlets and development of the jacquard loom a
nd the possibility of cross-fertilization or even quilts as possible source
s for weaving designs. To examine something like that is to conduct real ST
UDY in the development of quiltmaking. It would require pinning down dates
and designs and origins of makers and examination of communal or profession
al influences.

Contextual examination of collateral crafts within a group also deserves se
rious work. For instance, I've discovered one of the best clues yet to the
development of a design I've been studying from a study of Alabama pottery
and potters. The people who made quilts moved along the same paths and road
s as the people who made pots and furniture and tin cooking wares and build
ings. Contextual studies are logical outgrowths of that fact.

Such study requires patient research and requires one to learn about histor
ical currents, migrations, other crafts, industrial developments, ideas, an
d more. But after we've documented the presence of the quilts, it seems a d
irection the study quilt historians should take.

If, for instance, we discover a number of examples of a pattern in a given
region, all executed more or less in the same colorways, shouldn't we explo
re the reasons for that concentration?

I know we are in hard times and that publishing changes almost daily, but s
houldn't AQSG try to identify and encourage a publisher for this higher lev
el of publication? Increasing membership would help with such recruitment,
of course, but one lobbies for the things that advance her causes. I know A
QS has its own publication arm. It seems to me time that quilt historians s
ought out a university or special interest press to encourage the study of
the quilts we've identified. Maybe some firm that would devote its presses
to this study as people like the Jameses have devoted their collection and
means to the preservation of sterling examples in the history of quiltmakin
g?

While self-publishing is fine and often needful to fill in information gaps
, the demands of a publisher with an independent editor and standards often
assures a high standard of scholarship.

Just thinking......

Gaye Ingram

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Directions in study of quilt history
From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Nov 2011 19:11:42 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 5\


Well put, Gaye. I'm always on the look-out for books which, while not being
directly concerned with quilts and quilt-making, offer data which could th
row light on them. For example, David Hackett Fischer's Albion's Seed .Four
British Folkways in America is a mine of meticulously researched and refer
enced data about patterns of early settlement and the ways in which importe
d customs changed, and were changed by, life in the New World. (No coloured
illustrations, but black and white drawings, maps, tables and charts.)
I also have a wonderful book, given to me years ago by Michael James
and much-treasured and referred to, which IS illustrated in colour, and for
good reasons. This is The Spirit of Folk Art by Henri Glassie. It's bas
ed on the Girard Collection, made by Susan and Alexander Girard and housed
at the Museum ofInternationalFolk Art at Santa Fe. Each artefact, includ
ing some quilts, is illustrated, described and put into its historical and
social context. He seeks to elucidate the meaning in each item. So much of
what he writes can be extrapolated to apply to quilts and quilt-making.
Gaye writes:'If, for instance, we discover a number of examples of
a pattern in a given region, all executed more or less in the same colo
rways, shouldn't we explore the reasons for that concentration?For ye
ars I've pondered on the significance of the persistance of patterns and me
thods in particular regions. A simple explanation might be that Folk do the
same as other Folk! It seems that handed-down tradition plays a larger rol
e than innovation and imagination. Of course, within the parameters of any
style or design, we see variations, but these are usually minor and the obj
ects are still identifiably of their time and place. Where I live, in West
Cumbria on the Solway Firth, C19th quilts are almost ubiquitously quilted i
n the All-over Wave pattern. The same is true of most Northern Ireland quil
ts and those made on the Isle of Man, the areas geographically contiguous t
o West Cumbria. If I find a quilt in this area which has that pattern I can
be reasonably sure that it has local provenance, although (see above) I ha
ve one quilt which has good local provenance but which is quilted in the Ba
ptist Fans style. I can't help wondering about the woman who,
when she had finished piecing it, decided 'No, I won't use the traditional
pattern, I'll do something different.' Was she a lady of rare artistic
discrimination, or was she just a bit bolshie?!More food for thoug
ht?CeliaCelia EddyThe Brown HouseFleming Place
MaryportCumbria CA15 6ESTel: 01900 814959________________


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Looking for Dawn H
From: JLHfwaol.com
Date: Mon, 7 Nov 2011 15:01:21 -0500 (EST)
X-Message-Number: 6

--part1_4f1ed.c79ff62.3be99311_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Please forgive me for posting to the list, but I need to get in touch with
Dawn H who kindly sent me a Pennsylvania quilt book so that I can reimburse
her. Dawn, please contact me off list. Thanks, Janet Henderson, Fort
Worth, TX
--part1_4f1ed.c79ff62.3be99311_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Aunt Bina's Quilt - Civil War era.
From: suereichcharter.net



I uploaded another long historic newspaper story on my Blog Page about
quiltmaking during the Civil War. The story was published in 1898 in
the Lima News, Lima, Ohio. Hard to say if it is fiction or non-fiction.
It recorded the travels of a quilt made during the Civil War in a town
named Eden, Massachusetts. I cannot find an Eden, Massachusetts which
does not mean that it didn't exit. My own town of Washington,
Connecticut was called Judea until George Washington visited here during
the Revolutionary War.
Enjoy!

http://www.coveringquilthistory.com/bed-turning.php

Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Aunt Bena's quilt--Sue Reich From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2011 09:00:07 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

Sue, that was the loveliest Civil War Quilt story I have ever heard. Tha nks so much for sharing it.  best, Don Beld --0-309180061-1320771607:16283--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Nancy Cabot pattern From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2011 13:45:46 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Hi everyone. I am looking for information on or the actual article about a particular pattern attributed to Nancy Cabot. Any of you out there th at collect her patterns or could guide me on finding the one I need could c ontact me off line, I would appreciate it: donbeldpacbell.net  Thanks, Don Beld

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Last Call for Quilt Index Feedback Survey 2011 From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2011 06:48:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Dear QHL list subscribers:

Help us assess the value and usability of recent tools and additions to the Quilt Index and offer your suggestions for future planning!

The Quilt Index User Feedback Survey 2011 will close on November 30. We will be analyzing responses and reporting results back to the quilt communities in early 2012. Many user suggestions in the past have directly resulted in improvements to the Quilt Index and its user tools.

If you haven't already responded in the spring, we welcome your feedback. Please go to the survey site below:

<http://survey.constantcontact.com/survey/a07e367q0prgh54rneq/start>http://survey.constantcontact.com/survey/a07e367q0prgh54rneq/start (or shortened link: <http://goo.gl/E3E1z>http://goo.gl/E3E1z)

Already responded this year? Thank you very much! You can still help by spreading the word this month via your blogs and social networks.

Thank you very much for your continued use, comments and support. And stay tuned for new essays, galleries, lesson plans and many ephemera items coming online before the end of the year!

Sincerely,

Marsha MacDowell Michigan State University Museum H-Quilts Editor on Duty

--- On behalf of the Quilt Index team at the Alliance for American Quilts, Michigan State University Museum, and MSU's MATRIX: Center for Humane Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences Online --_-891196805_ma--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Directions in study of quilt history/A New Book From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2011 15:32:02 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

--Apple-Mail-2--965460923 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii

Gaye Ingram wrote:

"Contextual examination of collateral crafts within a group also  deserves serious work. ...... Such study requires patient research and requires one to learn about  historical currents, migrations, other crafts, industrial developments,  ideas, and more. But after we've documented the presence of the quilts,  it seems a direction the study quilt historians should take."

Dovetailing nicely with this comment is the publication this December of  a new book by UK quilt historian Dorothy Osler, 'Amish Quilts and the  Welsh Connection'. The visual similarities between the two styles has  often been remarked, but we have waited a long time for an academic  investigation into a possible cross-cultural link. 

Although already listed on Amazon, it is not published until the very  end of the year, so all I can offer is this from the publisher's  information:

<< Amish quilts always excite interest and admiration but Amish Quilts  and The Welsh Connection presents a new perspective on this very special  group of American quilts. In comparing the acknowledged visual  similarities between Amish quilts and lesser-known Welsh quilts, the  author considers how these visual connections could have come about, and  whether Welsh quilt-making style could have influenced the early  development of Amish quilts. Author Dorothy Osler presents a carefully  argued case for cross-over in design style to Amish quilts from equally  dramatic Welsh quilts when Welsh immigrants settled close to Amish  communities in nineteenth-century America. Splendidly illustrated with  high-quality quilt images and period graphics, this ground-breaking book  is both authoritative and visually stunning.>>

Sally Ward

--Apple-Mail-2--965460923--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Directions in study of quilt history/A New Book From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2011 09:36:37 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

Thanks, Sally! I knew she was working on this, so I will pre-order. Can't wait. Kim in ND

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: If problems with link for Last Call for Quilt Index Feedback Survey 2011 From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu> Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2011 11:02:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

For those who have trouble accessing the survey by clicking on the link, please try copying and pasting either of the following addresses into your browser.

http://survey.constantcontact.com/survey/a07e367q0prgh54rneq/a01kbguo0lgjq/questions

http://goo.gl/E3E1z

We apologize for any difficulties that the "clickable" address caused.

Thanks again for your input!

