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Subject: Re: Aunt Sukey's Choice From: LinusDonnaaol.com Date: Thu, 17 Nov 2011 06:30:40 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

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Does anyone know when Aunt Sukey's Choice quilts first appeared?

Was Aunt Sukey a fiction, or was she a real person? And if she was real, do we know anything of her life, or has her story been lost in time?

Many thanks and bright blessings! ~Donna Laing

_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_ (http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com/)

_http://www.facebook.com/northstarqualityquilting_ (http://www.facebook.com/northstarqualityquilting)

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 16, 2011 From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Thu, 17 Nov 2011 06:41:10 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

Here's a link to Judi Boisson's biz:

http://www.judiboisson.com/cgi-bin/cgi-local/Web_store/web_store.cgi

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Subject: RE: the term 'Broderie Perse' From: kittylovesbluehotmail.com Date: Thu, 17 Nov 2011 08:20:37 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

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Barbara Morris claims that use of the term "broderie perse" (French for embroidery stitch) also known as "cretonne applique" (named after unglazed chintz originating in France probably originated about the middle of the 19th century. However as you noted the technique itself is much older. Embroidering motifs cut from chintz for designs on coverlets and quilts is traditionally British and became fashionable there in the late eighteenth century. It flourished from around 1800 to 1850.

Kitty Ledbetter

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 16, 2011 From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 17 Nov 2011 12:09:25 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

Thank you for sharing Boisson's link. I want Copper Canyon. And a rug. Steph Whitson

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Subject: RE: the term 'Broderie Perse' From: textiqueaol.com Date: Thu, 17 Nov 2011 18:59:30 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 5

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Kitty,

I've always understood that the literal translation was 'Persian Embroidery= ', in the same way that 'Perse' was the French term for Oriental or Persian rugs at one time. = The stitch was an early 'Frenchification' of even earlier Persian Embroideries. 

Jan Thomas

Barbara Morris claims that use of the term "broderie perse" (French for embroidery stitch) also known as "cretonne applique" (named after unglazed=  chintz originating in France probably originated about the middle of the 19= th century. However as you noted the technique itself is much older.

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Subject: broderie perse continued From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 10:27:53 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

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Thanks for all the info about Broderie Perse. 'Cretonne' applique actually = sounds closer to what that quilt has--furnishings fabrics with pictorials c= ut out and sewn to the foundation.  So then could my 1950s quilt that had little woodland animals cut out from = a cotton print and appliqued on a muslin ground also be called Broderie Per= se? - yuk, that sort of dimishes the poetry of the early 19th century techn= ique. As with the terminology shift from 'cheater cloth' to printed patchwo= rk, is there some more descriptive term for everything else done in that ma= nner to distinguish it from the earliest Broderie Perse?!  And, another question, now that I am thinking about all the wonderful late = 19th c cretonne pictorial prints I lovethat run like mad when wet, is th= ere some way to handle and protect the fabric if it needs cleanng thatco= uld prevent the bleed from happening? (I know, don'tput it near water)  Happy holiday to all. Wish I had a turkey quilt to post on eboard. Has anyo= ne ever seen one?  L  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts ---851882195-1911245444-1321640873=:84912--

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Subject: RE: the term 'Broderie Perse' From: kittylovesbluehotmail.com Date: Thu, 17 Nov 2011 21:30:51 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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> I've always understood that the literal translation was 'Persian Embroidery' in the same way > that 'Perse' was the French term for Oriental or Persian rugs at one time. The stitch was an > early 'Frenchification' of even earlier Persian Embroideries. Of course you're right about this. Sorry for not thinking more clearly before I responded. I started off in my head with a train of embroidery terms a= nd went straight from broderie perse to the French term for stitch which isn't perse at all but "point." Thanks for speaking up and not just let ting me suffer with arrogance ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: broderie perse continued From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 14:05:04 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

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Did Broderie Perse become fussy cutting?

