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Subject: FYI: Textile Seminar From: Dye4Woolaol.com Date: Sun, 5 Feb 2012 08:50:20 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

The new exhibit at the Virginia Quilt Museum will be part of the textile seminar that MESDA is presenting next month. Hope this link works.

_http://mesda.org/programs_sprite/prog_calendar_sprite/mesda_2012-Textile-Se minar.html_ (http://mesda.org/programs_sprite/prog_calendar_sprite/mesda_2012-Textile-Seminar.html)

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Subject: etiquette From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 6 Feb 2012 15:16:41 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Hi all - since you are all adept at facebook, etc. I would appreciate advice as to whether each email to me offering congrats or commenting happilyon things I have posted on facebook or quilt blogs requires an individual response back from melike thanks?  Seems to me like this would take up an awful lot of both of our times to respond to every one, but I don't want to seem rude oraloof, especially when Iso appreciate that someone took the time to look. So to all who have commented favorably on my stuff, thanks thanks thanks always!  Laura  Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --1287737115-1063869973-1328570201=:22107--

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Subject: Re: etiquette From: Lisa Kay Ruetz <quilltraol.com> Date: Mon, 6 Feb 2012 18:50:36 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CEB34141ED4167_BD8_D4C4A_webmail-d162.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Laura, I don't post to Facebook so I don't know about that, but I do reply to eachcomment left on my blog, and almost all the comments I leave on other blogs I get a response to, too. Sometimes all you need is a quick "Thanks for visiting," but a reply is always appreciated.

Lisa

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Subject: Hawaiian Quilt Exhibit in Colorado From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 6 Feb 2012 21:35:44 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

 

Hawaiian Quilt Exhibit in Colorado

http://www.news.colostate.edu/Release/6060

sounds yummy,

Jan Thomas

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Subject: UGRR From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net> Date: Tue, 07 Feb 2012 07:04:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Here we go again:

Saturday, 25 Feb 2012Stories from the Underground Railroad (General Research Services) 3 to 4 pm, 1st Floor, Morgan Community Room, High Point, NC library  Conducted by Meltoina Young, this presentation is part art exhibition, part history, and part decoding of the secrets behind the quilt patches that are synonymous with the Underground Railroad. Areas examined will include why slaves sought out the Underground Railroad, the contributions of the Quakers, and a look at some of the heroic individuals who faced capture and death to help others to obtain freedom. An examination will be made of the myth of the significance of quilts to the success of traveling the Underground Railroad, including a lesson in decoding the quilt patterns used to communicate with runaway slaves pursuing freedom. The story of the Underground Railroad is one of courage and determination in the face of great peril, and should not be forgotten. This project is made possible by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information please contact Nic Covington, (336) 883-8512

Neva Hart in Virginia AQS Appraiser & Quilt Historian

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 06, 2012 From: "Donna" <linusdonnaaol.com> Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2012 13:48:50 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

Re Laura's question on Facebook etiquette: Laura, you can thank everyone by commenting on your own post after their congratulations are all posted. Or you can "like" each one of their comments. It's your choice. Facebook is a very open and free forum, and there aren't a lot of rules. Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

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Subject: Re: UGRR From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2012 09:52:38 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

Guess we will have to live with this myth as will our future quilters etc......I personally burned out of this story - as a volunteer at the  Shelburne Museum (VT) for some years where I was resident in person showing quilting etc,. - I pent many hours discussing this story to quilters from all over the world. Might be best to just lay this whole event to sleep and get on  with other things.  Mitzi   In a message dated 2/7/2012 7:05:41 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  nevahartverizon.net writes:

Here we go again:

Saturday, 25 Feb 2012Stories from the Underground Railroad (General Research Services) 3 to 4 pm, 1st Floor, Morgan Community Room, High Point, NC library

Conducted by Meltoina Young, this presentation is part art exhibition, part history, and part decoding of the secrets behind the quilt patches that are synonymous with the Underground Railroad. Areas examined will include why slaves sought out the Underground Railroad, the contributions of the Quakers, and a look at some of the heroic individuals who faced capture and death to help others to obtain freedom. An examination will be made of the =9C myth of the significance of quilts to the success of traveling the Underground Railroad, including a lesson in decoding the quilt patterns used to communicate with runaway slaves pursuing freedom. The story of the Underground Railroad is one of courage and determination in the face of great peril, and should not be forgotten. This project is made possible by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information please contact Nic Covington, (336) 883-8512

Neva Hart in Virginia AQS Appraiser & Quilt Historian

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mitzioakesaol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to  leave-qhl-1714905Ilyris.quiltropolis.com

--part1_5c6f3.39f27830.3c6294b5_boundary--

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Subject: history of yoyos? From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2012 06:53:48 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

There is a yoyo quilt for sale that the seller is dating to c1850s which really surprised me. Can't tell by the fabrics; colors are mostly tans with afew toned down reds and blues. Just how far back does that technique go?Mary Anne(in springlike Florida) ---2114655128-554413473-1328626428=:63395--

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Subject: Re: history of yoyos? From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2012 10:00:41 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 5

As a yoyo lover, I too would like to know more about their history. Maybe we just start looking on Google?. Mitzi from Vermont

In a message dated 2/7/2012 9:55:11 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, sewmuch63yahoo.com writes:

There is a yoyo quilt for sale that the seller is dating to c1850s which really surprised me. Can't tell by the fabrics; colors are mostly tans with a few toned down reds and blues. Just how far back does that technique go?