Marsha

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Post Partum Blues From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2011 15:48:31 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

 

Nah - I didn't have a young'un. At least  not a human one - Thank the L ord I am older than dirt and dont have to worry about any of that nonsense. Besides we have only spayed and neutered beings in this household i ncluding the human beings. HOWEVER - I have read here and there across the years about an emotio nal letdown of sorts when a major quilt is completed. And I'm thinking the theory has some truth to it. I've been working on a life story commission quilt for the past five months. It has been part and parcel of every thou ght and movement for five months and it went home with the client yester day. I truly experienced a feeling of loss - the design wall is empty t he bits and pieces and threads put away everything tidied up for the arr ival of the client - bare empty lifeless. The quilt "From Fried  Pies to Glass Slippers" has been the focus of every spare moment and  if you dont believe it you should see the dust on the lampshades!!  SO poof- just like that it is gone. I truly feel as if I have lost some thing. Thank goodness I have that nasty little Sue and her bad boy Sam to  fill in the empty spot. I had a block (making a lamp post for a street co rner...hmmm...what could that mean?) under the machine needle before the c lient got out of the driveway!  I have the clients permission to put it on my website so I'll do that be fore long. Right now I really oughta clean house - but wait - do yall hear that?? I think I hear Sue calling me.

Teddy Pruett

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Oregon Art Beat promoting cutting up old quilts From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2011 19:15:20 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello QHLers,

A dear friend in Oregon alerted me to a textile artist from Ashland, OR who cuts up old quilts for her newly constructed garments. Her story is being promoted on Oregon Art Beat, the state's premier weekly, televised showcase of artisans. Here is the link: http://www.opb.org/programs/artbeat

We are asking those who might be so inclined, to email Oregon Art Beat and share your displeasure with an organization that promotes the 'repurposing' of traditional, cultural heritage - with apparent lack of regard and respect for the original artist's intention and historical context. How many of these material culture objects might be sacrificed, without any research being done on them? And how many of these garments that are made from these old and beautiful quilts will even withstand the normal wear and tear of everyday life in the modern world?

Thank you in advance for allowing me to post this news to this list. I know many of you will join with us to not let this go unnoticed.

Feel free to email off list with your comments as well.

Martha Spark (former Co-Coordinator, Oregon Quilt Project) Edmond, OK

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cutting up old quilts From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2011 21:50:05 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

I like the question Martha's friend raises: Would it be ok to indiscriminately smash 19th c. pottery and glassware to make mosaics?

I first discovered Joanne Kliejunas's work ---mentioned in Martha's post -- in Aug 2010.

http://www.heirloom-couture.com/coat13-a.html

The pdf pages from Kliejunas's website that I saved from 2010 contain many of the same coats I see when I visit her website today. This leaves me with the impression that she is really not making many coats. But an awful lot of Teddy Bears, Cats, etc are being made by an awful lot of other people in the craft world! There is no way to stop them but that doesn't mean we can't attempt to educate them.

I know we as a group bring a totally different perspective to old quilts than many others do. But the sad thing is, there are not enough people trained in analyzing and interpreting all the old quilts that do exist. Nor do any of us have the money or the space to acquire all of them and preserve them indefinitely. So all we can do is educate .....and do our best to rescue the ones we can personally rescue.....knowing that some day, our own collections of "tired worn quilts" will once again hit the secondary market and have to take their chances out there in the open market once again.

We could wish that a trained person could be given the chance to evaluate and photograph every quilt before it is cut up, but it ain't gonna happen.

But, we can do our best to educate and at least encourage those who feel they must "repurpose them" to photograph them in detail before they cut them up, and then make those photographs available to quilt historians. But don't hold your breath.

Cutting will still always shock us.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Karen in the Islands

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting up old quilts From: Gloria Hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2011 23:20:37 -0900 (AKST) X-Message-Number: 2

I'm going to take an opposite position for a moment. While I have rescued many orphan quilts and now don't know what to do with them and am beginning to resent the room they take up, I do have to wonder if we are entering into a period of time where routine object is becoming "too" valued. I don't believe all quilts need to be saved as a quilt. I think some are in cutter condition and I would rather see them used for crafts than thrown in the trash.

Our museums and quilt collects are doing an excellent job documenting quilts, but I would have to wonder how many examples of string quilts are needed considering that people are still making string quilts?

Beautiful quilts notwithstanding, how many quilts are out on the secondary market because they were put away to keep and now have no meaning to any family member? I thought those were really attractive coats pictured on the website. Not practical at all, and I doubt that many people would want something that may not hold up to washing and wearing for any length of time.

Who was the designer in the 70's who was doing the coats, skirts and upholstery with quilts? It didn't last. Quilts are not sturdy objects for everyday use. None of the ones from my childhood lasted, only those family quilts which were put away. We still highly value the quilts with a provenance and I doubt if that will change--for any type of craft or art.

We do use my collection of double-knit quilts on a daily basis and I doubt if they will ever wear out. I have told my family to bury me with all of them and in a few thousand years when the archeologists find me, they will think I was a queen since I was the only person surrounded by riches that lasted though the ages.

Gloria

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cutting up old quilts From: QUILTMOOREaol.com Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2011 08:19:31 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

--part1_4c04f.5e781e1c.3befcc63_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I think Gloria Vanderbilt was a designer who was upholstering chairs with 19th century quilts that were not cutters. I also saw a vest on eBay some time ago, made from a c1900 quilt pieced with HST. It was by Ralph Lauren and listed as a Buy it Now for $1,150, later reduced to $750. I do not know if it ever sold. From the cut it looked like a man's vest. Also on eBay are many shapes such as hearts, ovals, bunnies, etc. die cut from old quilts. Sellers also cut old quilts into large square or rectangular pieces and sell them a piece at a time, thus increasing the money made from an old quilt. Nan in FL --part1_4c04f.5e781e1c.3befcc63_boundary--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting up old quilts From: kittylovesbluehotmail.com Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2011 05:53:29 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

--_9e0a0ba4-b4bb-4bfb-9644-7274af852d07_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

The same thing has been happening to illustrated books. Dealers break their spines extract the illustrations and sell them for high prices as individual engravings. The books are thrown in the trash. The problem with this is that dealers don't know what is of scholarly interest. One example of this is when I went to a much-respected rare book dealer in the early 1990s and asked why he did not have in his huge collection of nineteenth-century writers books by women writers. This man promptly responded: "They weren't writing then." At one time we may have believed that but now the se books are valuable for study for artifacts of women's lives and for their beauty. Beautiful or not artifacts have their own value. Certainly old quilts may be deteriorating at a faster rate than some old books but my point is that not everyone knows what they're cutting.

Kitty > Cutting will still always shock us.

--_9e0a0ba4-b4bb-4bfb-9644-7274af852d07_--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting up old quilts From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2011 15:26:12 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

I have a trip around the world quilt that my mother-in-law made. The  only one she ever made and it is very nearly a rag it is so shattered. The quilt was given to me when she passed away because I'm the  quilt-lover in the family. Well ... you can guess where it is. It's  stored away. You can kick me off QHL for this, but I'm making mitten-Christmas  ornaments out of the fragments of that quilt that are still viable. I laid my grand-daughter's hand on a piece of paper for the pattern  (this is my mil's great-grandchild), and I am going to make a set for Every child, every grand-child, and every great-grandchild in the family  with documentation as to the source. And I think my beloved mother-in-law would be THRILLED. Her handi-work  is being treasured in a new way. She will be remembered every single year when those mitten ornaments are  hung on Christmas trees all over the U.S. Her legacy will be present with them.

I have cut up quilts that should have been kept in tact ... back in the  days of ignorance. I have also rescued significant (to me) quilt tops that were going to  cut up to make antique santas. IN fact, I still have those. Tumblers and triangles that are a virtual album of fabrics from the era  of madder and double pink. They will always be tops, not quilts ... and they have given me unending  hours of pleasure and insights into the textile history of the time. HOWEVER....those tops are a dime a dozen in the quilt collecting world  and not "important" historically in the usual sense of that word. With wonderful museums caring more and preserving our quilt history,  such tops as these would be of no interest to a museum. They would likely not be of much interest to most of the quilt  historians I know, either, to tell you the truth. So ... when I am gone ... if my kids decide to "Parse" the quilt tops  because they treasure them in a new way ... that's going to OK with me.

I didn't go to the web site to see the coats. I agree with the idea of documentation and appreciation. I agree with the idea that a commercial venture like this raises  different questions than what I'm doing with my mil's old quilt. But I do not believe that it is always wrong to cut up an old quilt.

And I hope you won't kick me off the QHL, but I love it here....