Never seen a turkey quilt but would love to.

Warm regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Fri, Nov 18, 2011 at 12:27 PM, Laura Fisher wrote:

........So then could my 1950s quilt that had little woodland animals cut out from a cotton print and appliqued on a muslin ground also be called Broderie Perse? ...........  Happy holiday to all. Wish I had a turkey quilt to post on eboard. Has anyone ever seen one?  L  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE

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Subject: RE: broderie perse continued From: textiqueaol.com Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 15:37:25 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

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In the thousands of quilts I've looked at, I have seen one... "obviously a turkey quilt", and it made me smile. I'll contact the owner to see if she still owns it and will post a picture because I know you'd smile too. A 20th century, great big smile.

Jan Thomas

Never seen a turkey quilt but would love to.

Warm regards, Sharron

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Subject: Turkey quilts From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 14:55:34 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

At least Benjamin Franklin Tried ... can you imagine all those eagle quilts with TURKEYS instead ... if he'd won the turkey as the national bird? What a HOOT ... and no owls intended. Steph Whitson

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Subject: RE: broderie perse continued From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 16:12:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Just curious - the "real" paisley shawls that are not the ones woven in Paisley, Scotland, but the originals from India/Persia/Iran are pieced = in a way -- could that somehow be related to the broderie perse idea? Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: broderie perse continued From: textiqueaol.com Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 16:54:12 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 7

"Thanks for speaking up and not just letting me suffer with arrogance"

Oh, gosh, Kitty, I hope my reply didn't come off sounding like I thought you were arrogant. It seemed you understand embroidery history. I love it when we can discuss things like this.

If you look at those earlier Persian embroideries, they are outlined in a stitch and filled in with other decorative stitches. I've tried to conside= r where and when that could have transitioned to cut-out fabric where the fill-in stitches had been. And I often think of the very thing that Candace has suggested for us to think about. Certain shawls were totally hand-embroidered. Each of the thousands of motifs was done independently of the finished product, often by a hundred different embroiderers, and then pieced together into the end- product.  Even when the earlier shawls were woven, pre-Jacquard, they were done with a unique technique known as tapestry-twill. You see it in native Amer= ican rugs, only on a grander scale. The loom was vertical and all the colored e= lements were woven in separately, thereby creating the lazy line. You see tiny laz= y lines all over the hand woven shawls.  The point in both of the methods above was a focus on the individual elemen= ts of the design. And, as Candace suggests, this is where I begin to think th= ere could be a connection. Paisley shawls were a cheap substitute for the hand-made shawls but demand = was so great, only water-power driven looms could keep up with it. The poor qu= ality of the wool and all the floats on the back were their downfall.

Jan Thomas

"Just curious - the "real" paisley shawls that are not the ones woven in

Paisley, Scotland, but the originals from India/Persia/Iran are pieced in a way -- could that somehow be related to the broderie perse idea? Candace Perry"

 

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Subject: RE: broderie perse continued From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 20:36:34 -0600 X-Message-Number: 8

I use chintz applique now instead of labeling everything Broderie Perse..(if it's chintz, of course) If a piece is appliqued using images cut out from a pictoral cretonne I would maybe say selectively cut images from cretonne fabric (such as dogs, houses, children) are appliqued to a cream background , for instance. It makes more sense to me to use simple descriptive words that are understood by all than to use terms whose definition is unknown or widely but erroneously assumed. I also used stuffed work more often than trapunto which is the term many current quilt makers use when they stuff anything and it's really not trapunto. jean

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Subject: International Center online materials From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Mon, 21 Nov 2011 9:20:58 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Many thanks to Ellen for providing the link to the International Quilt Stud= y Center's exhibition of chintz quilts.