Mary Anne (in springlike Florida)

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Subject: 1895 Cotton States and International Exposition at Atlanta From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Tue, 07 Feb 2012 09:41:48 -0800 X-Message-Number: 6

Just back from 10 days away and catching up on my QHL reading. On Jan 28 QHL Digest, Sue Reich shared a news article from the Anniston Star, Anniston, Alabama dated February 21, 1937, page 10. The last item mentioned in this article caught my eye

<<A metal souvenir he received while attending cotton states and international exposition at Atlanta in 1895 is among the other keepsakes of Mr. and Mrs. Lowry.>>

This is the year and the exposition that Harriet Power's Bible Quilt was on exhibit in Atlanta. I wonder if this couple actually saw the quilt!

When I first read the article, I got VERY excited for I mistakenly thought the metal souvenir was found the in the ex-slave cabin that the article mentions being demolished. Had it been found in the ex-slave cabin, I was hoping the ex-slave had actually seen the quilt. Ahhh, how the imagination does jump to conclusions sometimes.

If you haven't read the full story, you need to get Kyra Hicks' book "This I Accomplish." The story of her research journey of the Harriet Powers' Bible quilt is very exciting and inspiring.

Karen Alexander

Quilt History Reports http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/

Honorees of The Quilters Hall of Fame http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Re: Single process green From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2012 11:06:15 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 7

Here's a reference to Ilett's green, a single process green. The reference is available on Google Books."Specification of the Patent Granted to Joseph Ilett, of Stratford, in the County of Essex, Calico Printer." TheRepertory of Arts, Manufactures, and Agriculture 15 (1809): 75-77.-----------------------------------Anita B. Loscalzo16 Ledgewood DriveDover, MA 02030-1812 ------------------Tel: 508-785-1407Fax: 508-785-

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Subject: Silk/cotton vintage labels from Japan From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2012 15:10:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

All - I found four vintage, pre war labels from Japan - one for cotton from the Japan Cotton trading Co, Yokohama (with a wonderful and strange Native American chieftain in profile); two for silk filature "sumyoshi sha" which I understand is a shrine in Japan: and for one for "cherry" inspected by Mitsui & Co. These are lovely full color labels in great condition, but are not appropriate here. Any interest, or can you point in me in the direction of someone who might be studying the Japanese textile industry?

Candace Perry

Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Subject: Update on the Mary Silliman DAR Quilt From: suereichcharter.net Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2012 18:34:33 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 9

I finally transcribed all of the names from the Mary Silliman DAR quilt. There were only about 800. The Word Doc is attached to my web site. Go to www.coveringquilthistory then to Mary Silliman quilt on the scroll bar on the left. If you have ancestry from the Connecticut shoreline around Bridgeport, your family's Revolutionary soldier might be listed on this quilt. If you have ancestors named Consider Law, Nehemiah Beers, Mehitabel Wheeler, Hepzibah Lewis, Captain Remember Baker, Penelope Fayerweather, or Mercy Blakeman, take a look, you may find a family member. Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut www.suereichquilts www.coveringquilthistory www.majorreichaward

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Subject: primary source question From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Wed, 08 Feb 2012 03:31:39 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Has anyone read the book mentioned in this entry from Wikipedia?

The *Underground Railroad Records* chronicle the stories and methods of some 649 slaves who escaped to freedom via the Underground Railroad <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underground_Railroad>. William Still <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Still>, ^[1] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Underground_Rail_Road_Records#cite_note-0> known as the father of the Underground Railroad, used his detailed documents regarding those he helped to escape in the Underground Railroad Records. While working with the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Anti-Slavery_Society>, Still worked with a fugitive slave who, he eventually realized, was his long-lost brother. He later then published a book, /The Underground Railroad,/ based on the interviews he made with the fugitives he sheltered.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: YoYos From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2012 12:35:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Yo-yos were also called Suffolk Puffs and Marguerites=2C so while you are googling=2C try those terms. I once appraised a Yo You quilt done all in muslin=3B each puff had a bit of embroidery in the center..... I think .....it has been a long long time ago. I thought it was very unique=2C and much later I actually found directions for the exact quilt/non quilt in an old magazine. I am thinking the magazine was around the TOC - but can't really remember for certain. But itseems as if it did pre-date the early 20th c. printed yoyos. Sorry the info is vague. There have been a lot of quilts under that bridge(or should I say 'under that presser foot'?) since the muslin yoyo.

Teddy Pruett

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Subject: Yo-yo history From: Pepper Cory <pepcorymail.clis.com> Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2012 06:12:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Interesting bit of trivia from Teddy regrading yo-yos' origin. Like Teddy, somewhere I have seen an English reference to yo-yos that pre-date the American Depression-era beauties. In the dim recesses of memory, I thought they were called Suffolk Daisies. 'Marguarites' sounds more high-tone than 'daisy' but any gardener will tell you they're one and the same. Poor Suffolk! The region also it seems was to blame for Suffolk Puffs, those ubiquitous folded buns that we were taught to call Biscuit Quilts. Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

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Subject: Mary Silliman DAR Quilt From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2012 08:07:08 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

The site address (_www.coveringquilthistory_ (http://www.coveringquilthistory) ) doesn't seem to work

Regards,

Darwin D. Bearley --part1_9183c.3918a444.3c651efc_boundary--

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Subject: Re: Yo-yo history From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2012 09:19:08 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

Interesting that when you google Suffolk Puffs, you sometimes get yo-yos that are called that. It's nice to know the distinction! I'd love to have a reference citation on that, Pepper, so that I can use it! Everything old is new again, huh? Marcia Kaylakie in glorious, spring-like Texas