Stephanie Whitson

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting up old quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2011 17:21:01 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

I am currently in DC where I visited the Textile Museum yesterday. One  of the exhibits is entitled: Second Lives :The Age-Old Art of Recycling  Textiles. From the brochure description " this exhibition highlights the ways  people in various cultures have ingeniously repurposed worn but precious  fabrics to create beautiful new textile forms." One example was a  beautiful wall hanging was made from an old Dragon kimono - they  speculated the possible reasons: worn and threadbare in places,  inherited by someone not entitled to wear it, robes becoming obsolete  etc. One display discussed using a textile of any sort in a series of  ways in its lifetime: it could be folded and used to pad a chair etc  until, finally, when unable to serve any purpose it was used "as  kindling, completing the life cycle by returning to the earth as ashes." If you are in the DC area the steep walk up the hill (Dupont Circle  area) is worth it! The other exhibit was even more exciting to me -  textiles from central Africa....too hard to explain. I was wowed! Try  the website. http://www.textilemuseum.org/about/visitor.htm How different are these examples than repurposing a quilt? Jean

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting up old quilts From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2011 17:18:50 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 7

---1952832855-389931155-1321147130:72227 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Stephanie,Many years ago, my mother divided up a quilt made by her mothe r, with a block going to each of the grandchildren. I think I may have the  leftovers somewhere. ;) But the quilt's sashing and some of the blocks were shattered, so that it wasn't useable as a quilt any longer, and it was the only way to share out my grandmother's work to all of her grandchildren. S he also divided a SBS among her daughters, making wall hangings from the se ctions that were still good. We girls had certainly loved that one to piece s. Jocelyn________________________________ ---1952832855-389931155-1321147130:72227--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cutting up old quilts From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2011 19:42:01 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

This is a multipart message in MIME format.

------_NextPart_000_003F_01CCA173.2882BF30 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Well ... I take it back. I went to the site and watched the video and I sent this comment:

It is HORRIFYING to see someone who claims to respect other women's skill slice it up. The very fact that your "artist" realized she should "beg the forgiveness" of the quiltmaker says it all. It is one thing to repurpose a quilt that is mostly a rag. It is quite another to cut up the quilts that were featured on that video. They didn't deserve it, and the "artist" should be ashamed of herself. Her design is great and her sense of pattern is admirable. But if she wants quilt patterns and a vintage look, there are plenty of reproduction fabrics out there and plenty of way to create the parts that she wants. That New York Beauty took THOUSANDS of hours ... and she destroyed it in a few minutes. Shameful.

I don't think I'm being hypocritical after I said I was cutting up my mil's rag. That's NOT what's happening on that video.

Stephanie Whitson

------_NextPart_000_003F_01CCA173.2882BF30--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ebay - 1827 coverlet with woman's name From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2011 19:06:22 -0800 X-Message-Number: 9

Don't often see a woman's name on a coverlet!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Coverlet-Signed-Ann-Phillips-1827-Navy-Cream -Coverlet-Southfield-MI-/230696731355?_trksidp4340.m1374&_trkparmsalgo%3DP I.WATCH%26its%3DC%252BS%26itu%3DUCC%26otn%3D15%26ps%3D63%26clkid%3D415625190 9276888101#ht_1480wt_1398

Or this link

http://tinyurl.com/dyhjajh

No affiliation. Couldn't find her name in America's Quilts and Coverlets.

No affiliation.

Karen Alexander

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: woman's name on coverlet, crochet spreads From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2011 23:20:54 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

---1301562389-1579033811-1321168854:60870 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

HI all - probably Phillips was the name of the person for whom the coverlet was made, not the weaver of it. Thereare very few knownfemale weaver s of jacquard coverlets; have a look atthe book fromAbby Aldrich Rock efelller Museum/Williamsburg "Checklist of American Coverlet Weavers to lea rn about any. If I recall, the one on ebay was a red NYState coverlet woven by either Van Ness orA0A0A0 (oops, just had a senior, or maybe a Rick Perry, moment, can't recall the name of the other NYState weaver wh o did the same patriotic design.) Simpler overshot coverlets andblankets might have been woven by womenbut rarely signed or identified as to the weaver.  Also, here's an antique textile alert for a newmovie J. Edgar (about FBI 's Hoover)--no Depression era quilts, though that would have been appropria te. Instead, there are real period knit and crochet bedspreads, including a Martha Washington pattern onHoover's (very beloved it seems) mother 's bed; it resembles a Dresden Plate pattern with raised layered circular r epeat motifs.  L  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts ---1301562389-1579033811-1321168854:60870--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: cutting up old quilts, dismantling antique sewing machines.... From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 13 Nov 2011 06:40:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I personally have had a hard time when I have seen quilts that have been cut up. But, it depends (in my mind) on the condition and restorability of a quilt. I went into an antique shop a few years back and there were a few cut up quilt squares in frames, under glass. I loved them. The woman in the shop had said that the quilts were so bad in some places that nothing could be done to bring them back. Apparently mold/mildew had taken it's toll as well as some mice. But, there were still some very nice areas among the folds that she felt she wanted to preserve and enjoy. She had painfully taken the good quilted blocks and set them in frames, under glass and I truly appreciated what she did. I find no fault with her efforts and I even contemplated buying one of them. In another shop, I saw some Christmas stockings made up of old quilts and I wondered about them, but no one working there had any information about what kind of quilts had been used. They were nice, though, I have to admit. They had that worn, "homey" look that was really nice. But, in this case, I wondered about the condition of the quilts that were cut up as these didn't look truly worn as the ones under glass did. I kind of felt badly about the quilt used. As the old saying, "beauty is in the eye of the beholder" goes, I guess use of an old quilt is also the right of the beholder as well? As much as it offends some of us, I guess we have to understand. I only condone it if the quilt is not restorable and not historic in nature. If it were truly historic, then it shouldn't be cut, and how would some of these people truly know? Now, I do want to compare something here. I'm a collector of antique sewing machines. I have become so very offended when I have seen people take an old sewing machine head off a treadle base and make a table out of it. I have seen the wood toss and shiny polyurathane and new wood placed on top of something I would have cherished. I have seen old (beautiful to me, sadly) sewing machine heads made it into lamps. I have seen people paint over (Gosh, how awful it is to me...) a valuable antique sewing machine and make some form of "art" out of it. I have had to settle with myself and recognize that not everyone thinks and respects these machines as I do and their efforts are pleasing to themselves. The one Featherweight I saw that I actually liked is owned by someone well known in this group (let her identify herself if she wants to, otherwise she goes nameless here) is painted like an American Flag. It made my heart go "pitty patter", which is a saying I use when I see something in the sewing machine or quilting world that I love dearly. That machine was painted over and it was done so well and it is truly lovely. So, even I, can find some things like that acceptable. : )

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cutter Quilts From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Sun, 13 Nov 2011 11:45:08 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

Once upon a time there was a young quilter who loved to go to flea  markets and collect old blocks and quilts. One day she found a shabby  old quilt. It had been used to pack something with grease, the edges  were totally frayed and one end was ragged. It had a lot of names and  dates embroidered on it and, though not a very fancy pattern, some of  the embroidered flowers were unusual. So the quilter cut off the ragged  end but kept the pieces because they had names on them. She put wider  binding around the edges and used the quilt to tuck around pillows in a  sunny south facing window seat.

Ten years later, as the quilter grew in knowledge and joined AQSG she  learned about research, signature quilts and what the sun does to old  quilts. So she decided, with the encouragement of Nancy Hornback, to try  to find out something about the old quilt. She made a list of all the  names, showed the quilt to her quilt guild and put the names in the  newsletter. Within a week she had three confirming calls from people who  knew the quilt came from Lewis KS. Our quilter called the librarian in  Lewis who also recognized the names. The librarian arranged for the  quilter to meet with two other women in Lewis who had similar quilts.  She also shared a collection of Women's Club scrapbooks from the early  1900s through the 1950s, old school annuals, and the town's centennial  book and quilt.

Now our quilter has enough information to write an article for Blanket  Statements someday and tell you the rest of the story.

Not every quilt can be documented, but no one should cut a quilt until  an effort has been made to discover the history and the quilt has been  evaluated by historians. It is our responsibility to encourage every  quilter and crafter to come with us on these remarkably exciting  journeys of discovery.

Linda Laird Still in KS 'cause the weather's so nice

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cutting up old quilts-mea culpa From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Sun, 13 Nov 2011 15:33:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

--f46d043c7ccc4eeb3104b1a3aca3 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8

Hello all-Interesting discussion. I am liable to get hot under the collar here so please forgive me. Saw/read the news story about the 'designer' who cuts up old quilts. And on this one coming down squarely on the "Don't do it and don't support it-" side... with this cavet: if the old quilt is yours (your family, your property) you may do with it what you like. BUT, buying and cutting up someone else's old quilts, even if they're anonymous, feels to me like burning a book. I used to be a vintage quilt buyer/seller and have sold my share of cutter quilts. The people who want them must buy 1) cheaply and 2) cheaply. But, as their own tastes get more discriminating and sophisticated, they start placing orders for cutter quilts--"...I'll take something like this Tumbling Blocks but it needs to be in blues-" since their customers are dictating to them. When a frequent customer of mine started buying 5-6 quilts at a time but then telling me what she would/wouldn't buy in the future, I had a choice: continue to supply her scissors with fodder or stop the carnage now? I stopped selling to her. And she knew exactly what I was doing. Next meeting, I simply said, "I have nothing for you-" and stood my ground. She looked long and hard at me and walked away. I have never regretted the decision. Further on this subejct: I now see a lot of those teddy bears made in the 1980s from old quilts completely in tatters and thrown in the trash. Quilts are unique textile documents. Some are wonderful, strange, and artistically worthwhile. Some are only average. But is it up to us to decide? Someone needs to speak up for the old quilts. An earlier query was right on the money: if someone smashed 19th century folkart pottery to use for tiles or broke up Hepplewhite chairs to remake as wooden trivets and plaques, wouldn't people be horrified? Make no mistake: quilts, to the ignorant, are old blankets and not worthy of consideration or discussion. So why are you reading this list if you don't respect the art form? Again, if its yours, do what you like---free speech etc---but don't buy my grandmother's quilt (even if you didn't know her-) and scissor that quilt into tatters. Getting down off the soapbox now- Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--f46d043c7ccc4eeb3104b1a3aca3--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting up old quilts-mea culpa From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 13 Nov 2011 15:17:54 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Someone else made the point that if one needs pieces of quilts, one can  always buy the imports. What are the thoughts on cutting those up? My initial thought is that that isn't the same thing ... but what if it  encourages others who don't know the difference?