I was not aware that the museum brochures for Center exhibits are available= online or, for that matter, that older exhibitions remain online for viewi= ng. I was glad to learn that and took good advantage of the opportunities.= 

I have always been interested in story quilts, and so I looked at the exhib= ition of Yvonne Wells' quilts, which included story quilts. In the well-ref= erenced piece, there was a link to an interview with Wells pub'd in a perio= dical by the University of Cairo.

I was taken with Ms. Wells' candor and adamant refusal to let herself be ca= tegorized. Wells is from Alabama, where she was a p.e. teacher in a school = in the Tuscaloosa area. She is also African-American.

This excerpt gives the flavor of the interview and shows what I believe is = the good sense of Ms. Wells.

Interviewer: In her book "Signs and Symbols," MaudeWahlman talks about the choice of strong color contrasts as being distinctive to African textiles and African American quilting (35). Do you find that to be true when you look around at work by other quilters or your own quilts?

Yvonne Wells: Well, let me say this: I don=E2=80=99t know about quilting and its history.= I don=E2=80=99t. Because when I started quilting, I didn=E2=80=99t know wh= at I was doing was so wonderful [laughs] until someone else told me. As far= as it being distinctive to African Americans or Africa, I was not aware of= that until I met scholars like Maude Wahlman ...... I have since learned .= . . They talk very openly about what colors and what stitches and what mov= ements go together as being typically African American. I was not aware of = that. I just do my thing, and if it is, it is. And if it isn=E2=80=99t, it = isn=E2=80=99t. I didn=E2=80=99t start out for it to be specifically African= American, Caucasian, or anything. I just did it because it felt good."

How refreshing in era given increasingly to marketing and commodifying ones= elf, particularly if one is African-American!

One of the things that has interested me in the great discovery and exaltat= ion of certain types of Gee's Bend quilts (for the exhibition quilts were c= arefully edited to present a single impression) and of Harriett Powers' won= derful quilts and aprons and other work done by black southerners is that t= hey are treated as products of a distinctly African-American culture which = is sui generis, a stand-alone culture ---except, of course, for those quilt= ers who were churning out the UGRR "sign" quilts. We must except them. But = generally the exhibitions we've seen have been highly selective to emphasiz= e certain traits, even certain patterns. And increasingly we see the result= s of these exhibits, large and small, in the art of black southerners, an a= rt erroneously called "folk art," because it is generally informed not by a= folk tradition but by commercialization.

Those of us who have lived a lifetime in the South know that while segregat= ion was a legal fact that applied to public facilities and schools, so larg= e was the African-American population in comparison with the European that = people of all sorts knew one another informally and that Southern culture w= as a culture forged of both black and white traditions. We know that about = foodways and music and language.

I've been interested to see how that fact has generally been ignored by tho= se who purport to study and especially those who purport to market African-= American quilts and other folk arts.

In America, we've let ourselves become so hung up on minorities that we've = forgotten that minority though they might be, members of minority populatio= ns participate actively in a larger culture.

Attempting to explain why the greatest literature in America in the twentie= th century had come out of the South, a region H.L. Mencken had declared "t= he Saraha of the beaux arts, literary critics and cultural historians spent= at least half a century trying to identify the unifying traits of that lit= erature and culture.

I think Flannery O'Connor got it right when she said the South "had the Bib= le and history." By that, she meant that Southerners had fought a war trust= ing God was with them, and they lost that war. So life forced them to consi= der the mystery of human existence. And the Bible provided them the means b= y which to explore the questions that arose from this central historical an= d spiritual event as well as others. Moreover, the Bible made clear that vi= ctory does not always go to the good, no matter what Northerners might beli= eve. It is pretty clear that good things do not always happen to "good" pe= ople and bad things to "bad" people. Its message, however, is that all thin= gs work to the good of those that love the Lord. So it made it hard to sett= le for any pat explanations. The hard part came with recognizing God teache= s in ways that are not always pleasant to the learner.