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Subject: yo yo origins From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2012 10:54:39 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

What about the 19th c show quilts with rosette flowers? Were those fashioned in the same technique? Think those were precursors to the yo-yo concept?  Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor

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Subject: the Underground Railroad saga From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2012 12:30:20 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

It never ends. I have a suggestion that might help in some circumstances. Episode 9- Quilt Scholarship: Romance and Reality in the series "Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics" takes on the underground railroad issues directly with conversations featuring a number of scholars. Take a look at it and consider sending the episode along to the institutions in question. I would be willing to donate some DVD sets so that you could send them with an appropriate message. You could also, if you have the technology, extract just that episode to send on its own. It is 27 minutes long. It is not ALL about the UGRR issues but a good portion is about it. When you send to these institutions you could also send the series review by EMRO (educational media reviews online) which helps to give the series even more cred. Onward, Shelly Zegart

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

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Subject: Update on "help a Kid from Julie" From: Edwaquiltaol.com Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2012 07:44:41 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

Since I had received a similar email a few years ago, I decided to do a bit of detective work on Julie's question. I called the school to find out if this is a legitimate request and if the students are actually doing a research. Checked the web site and found the school and called, gave info and the name of the student and the person answering knew the name. In fact she gave the last name of the student (Wagh) and referred me to the Principal of the Middle School. I talked to him (Donald Lam) and he confirmed that it is a project they have given some students. I told him of our concerns over such emails and suggested he talk with the student and encourage any to follow up on responses so those receiving such requests will know they are actually from a student. He said he will and also talk to the parents.

My reluctance in responding to such requests is when there is no indication of what research the student has already done.

Holice

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Subject: UGRR From: carylschuetzyahoo.com Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2012 17:59:29 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

I don't think we quilt historians should give up with trying to correct the myth when it rears its ugly head (so to speak few years ago, a friend told me that the small museum in a town next to mine had an exhibit of newly made UGRR quilts (from Eleanor Burns' book and the stories of the myth of the UGRR,) and a woman was going to do a presentation about the exhibit I called and spoke with a woman I know who was on the board of that museum at the time, and the exhibit was taken down That was the end of it. You never know.........___________________ Caryl Schuetz Professional Association of Appraisers - Quilted Textiles ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: William Still From: Laura Lane <collectionsnequiltmuseum.org> Date: Thu, 09 Feb 2012 11:03:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Andi in Paducah asked about William Still. Our PBS station, WGBH Boston, had a one-hour program about Benjamin Still and the Underground Railroad earlier this week. I believe it was part of the /American Experience /series. It was very well done-the only dialogue was taken directly from Still's journals. I might add that there was no mention of quilt codes anywhere in the program!

Laura Lane

-- Laura P. Lane Collections Manager New England Quilt Museum collectionsNEQuiltMuseum.org 978-452-4207 Ext.11

 

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Subject: RE: Update on "help a Kid from Julie" From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2012 08:58:14 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

What a thoughtful thing to do.

In my life as a novelist I do on occasion get letters from students who have had an assignment to write about an author. Usually those e-mails amount to, "will you do my homework for me?" They haven't even bothered to read what's available on my web site. For those questions, I usually offer to answer any questions they still have AFTER they've gone to my web site (since they probably had to be ON my web site to find my e-mail address).

At any rate, I think you were very kind to respond so carefully and to follow through. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: 19th century Four Block Southern Quilt From: Wildemuth Susan <wildemuthsewgmail.com> Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2012 09:14:56 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

Does anyone recognize this quilt pattern? This quilt has a North Carolina/South Carolina provenance? It is stamped 1856 with the name Calhoun.

I posted it on the vintage pictures eboard

Go to:

http://vintagepictures.eboard.com

Click on the Quilts heading and scroll down to the bottom.

Click on Four Block Southern Tree Quilt????

I don't really think it is a tree pattern. Possibly a biblical pattern? Or botanical pattern of some sort?

Thanks,

Sue in Illinois

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Subject: new quilt gallery to open From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2012 08:39:28 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 7

Elizabeth Richardson Quilt GalleryKentucky MuseumWestern Kentucky UniversityBowling Green, KYOpening February 24, 2012 Assembled over two decades, the Elizabeth Richardson Collection is a case study of American quilt collecting from the late 1930s through the late 1950s. The eventual outgrowth of Richardson attempt to connect with the female members of several rural Kentucky churches, it includes 13 quilts and 26 historic textile samples; correspondence with several leading figures such as Florence Peto and William Rush Dunton, Jr., who were active in the middle period of the 20th Century Quilt Revival; books about and photographs of historic quilts; and five scrapbooks that chronicle her interest in old quilts. In addiition to featuring quilts and textiles from the Richardson Collection, the opening of the Richardson Gallery will showcase 15 variations of Star pattern quilts that were selected from other parts of the Kentucky Museum Quilt Collection. The Richardson Gallery will open with a ribbon cutting at 2:00 pm on February 24, 2012.. Regular gallery hours start on February 25, 2012. The Kentucky Museum will close March 5-9 for Spring Break ---279825530-202143769-1328891968=:40655--

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Subject: Re: UGRR From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2012 12:29:44 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 8

As a long time volunteer at the Shelburne Museum, VT where I was the quilter of the day where they have some of their collections on exhibit. AND, I can not think of a day I was there that someone did not come in and ask to see the UGRR quilts - I get very good at blowing their bubbles most of the time. Some would not believe it and walked out still looking for those slave fleeing quilts.........I doubt the myth will ever completely die (who is to say that George Washington really did cut down that cherry tree . Mitzi from snowless Vermont very funny winter so far.

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Subject: RE: 19th century Four Block Southern Quilt From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2012 15:30:02 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

This quilter was clearly abducted by aliens. ET pincers?

I hope someone knows the pattern ... never seen anything like that! Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: question about a kit quilt From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2012 13:39:45 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 10

Hello all,I had a phone call from a woman whose mother left her a Home Needlecraft Creations #7022 quilt. Does anyone know the date on this, please? The only info in Brackman's Encyclopedia of Applique is "Kit company".Thank you in advance.Judy SchwenderPaducah, KY ---2053401547-1527815983-1328909985=:6662--

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Subject: inspiration for quilt patterns From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2012 14:30:29 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 11

Check out the article Cabin Fever about a Russian who made a countryhomein an old Moscowbuilding. The parquet floor patterns are so like geometric quilts.  I know quilt design has long been linked to the patterned stone floors of Venice, for example (I have a book on it); now maybe someone should do a bookon parquetry (or perhaps there is one?)  "Elle Decor" elle.comemail.hearstmags.com - ('m not sure if I did this link the correct way, but I am exhausted from clickingfacebook links, it's like going down a rabbit hole, never ending!  Laura

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --185291547-1680112273-1328913029=:45966--

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Subject: RE: question about a kit quilt From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2012 16:42:57 -0600 X-Message-Number: 12

Use the premier 'kit' site by Rosie Werner.

Quiltkitid.com

- a must have for all quilt researchers. She has done tons and tons and tons of work on kit quilts.

Jean

> Hello all,

> I had a phone call from a woman whose mother left her a Home Needlecraft Creations

> #7022 quilt. Does anyone know the date on this, please?

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Subject: William Still From: "Roberta (Bobbe) Benvin" <quiltsndogsaol.com> Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2012 01:12:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

To Andi et al,

The book written by William Still in 1871, entitled "The Underground Railroad. A Record Of Facts, Authentic Narrative, Letters, &C.,Narrating the Hardships, Hair-Breadth Escapes and Death Struggles OF THE Slaves in Their Efforts of Freedom, AS RELATED BY THEMSELVES AND OTHERS,OR WITNESSED BY THE AUTHOR..." is available in its entirety for FREE at Project Gutenberg.

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/15263

Bobbe Benvin

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Subject: Re: inspiration for quilt patterns From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2012 02:43:53 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Well, I got to the Elle Decor website and that home is magnificent. How can you not be happy in that kitchen with those magnificent cupboard doors. They could be inspiration for applique! The floors were magnificent too -- inspriation for piecing. Thanks for the heads up. Here's the link to my favorite photo.

http://www.elledecor.com/image/tid/6619?page=2

The Hay House in Macon Georgia has some gorgeous parquet floors too.

Judy Grow

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Subject: Re: inspiration for quilt patterns From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2012 05:25:02 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

Proof of how different people are: I looked at those kitchen cabinets and immediately thought they would make a great "before" illustration for an article on painting kitchen cabinets....Kris> Well, I got to the Elle Decor website and that home is magnificent. How can you not be happyin that kitchen with those magnificent cupboard doors. They could be inspiration for applique! http://www.elledecor.com/image/tid/6619?page=3D2

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Subject: RE: William Still From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2012 10:18:01 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

I watched the PBS special last night. There is one section that made me cry. Still's encounter with someone looking for family. I couldn't use it in a novel because no one would believe it. I know 2 other similar stories from primary sources. Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: inspiration for quilt patterns From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2012 10:19:44 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

I knew I was a quilter when, on one trip to Europe, I was looking at and photographing floors thinking "quilts." At San Miniato al Monte above Florence ... at the Louvre ... SO glad to know I'm not the only one! Steph Whitson

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Subject: Dear Sue, From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2012 15:43:41 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

I think the quilt portrays racks of pliers in a mechanics office or forceps in an OB's office. In any case, it looks dangerous. However I think I see that the quilting is wonderful,

Barbara Woodford, also Illinois.

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Subject: Sue W's photo post From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2012 23:36:00 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Sue, the first thing I thought of when I saw this photo was empty cotton boles blown up VERY VERY large!

Sue wrote: Does anyone recognize this quilt pattern? This quilt has a North Carolina/South Carolina provenance? It is stamped 1856 with the name Calhoun.

I posted it on the vintage pictures eboard

Go to:

http://vintagepictures.eboard.com

Click on the Quilts heading and scroll down to the bottom.

Click on Four Block Southern Tree Quilt????>>

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: CW Quilt Exhibit From: Sheri Lesh <leshsherigmail.com> Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2012 08:20:04 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Since the threads lately have been related to the CW.....I finally wrote about the quilt retreat at the Grout Museum last weekend that I attended. I included links to a very nice slide show by Kathleen Tracy. So if you are interested in a sneak peak into the exhibit. I thought it was wonderful.....thoroughly biased I'm sure since my friends & I were able to contribute. But if you are going to be in the Eastern Iowa.....you will want to take this in. It will be up until September 1, I believe.

Sheri in Iowa

-- Sheri R. Lesh leshsherigmail.com http://4andfifteen.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Re: italian floors From: "Gale Slagle" <glslagcox.net> Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2012 09:32:20 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

The tile floor in the Sistine Chapel at the Vatican in Rome is very similar to quilt patterns. But then only a quilter would be looking at the floor in the Sistine Chapel....

Gale

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Subject: Re: italian floors From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2012 15:08:12 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

What look like quilt patterns are very, very common in Renaissance Italian stonework. Here are a few links for the interested:

Cosmatesque ornament: _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmatesque_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmatesque)

The Baptistery in Florence, where the floors are meant to look like Oriental carpets: _http://www.thejoyofshards.co.uk/tuscan/bapstry.shtml_ (http://www.thejoyofshards.co.uk/tuscan/bapstry.shtml)

San Miniato al Monte, Florence: _http://www.museumsinflorence.com/musei/san_miniato.html_ (http://www.museumsinflorence.com/musei/san_miniato.html)

The Impruneta Cushion, a 15th century piece of patchwork that bears a passing resemblance to Cosmatesque stonework - and no, it almost certainly wasn't a coincidence: _http://www.leoquilt.it/?p=234_ (http://www.leoquilt.it/?p=234)

Enjoy!

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: italian floors From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2012 15:19:32 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Here's one of the photos I took as a quilt inspiration at San Miniato al Monte in Florence...no flash of course, which is why it isn't exactly in focus ... but it's enough to make the quilt. In my next life, probably. With celestial fabric ... literally. Steph Whitson

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Subject: RE: Itallian Floors From: Ady Hirsch <adamroninetvision.net.il> Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 08:26:53 +0200 X-Message-Number: 1

And before - way before. Here's a link to the mosaic floor of a 6th cent. AD Bizantine palace in Caesarea (The port city built by Herod the Grerat after the model of a Roman town): http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A7%D7%95%D7%91%D7%A5:Caesarea-Maritima-2-23 2.jpg And here's another Roman beauty, 2nd Cent. AD (please scroll down - it's sixth from the top): http://www.travelinstyle.com/greece/general_info/Ancient%20Corinth.htm

A quick search on antique Roman / Greek geometric mosaic will produce dozens of ancient quilt patterns. Cheers, Ady

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Subject: Re: italian floors From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2012 15:08:12 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

What look like quilt patterns are very, very common in Renaissance Italian stonework. Here are a few links for the interested:

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Subject: William Still's book From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 04:54:23 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

 

Many thanks, Bobbi, for the link to the Gutenburg project and William Still's firsthand account of UGRR activities. I heard about him through the PBS show others have mentioned and was very glad you could steer us to more information.

Fascinating reading. It doesn't go quickly, but then, maybe that's appropriate; the reality of what he describes really sinks in. And it's horrifying. Definitely worthwhile for dispelling myths, but too dense and intense for quick fixes.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: RE: Itallian Floors From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 07:06:39 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

Not surprising at all. Geometric patterns have appeared in human work for a long, long time.

Lisa

In a message dated 2/13/2012 1:47:26 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, adamroninetvision.net.il writes:

And before - way before. Here's a link to the mosaic floor of a 6th cent. AD Bizantine palace in Caesarea (The port city built by Herod the Grerat after the model of a Roman town): http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A7%D7%95%D7%91%D7%A5:Caesarea-Maritima-2-23 2.jpg And here's another Roman beauty, 2nd Cent. AD (please scroll down - it's sixth from the top): http://www.travelinstyle.com/greece/general_info/Ancient%20Corinth.htm

A quick search on antique Roman / Greek geometric mosaic will produce dozens of ancient quilt patterns. Cheers, Ady

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Subject: Re: italian floors From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2012 15:08:12 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

 

What look like quilt patterns are very, very common in Renaissance Italian

stonework.

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Subject: upcoming exhibitions in the Baltimore area From: <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2012 16:54:10 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

I am going to be in the Baltimore area the first week of March and I am wondering if there are any quilt or textile related exhibits to see. There must be something good to see. Any ideas?

Thanks, Kathy Moore Quiltn in Texas!

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Subject: Quilt exhibition in North Georgia From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 12:12:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I saw this link on another website, and wanted to pass it in case there are some southern folks who can visit - there's a quilt and coverlet exhibit, I understand.

http://www.negahc.org/

Candace Perry

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Subject: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 20:07:38 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 6

Friends,

I received the pictures (posted on eboard under 'quilt' and then 'UGRR Quilt') and also spoke to the owner in Angelina County, TX. She told me she bought it at anestate sale in Woodville, Tyler Co., and the family knew nothing about it. They did say it was used by someone on the train or a train. The new owner did some research into the code story and mentally linked the quilt, train and the UGRR. When she went back for more info, the house where she purchased it was closed and the sellers were no where to be found. 

She took it to her fine arts class at Angelina College, where the instructor got very excited and called on her fine arts professor at SFAustin. This professor called on several experts who helped them date it to 1840 and define it as a real code quilt. None of the experts were quilt appraisers or historians.

The owner, who has bought and sold quilts for over 20 years in this area, thinks the date is off by 10 years and should be 1850. I was clear with her in that 'I' date the little bit of the top that I can see, much later, and that I think the cross-stitch on the front is what remains of initials.

I advised her to get it appraised so she'd have another opinion on the date. Keeping in mind that I don't want to put someone into the middle of a discussion they don't want to have, I'm simply suggesting she go to the appraisers site for someone closeby.

I don't understand the odd knotting unless it was put there later with intent. She agreed to my posting the pictures for you to review. I didn't detect any purposeful misinformation. Any comments would be appreciated

Thank you for your advice,

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 21:47:29 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 7

Can you post a link to the pictures - I can't see them!