Steph Whitson

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting up old quilts-mea culpa From: Quilltraol.com Date: Sun, 13 Nov 2011 16:30:34 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 6

--part1_f2e5.692de40b.3bf190fa_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I wrote in my letter that if she liked the idea of using the quilts in her clothing, she should make her own reproductions and then cut those up. I think that would cure her of the idea.

Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/) _http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays_ (http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays) _http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery_ (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery)

In a message dated 11/13/2011 4:18:10 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, stephaniestephaniewhitson.com writes:

Someone else made the point that if one needs pieces of quilts, one can always buy the imports. What are the thoughts on cutting those up?

--part1_f2e5.692de40b.3bf190fa_boundary--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Cutting up old quilts-mea culpa From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Sun, 13 Nov 2011 18:55:01 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 7

---1952832855-730992232-1321239301:1632 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Pepper,I certainly agree with you, with one difference: I don't endorse  cutting up a quilt, even if it WERE made by your ancestors, unless it canno t be used as a quilt any longer due to damage, and making it into a wall ha nging, lap robe or framed blocks is the only way to continue to enjoy the g ood portions. My mother certainly wouldn't have taken scissors to either of those quilts if there had been a way to restore them. She could have kept  them intact, and I probably would have inherited them, and kept them intact , but eventually, there would be a generation to whom it was just a frayed  old quilt. Instead, fragments of those quilts are displayed as wall art in  the homes of the descendents of their makers, and surely they'll be inherit ed by the most quilt-loving grandchild of the original recipient. And I thi nk that honors the makers as much as keeping a quilt too frayed to use. Bec ause, after all, aren't our own ancestors as worthy of honor as any anonymo us maker of a quilt we stumble across in a flea market? Blood kinship, IMHO,  doesn't make it somehow OK to destroy their work.Jocelyn ________________________________ ---1952832855-730992232-1321239301:1632--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting up old quilts-mea culpa From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Sun, 13 Nov 2011 18:58:32 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 8

---1952832855-960251901-1321239512:46819 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Steph,Those who don't know the difference between antique and modern, wi ll certainly know the difference when they look at the price tag. :) I reme mber when I was starting my collection, and I bought a lot of stuff for und er $100. Those days are long gone...except at WalMart. Jocelyn

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Just discovered Judi Blossom quilts From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sun, 13 Nov 2011 22:05:07 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Stumbled across a Judi Blossom quilt today for the first time because I saw one on eBay. There was a tag on the quilt indicating it was a "manufactured" quilt, but this is not your run of the mill imported quilt. These are very high end quilts. Some of the crib quilts go for between $700 and $800. I guess I never saw these before because I don't get her catalogue? Anyone know how long has she been selling these high-end quilts? Anyone know where they are made?

http://tinyurl.com/6ons8mh

Karen in the Islands

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Just discovered Judi Blossom quilts From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 14 Nov 2011 02:20:02 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE70B4F587AE6F_F54_90551_webmail-d006.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"

Karen,

The name is Boisson and Judy used to buy from us at Oh Suzanna back in the 80s. I think she started her business by replicating some of her own collection. I purchased one of her first crib  quilts "Cowboy Mickey Mouse" for my brand new grandson in 1988. Her first crop came without labels and there was a probl em with the possibility of mistaking them for older quilts because they were done so well. Her next shipment came with her hea vily embroidered name on the back. I'm not sure how they are labeled now. 

If I remember correctly, she went to China to work on the quality of the fa bric, dyes and production before the first quilt was made. She also oversaw or personally designed each quilt, at least, in the last 80s. The workmanship on mine is very good but I haven't looked at one for several years. After the divorce, my  ex-DIL stored it in her mother's basement, which then flooded several years ago. It destroyed the quilts from my great-gran dmother I'd given her. She finally got tired of looking at a stained and grungy Mickie so she gave it back to me during my  last trip to Ohio. It smelled to bad, no one would get near it and DH thought I'd lost my mind for accepting it. Starting out as a worst case scenario, it turned out extremely well and will look very good over my grandson's first child's crib.  Once I get caught up on my email, I'll take a picture and post it. What I' ve written is from memory. Perhaps someone else is still close to Judy today.

Jan Thomas

know how long has she been selling these high-end quilts? Anyone know where they are made?

----------MB_8CE70B4F587AE6F_F54_90551_webmail-d006.sysops.aol.com--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting up old quilts-broadening the scope From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Mon, 14 Nov 2011 10:52:08 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I like Pepper's comment about the difference between someone doing what  they will with their own quilt or quilts -which would most likely be on  a one-time or limited basis and the idea of 'buying up' quilts for the  purpose of making something else out of them on a large scale and then  selling for profit....making money on them.... it IS horrifying and just  plain wrong to me... but we do live in a free society and I can only say  I wouldn't do it and I wouldn't support it by buying anything from them. .We on this list LOVE quilts but lots of the world just thinks of them  as blankets. I know they are not in the same category as clothing (to us  anyway) but I have bought shirts and jeans at rummage sales and cut them  up...perfectly nice, usable as shirts and pants to someone.... and I  have felt sort of strange about it even but I did it. I have unraveled  old wool sweaters to use the yarn for something else - sweaters I made  myself....and even thought - hmmm. Maybe I should just donate it to  someone who will wear it as a sweater but I didn't. And think of all the other examples of things that are just a shame to  some of us...like painting beautiful natural woodwork, old dressers (  I've both stripped and painted them!) or fern stands and end tables. I  bet some of you have done that... or......or spray painting a natural  brick fireplace white. AARGH These things, too, are someone's work of  art if you will. It really is a subject that has many sides and one which we can only  say "I wouldn't do that to a quilt." and take any opportunity that comes  along to help others think about what they are doing before doing it. I  have had clients who show me old family quilts and say they want to cut  it in fourths or whatever to give each grandchild etc and I have an  opportunity to help them think this through. Do the intended recipients  want this? Will they appreciate it or just stick that somewhere and now  you have a ruined original piece and 4 unwanted sections! This in no way condones what started the discussion but these other  examples came to mind and I think they are related. Jean

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 13, 2011 From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Mon, 14 Nov 2011 08:22:25 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

--part1_113d4.78fb9983.3bf27010_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Regarding cutting up quilts.

Back in the 80's when there were still a lot of very good quilts available, I would buy old tattered quilts and have throw pillows made from them. I was able to sell each pillow for more than I could sell the tattered quilt for, if I could sell it at all.

At some point I started looking at perfectly good quilts and thinking of how much more money I could make by making pillows from them rather than selling them whole. It was sad but true. I finally stopped the pillow thing all together and glad I did.

However, not all quilts are treasures. Yes, someone spent hours making them and that someone is somebody's grandmother or great aunt etc. etc. but if it is not a treasure and it is tattered and worn, I personally don't see the harm in turning it into something useful and presentable rather than adding it to a landfill or used to sit on at an outdoor music concert...

Someone mentioned breaking up pottery to use as tiles and Hepplewhite chairs to use as trivets. Well, the truth is that not all pottery is valuable and not all Hepplewhite chairs are valuable either. I see lots of these things at auctions that nobody wants because of the condition. Again, isn't it better to recycle these into something useful rather than filling up our landfills with them. I think so Regards,

Darwin D. Bearley --part1_113d4.78fb9983.3bf27010_boundary--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: art Beats answer to my "outraged letter" From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 14 Nov 2011 15:04:48 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multipart message in MIME format.

------_NextPart_000_0019_01CCA2DE.C22780F0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Here92s the answer I just got (sent to Stephanie Whitson)

 

Thank you for writing 8B we appreciate hearing from our viewers.  WeB9re sorry you found the story on Joanne KliejunaB9s quilt clothing upsetting;  perhaps you missed the portion where she stated she ONLY uses quilts that are so badly worn or damaged or stained that they canB9t be used a quilts  anymore. Though we might wish it, all quilts do not get saved and catalogued.  Rather than have them languish in the attic or get thrown out, she chooses to  give them a new life by mixing the usable parts of the quilt with new fabric.

Art can be controversial. Although to some cutting an old quilt is never acceptable, we feel that Joanne honors these womenB9s work, and gives  their craft modern use, with her own artistry.

Thank you for watching Art Beat.