This same process occurred among the enslaved and formerly enslaved, most w= ho had, legally or otherwise, been taught the rudiments of Christianity and= been baptized in that religious faith. Certainly, one would wonder why, wh= en she was minding her own business, taking care of home and family and not= disturbing the universe, she would be snatched away and sold into human sl= avery. That ought to be mystery enough for one lifetime. And most black peo= ple sought to understand and interpret what had happened to them--their his= tory---from the Christian Bible.

So shared experiences of mystery and shared religion unified the South in a= way nothing else could have done, forged a common heritage. And such a bon= d shows up in all one does, quilting or cooking.

Historians and literary critics are never so succinct and sharp as Flannery= O'Connor, however. They've listed many traits common to southern literatur= e and hence southern thought. Among the traits they cite as distinctive to = the South---by which they generally meant the white South since the literat= ure they dealt with was generally white, with the exception of a Richard Wr= ight here and there---was the preference for story-telling as explanation, = the tendency to think about things in terms of narrative. Southerners, all = agreed, love telling stories, even on themselves.

So why shouldn't that trait affect quilts made by Southerners, black or whi= te?

Better yet, how can we imagine that even in set-away places like Gee's Bend= that an essentially African culture could have persisted regarding color a= nd design? And what about all those other quilts from that community, the o= nes warehoused? Any Dresden plates among them?

Compare the quilts of mountainous Kentucky or North Carolina and those care= fully recounted and considered by Fawn Valentine in the West Virginia book.= Did isolation and ethnicity have a similar effect?

A famous early exploration of language in these areas attributed many lingu= istic usages to "good Elizabethan language" usages that had been preserved.

The only problem with that was that the groups studied were primarily Scots= -Irish, not good Englishmen at all.

I come back to Ms. Wells' words: "I just do my thing, and if it is, it is. = And if it isn=E2=80=99t, it isn=E2=80=99t. I didn=E2=80=99t start out for i= t to be specifically African American, Caucasian, or anything. I just did i= t because it felt good."

If one starts out "for it to be specifically....anything," how do we catego= rize that?

And when we say "southern," do we refer only to "white" southern or "black"= southern? Or do we refer to people whose identity was forged in the Americ= an South? What traits do THOSE folks share, I wonder.

Someone once told me, "I thought we knew everything about Southern quilts."= I don't think so.

Planning to plant pansies in North Louisiana, Gaye Ingram

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Subject: lost coat at conference, maybe From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Mon, 21 Nov 2011 10:59:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

To those of you who were at the AQSG conference did you maybe see my coat that I have searched and searched for? ......It is a kimono style batik strippy pattern in browns/teals/purples, etc. with a reversible batik inside of green/brown/purple. The last time I wore it was on the Sunday I left the conference. I remember taking it off because it was so warm that day. I THOUGHT I put it in my car when I was packing. Now I am wondering if I ended up laying it down. I called the hotel a few weeks ago and they didn't have it in lost and found and the AQSG office doesn't have it. I have contacted everyone I saw on my way back to NC. I really don't think I left it in NJ, but just in case. So if by some chance you found my coat please write to me at ---- palamporeaol.com I spent hours and hours making the coat and tons of money on the class and fabric. I even have a top and pants cut out to sew to make it a complete ensemble. I am sick over this........... Yes, I have searched my closets. I have found 2 things this past weekend that had been lost for some time, so there is hope!!!!

I really hate that QHL doesn't take my palamporeaol.com address anymore. I miss all of you!!! My laptop has issues with cookies and gmail so I am rarely seeing QHL these days. I hope to get my son to resolve that while he is home for Thanksgiving. I am computer incompetent.