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 22:06:10 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 8

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CEB8DCBD1682B0_4D8_1817A_webmail-m149.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Last one on the eboard under quilt. The link is too long. Try the tiny url: http://tinyurl.com/76adwj5

http://www3.eboard.com/eboard/servlet/BoardServlet?&ACTION=3DTAB_SHOW&ACTION_ON=3DTAB&OBJECT_ID=3D166573&SITE_NAME=3DDestination&BOARD_NAME=3DVintagePictures&TAB_ID=3D166573&SESSION_ID=3Dk57m3q8ojj7wac7597

Thanks Lisa

Can you post a link to the pictures - I can't see them!  Lisa Evans  

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 21:54:56 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

Why would someone connect this to the UGRR? Were crazy quilt stitches done in 1850? It looks like a hodge-podge. Are the pieces machine pieced?

Just questions ... no answers. It's a very big leap to get from the word "train" to "underground railroad." Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: RE: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 22:43:22 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 10

It makes me think some older blocks were used in a newer quilt. Is there a photo of the entire quilt?

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Mon, Feb 13, 2012 at 7:07 PM, textiqueaol.com wrote:

>

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Subject: RE: Duped From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 19:34:13 -0800 X-Message-Number: 11

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Winter Greetings to the group...

It isn't often I feel duped by someone, but I recently purchased two children's quilts on ebay - one claimed to be "vintage embroidery" and one "c1930s". I have enough of a background in antique textiles to know that this is not at all possible given the fabrics and the embroidery on these quilts. I wasn't able to really see the quilts up close on ebay (only one picture each) so I took a chance. So when I got them in the mail today I was sort of mad at the misleading description that was given to the quilts - though I'm sure the dealer will likely claim ignorance. 

My question to this group is... Since the refund policy is simply to get a credit with the dealer (which I don't want at all) is it inappropriate to give this deal a bad or neutral feedback rating. I have NEVER given a bad feedback even when I was not thrilled with my purchase - but I have never felt duped like I did with this deal. I also sometimes sell on ebay and I know the importance of a rating. The rating for the dealer is 100% positive so my negative or neutral would impact their rating. 

Or, should I just chalk it up to experience and leave it alone? Is leaving no feedback appropriate when not happy with a deal?

I will be contacting the dealer in the morning and letting them know that the items were not as described - 

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Leah Zieber

Temecula - Raining :-) Yeah!!!

 

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Subject: RE: Duped From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 22:45:48 -0600 X-Message-Number: 12

My decision on how to handle this would depend a LOT on what the dealer said when I contacted them. When I have sold quilts/tops, etc. I have always given right to return (at buyer's expense) for a full refund within 24 hours of receipt. I would hope this dealer would apologize and offer a cash refund after hearing from you.

If I felt that the duping was purposeful, I think I'd probably give an honest rating of the transaction. It's one thing if a person is ignorant, another if they are on the fringe of dishonest. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: RE: Duped From: Quilltraol.com Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 08:00:00 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

Leah, If you don't get a refund from the seller after you contact him/her, open a claim with eBay. If they find in your favor, they will refund your money and take it out of the sellers account. This happened to me not long ago. The seller was not very nice, so I opened a claim and got all my money back. I didn't leave any feedback because, like you, I hate doing that.

Good luck.

Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/) _http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays_ (http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays) _http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery_ (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery)

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Subject: RE: Duped From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 09:39:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Leah, I think I agree with Stephanie -- it's all in the dealer's reply. I had a really bad episode a few years back with a dealer who sent me the right thing, but packed it in Kleenex -- a piece of 19th century ceramic -- and claimed that she always did it, and nothing bad had ever happened. Of course it arrived in pieces. She had actually insured it, but it didn't really matter at that point because she packed it so poorly. I wanted the object, not the insurance money! She was so horrid I think I ended up giving her bad feedback. Had she admitted packing fragile items in Kleenex was a poor choice, I would have let it go. Candace Perry

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Subject: Duped From: "Judith Fibush" <judifibush.com> Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 09:18:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Leah,

If possible go to my website at http://www.vintagekitquilts.net/ and click on the top of page to Kit Quilts. You will see 20+ 1930s and newer kit quilts that may help determine if your quilt is really a true item. Also you can email me at judifibush.com with a pic and maybe I can give you more info on it

Judi Fibush

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Subject: Duped From: judifibush.com Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 06:17:01 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

I too deal on eBay a lot. You should definitely contact the seller and list your complaint. However, if you do sell on eBay, I would be careful about leaving a negative feedback as it will give that seller the opportunity to leave the same for you. I have had a couple of bad experiences - one the seller made it right and the other didn't and I just chose to not leave feedback at all. I also sell on eBay and want to keep my 100% rating. A lot of people do not leave feedback at all.

Judi Fibush

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Subject: Feedback? From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 15:52:03 +0000 X-Message-Number: 5

I am interested in the question of leaving feedback, because I am someone who relies on it quite heavily on any inernet shopping sites I use. I tend to automatically filter out over-effusive praise, suspecting ulterior motives or self-advertisement. I also filter out the plain rude, for similar reasons. I rely most on the measured responses, and always admire writers who manage to say what they mean politely, and allow me draw my own inferences. I would hate to think that people with true bad experiences failed to write anything at all otherwise what is the point of the feedback ?

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 08:15:55 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 6

I think it is just wishful thinking. That quilt doesn't look 1850 to me, although I can only see parts of it. The block that contains the path to the log cabin does look like it was appliqued over something else. I would take those knots to represent crops. Maybe the thread would give us a clue?

Other question - is the log cabin machine stitched? Would an 1850 representation of smoke be little circliques? Was the 1/4 seam standard back then?

Kris

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 11:49:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Hi Jan -

It's difficult to draw conclusions after seeing only 3 or 4 small portions of a quilt, but what I see is 1890-1910 -- fabric, style, stitching. A view of the entire quilt would be nice.

When I began reading your note and saw "used on the train", I was picturing someone riding a train (big/black locomotive) to or through Texas. Were there trains in Texas in the 1880 -1910 time period? I'm picturing an immigrant wrapped in his quilt for warmth.

I think the "odd knotting" looks like popped quilting stitches -- see how the rows of white stitches look like quilting in part of it, and not knots?

I'm not sure you can be an "expert quilt dater" without being a "quilt historian" -- so to me, those "experts" are suspect.

Just my thoughts.....

Please keep us posted on what you learn.

Barb

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 12:19:16 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 8

It's a HUGE leap from 'train' to 'UGRR' and made me wonder how two college fine arts departments came to that conclusion without proof. Assuming that one buys the idea that "none of the quilts survived" because they were used up, I'd still want some discussion with the owner and further research on the family history BEFORE making that jump. I'd also want it correctly dated by an appraiser of quilted textiles FIRST, since that could end the discussion before it starts. There seems to have been no critical thinking used to evaluate this quilt.

'They' connected it to the UGRR because 'they' think the images embroideredon the back comprise a map. She read the version of the code that refers to knotsdefining measurement (miles) and combined it with the images of the tree, path and log cabin, a map. 

It is on display now at the Heritage Antique Shop in Lufkin, TX, so everyone can see it. Apparently, 'someone who had studied textiles' stopped by and said it datedfrom the fur trapping days, and I quote "when they started mercerizing cotton."

I have an opportunity here for education but if she chooses to believe two fine arts departments of my facts, there isn't much I can do.

Jan

Why would someone connect this to the UGRR? Were crazy quilt stitches done in 1850? It looks like a hodge-podge. Are the pieces machine pieced?

Just questions ... no answers. It's a very big leap to get from the word "train" to "underground railroad." Stephanie Whitson

 

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Subject: RE: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 12:35:43 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 9

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The owner was going to send me a photo of the entire quilt to share with you all. However, she wasn't impressed with my opinion in regards to the quilt's connection to the UGRR so that might not happen. But, she did say she didn't want to mislead anyone.

Originally, she purchased it to cut up to make a pillow out of the cabin embroidered on the back. I LOVE the folksy nature of the cabin, path and tree and would have bought it myself just for those images. In my opinion, she's simply way over-thoughta turn of the century comforter. That doesn't explain the evaluation process of the two schools though. They are responsible for teaching proper assessment methods.

Jan

It makes me think some older blocks were used in a newer quilt. Is there a photo of the entire quilt?

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 16:28:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

I think the fact that it was shown to fine arts people -- who would be more invested in the visual culture rather than the material culture -- helps explain why they made that leap. At least to me! Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 15:27:26 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

Yes, indeed, there were railroad trains in Texas between 1880-1910, most lines were establishe dby then, with the majority of them making it at least partway across the state by about 1875 or so. The first train pulled in to Austin, Texas on Dec. 25, 1871! Ask me how I know this, Marcia Kaylakie, doing an exhibit of 19th century quilts in Texas with the emphasis on transportation and immigration! Opening on Texas Independence Day, March 2nd!

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Subject: RE: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 17:36:18 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 12

This thread is making me nuts! I'm only about an hour and a half from Lufkin and am dying to see this quilt. Prior to the first of the month, I'd already have been in the truck and gone. Unfortunately, I had a hysterectomy Feb. 8th and I don't jump into the truck as well as I used to.

Jan, aren't you around DFW?

Well, I can easily explain the evaluation process of the schools? Someone once read a book on quilting, someone's Great Aunt made quilts and someone else appraised a coin set once. Oila, experts!

Warm regards,

Sharron.......................on a beautiful, sunny 70 degree day

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Subject: RE: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 17:38:39 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 13

This thread is making me nuts! I'm only about an hour and a half from Lufkin and am dying to see this quilt. Prior to the first of the month, I'd already have been in the truck and gone. Unfortunately, I had a hysterectomy Feb. 8th and I don't jump into the truck as well as I used to.

Jan, aren't you around DFW?

Well, I can easily explain the evaluation process of the schools? Someone once read a book on quilting, someone's Great Aunt made quilts and someone else appraised a coin set once. Oila, experts!

Warm regards,

Sharron.......................on a beautiful, sunny 70 degree day

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 18:13:06 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 14

 

I think it is turn of the 20th, no earlier. I can't see the embroidery stitches well enough to comment on whether the cabin is hand, machine or even punched.  

I did invite the owner to join this list so we'll just have to wait and see. I agree with you, Kris, that this is wishful thinking but she repeated that two schools have looked at it. (we all know they are wrong, in this case)

Jan

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 18:19:10 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 15

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They are displaying it at as an UGRR quilt. Thanks, Barb, and I agree withyou about the 'experts'. 

Jan

From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>

I'm not sure you can be an "expert quilt dater" without being a "quilt historian" -- so to me, those "experts" are suspect.

Please keep us posted on what you learn.

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Subject: Re: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 18:28:45 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 16

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That is a thought but aren't fine arts people, at least, trained in folk art and and object identification and verification techniques? I certainly wouldn't offer my "expert" opinion on something that would have occurred before the Civil War unless I knew itsurely dated before the Civil War.

Jan From: Candace Perry <candaceschwenkfelder.com>

I think the fact that it was shown to fine arts people -- who would be more invested in the visual culture rather than the material culture -- helps explain why they made that leap. At least to me! Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 19:25:50 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 17

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Sharon,

I hope you're doing well after you're surgery. I'm in Colorado. I take your point on so-called experts. It concerns me that people in certain disciplines don't take quilt history seriously. I did some research recently on an Ohio Quaker quilt and an archivist that I spoke to laughed when I referred to it as a document. In reality, it might be the only evidence left that does document certain activities of this group or some people on it.

Jan

Jan, aren't you around DFW?

Well, I can easily explain the evaluation process of the schools? Someone once read a book on quilting, someone's Great Aunt made quilts and someone else appraised a coin set once. Oila, experts!

Warm regards,

Sharron.......................on a beautiful, sunny 70 degree day

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Subject: UGRR CODE Quilt on eboard From: suereichcharter.net Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 20:46:28 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 18

 

It's amazing that we are even deliberating this quilt as UGRR or Mid-Nineteenth Century! The pictures are not that great but it looks all the world to me like a turn of the century, utility quilt. Even the wadding isn't right for pre-Civil War. Can someone explain to me why the academic world will jump on a quilt like this to keep the myth alive? I might have a few quilts George Washington slept under when he stayed down the road from my house at the Cogswell Tavern. Could someone please pass this info on to them?

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut

 

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Subject: Re: UGRR CODE Quilt on eboard From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2012 22:30:19 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 19

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Sue,

"WE" aren't deliberating either. I told the owner straight off where it dates but she's choosing to disagree with me and sticking to her self-applied 1850 date.  She deals with Paul Saul so maybe he can straighten her out. As to the academics, until I know who they are, I can't talk to them. 

jt

Subject: [qhl] UGRR CODE Quilt on eboard It's amazing that we are even deliberating this quilt as UGRR or

Mid-Nineteenth Century! The pictures are not that great but it looks all the world to me like a turn of the century, utility quilt. Even the wadding isn't right for pre-Civil War. Can someone explain to me why the academic world will jump on a quilt like this to keep the myth alive? I might have a few quilts George Washington slept under when he stayed down the road from my house at the Cogswell Tavern. Could someone please pass this info on to them?

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut

---

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Subject: Duped From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 07:49:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Sally Ward said: I am interested in the question of leaving feedback, because I am someone who relies on it quite heavily on any inernet shopping sites I use. I tend to automatically filter out over-effusive praise, suspecting ulterior motives or self-advertisement. I also filter out the plain rude, for similar reasons. I rely most on the measured responses, and always admire writers who manage to say what they mean politely, and allow me draw my own inferences. I would hate to think that people with true bad experiences failed to write anything at all otherwise what is the point of the feedback ?

My thoughts exactly! I would make every effort to resolve the matter, including those available through Ebay first. If, after all reasonable efforts have been made I would seriously give the seller a negative feedback. I don't do a lot of buying or selling on Ebay, but I left negative feedback about a Seller once when the box arrived empty. The Seller admitted the mistake and offered a refund that also never came. Thankfully the amount involved was minimal and Ebay was good enough to work with regarding my complaint, but I thought future buyers should know that Seller failed this customer miserably.

If I understand Ebay's policy correctly a Seller's feedback no longer impacts a Buyer's feedback rating. I understood this change in policy was made a few years ago specifically to avoid the fear Buyers have about being honest about bad sellers.

Greta Van Den Berg http://splintersenthreads.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Re: UGRR CODE Quilt on eboard From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 09:41:51 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Sue - I have a quilt that supposedly came from the White House when Millard Fillmore was President (a long long long part of my Husband's family ).!!!! Not a chance but it makes from family fun, huh? Mitzi from snowless Vermont

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Subject: RE: Pictures of an UGRR CODE Quilt? From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 10:52:07 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

Thank you. I'm up but not yet running.

I have held or been at quilt studies and watched women argue over their point of view, right or wrong. I learned early on, there are those who wish to listen to what I'm saying and those who wouldn't listen to what anyone says. I don't need much time anymore to decide whether I'll voice an opinion or keep it to myself.

Thanks again for your kind thoughts.

Sharron

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Subject: no go on "help a kid" From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellengmail.com> Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 09:17:01 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

> HOLICE wrote:

> Since I had received a similar email a few years ago, I decided to do a bit > of detective work on Julie's question. > I called the school to find out if this is a legitimate request and if the  > students are actually doing a research. > Checked the web site and found the school and called, gave info and the  > name of the student and the person answering knew the name. In fact she gave > the last name of the student (Wagh) and referred me to the Principal of the > Middle School. I talked to him (Donald Lam) and he confirmed that it is a > project they have given some students. I told him of our concerns over  > such emails and suggested he talk with the student and encourage any to > follow up on responses so those receiving such requests will know they are > actually from a student. He said he will and also talk to the parents. > > My reluctance in responding to such requests is when there is no  > indication of what research the student has already done. > > Holice > THANKS SO MUCH HOLICE. SO GREAT OF YOU TO DO THE FOLLOW UP. I FELT THE KID WAS SINCERE, AND AM GLAD TO KNOW IT WAS "FOR REAL." HOWEVER, I HAVE HAD NOT ONE WORD FROM SHINI SINCE SHE FIRST WROTE, NOT EVEN SINCE YOUR GENEROUS FOLLOW-UP CALLS TO THE SCHOOL. SIGNS OF THE TIMES PERHAPS. AGAIN YOU ALL ARE WONDERFUL.

THANKS, JULIE > > > -