 

S

 

------_NextPart_000_0019_01CCA2DE.C22780F0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Jean Carlton's post From: kmoore81austin.rr.com Date: Mon, 14 Nov 2011 10:21:32 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------_NextPart_000_003B_01CCA2B7.2E1191C0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Jean, over the last 20-ish years I have gone to D.C. every January with my husband to an international meeting he attended. Every time I was there I made a trip to the Textile Museum. ItE28099s a real treasure. They always have interesting exhibits. Nowhere else like it for textiles and textile history. And, their gift shop is full of goodies and good books...a great place to shop for gifts.

I recommend a visit to anyone interested in textiles.

Thanks for your post.

Kathy Moore now in Round Rock, Texas

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: art Beats answer to my "outraged letter" From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 14 Nov 2011 17:42:42 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 7

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE7135DAED1151_4C0_D55A9_webmail-d079.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"

Stephanie and list,

I don't have a problem with preserving parts of badly damaged quilts for fa mily or others. What I do have a problem with is who decides which quilts, linens or laces to cu t and how they know that specific textile has NO relevance to women's or any history. These are my  responses to the answer they sent you and I use the word quilt to 'cover' all old textiles. (That  New York Beauty made me cringe.)

"perhaps you missed the portion where she stated she ONLY uses quilts that  are so badly worn or damaged or stained that they can't be used as quilts anymore."

Quilts are not just bedcovers. They are documents of personal history and  can be read, stained, damaged and worn, as easily as an old photograph or diary in the s ame condition. Is this artist trained in how to read quilts. Anonymously made or not, doe s she understand the historic significance of what she is cutting? Perhaps if she did, she'd be the one taking it to the museum for documentation instead of keeping it to cut.

"Art can be controversial. Although to some cutting up an old quilt is nev er acceptable, we feel that Joanne honors these women's work, and gives their craft modern use, with her own a rtistry." 

So, which is it, art or craft. Or, is it craft before she cuts it and art a fterward. That in itself exposes a regard for the modern artist that is not given to the unkn own quilter, the ultimate lack of honor.

If she truly wanted to honor the quilter's work, she would document the pie ce herself, re-create it (thus honoring the amount of work), and then cut her  newly made quilt. It would certainly last longer and think of what a great book  or fashion show that would make. The original with the new inspiration. I would love to see the artist's reaction to witnessing one of her creations recycled and given "new life" as a dog bed in a few years.

Perhaps this organization and this 'artist' would benefit from witnessing s everal of the documentation days. There they could witness a real honoring of the or iginal quiltmaker. 

Jan Thomas

 

----------MB_8CE7135DAED1151_4C0_D55A9_webmail-d079.sysops.aol.com--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: art Beats answer to my "outraged letter" From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 14 Nov 2011 19:15:18 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

The comment about dog beds reminded me of something years ago. When my kids were young, part of our teaching included a home-based business. We grew organic produce and had a regular spot at a farmer's market about 20 miles away. this was early on in my love of old quilts, but one Saturday morning, I was horrified to see a quilt in reasonably good condition being used as "bedding" for puppies for sale. I offered to buy the quilt. The owner's reply: "Oh, my grandmother made that. I could never sell it."

Stephanie Whitson (and it was the new York Beauty that killed me, too)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: interesting quilt coing to auction From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 15:10:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------_NextPart_000_0216_01CCA3A8.ABDAFAF0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/crewel-embroidered-linen-quilt,-worked-by -betsy-205-c-9efc077592

The picture isn't very good, unfortunately.

Candace Perry

------_NextPart_000_0216_01CCA3A8.ABDAFAF0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: and another interesting quilt From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 15:16:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------_NextPart_000_021D_01CCA3A9.8D842530 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

You may want to look at the entire listing for this auction - it's the upcoming Doyle's auction, and there are numerous quilts - some mundane but several terrific ones!

http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/broderie-perse-commemorative-applique-qui lt-271-c-a76bcc496b

------_NextPart_000_021D_01CCA3A9.8D842530--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Just discovered Judi Blossom quilts From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 16:31:30 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Had to laugh when I saw how I had spelled Judi's last name. Blossom is the name of our organic grocery store here on the island. I had my To Do List on my mind as I was typing my QHL post. So much for not re-reading before I hit the SEND button!

But speaking of Judi Boisson, there is certainly a good story there that needs research and telling some day. I have heard snippets of other merchants who continue to send quilt-teaching teams overseas to train needlewomen in South East Asia how to make high quality American-looking quilts to sell in the USA. They do not try to pass them as American-made, but they are high quality and cheaper than American made, of course, because the labor is cheaper.

Jan, I look forward to seeing your photo of Judi's Cowboy Mickey Mouse quilt. As pervasive as the Disney images have been for over 70 years, I am always surprised at how few Disney-inspired quilts I actually see as I browse eBay.

Karen in the Islands

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Zoot suit sets wold auction record From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 19:47:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

See the Story at the Karen August Web site.

https://app.e2ma.net/app/view:CampaignPublic/id:1400707.7344241079/rid:ba0979ea596cef84229e5715d0c63d14 or

http://tinyurl.com/7agct4z

Judy Grow

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judi Boisson's stuff From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 20:35:54 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5

--944242502-863414098-1321418154:78761 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Judi has beenmaking her quiltsin China since the 1980s. She has a cat alog I'm sure, if she is still producing them. She also made repro crochet  'Amish' rugs, sheets, pillows, etc.. They were marketed here and in Europe. And they were way pricier than any other repro quilts, sold in the mid to  higherhundreds. Having seen many of hers, I would say the quality of the cotton, workmanship,designs and coloration leave other reproquilts i n the dust.Judi's 'Amish' quilts have made their way into many a midwest auction, havinghad their identifying embroideredJudi Boisson signa ture and date easilyremoved fromthe corner, and sold to unsuspecting  buyers as vintage Amish (a little stone washing, and voila--vintage). So ca veat emptor, but at least it's a quality product.  Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Judy Boisson quilts From: BunJordan <bunjordaaol.com> Date: Wed, 16 Nov 2011 07:59:02 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE7276A5D46168_85C_177A9B_Webmail-m110.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"

Another note about Judy Boisson's quilts. Several years ago she won a laws uit against the Chinese company that copied her designs. I believe it was r eported in Quilters Newsletter, but you can also read about it here.

http://www.allbusiness.com/marketing-advertising/segmentation-targeting/110 7196-1.html And I think the dearth of Disney designs on quilts is because they closely  guard their copyrighted images.

Bunnie www.bunniejordan.com

 

 

-----Original Message----- From: Quilt History List digest <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> To: qhl digest recipients <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Wed, Nov 16, 2011 12:23 am Subject: qhl digest: November 15, 2011

QHL Digest for Tuesday, November 15, 2011.

1. interesting quilt coing to auction 2. and another interesting quilt 3. Re: Just discovered Judi Blossom quilts 4. Zoot suit sets wold auction record 5. Judi Boisson's stuff

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: interesting quilt coing to auction From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 15:10:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------3D_NextPart_000_0216_01CCA3A8.ABDAFAF0 Content-Type: text/plain; 09charset3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/crewel-embroidered-linen-quilt,-worked-b y -betsy-205-c-9efc077592

 

The picture isn't very good, unfortunately.

Candace Perry

------3D_NextPart_000_0216_01CCA3A8.ABDAFAF0--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: and another interesting quilt From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 15:16:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------3D_NextPart_000_021D_01CCA3A9.8D842530 Content-Type: text/plain; 09charset3D"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

You may want to look at the entire listing for this auction - it's the upcoming Doyle's auction, and there are numerous quilts - some mundane but several terrific ones!

http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/broderie-perse-commemorative-applique-qu i lt-271-c-a76bcc496b

------3D_NextPart_000_021D_01CCA3A9.8D842530--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Just discovered Judi Blossom quilts From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 16:31:30 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Had to laugh when I saw how I had spelled Judi's last name. Blossom is the name of our organic grocery store here on the island. I had my To Do List on my mind as I was typing my QHL post. So much for not re-reading before I hit the SEND button!

But speaking of Judi Boisson, there is certainly a good story there that needs research and telling some day. I have heard snippets of other merchants who continue to send quilt-teaching teams overseas to train needlewomen in South East Asia how to make high quality American-looking quilts to sell in the USA. They do not try to pass them as American-made, but they are high quality and cheaper than American made, of course, becaus e the labor is cheaper.

Jan, I look forward to seeing your photo of Judi's Cowboy Mickey Mouse quilt. As pervasive as the Disney images have been for over 70 years, I am always surprised at how few Disney-inspired quilts I actually see as I browse eBay.