Hope you all have a special time with family and friends over Thanksgiving. Our children will be with us so I am going to be happy happy and thankful. Lynn in New Bern, NC

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Subject: Re: International Center online materials From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Mon, 21 Nov 2011 10:40:04 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

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Gaye,Storytelling is not just Southern...it's related to poverty and lac= k of leisure time the world over. If you're rich, you jet off somewhere whe= n you're bored. If you're poor... you make your own entertainment. You get = work done by hosting work parties- quilting bees, cornhuskings, barn raisin= gs. And in the evening, you gather around and tell stories. A good storytel= ler is a family treasure, and it's an activity that elders can excel at, be= cause they have such a store of events that other people weren't around to = witness. Other folks can work while the storyteller entertains them.As f= or colors...the entire art or science of heraldry in Western Europe is all = about color contrast. It was rather of significance to be able to recognize= both enemies and friends on the battlefield. :) We continue to use the pri= nciples of color and 'metal' contrast in sign making today; the only major = difference is the addition of 'copper' (orange) as a 'metal'. It seem= s to me that Africans included orange long before it was a common or signif= icant color in Western European culture. But I remember reading in HIPV tha= t blue and yellow are a traditional African color combination, as if Sweden= doesn't exist. There may be cultural differences in preference for certain= color combinations, but certainly no culture can claim a combination as ex= clusively their own, or as a hallmark of their culture. Unless we want to w= atch the African-descent quilters line up to slug it out with the Swedes ov= er blue and yellow. :)Jocelyn

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Subject: RE: lost coat at conference, maybe From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Mon, 21 Nov 2011 13:35:35 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

That's just horrible! Did you try the lost quilt page just in case? ( I know it's a coat but...) Post photos so our 'network' can keep an eye out?

jean

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Subject: RE: broderie perse continued From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sun, 20 Nov 2011 12:49:42 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Re Jean's statement: "It makes more sense to me to use simple descriptive words that are understood by all than to use terms whose definition is unknown or widely but erroneously assumed."

AMEN!!

When a word becomes fuzzy, unspecific, a word will eventually take its place. It might be the old term, revived into currency; it might be new. But if the activity or object exists in an environment, people find a good, specific word for it.

Until then, "simple, descriptive words that are understood by all" is the only reasonable thing to do if one wants to be understood.

Thanks, Jean, for the observation.

Gaye

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Subject: RE: broderie perse continued From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:59:47 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

I agree 150%. The first year I volunteered as the 'resident quilter for the day at the Shelburne Museum in VT, one of the first questions thrown at me was "Do you have any broderie perse on display" - talk about feeling stupid - I did not know that name at all (and I have been quilting for almost 25 years!). I made sure I knew that term the next day I went to volunteer! Mitzi from Vermont

In a message dated 11/20/2011 1:49:55 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, gingramsuddenlink.net writes:

Re Jean's statement: "It makes more sense to me to use simple descriptive words that are understood by all than to use terms whose definition is unknown or widely but erroneously assumed."

AMEN!!

When a word becomes fuzzy, unspecific, a word will eventually take its place. It might be the old term, revived into currency; it might be new. But if the activity or object exists in an environment, people find a good, specific word for it.

Until then, "simple, descriptive words that are understood by all" is the only reasonable thing to do if one wants to be understood.

Thanks, Jean, for the observation.

Gaye

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Subject: women and the war article From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Sun, 20 Nov 2011 18:04:24 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I think I've mentioned before the series of articles on the War Between the States being written by Philip Gerard for /Our State Magazine: Down Home in North Carolina/ (www.ourstate.com). In the December 2011 issue, the article is called "The Women's War." It is full of mentioned of textile-relates issues and covers multiple economic classes and their varying plights:

[before the war begins] ...Using store-bought patterns, Nancy sews trousers, vests, and coats for sale in order to augment the family income.... [during the war] ... Have been all day devising ways to make a small piece of flannel do duty for a large one... [later] ...They spin rabbit fur with wool and make socks for men at the front....

I can't share more in good conscience; the author and magazine deserve their due, but there is more, and this article should be of interest to those who follow the mid-19th century period of time.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Lancaster Museum to close From: Senoperaaol.com Date: Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:33:05 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

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Very sad news -