Karen in the Islands

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Zoot suit sets wold auction record From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 19:47:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

See the Story at the Karen August Web site.

https://app.e2ma.net/app/view:CampaignPublic/id:1400707.7344241079/rid:ba09 79ea596cef84229e5715d0c63d14 or

http://tinyurl.com/7agct4z

Judy Grow

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judi Boisson's stuff From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2011 20:35:54 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5

--944242502-863414098-13214181543D:78761 Content-Type: text/plain; charset3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Judi has been3DA0making her quilts3DA0in China since the 1980s. She has a cat3D alog I'm sure, if she is still producing them. She also made repro crochet  3D 'Amish' rugs, sheets, pillows, etc.. They were marketed here and in Europe. 3D And they were way pricier than any other repro quilts, sold in the mid to  3D higher3DA0hundreds. Having seen many of hers, I would say the quality of t he3D cotton, workmanship,3DA0designs and coloration leave other repro3DA0quil ts i3D n the dust.3DA0Judi's 'Amish' quilts have made their way into many a midwe st3D 3DA0auction, having3DA0had their identifying embroidered3DA0Judi Boisson signa3D ture and date easily3DA0removed from3DA0the corner, and sold to unsuspect ing 3D buyers as vintage Amish (a little stone washing, and voila--vintage). So ca 3D veat emptor, but at least it's a quality product. 3DA0 Laura

Laura Fisher at

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: American Fire Lily From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com> Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2011 21:12:59 +0000 (GMT) X-Message-Number: 1

--0-450969935-1321996379:68853 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

An Ohio quilt I'm researching features blocks which I'd usually describe as 'North Carolina Lily' butwhich was described to me once as 'American Fi re Lily'? Anyone heard of that name? And if so, what pattern did it it rela te to?ThanksCeliaCelia EddyThe Brown HouseFleming Plac eMaryportCumbria CA15 6ESTel: 01900 814959 --0-450969935-1321996379:68853--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Storytelling/quiltmaking From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2011 15:27:28 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Jocelyn wrote: "Storytelling is not just Southern...it's related to poverty and lack of leisure time the world over. If you're rich, you jet off somewhere when you're bored. If you're poor... you make your own entertainment. "

Jocelyn, I did not mean to suggest that storytelling was unique to the American South. It is but one of a cluster of associated traits believed to account for the literary renascence of the twentieth century and to identify the culture in which that phenomenon grew.

I take exception, however, to the claim that storytelling is causally related to poverty and the lack of leisure.

In fact, I believe that it is leisure that makes storytelling possible, that it creates the environment congenial to it. That is also the argument of a host of literary-social critics from T.S. Eliot onward.

Eliot and others have argued that the very nature of industrial society tended to preclude leisure for most people engaged in its activities. And the post-industrial, technology-driven world seems to have the same effect, creating frenzied activity that quakes at silence. We dare not be alone without our music. It goes with us when we walk or drive, driving out thought and meditative thought. And we are an affluent society.

What is generally understood as conversation---the slow-paced, ruminative consideration of events and experience---finds no table set for it at McDonalds. Exhausted by a day of superficial talk, folks get their "conversational" fix vicariously by watching television programming like the Charlie Rose Show or perhaps C-Span on weekends. Consider the irony: watching other people talk.

Storytelling tends to take place in a society that puts a premium on leisure, conversation, and on narrative as a way of understanding experience, regardless of that group's economic standing. Such a culture makes a place for this activity. It requires an appreciation for the spoken word, the art of talking. And it assumes that history or past experiences afford valuable knowledge and explanations of things one doesn't understand in the present.

It might take place while shelling peas or piecing a quilt, but the chances are that those who participate in these activities regard them as social, not work, activities. They give busy fingers something mechanical to do while the mind is occupied in discussion.

I grew up in a world where people made time for that kind of leisure. Strong vestiges of that preference remain. Stories were ruminative: one considered various reasons for an action---why would someone behave as Beatrice Miller behaves? In the not-so-far-gone South, children grew up thinking Job, Solomon, Jonathan, and David were family members, so often were their stories brought in to help define or understand some question.

And while storytelling might flourish in such a social setting, it need not. Some groups seem less inclined to talk or narrative. I recall (see the impulse in my thought?) a family that lived in our neighborhood briefly during the Korean War. They were from Vermont and New Hampshire and their parents back home were dairy farmers. My mother would invite the wife over for coffee. None of the usual conversational ploys worked with this young woman. Down here, "Tell me about your family" is a sure-fire conversation starter. Somewhere in the mix will be a good story. Not so with her quiet guest. Long periods of silence followed terse replies or short-answer questions put forward by the guest. My sister and I laughed our heads off when our mother would describe these encounters, for she inevitably ended by saying, "I want to make her comfortable. I know she's alone down here. But I'm telling you, her silence just shatters my nerves!"

Then we would all laugh, imagining the non-talkative young woman returning to her house and putting a pillow over her head, soaking in the comfortable silence, while two houses down my mother dripped coffee to sooth her shattered nerves.

I submit that storytelling as a way of understanding is more important to some groups than to others, regardless of economic status. Traditional groups, poor or rich, cultivate it to establish communal memory, which then becomes part of the pool of stories by which members understand and preserve their group identity. Like metaphor, it becomes a way of thinking.

In the American South, storytelling---memory telling---was as common in conversation as scrap quilts were common on beds. Scrap quilts were where pasts and present met. My personal experience suggests this preference for scrap quilts lay in their preservation of memories. I've spent long afternoons listening to a grandmother point out the various pieces of a scrap quilt and telling the stories that grow out of them. I've made scrap quilts in order to preserve stories. I don't know if that is special to this region or not. But I'm willing to bet it is not linked to poverty, but to a traditional society, one that values history, both personal and group.

My general point was that quilts made by Southern whites might have a lot more in common with those made by African-Americans than is currently recognized, that we should remain open to that possibility.

Gaye Ingram

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: American Fire Lily From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 08:33:42 +1100 X-Message-Number: 3

The Fire Lily/North Carolina Lily block can be found in Blockbase with several names and references, number 765.4.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Northern storytelling... From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2011 14:47:44 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

---1759148784-1655136357-1322002064:47352 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Ahem...lest anyone think a New Englander does not care for a good story...h ere is one from Christopher Kimball sent in one of his "Letters from from V ermont':

" When they sit down to noon dinner, they just eat; they don't talk and  eat. They spend a lot of time sitting around not saying anything, which, of course, reminds me of a story. Three local farmers were sitting on t he front steps of the country store when approached by an out-of-towner. He tried to start a conversation but was notably unsuccessful-their lip s were sealed. Finally the visitor, slightly irritated, inquired, "Is  there a law in this town against talking?" One of the farmers finally  looked up and said, "No, there is no law in this town against talking.  But we aim to keep our mouths shut unless we're damn sure we can improve  on the silence!"

It just don't take so many words.A0

In all good humor, hoping you all have a lovely, newsy, chatty Thanksgiving with time for all of your best pie, coffee and favorite yarns. Fondly, A0 Susan

---1759148784-1655136357-1322002064:47352--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: American Fire Lily From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2011 17:44:08 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Celia,

I'm not sure about the North Carolina Lily, whether it is drawn from a spec ific plant.

But the term "Fire Lily" is used informally for several different bulbs. Al l, however, have blooms that face upward, have 6 tepals, and are red-orange , depending on soil. Some have "freckles" like Tiger Lilies.

They grow wild and Wm Bartram collected some in mid-18th century. I think  they are called fire lilies because their seed is germinated by fire. Grass land fires were fairly common in areas where these grow.

This is what The Old House Gardens, which propagates and sells old bulbs, s ays:"Lilium bulbiferum A European wildflower, it appeared in the earliest h erbals, was painted by the Dutch masters, and was offered in U.S. catalogs  by 1830. In Germany itE28099s known as E2809Cfire lily,E2809D and  in Northern Ireland its rich orange color has made it a special favorite. U p-facing, cupped, mid-summer flowers. 3-4E28099, zones 4-7S/9WC, Holland ."

Gaye ---- C\

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Storytelling/quiltmaking From: Gloria Hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2011 16:06:18 -0900 (AKST) X-Message-Number: 6

I believe it's important to also remember that literacy in the general population is a recent thing. One hundred years ago, my grandparents barely had a second grade education. Before that, no education could be expected for the masses.

In other societies, such as Alaskan Native, storytelling for languages which weren't written down was the way to convey knowledge and skills.

Story telling is part of all cultures, is it not? Through song, dance and art.

Gloria Hanrahan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Storytelling/quiltmaking From: Hiranya <nomad0101gmail.com> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 15:10:14 +1100 X-Message-Number: 7

--000e0ce03bb8cdc61904b25f1844 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1

Dear Gaye

What you said resonates with me:

"...the post-industrial, technology-driven world seems to have the same effect, > creating frenzied activity that quakes at silence. We dare not be alone > without our music. It goes with us when we walk or drive, driving out > thought and meditative thought. > What is generally understood as conversation---the slow-paced, ruminative > consideration of events and experience---finds no table set for it at McDonalds.

Though living in Australia I originally hail from Ceylon or Sri Lanka as it is called now. The Sinhalese were very "British" in my youth and the old songs around the piano and the stories over pre dinner drinks and during dinner etc was so common. I have wonderful memories of my childhood listening to wise old tales, laughing at yarns, imagining in vivid colours of sights seen.

These days I feel a great sadness and disquiet as I serve dinner and my daughter Anika invariably will be eating and communicating via iPhone with her friends on Facebook etc, whilst my husband and I try to do our best to draw her into conversation. Then we actually end up having conflict as I insist on the phone being left in the bedroom or at least out of the room. The rest of the meal is hurriedly gobbled down with a few words here and then and she asks to be excused. As a child I remember the wonderful times we had over a meal, or in the car on a drive somewhere just to enjoy nature. We would sing and chat along the way, however I have observed when I took Anika and her friends out-all three heads were bent over their mobile phones and I might as well have gone on my own-as I was very much on my own. No interest in making memories at all, no interest in the vivid colours of the scenery besides a glance up when I insisted on them looking.

I think our value system comes into play as well. Where does the idea of "family" and "family history" fit into all this? Many do not even consider the concept of making happy memories, by just spending time together. Instead a computer game or chatting online is way more valued. I guess their memories will be all Online and I just hope that what with all the software changes, that there will be someway of preserving their history for their future generations..........

Good grief....I sound like my elders! :( Scary indeed!!

Happy Thanksgiving to you all, Hiranya : >

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: American Fire Lily From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 11:24:51 +0000 (GMT) X-Message-Number: 1

Of course - I should have looked in Blockbase first! But thanks, Janet, for reminding me.Interestingly, the version under that name is the same as the one in the quilt I'm concerned with.And thanks, too, to Gaye - a  mine of information as ever! Being a gardener, I like nothing more than get ting botanical chapter and verse about plant names connected with quilt pat terns. This one is particularly interesting. Because the quilt I'm research ing is in Guernsey in the British channel Islands, I'd already nick-named i t 'The Guernsey Lily' when, to my delight, I discovered that there really I S a Guernsey Lily - Nerine sarniensis.CeliaCelia EddyT he Brown HouseFleming PlaceMaryportCumbria CA15 6ESTel: 01900 8 14959_

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Story quilts From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 09:46:13 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

--_f29bdbd8-f986-4cfd-9e07-e3f7288b5ad0_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I read this latest discussion about storytelling with great interest. Gaye even mentioned shelling peas and I laughed out loud with recognition.  As a child there was no conversation more enlightening than that overhea rd while shelling peas. The peas 'plinked' into large dented metal pans grownup fingers flying butts sitting on a squeaky metal glider on the w ooden porch of a traditional Cracker shack. When the conversation got part icularly dicey my cousin and I would put our heads down over our pans and sneak knowing glances at each other as a signal that we were going to  giggle and snort over the good stuff later - later usually meaning while we walked the farm carrying tobacco sticks opening barn doors in an att empt to find a rat to whack. I could go on and on......but that would be a story.  You know it might be interesting to look at the extant quilts that we wo uld agree as being 'story' quilts and determine the place of origin.I make  story quilts. I am quintessentially Southern. I'm just sayin'. 

Teddy Pruett

 

www.teddypruett.com Art is the only way to run away without leaving home. -Twyla Tharp

 

--_f29bdbd8-f986-4cfd-9e07-e3f7288b5ad0_--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Storytelling From: golden.bcverizon.net Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 07:54:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I have been enjoying reading the posts on storytelling, and can't resist mentioning my current "sewing book", which I'm listening to from Audible. This is only quilt related because it is the backdrop of the slow process of sewing my current project, a Pickle Dish quilt together. It's called Ireland, by Frank Delaney. It's the story of an itinerant storyteller and the myths/histories/stories he tells. It is a wonderful example of oral tradition and a culture which values its stories! Usually with a glass of whiskey, according to the author.Betsy Golden

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: So. Calif Quilt Study Group From: "Gale Slagle" <glslagcox.net> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 10:41:51 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

The Southern California Quilt Study Group "Repiecers" has a new website address.

Cox no longer offers personal web space so Repiecers has moved to a real domain, etc.

our new URL / Domain name is

www.repiecers.org

Come visit if you are in the So. Calif. area.

Gale

--------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: story-telling. From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 14:19:54 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5

---1130813930-729445268-1322086794:56554 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I do not believe this discussion is appropriatefor a quilt chat line; an d, frankly, some of the comment come close toupsetting to me.  Please discuss quilts. best, Don Beld ---1130813930-729445268-1322086794:56554--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: contact information From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 19:50:01 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

I just learned from a more or less reliable friend who is on this list that I am not getting private messages at this email address.

I will talk with SUDDENLINK yet once more about the problem to try to resolve it. Reviewing my mail, it seems that qhl messages are about all I am receiving here.

Meanwhile, please know I've not intentionally failed to respond to anyone. Maybe Facebook message?

Suddenlinked again, Gaye Ingram

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: story-telling and Thanksgiving From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 17:57:16 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 7

Don was kidding, of course. Quiltmaking and storytelling are inexorably intertwined through the quilting bee, if nothing else.

Thursday is the American day of Thanksgiving, a day in which we gather with friends and family to share traditions and memories. Yes, I know some families don't celebrate Thanksgiving as such - but it really doesn't matter. It's the gathering, the making and sharing of memories that is important. Who *doesn't* have a funny family dinner story to tell?

To me, quilts are part of the story. The quilts I have made evoke memories of what was going on at the time. The antique quilts I own remind me of the life and times of the person who made it. And make me grateful for the blessings that I have now:-))

For those of you celebrating Thanksgiving tomorrow or later this week, I wish you happy times and funny stories!

Kris (list mom)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: story tellinig over the quilting frame From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 02:00:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Below I quote from a post I wrote to the QHL list back on 7/21/2007.

"Though we can't recognize many of our correspondant's faces we know their written voices through this on-line quilting bee. And like women around a literal quilting frame we sometimes go off on tangents, the better to know each other."

Judy Grow

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Orange Spots on Quilts From: "Cathy Hooley" <cathygoosetracks.com> Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 11:18:24 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

------_20111124111824000000_84793 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

What causes the little orange spots on old quilts? I have an old appliq ued quilt with a white background that I was going to put out for Thanksgiv ing and there are some areas that are fine, and other areas that the white  fabric is covered with little orange spots. I don't remember it having the spots before. It was stored folded on a shelf. Can the spots be removed w ithout damaging the rest of the quilt? Thank you Cathy Hooley Goose Tracks Quilts[http://www.goosetracks.com/] www.goosetracks.com  ------_20111124111824000000_84793--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Orange Spots on Quilts From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 11:12:59 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

Cathy,To paraphrase Yoda, 'When so old you are, dark spots you have too, hmm?' :)Seriously, I don't worry about it. Anyone who comments, gets to ld that it's just a sign of aging. I don't know of any way to take it out t hat is 100% safe. I'd rather have the little age spots than a frayed-away h ole.Jocelyn

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Orange Spots on Quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 20:48:00 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

The only way to evaluate it properly is to see it in person but I think  it's safe to say that they can't be removed without affecting the rest  of the piece - one way or the other. Dark fleck-y marks can be from the  'trash' in the cotton batting...little bits of stems etc that are not  combed out - You say orange... or if stored on a shelf made of wood  that could have caused the spots where it touched the wood and would  explain why it is in some places and not others. Someone could have  'splashed' something on it....too many possibilities. It could still be displayed with the worst areas hidden by folding. I'd  consult someone who lives near you that could examine it in person and  advise you. Try AQS or PAAQT for an appraiser. Jean

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: story-telling From: maureenbooksandoldlace.com Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 11:40:29 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

There was no quilt tradition in my east coat, immigrant family and when we moved to Alabama, I was taken with the story telling and civility of those I met. There I learned of the Freedom Quilting Bee and the Gee's Bend quilts. Ten years later we moved to northeastern Nebraska and I happened on the Wayne Quilting Ladies who quilted at the senior center. I threaded their needles for five years, listening to stories of small town, rural living, farming, and the great prairie. Snorts and snickers from these women, telling tales of generations of families married to the land, and me - all the while watching their careful fingers.

Here's my story of these wonderful women - a period of my life when time stood still. http://booksandoldlace.com/quilting/thequiltingladies.htm

Maureen in southern oregon. Tasty turkey in the oven; later in our tummies.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Orange spots on quilt From: "Cathy Hooley" <cathygoosetracks.com> Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 10:11:55 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks for the info - now that I look at the quilt more closely, it looks l ike the spots may be from sitting on a wooden shelf at one time. Ther e is a large square area with the spots, as well as spots around some of th e edges where it may have touched the wood. They must have been on th e quilt when I got it and I forgot - a very common occurrence around here l ately! I folded it so the spots don't show and draped it over the bac k of a rocking chair and it looks fine. Thanks again!Cathy Hool eyGoose Tracks Quiltswww.goosetracks.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Spotty quilts From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 09:43:13 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I leave my quilts spread on spare beds in stacks of several per bed. I  leave a ceiling fan on low year round in each room. We don't heat or  cool the upstairs but some "leaks" up so it doesn't usually get to hot  or cold. We live in KS and the humidity fluctuates some. I found black  spots two years ago in the middle of a stack on a 30s embroidered summer  spread. It looked like mold and just brushed off. This summer I found a  big spot on muslin used to set a quilt that my Mother made in the 80s  that is probably a spill. Would I do better to fold and stack them in a  part of the house that is heated and cooled year round? Could it be the  basement which I don't think has a humidity problem? Would placing a  cotton sheet between each quilt in the stacks help?

Linda Laird Still in KS, sigh!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: story-telling From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2011 6:27:56 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Maureen, I distinguish between the overtly narrative quilts and quilts as memory preservers/story tellers in that the first use different means, generally. But I have grown interested in whether most quilts are deliberate acts of memory. I think in the South at an earlier time, the scrap quilts might have been. Certainly many of the bi-centennial quilts were. gaye Ingram

-

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: hand quilters From: Jan Drechsler <quiltdocgmail.com> Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2011 10:04:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Maureen Wrote:

Here's my story of these wonderful women - a period of my life when time stood still. http://booksandoldlace.com/quilting/thequiltingladies.htm

Maureen, does this group still carry on the hand quilting in the same  tradition? It is a great history and a follow-up story is begging to be  told!

Jan Drechsler Guilford, VT

--Apple-Mail-46-415289392--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The "real" code From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2011 08:31:36 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

I found this fascinating:

http://books.google.com/books?idq5Y9AAAAcAAJ&printsecfrontcover&dqamerican+slave+code+in+theory+and+practice#vonepage&qamerican%20slave%20code%20in%20theory%20and%20practice&ffalse

Christine Thresh

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: need name of quilt pattern From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2011 11:35:39 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

---770455430-1460803571-1322422539:99455 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi all - I wonder if there is an official name for the hexagons quilt, a Gr andmother''s Flower Garden variation, that I am sending to Japan for the To kyo Quilt Festival Exhibition. It has pieced flowers baskets of hexagons arranged with the handles pointing toward the center of the composition, e ach segmentframed with a solid colorrow of hexagons outlining thed iamond shape that makes the arms of a single huge six point star. I will tr y to posa picture on eboard (I hope) and it is on my site. I presume thi s was a published pattern. Typically I have seen the flower baskets of hexa gons arranged across a quilt surface in asymmetrical rows, this is the only six point star configuration I have seen, but I presume there must have be en others. thanks

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts ---770455430-1460803571-1322422539:99455--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: hand quilters (was story-telling) From: maureenbooksandoldlace.com Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2011 12:00:32 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Jan, The Wayne Quilting Ladies are still hand quilting for others. It's a daily activity at the Wayne Senior Center and a great fundraiser supporting the elderly population of this rural Northeast Nebraska town. Penny Volbracht is the coordinator now and can be reached at seniorcentercityofwayne.org, 410 Pearl Street in Wayne, Nebraska and by phone at (402) 375-1460.

Maureen in Southern Oregon Where the afternoon sun is burning off the morning fog And a six point buck is grazing outside my window.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re:9 From: miss luna moth <misslunamothmsn.com> Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2011 12:57:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

--_beb945ba-1f18-411b-a0a3-50e9a8f9955f_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I truly want you to be happy! I can help you to solve your problem!.. http: //drapdor.fr/yahoo.com.php?tayahooID3D59ul2 

--_beb945ba-1f18-411b-a0a3-50e9a8f9955f_--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Turkey Quilt From: vaughn8047msn.com Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2011 20:21:26 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

--_e830a2ff-ff19-436c-82c3-b6f40c835b65_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Jan Thomas et al..... I am sorry to say I cannot locate the turkey quilt. Now that you've asked about it Jan I can't remember the last time I saw it and that's not a good thing. I am actually missing 2 quilts. Am very puzzled about where they could be. I wouldn't have given the turkey quilt to anyone it wouldn't have meant anything to anyone but me. I just don't know. I'm pretty crushed. The other grandmother's fan that I am missing is the one quilt that I completed the whole thing piecing applique quilting and binding... I'm hoping it's at my sons..... Sorry not to be able to share this quilt with you all. It was quite cute! I don't think I even have it photographed.....My loss on all fronts.

Jessica vaughn8047msn.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: DuMont's Pride From: donbeldpacbell.net Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2011 16:33:58 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

---1130813930-1691683982-1322526838:81987 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Everyone. Hope you all had a wonderful and safe Thanksgiving. Thanks to Kris for explaining my weird sense of humor on my comment last week. I should know by now that not everyone understands I am just poking fun. Anyway, question on a pattern.

I have recently come across a pattern named DuMont's Pride. It is one of those late 1800's early 1900's magazine patterns.

But I have no idea who DuMont is and what he/she has to be proud about.

Nothing on my search engine makes any sense.

Does anyone have any suggestions.

(By the way--always feel free to poke fun at me--I never take offense and enjoy a good laugh best, Don ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re spam on site From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2011 08:14:59 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

--944242502-1057954239-1322583299:5882 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Tech question -- does the spam from miss luna moth 9 promising she "can mak e me happy and solve my problems" mean that now this is a virus that has ca ptured all our emails and will go out to our mailing lists? Is there a reme dy or preventive measure to take (other than spam and virusprotectors al ready on my computer)? I ask because recently I have received emails from p eople I know, on my list, but obviously hacked and spammed to their lists.  What to do?  .Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --944242502-1057954239-1322583299:5882--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: re spam on site From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2011 11:48:25 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I have received this e-mail and many others like it and never associated it with any specific email loops in which I participate. I just delete without a second thought. Maybe I should be having thoughts.....????? Stephanie Whitson

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Turkey Quilt From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2011 13:31:07 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE7CDC31655567_1370_16E07A_webmail-d018.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"

Jessica,

I hope it is at your son's house. I didn't have a chance to examine it clo sely but it looked vintage to me, the only vintage turkey quilt I've ever seen.  Perhaps one of us in the study group has a picture. That's a valuable quilt.

Jan Thomas

I'm pretty crushed. The other grandmother's fan that I am missing is the o ne

quilt that I completed the whole thing piecing applique quilting and bindin g... I'm hoping it's at my sons..... Sorry not to be able to share this quilt wi th you all. It was quite cute! I don't think I even have it photographed.... .My loss on all fronts.

Jessica vaughn8047msn.com ---

 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Needlebooks From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2011 15:27:49 -0800 X-Message-Number: 7

Here is an entry from a young West VA girl's diary written during the Civil War. I found it as a result of a link from Barbara Brackman's Civil War blog to a West Virginia website.

http://www.wvculture.org/history/journal_wvh/wvh48-1.html

May 26, 1863. Went to meeting and to the graveyard, we set some things out on Birney's grave not long ago and they are growing. Had a letter from Watson today, he is in Tenn. He sent me part of his watch chain. He has a commission for first Lieut, maybe he will be Captain some day. L. B. was up today but did not stay long. I am making him and James a needlebook.

Karen in the Islands

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Need help locating quilt! From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2011 13:08:01 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------_NextPart_000_0261_01CCB02A.4270DE70 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary"----_NextPart_001_0262_01CCB02A.4270DE70"

------_NextPart_001_0262_01CCB02A.4270DE70 Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Good afternoon, QHLers - On another list, the following request for information has been posted. I am cross-posting with Katherine's permission. She is trying to locate the quilt "Challenger Space Shuttle" made in 1987 by Robert L. Hamilton of Titusville, FL in memory of the Space Shuttle Challenger. The quilt was documented by the Florida Quilt Heritage Project. I've told Katherine that the FQHP documentation is held by the Museum of Florida History. Any other suggestions for Katherine?

Regards,

Meg

. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney

Textile/Costume Conservator &

Collections Management Consultant

Professional Associate - AIC

707-763-8694

mgmooneymoonware.net

Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 10:59 AM Subject: Need help locating quilt!

Hello,

I feel like i"m looking for a missing child. Has anyone seen this quilt or know who might own it or what institution might have it? We've pretty much covered all of FL including NASA. We've also contacted the McAuliffe Planetarium. Any other sources or help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Katherine Taylor-McBroom

Assistant Registrar

Shelburne Museum

ktaylor-mcbroomSHELBURNEMUSEUM.ORG

------_NextPart_001_0262_01CCB02A.4270DE70--

------_NextPart_000_0261_01CCB02A.4270DE70--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Crazy Patchwork at auction From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2011 08:30:42 +1100 X-Message-Number: 2

This item came up on an auction watch list recently: http://www.icollector.com/Jane-Powell-ivory-cotton-dress-skirt-and-petticoat-from-Seven-Brides-for-Se ven-Brothers_i11436878 Use the zoom feature to take a closer look. Does anyone know if this was specially made for the film or if a quilt top was vandalized? It must be quite heavy.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Crazy Patchwork at auction From: textiqueaol.com Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2011 17:51:48 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CE7E92F1865A59_1688_813C9_webmail-d160.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"

Janet,

It looks too authentic. I'm thinking it 'was' an old top cut into a skirt. The silks probably hadn't started splitting/shattering when she wore it. I love the  movie but don't remember the skirt in it. Now I'll have to watch it again.

Jan Thomas

Does anyone know if this was specially made for the film or if a quilt top  was

vandalized? It must be quite heavy.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

 

----------MB_8CE7E92F1865A59_1688_813C9_webmail-d160.sysops.aol.com--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Crazy Patchwork at auction From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2011 16:46:25 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

I'm betting vandalized quilt, as there's quite a bit of embroidery on it th at wouldn't really show up in the movie (and which would have been a waste  of time and money to do).Jocelyn

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Crazy Patchwork at auction From: "Janet O'Dell" <janettechinfo.com.au> Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2011 12:00:23 +1100 X-Message-Number: 5

I just had another thought - the film was supposedly set in Oregon in 1850, somewhat early for crazy patchwork? Bless their beautiful hides ;-)

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia