Subject: Re: Fw: quilt sighting in movie From: Meandle217 <meandle217'aol.com>

I also noticed the double wedding ring quilt in the cart in that movie and ' wondered if my eyes were deceiving me. Marilyn ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ebay and UGRR From: Mitzioakes'aol.com

Amen to Kris Driessen.......Mitzi from Vermont

In a message dated 2/20/2012 6:28:54 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, krisdriessen'yahoo.com writes:

What quilt activists we are!

I am annoyed by the unpatriotic and mercenary attitude of the seller of the QOV quilt on Ebay. I understand that QOV can't prove it was stolen, but the seller has been declining to show it was lawfully obtained. Donna, you can do what you want BUT if does turn out to be stolen, your son will have to return it.

That said, probably the whole thing will get dropped. (sigh)

Since I am still in activist mode, I sent an E-mail to both the newspaper and Lehman college asking them politely to check their facts and PLEASE honor the real heros of the UGRR.

I am awful cranky for such nice weather:-))

Kris

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Subject: RE: green fabric info -- xenia From: "Janet" <seamstress6139'bigpond.com> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 13:22:06 +1100 X-Message-Number: 3

I cannot confirm the 1770 date but I do have several antique quilts from that era. Some of the green fabrics used in them would fit into Xenia's timeline.

I should perhaps take some photos! People always remark on the greens whenever I show the quilts. I have never seen anything in reproduction fabrics to match the colour accurately.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: RE: green fabric info -- xenia From: Xenia Cord <xenia'legacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 08:57:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

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The date given by Lyles was approximate: "This from J.N.Lyles, a dye '

historian, in The Art and Craft of Natural Dyeing, 1990: Scheele's green (blue-stone sage, green arsenic sage, or arsenic sage) appeared '

about 1770, and while it was lightfast on cotton, linen, and paper, it '

was extremely poisonous."

You can search for Scheele, Paris Green, Sheele's green. Here are some other easily found sources:

'46rom Wiki - Scheele's Green, also called Schloss Green, is chemically '

a cupric hydrogen arsenite (also called copper arsenite or acidic copper arsenite), CuHAsO3. It is a compound similar to Paris Green. It '

is a green pigment, of yellowish hue and was used in the past in some '

paints but has since fallen out of use due to its toxicity.

Scheele's Green was invented in 1775 by Carl Wilhelm Scheele.[1] By the end of the 19th century, it virtually replaced the older green pigments based on copper carbonate

'46rom Mirriam-Webster - Schee'B7le \'CB'88sh'C4'81-l'C9'\ Carl ' Wilhelm (1742''93 1786), Swedish chemist. Scheele is most famous as the chemist who is now credited with discovering oxygen at least two years before Joseph '

Priestley. (Priestley had long been accepted as the original discoverer.) Scheele spent his life as an apothecary, working in his small chemical laboratory in his spare time. He first described Scheele's green in an article on arsenic published in 1775.

Xenia'

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Subject: quilt sighting in movie From: "Kim Baird" <kbaird'cableone.net> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 08:22:32 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

I suppose everyone else has seen it long ago, but I finally watched Greta Garbo in Ninotchka on TV. A fun movie!

When we see Ninotchka's room in Moscow, one of her roommates has a log cabin courthouse steps quilt on her bed. Kim

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Subject: QOV on EBay questions answered From: "Marlene Royse" <marleneroyse'nc.rr.com> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 08:47:22 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

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I emailed QOV from their website on Saturday, Feb 18 and received replies from the Executive Director and Deputy Director which are shown below. They are aware of the situation and taking action.

Marlene Royse

From: June Moore [mailto:june'QOVF.org] Sent: Monday, February 20, 2012 2:10 PM Cc: Lori Kutch; 'Catherine Roberts'; Judie Yates Subject: QOV on EBay questions answered Importance: High

To all who have inquired about the QOV offered at auction on EBay:

I apologize for not replying sooner. The person who monitors this request for information email is away.

Here are the facts as I and our Board of Directors know them:

. QOVs are NOT allowed to be auctioned as fundraisers.

. The piecer and quilter completed the QOV in 2007, and it was sent to a point of contact to be awarded to the wounded.

. It is not possible for QOVF to keep a list of each recipient because of privacy requirements and the sheer volume of QOVs awarded by POCs in hospitals, medical evacuation facilities, and medical centers.

. We do not know how the seller acquired the QOV.

. We do not know whether the quilt was awarded. We do know that the recipient's name was not written in the blank left for that.

. This is the second incidence in eight years and over 60,000 Quilts of Valor that we have learned of one being put on EBay.

. I emailed the seller 2.17.2012 as soon as I was alerted, but the seller has refused to reply to either me or the piecer of the quilt.

. Our QOVF Destinations Coordinator, as well as many other members of our community have emailed the seller with no replies.

. Requests to email the seller have been posted by me on our QOVF Chat list, QOVF Staff list, and our Quilts of Valor Facebook page.

If you have further questions and comments, you may contact me by email or telephone.

Quilting to Honor & Comfort,

June D. Moore

Executive Director

Quilts of Valor Foundation

www.QOVF.org

509-346-9332

From: lorilovesred'gmail.com [mailto:lorilovesred'gmail.com] On Behalf Of Lori Kutch Sent: Monday, February 20, 2012 6:23 PM To: marleneroyse'nc.rr.com Cc: June Moore Subject: Re: QOV quilt for sale on E-bay

Dear Ms Royse

Thank you for bringing this to our attention and for your concern.

It is not the Quilts of Valor Foundation policy to have Quilts of Valor be bought or sold. It is always our intention that they be given freely to honor and comfort those touched by war.

Our Executive Director is making contact with the E-bay seller to negotiate the removal of the quilt from e-bay sales.

Lori Kutch

Deputy Director

Quilts of Valor Foundation

lori'qovf.org

www.qovf.org <http://www.qovf.org/>

On Sat, Feb 18, 2012 at 5:37 AM, <marleneroyse'nc.rr.com> wrote:

Contact us Inquiry at qovf.org Please find below Information for Inquiry. Name : Marlene Royse State : North Carolina Email : marleneroyse'nc.rr.com Subject : QOV quilt for sale on E-bay Message : It has come to my attention that a QOV quilt is for sale on E-bay. It seems that it has never been given to a soldier. The link is: http://www.ebay.com/itm/MAGNIFICENT-STARS-STRIPES-Quilt-Made-Soldiers-SEE-/3 00665735766?pt'Quilts <http://www.ebay.com/itm/MAGNIFICENT-STARS-STRIPES-Quilt-Made-Soldiers-SEE-/ 300665735766?pt'Quilts&hash'item4601130a56#ht_500wt_1413> &hash'item4601130a56#ht_500wt_1413 or http://tinyurl.com/76yao66 I am distressed to see this and wonder how it could happen. Thank you for all this organization does to honor our military. Marlene Royse

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Subject: I-80 From: litwinow62'msn.com Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 09:32:11 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

I just drove past the UGRR rest stop on I-80. The quilt blocks on the building are wonderful. The brass information sign is a review of HIV. ' The DOT only contacted artists when designing the plaza. I did write but got no response.

Continuing west, I-80 goes right past the Hoover birth place, library, museum and grave site. At one time there was a small exhibit that stated ' John Brown followers had some training in the county. I really doubt that the Quakers in the area participated. Catherine Litwinow in Iowa where we have a half inch of snow.

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: QOV quilt story From: "Gale Slagle" <glslag'cox.net> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 10:46:48 -0800 X-Message-Number: 8

My quilt guild had a sew day last year to make Quilts of Valor quilts. The Quilts of Valor quilts are made with love and meant to bring comfort and warmth to the families who receive them. Hearing about kids roll up a quilt to watch TV makes me happy. It reminds me of the final scene in the movie Descendants when the family appeared to be comforted by that well loved antique Hawaiian Quilt. It is good to know that one of the QOV quilts brought warmth and comfort to a family. Thanks for sharing -- Gale

Jocelyn wrote: ---- a student of mine whose husband received one...she told me it was so nice to put down on the floor and let the kids roll up in it to watch TV. ----

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Subject: RE: eleanor burns ugrr From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larryw'greenhills.net> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 13:08:07 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

I have explained that it is a myth to members of our guild that were ' making the quilt from Eleanors's book. They said they knew and did not care. ' The quilt is cool. So, I gave up and had a cuppa tea. Sherrie Wohlgemuth Missouri

-----Original Message----- From: ikwlt [mailto:ikwlt'yahoo.com] Sent: Monday, February 20, 2012 7:47 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] eleanor burns ugrr

<snip> Unfortunately some quilt shops teach the UGRR quilt that is from Eleanor Burns' book. She has done so much to perpetuate the myth with that book. Since so many quilters like her and her books, they believe in the myth. And what will make it even more difficult for us historians is that she is the inductee of the Quilters Hall of Fame this year. I have come across quite a few of these quilts in my area, and the makers are believers.'3D ' Caryl Schuetz <snip>

i was very anxious to see the eleanor burns book when it first came out ' and must say i was pleasantly surprised. in the beginning of her book she ' does say that the story of the ugrr quilt code came from one woman's oral ' story. i don't have the book or would quote it here for everyone. --- the ' bad thing is that basically no one reads that, or if they do it is skimmed briefly and unless you are looking for it as a disclaimer it won't be noticed. i've approached our local quilt shop where it is taught as a ' class and repeatedly reminded the teacher to be sure to explain the origin of ' the story in the context it was originally given when she begins the ' class. who knows if it does any good, but i think every little bit helps. things ' are much better these days than they were when the HIPV book came out and i ' know it is because of quilt historians and word of mouth. does anyone know ' if that roadside rest in cedar county iowa that displayed the quilt blocks is still in existence?

patti

________________________________

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: larryw'greenhills.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1524003X'lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: AZ Regional Quilt Study Weekend From: "Stan/Lenna Singer/DeMarco" <demsing'msn.com> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 16:58:46 -0700 X-Message-Number: 10

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Hi all,

The AZ Quilt Study is hosting a Regional Quilt Study weekend on Friday ' and Saturday, March 23, 24 at the AZ Historical Society Museum in Tucson, ' AZ. Sponsored by the AZ Centennial Quilt Project and the AZ Quilters Hall of ' Fame we will celebrate Arizona's centennial birthday and focus on AZ quilt ' history.

Julie Silber will be our featured speaker with her lecture QUILTS IN ' WOMEN'S LIVES. In addition to the two days of quilt lectures attendees will get ' a chance to view the milestone exhibition 100 YEARS-100 QUILTS, including the ' magnificent Centennial quilt.

AZ speakers include: Janet Carruth - The Quilts of Emma Andres Carolyn O'Bagy Davis - Hopi Quilting (including a tour of the Hopi Quilt exhibit) Helen Young Frost - GRAND ENDEAVORS and the AZ quilt project Jean Carlton - Cold Trunk Show focusing on quilts at the time of ' statehood.

For further information, registration and hotel information please vist ' the AZ Quilters Hall of Fame website:

http://www.arizonaquiltershalloffame.org<http://www.arizonaquiltershallof' fame.org/>

Look on the right hand side of the home page for the red and green ' exploding star quilt. The link to registration is there.

We hope to have attendees from far and wide. This is a very special time ' for quilters in AZ as well as for all Arizonans as we celebrte our 100th ' year of statehood. Information about the AZ Centennial Quilt Project can be ' found on the AZ Quilters Hall of Fame website.

If you have any questions please contact me. We'd love to have EVERYONE ' come!!

Lenna DeMarco in beautiful, 100 years old Arizona

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Subject: I don't believe it. UGRR From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephanie'stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 21:09:11 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

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Tonight in class (working on my masters in history) we were presenting our proposals for our final projects (akin to our thesis but we are all teachers planning units of study for our various classes-ever level of class from Kindergarten to college level).

Would you believe that a 4th grade teacher eagerly shared her plans to develop a unit on how quilts and songs were used to give coded messages on the underground railroad. Gulp. She had some "great" children's books on the topic. ARRRRRRGHHHHHHHHH.

You would be proud of me. I did speak up, as gently as possible.

She held up Hidden in Plain View as her primary source. "Have you seen this book?"

I told her that I was very familiar with that book.

She asked, "It isn't TRUE?!"

I said that the book is based on one woman's story told at an open air market and that there are no primary documents (slave narratives) etc. etc. You get the idea.

I offered to e-mail her some new resources on the topic and she took it quite well.

What was really great was that our professor backed my play and sent her to the national underground railway museum to look for insights.

I'll send her Brackman's paper and the paragraph that was recently shared on this list.

WHEW........

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: I don't believe it. UGRR From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen'yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2012 11:19:52 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

Well, you can refer to her a letter that Jacquelin Tobin wrote a local school district about 10 years ago:

http://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/greenway/leahy/ugrr/quiltsdebate.htm

She explained to those school kids that the book was just "informed conjecture" and that she never meant the actual blocks to be taken literally.

Kris

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Subject: Stephanie's UGRR discussion. From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephanie'stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2012 15:51:29 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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I followed up on my "in-class" challenge today with this e-mail.

Stephanie Whitson

Just FYI:

The UGRR quilt issue is a controversy that is a "hot button" among textile historians, and it's been hashed and rehashed on some quilt history discussion loops that I'm on over the years. (I'm an amateur textile historian and have taken hours of instruction in dating textiles, quilt appraisal, etc. and help with quilt id days up at the international quilt study center & museum) I heard the author of the Hidden in Plain View book speak when the book first came out. It's a fascinating book, but over the years the story has taken on a life of its own. Here are the most recent things that have been presented to me by quilt historians on the topic for your consideration as you plan your unit of study.

<http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/Quilts_and_the_Underground_Railroad_Revis ited_-_Interview_with_Historian_Giles_R._Wright.html> http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/Quilts_and_the_Underground_Railroad_Revisi ted_-_Interview_with_Historian_Giles_R._Wright.html <http://www.freedomcenter.org/underground-railroad/history/myths/> http://www.freedomcenter.org/underground-railroad/history/myths/

<http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/bhistory/underground_railroad/myth s.htm> http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/bhistory/underground_railroad/myths .htm

<http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/Fact_Sheet_on_the_Quilt_Code.html> http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/Fact_Sheet_on_the_Quilt_Code.html

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Subject: Re: I don't believe it. UGRR From: Kittencat3'aol.com Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2012 06:29:35 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

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In a message dated 2/22/2012 2:47:25 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, krisdriessen'yahoo.com writes:

_http://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/greenway/leahy/ugrr/quiltsdebate.htm_ (http://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/greenway/leahy/ugrr/quiltsdebate.htm)

I'd never seen that letter before. What a self-justifying, insulting slam against quilt historians! If anything, I'm less impressed with Jacqueline Tobin than I was before, and I'm one of the people who wrote to her asking for clarification and never received a reply.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Civil War Quilt Question From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen'yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2012 08:47:15 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Well, on a not-terribly-related subject, I have a question.

I mentioned that I am doing a presentation on pre civil war quilts this weekend to a group of quilters. To make it interesting for them, I am planning on showing them some early quilts that I own that are the ordinary every-day use type.

As I was pulling them out and patterning the blocks, I was noticing that a lot of pre civil war quilt blocks seem to be the X type. By that I mean the pieced motif forms an X on the block. For example, the album block or a quarter square triangle block.

My question is: is this just co-incidence or was that an actual theme? Or am I just reading more into a diagonal seam than I should?

I am also not seeing a lot of pre-civil war quilts set on point. Was this more of a post civil war and/or a 20th century setting? I did look through my books and poke around the internet a bit but I am not sure how much of this is me seeing what I want to see.

Has anyone else noticed the same thing?

Kris

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Subject: program at the MFA, Boston From: Lynne Bassett <lynne'lynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2012 17:06:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

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For those of you in the Boston area, I'd like to alert you to a movie to be shown next week at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston:

_http://www.mfa.org/search/programs/Stitched

_Hope to see you there!

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: Civil War Quilt Question From: "Roberta (Bobbe) Benvin" <quiltsndogs'aol.com> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 01:01:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Kris,

Checking in from south-central PA; York County, to be specific. My own collection of antique quilts focuses mainly on pre-Civil War era, and contains a sizable percentage with blocks set on-point. In fact, when I make reproduction quilts, I generally set the squares on-point because that is what I am so used to seeing. I have also participated in the York County Quilt Documentation project since its inception, and find this to be true in this area. Of the hundreds of early quilts that I have seen/examined, I have come to the conclusion that the Dbl.Irish Chain, Nine-Patch, and Uneven Nine-Patch were predominant.

Bobbe Benvin ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hey, they published my letter From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen'yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 04:46:17 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

and Judy's, which was far better written.

http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/readers-sound-slave-quilts-pension-reform-article-1.1027039?localLinksEnabled'false

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Subject: Kris question From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer'hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 09:13:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi Kris and all - as an appraiser in Florida'2C I am probably in a unique ' position. My clients come from all over the eastern U.S.'2C New ENgland'2C' and midwest-ish over to Ohio Illiinois'2C Indiana'2C Michigan. May as wel' l say the upper eastern quadrant of the country. I say that to say this: ' I see a LOT of quilts from a lot of places'2C and I fear I am going to shat' ter the just-beginning theory about diagonal sets. I see a lot of them in ' the NE areas in the pre-war era. Particularly album signature quilts'2C as' you mentioned in the Chimney Sweep/Album pieced patterns (NOT applique alb' ums.) Most of the ones I see from 1840's-50's are actually in a diagonal s' etting with fairly narrow sashing.I imagine some of the list members from V' T'2C NH'2C MA can verify that. Or blast it into oblivion. But that has been my observation - just casual' '2C noted in my head'2C not researched.

Teddy Pruett

www.teddypruett.com Art is the only way to run away without leaving home. -Twyla Tharp

'

--_3fd2f661-aaa7-4c74-9fee-04804af17cca_--

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 23, 2012 From: "M. Chapple" <mem914'yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 05:49:35 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

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I've spent some time going through the quilt index and the documentation bo' oks looking at civil warquilt patterns to use in my re-enacting and livi' ng history presentations.From what I've seen, the x or diagonal is no' t a conscious theme. I've seen a number of patterns called "crosses" or ' "road to (fill in the blank)" that use this theme, but most of them seem to' be variations on a pattern. I have also noticed that most of the civil ' war and pre-civil war quilts were not done on point. I think this may be' a carry-over from the medallion quilts of earlier times, but that is only ' my opinion.It may also have been that it was easier to work in a square ' than a diamond, and reduced the amount of fabric needed for a background, a' gain only my opinion.'0A'0AThis would be an interesting research project' for someone with the time.'0A'0AMary in Virginia '0AWhere it's 65 yeste' rday and 40 tomorrow'0A'0AFrom: Quilt History List digest <qhl'lyris.quiltr' opolis.com>'0ATo: qhl digest recipients <qhl'lyris.quiltropolis.com> '0ASen' t: Friday, February 24, 2012 12:01 AM'0ASubject: qhl digest: February 23, 2' 012'0A'0AQHL Digest for Thursday, February 23, 2012.'0A'0A1. Re: I don't be' lieve it. UGRR'0A2. Civil War Quilt Question'0A3. program at the MFA, Bosto' n'0A'0A--------------------------------------------------------------------' --'0A'0ASubject: Re: I don't believe it. UGRR'0AFrom: Kittencat3'aol.com'0A' Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2012 06:29:35 -0500 (EST)'0AX-Message-Number: 1'0A'0A--pa' rt1_70606.58c55817.3c777d1f_boundary'0AContent-Type: text/plain; charset'3D' "US-ASCII"'0AContent-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit'0A'0A'0A'0AIn a message dated ' 2/22/2012 2:47:25 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, '0Akrisdriessen'yahoo.com ' writes:'0A'0A_http://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/greenway/leahy/ugrr/quiltsdeba' te.htm_ '0A(http://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/greenway/leahy/ugrr/quiltsdebate' .htm) '0A'0AI'd never seen that letter before. What a self-justifying, i' nsulting slam '0Aagainst quilt historians! If anything, I'm less impr' essed with Jacqueline '0ATobin than I was before, and I'm one of the peo' ple who wrote to her asking '0Afor clarification and never received a re' ply.'0A'0A'0ALisa Evans'0A'0A'0A'0A--part1_70606.58c55817.3c777d1f_boundary' --'0A'0A'0A----------------------------------------------------------------' ------'0A'0ASubject: Civil War Quilt Question'0AFrom: Kris Driessen <krisdr' iessen'yahoo.com>'0ADate: Thu, 23 Feb 2012 08:47:15 -0800 (PST)'0AX-Message' -Number: 2'0A'0AWell, on a not-terribly-related subject, I have a question.' '0A'0AI mentioned that I am doing a presentation on pre civil war quilts th' is weekend to a group of quilters. To make it interesting for them, I am' planning on showing them some early quilts that I own that are the ordinar' y every-day use type. '0A'0AAs I was pulling them out and patterning the' blocks, I was noticing that a lot of pre civil war quilt blocks seem to be' the X type. By that I mean the pieced motif forms an X on the block.' For example, the album block or a quarter square triangle block.'0A'0AMy q' uestion is: is this just co-incidence or was that an actual theme? Or am' I just reading more into a diagonal seam than I should? '0A'0AI am also no' t seeing a lot of pre-civil war quilts set on point. Was this more of a ' post civil war and/or a 20th century setting? I did look through my book' s and poke around the internet a bit but I am not sure how much of this is ' me seeing what I want to see. '0A'0AHas anyone else noticed the same thi' ng?'0A'0AKris'0A'0A'0A-----------------------------------------------------' -----------------'0A'0ASubject: program at the MFA, Boston'0AFrom: Lynne Ba' ssett <lynne'lynnezwoolsey.com>'0ADate: Thu, 23 Feb 2012 17:06:26 -0500'0AX' -Message-Number: 3'0A'0AThis is a multi-part message in MIME format.'0A----' ----------060904090509030109030402'0AContent-Type: text/plain; charset'3DIS' O-8859-1; format'3Dflowed'0AContent-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit'0A'0AFor those ' of you in the Boston area, I'd like to alert you to a movie to '0Abe shown ' next week at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston:'0A'0A_http://www.mfa.org/sear' ch/programs/Stitched'0A'0A_Hope to see you there!'0A'0AAll best,'0ALynne'0A' '0A--------------060904090509030109030402--'0A'0A'0A'0A'0A---'0A'0AEND OF D' IGEST'0A'0A---'0AYou are currently subscribed to qhl as: mem914'yahoo.com' '0ATo unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1850142T'lyris.quiltropol' is.com'0AFor more information, articles and archives, visit our home page a' t http://QuiltHistory.com. ---1458831725-530186498-1330091375':57843--

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Subject: Re: Hey, they published my letter From: Mary Persyn <mary.persyn'valpo.edu> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 08:44:54 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

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Congratulations to both of you!!

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn Associate Dean for Law Library Services Valparaiso University Law School 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 (219) 465-7830 FAX (219) 465-7917 mary.persyn'valpo.edu

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Subject: Album X Block From: donbeld'pacbell.net Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 06:22:13 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 6

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Hi Kris, the Album X Block--both the skinny X and the fat X (yes there are two), in my studies, was probably the most popular inscribed block both bef' ore the Civil War and during. As they were usually used in gift quilts, I suspect it was because they were easy but attractive blocks to make espec' ially when there is a deadline. It is one reason I picked the Skinny X Album block as the block of choice for the Home of the Brave Quilt Project. After the War (and during it) you see many more Album (Chimney Sweep) blocks.

I, too, have noted the popularity in the 1880's of on point blocks--usually set with alternating one piece blocks.

best, Don ---802094031-1382225371-1330093333':20731--

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Subject: Jacqueline Tobin's letter on school web site From: quiltarkmv'yahoo.com Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 05:26:52 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 7

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Normally, I don't say much (especially if it is negative); however, I read the letter by Jacqueline Tobin which is posted on the Greenwood Elementary School's web site by teacher David Leahy. And....I just couldn't let it pass unnoticed. So I critically analized the letter (which does not need to be blasted all over the Internet, please).

I have not heard anything about this letter from the author of Hidden in Plain View. It surprised me that it appears on a school web site that has not been updated since 10/06/2000. http://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/greenway/leahy/ugrr/quiltsdebate.htm

In the letter the author claims: " No quilts per se were used on the escape; no quilts were taken on the journey, no quilts hung outside safe houses, etc according to Ozella's story. In her code the quilt pattern names were appropriated by the slaves on the plantation to be used as mnemonic devices; to trigger memory of clues they could remember as they journeyed north. All of it was in their mind;" This seems to be justification for not finding any artifacts or documentation of UGGR claims outside the oral history of 1 person from 1 family.

Also in the letter, the author makes several excuses: "The graphics editor made a mistake". And, "...the best scholars in related fields that we could find. They read our research and wrote what they wanted; we did not dictate any words to these scholars." Then she adds: "While we recognize there is argument in the "mostly white" quilt community about oral tradition and this story......"And, "all the scholars who have heard our lectures have come to us and stated that we were absolutely on the right track with this story. If some of the specific interpretations we suggested are not totally accurate; the substance has not been challenged as not only possible, but likely. "

But the excuses continue with "The log cabin quilt, which unfortunately is poorly pictured in our book" and " It is sad that most Americans believe that our history begins and ends with our borders. "She further continues with "As to the idea that this story was a ploy by Ozella to sell her quilts; how insulting." And she goes on to explain the story was given by someone older who was dying of cancer and, therefore, believeable.

But again with the excuses......"The book was written for the average, non quilter, not the quilt historian." To explain away the use of new quilts in the books, she offered: "There was not time to seek out antique quilts, nor were we trying to be accurate as to the date of the quilt shown. These quilts were illustrative. "

In case the author missed it, the online and media debates have been swirling around her book and this story since the book was published. So when they write that "no one has taken us up on our offer to hold a panel discussion of the elements of this book", I ask....really?

In the next to the last paragraph she again turns to another family's oral history about a quilt from the Scott family which was replicated and offers this as vague proof of an unstated theory. In the same paragraph she offers more proof from an unidentified "museum planetarium astronomer " which is apparently supposed to validate the existence of UGGR quilts or maybe it's something about the Scott family quilt--the author does not make that clear.

In her final paragraph, the author justifies the UGGR story by the research she has done with Dr. Dobard: "We have just tried to present the story and interpret it in light of the research we have done." The author wants us to believe the UGGR story because : "I remain honored that Ozella told her story to me and told me to 'write it down.' " Clearly their research methods were questioned by more than just a few people, but mostly by a community of qualified historians. And again, while oral history is an important aspect of history, it cannot stand alone...it needs documentation and artifacts. [Has Dr. Dobard retracted his initial support of the UGGR theories since 2000? I seem to recall that several authorities in African American history have retracted their support due to questions about the research.]

Her final statement should not escape scrutiny: "History will have to decide the veracity of her story. " No, I think the historians will decide after looking for corroborating documentation and historical realia and analizing the research methods used by the author of Hidden in Plain View.

I don't find the letter very convincing. IMHO C. Ark, Urbana, Ohio QHL member --411857043-1657595717-1330090012':11884--

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Subject: Re: Hey, they published my letter From: Judy Schwender <sister3603'yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 08:57:55 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 8

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Hi all,'0AThank you Kris. We all do what we can. Here is what m' y letter said, in full:"On Wednesday, February 15, 2012, an article by Lynn' McCamey ran which was titled ''9CQuilt exhibition at Lehman College u' ncovers secret messages from the Underground Railroad''9D. What ' a shame. Quilt historians and scholars of history do not find any per' suasive evidence that quilts were used as signals on the Underground Railro' ad. You are only helping to perpetuate a myth.'0A'0A"For once i' t would be nice if someone researched such topics before running these '' ''9Cnews''9D articles."'0A'0AJudy Schwender'0A'0A'0A'0A_' _______________________________'0AFrom: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen'yahoo.c' om>'0ATo: Quilt History List <qhl'lyris.quiltropolis.com> '0ASent: Friday, ' February 24, 2012 6:46 AM'0ASubject: [qhl] Hey, they published my letter'0A' '0Aand Judy's, which was far better written.'0A'0Ahttp://www.nydailynews.co' m/opinion/readers-sound-slave-quilts-pension-reform-article-1.1027039?local' LinksEnabled'3Dfalse'0A'0A'0A'0A'0A---'0AYou are currently subscribed to qh' l as: sister3603'yahoo.com.'0ATo unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qh' l-1442697G'lyris.quiltropolis.com ---1933122451-1960332558-1330102675':19553--

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Subject: quilt repair in NYC? From: Judy Schwender <sister3603'yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 09:23:52 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 9

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Hello all,'0AI have been asked if there is someone in the New York City are' a who repairs quilts. The quilt in question is about 75 years old; I do ' not know the extent of the work.'0ADoes anyone know of someone who does thi' s type of work in the NYC area?'0AThank you.'0AJudy Schwender --1886287700-1135268960-1330104232':92573--

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Subject: RE: Hey, they published my letter From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephanie'stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 11:54:12 -0600 X-Message-Number: 10

Good Work! StephWhitson

-----Original Message----- From: Kris Driessen [mailto:krisdriessen'yahoo.com] Sent: Friday, February 24, 2012 6:46 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Hey, they published my letter

and Judy's, which was far better written.

http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/readers-sound-slave-quilts-pension-reform -article-1.1027039?localLinksEnabled'false

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Subject: Re: quilt repair in NYC? From: "Judy Grow" <judy.grow'comcast.net> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 13:04:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Tracyt Jamar is in NYC

----- Original Message ----- From: "Judy Schwender" <sister3603'yahoo.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl'lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Friday, February 24, 2012 12:23 PM Subject: [qhl] quilt repair in NYC?

Hello all, I have been asked if there is someone in the New York City area who repairs quilts. The quilt in question is about 75 years old; I do not know the extent of the work. Does anyone know of someone who does this type of work in the NYC area? Thank you. Judy Schwender

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Subject: Re: quilt repair in NYC? From: Judy Schwender <sister3603'yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 10:14:23 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 12

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Thank you, Judy. I appreciate it.'0AJudy Schwender'0A'0A'0A_____________' ___________________'0AFrom: Judy Grow <judy.grow'comcast.net>'0ATo: Quilt H' istory List <qhl'lyris.quiltropolis.com> '0ASent: Friday, February 24, 2012' 12:04 PM'0ASubject: [qhl] Re: quilt repair in NYC?'0A'0ATracyt Jamar is in' NYC'0A'0A'0A----- Original Message ----- From: "Judy Schwender" <sister360' 3'yahoo.com>'0ATo: "Quilt History List" <qhl'lyris.quiltropolis.com>'0ASent' : Friday, February 24, 2012 12:23 PM'0ASubject: [qhl] quilt repair in NYC?' '0A'0A'0AHello all,'0AI have been asked if there is someone in the New York' City area who repairs quilts. The quilt in question is about 75 years old;' I do not know the extent of the work.'0ADoes anyone know of someone who do' es this type of work in the NYC area?'0AThank you.'0AJudy Schwender'0A'0A--' -'0AYou are currently subscribed to qhl as: judy.grow'comcast.net.'0ATo uns' ubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442697G'lyris.quiltropolis.com'0A' '0A'0A'0A---'0AYou are currently subscribed to qhl as: sister3603'yahoo.com' .'0ATo unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1442697G'lyris.quiltropo' lis.com --1886287700-1663789303-1330107263':56202--

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Subject: Re: Jacqueline Tobin's letter on school web site From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn'rocketmail.com> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2012 15:39:13 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 13

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I don't normally pick on typos, but this one needs correction before this v' ery nice letter is passed on:'0AIt's 'analyzing', not 'analizing'. Analizin' g is something very, very different.'0A'0A'0AJocelyn'0A'0A'0A___________' _____________________'0A From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv'yahoo.com>'0ATo: Quil' t History List <qhl'lyris.quiltropolis.com> '0ASent: Friday, February 24, 2' 012 7:26 AM'0ASubject: [qhl] Jacqueline Tobin's letter on school web site' '0A '0ANormally, I don't say much (especially if it is negative); however, ' I read the letter by Jacqueline Tobin which is posted on the Greenwood Elem' entary School's web site by teacher David Leahy. And....I just couldn't let' it pass unnoticed. So I critically analized the letter (which does not nee' d to be blasted all over the Internet, please).'0A'0AI have not heard anyth' ing about this letter from the author of Hidden in Plain View. It surprised' me that it appears on a school web site that has not been updated since 10' /06/2000. http://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/greenway/leahy/ugrr/quiltsdebate.h' tm'0A'0AIn the letter the author claims: " No quilts per se were used on th' e escape; no quilts were taken on the journey, no quilts hung outside safe ' houses, etc according to Ozella's story. In her code the quilt pattern name' s were appropriated by the slaves on the plantation to be used as mnemonic ' devices; to trigger memory of clues they could remember as they journeyed n' orth. All of it was in their mind;" This seems to be justification for not ' finding any artifacts or documentation of UGGR claims outside the oral hist' ory of 1 person from 1 family.'0A'0AAlso in the letter, the author makes se' veral excuses: "The graphics editor made a mistake". And, "...the best scho' lars in related fields that we could find. They read our research and wrote' what they wanted; we did not dictate any words to these scholars." Then sh' e adds: "While we recognize there is argument in the "mostly white" quilt c' ommunity about oral tradition and this story......"And, "all the scholars w' ho have heard our lectures have come to us and stated that we were absolute' ly on the right track with this story. If some of the specific interpretati' ons we suggested are not totally accurate; the substance has not been chall' enged as not only possible, but likely. "'0A'0ABut the excuses continue wit' h "The log cabin quilt, which unfortunately is poorly pictured in our book"' and " It is sad that most Americans believe that our history begins and en' ds with our borders. "She further continues with "As to the idea that this ' story was a ploy by Ozella to sell her quilts; how insulting." And she goes' on to explain the story was given by someone older who was dying of cancer' and, therefore, believeable.'0A'0ABut again with the excuses......"The boo' k was written for the average, non quilter, not the quilt historian." To ex' plain away the use of new quilts in the books, she offered: "There was not ' time to seek out antique quilts, nor were we trying to be accurate as to th' e date of the quilt shown. These quilts were illustrative. "'0A'0AIn case t' he author missed it, the online and media debates have been swirling around' her book and this story since the book was published. So when they write t' hat "no one has taken us up on our offer to hold a panel discussion of the ' elements of this book", I ask....really?'0A'0AIn the next to the last parag' raph she again turns to another family's oral history about a quilt from th' e Scott family which was replicated and offers this as vague proof of an un' stated theory. In the same paragraph she offers more proof from an unidenti' fied "museum planetarium astronomer " which is apparently supposed to valid' ate the existence of UGGR quilts or maybe it's something about the Scott fa' mily quilt--the author does not make that clear.'0A'0AIn her final paragrap' h, the author justifies the UGGR story by the research she has done with Dr' . Dobard: "We have just tried to present the story and interpret it in ligh' t of the research we have done." The author wants us to believe the UGGR st' ory because :'0A"I remain honored that Ozella told her story to me and told' me to 'write it down.' " Clearly their research methods were questioned by' more than just a few people, but mostly by a community of qualified histor' ians. And again, while oral history is an important aspect of history, it c' annot stand alone...it needs documentation and artifacts. [Has Dr. Dobard r' etracted his initial support of the UGGR theories since 2000? I seem to rec' all that several authorities in African American history have retracted the' ir support due to questions about the research.]'0A'0AHer final statement s' hould not escape scrutiny: "History will have to decide the veracity of her' story. " No, I think the historians will decide after looking for corro' borating documentation and historical realia and analizing the research met' hods used by the author of Hidden in Plain View.'0A'0AI don't find the lett' er very convincing.'0AIMHO C. Ark, Urbana, Ohio'0AQHL member'0A'0A---'0AYou'

Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2012 18:13:19 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

We all (most of us) know what you're talking about but don't you all think we should to refer to these quilts as "Civil War Era Quilts" as opposed to "Civil War Quilts"?

They were only made during the period , they had nothing to do with the war. Well, at least most of them had nothing to do with it.

We don't refer to others as "World War One Quilts" or "World War Two Quilts"

Just thinking out loud....

Darwin D. Bearley

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Subject: Re: Brit Version UGRR? From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn'rocketmail.com> Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2012 15:35:08 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

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Well, it's only fair that our British friends get their own urban legends. ' ;)'0AThe UGRR has so many...like Colonial houseswith tunnels in them: most ' likely they were built for escape hatches in case of attack by Indians or h' ostile troops, but of course everyone's sure that they were used for the UG' RR

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Subject: hidey-holes From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciark'earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 05:23:08 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Many houses, specially larger estate homes, Engladn, Ireland and Scotland,but even some smaller houses, had hidey holes for priests during the time of king Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Regarding hiding places, escape routes and such in early American homes, my grandmother's and grandfather's house had 2 such places on either side of the fireplace for hidingn from Indian attacks, as well as a sub-cellar with a small door (iron) that opened onto a tunnel that led to the the Greater Egg Harbor Bay. I was shown these as a child and then showed them to the later owners as an adult. The orginal owner of the house was a sea captain. It may give rise to rumors that are untrue. Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, TX

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63'yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 04:23:22 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

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Marcia wrote that her grandparents' house had "a sub-cellar with a small door that opened onto a tunnel that led to the Greater Egg Harbor Bay." It is my understanding that those were used during Prohibition. In which direction the 'beverages' were headed is still to be determined. :) :) :)

Mary Anne ---2114655128-2102453137-1330259002':61909--

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: "Debbie Welch" <deb'quiltingposs.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 08:05:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I've been in a hidey hole in a house in Essex, Mass where a portion of the wall beside the fireplace moved and behind the fireplace was a small room. I was told at the time it was to hide from Indians. I was about 12 at the time and it was incredibly neat!

Debbie in NJ

-----Original Message----- From: Mary Anne R [mailto:sewmuch63'yahoo.com] Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2012 7:23 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: hidey-holes

Marcia wrote that her grandparents' house had "a sub-cellar with a small door that opened onto a tunnel that led to the Greater Egg Harbor Bay." It is my understanding that those were used during Prohibition. In which direction the 'beverages' were headed is still to be determined. :) :) :)

Mary Anne

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Subject: Re: Civil War Quilts From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen'yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 05:29:56 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

I agree - the class I am doing today is entitled "Make a Civil War Era" block. I am struggling with the name of the series I am doing and thinking about Piece before War, since most of the blocks I am using were actually pieced during the events that led up to to the War Between the States.

Kris

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Subject: Re: Civil War Quilts From: "Kim Baird" <kbaird'cableone.net> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 08:25:41 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

The word you want is ante-bellum

Kim

-----Original Message----- From: Kris Driessen [mailto:krisdriessen'yahoo.com] Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2012 7:30 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: Civil War Quilts

I agree - the class I am doing today is entitled "Make a Civil War Era" block. I am struggling with the name of the series I am doing and thinking about Piece before War, since most of the blocks I am using were actually pieced during the events that led up to to the War Between the States.

Kris

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Subject: Re: Civil War Quilts From: Kittencat3'aol.com Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 09:25:57 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 6

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There were rumors for years that a dormitory at my college had been a stop on the Underground Railroad...and by God, the rumors turned out to be true. The dorm, Sessions House, had originally been the first house in Northampton to be built outside the wooden stockade in the early 18th century, and excavation in the cellar a few years ago revealed a tunnel that led underneath the street (Elm Street/Route 9) to a trail beside the Mill River.

The tunnel was originally built so that the owners could escape in case of attack by the local Native Americans, which was not nearly so paranoid as you might think so soon after the Deerfield Massacre. Later it was used to hide escaping slaves in the early 19th century; Northampton was an abolitionist stronghold, and the next town over, Florence, was the home of Sojourner Truth and a small, strongly abolitionist colony of silk manufacturers.

So sometimes the legends are true!

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciark'earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 10:08:31 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

What Debbie describes is what was in my grandpartent's house. and used for exactly the sasme reason. The sub basement and tunnel where built at the time of the home, early, early 1800s, and so pre-date Prohibition by a century or so. I believe the Good Captain might have moved a few "items" from shipboard to his house quietly, if you know what I mean. But that is pure conjecture on my part with no proof of it at all, so take that with a grain of salt, please. I stayed at the house as a child and loved it, when I could stay overnight with my grandmother, in the 1960s. They had the home for several years after my grandfather died, then she was persuaded to move, finally. I miss it. Ah, OK, now I'm homesick this morning! Marcia

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Subject: Anyone living in Missouri want to take this on? From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt'rockisland.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 13:05:47 -0800 X-Message-Number: 8

http://www.hannibal.net/features/x1771579942/Johnson-s-new-character-inspire d-by-a-quilt

Or

http://tinyurl.com/85op3fz

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Re: Anyone living in Missouri want to take this on? From: Mitzioakes'aol.com Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 16:26:02 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 9

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Will this ever end? I see now that I have my work ahead of me this season at one of Vermont's most famous Museums (the Shelburne) where I am a volunteer in their quilt building. I have tried for almost 10 years now to try to get this myth out of the way, but guess I will keep on trying. Thanks for sharing. Mitzi from Vermont

In a message dated 2/26/2012 4:06:15 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, karenquilt'rockisland.com writes:

http://www.hannibal.net/features/x1771579942/Johnson-s-new-character-inspire d-by-a-quilt

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelyn'rocketmail.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 19:15:40 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 10

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Lawrence, Kansas, had a network of tunnels under the downtown area. While i' t's believed that they were used during Prohibition, they were originally b' uilt to roll big barrels from the docks to the bars prior to that. Those ba' rrels were heavy, hard to wrassle into a wagon, and required stout horses t' o pull them through the crowded streets...but they could be rolled easily d' own a tunnel into the bar's basement. :) So when a shipload arrived, they'd' just roll the barrels through the tunnels, dropping them off at the variou' s bars along the way.'0A'0A'0AJocelyn'0A'0A'0A__________________________' ______'0A From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63'yahoo.com>'0ATo: Quilt History List ' <qhl'lyris.quiltropolis.com> '0ASent: Sunday, February 26, 2012 6:23 AM'0AS' ubject: [qhl] Re: hidey-holes'0A '0AMarcia wrote that her grandparents' hou' se had "a sub-cellar with a small door that opened onto a tunnel that led t' o the Greater Egg Harbor Bay." It is my understanding that those were used ' during Prohibition. In which direction the 'beverages' were headed is still' to be determined. :) :) :)'0A'0AMary Anne'0A'0A---'0AYou are currently sub' scribed to qhl as: Martinjocelyn'rocketmail.com.'0ATo unsubscribe send a bl' ank email to leave-qhl-1442652W'lyris.quiltropolis.com ---1952832855-665177590-1330312540':76568--

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephanie'stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 22:31:29 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

I think it's human nature to go for the most dramatic version of a story, especially when it comes to "history's mysteries." Everyone loves a good story, so clandestine and secret meanings are naturally ascribed to hidey-holes and loose floor boards and false walls and dugout basements. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: QUILT SALE From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellen'gmail.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 21:26:02 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi All,

At the risk of being shamelessly self-promoting, I wanted to let anyone who doesn't already know ~ that there is just ONE MORE DAYto take advantage of our sale on antique quilts. [See, it is a public service message... :) ]

Up to 50% OFF on ALL of our quilts -- through the end of Monday!

You can get there ONLY through these links:

http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2012/02/february-sale-page.html

and

http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2012/02/february-sale-page.html

Thanks, Julie Silber

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Subject: statement denying UGGR myth From: quiltarkmv'yahoo.com Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 04:18:12 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

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Send the paper and the school principal a note with this link and the quote from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. <http://www.freedomcenter.org/underground-railroad/history/myths/>

"One of the most famous symbols of the Underground Railroad is the quilt. Supposedly used as an indicator of a safe place, it is claimed that quilts were hung from roofs, barns, and fences to signal to enslaved individuals the location was a station on the Underground Railroad. There are two pieces of evidence that allow many historians to question the validity of Underground Railroad quilts. The first being that no former enslaved individuals accounts mentioned these quilts in the Works Progress Administration Slave Narratives from the 1930s. Second, that quilts also were not mentioned in any 19th Century slave narratives. Had these quilts been utilized by those participating in the Underground Railroad, it is likely that they would have appeared in at least a few of these narratives. There is also no hard evidence of their existence; no quilt with proven Underground Railroad usage has been found. Still, these quilts remain one of the most famous symbols of the Underground Railroad."

C. Ark, Urbana, Ohio QHL member

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Subject: Re: Anyone living in Missouri want to take this on? From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larryw'greenhills.net> Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 10:47:18 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I would need help. I don't have any of the documentation sources save so if you could privately email me ammunition I would talk to this gentleman. I am sure he wants to be factual in his character. At least I would hope so. I am 2 hours away from Hannibal but would even make a road trip to meet him and show him the evidence. :^). Tell me what to say and point me in the right direction.

Sherrie Wohlgemuth Missouri

-----Original Message----- From: Mitzioakes'aol.com [mailto:Mitzioakes'aol.com] Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2012 3:26 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: Anyone living in Missouri want to take this on?

Will this ever end? I see now that I have my work ahead of me this season at one of Vermont's most famous Museums (the Shelburne) where I am a volunteer in their quilt building. I have tried for almost 10 years now to try to get this myth out of the way, but guess I will keep on trying. Thanks for sharing. Mitzi from Vermont

In a message dated 2/26/2012 4:06:15 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, karenquilt'rockisland.com writes:

http://www.hannibal.net/features/x1771579942/Johnson-s-new-character-inspire d-by-a-quilt

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: larryw'greenhills.net. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1524003X'lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: escape routes From: Pepper Cory <pepcory'clis.com> Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

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This isn't about the UGRR but about earlier times--my sister married a Marshall in Maysville KY and that family actually got their farm as a land grant in the 1700s. For a long time, a stone stable made of limestone slabs dominated the farmyard. Then a doctor from Lexington offered her father-in-law some $ to tear down the old building so the doctor could cart away the stones and make himself a patio at his house. In that demolition process, the chimney was found to have 'foot stones' (slabs that lay flat but could be swung out to make steps) leading from the top to the bottom. The building also had slit windows for defense. It was thought that the foot stones indicated they might have been intended as an escape route from the haymow down the outside of the building and thus into the woods. I remember the lintel above the doors was one huge walnut beam. The haymow also yielded trunks full of family pictures and even a cutter (a sled horse carriage). I was lucky to see it once before it became a patio. Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--f46d04427182590f3104b9f521e2--

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Subject: FYI for researchers: 1940 census goes online April 2 From: textique'aol.com Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 16:45:26 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 5

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The National Archives will release the 1940 Census on April 2, 2012. It wil' l be available for online searching free of charge at http://www.1940census.arch' ives.gov. The 1940 Census will not have a name index when it opens on April 2, 2012. ' In order to locate someone, you will need to know his or her address and the C' ensus enumeration district in which that address was located. For more informati' on visit http://www.archives.gov/research/census/1940/start-research.html

Jan Thomas

A generation who ignores history has no past and no future ... Robert Heinl' ein

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Subject: Re: FYI for researchers: 1940 census goes online April 2 From: kyra hicks <kyra262'yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 21:55:20 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

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Jan,

Thank you for posting your note about "The National Archives will release t' he 1940 Census on April 2, 2012."

I'm too excited about April 2nd coming! I have a subscription to Ancestry.c' om and have been researching the extended family of the quilter Harriet Pow' ers (1837-1910). There is one great-grandson, born in the 1930s, who I woul' d LOVE to find in the 1940 census as he still may be alive. I can't tell fr' om the 1930s census if the g-g-son's mother was in GA or Greenville, SC or ' not when the son was born.

There are also three granddaughters who moved to Richmond, Virginia in the ' late 1920s who I would also like to confirmed where they lived in the 1940 ' census. One, if not two, of the girls moved to Baltimore, MD, where a br' anch of the family still lives.

So exciting! Best, Kyra in Arlington, VA

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Subject: Civil War Quilts (book) From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeks'gmail.com> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 06:41:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi All,

The recent comment about "Civil War Era" quilts has spurred me to post the following:

Kris has given me permission to let you know that although Amazon is currently "out" of our book, *Civil War Quilts,* both Don Beld and I have copies available for purchase. You can contact Don directly if you are in the West or prefer to order from him. You can purchase an autographed copy from me in one of several ways--check out my website (nearly finished!) www.pamweeksquilts.com, or on Amazon, I am the seller listed as comfortcotton. OR, contact me directly--info below. The price on my website includes shipping and handling. (media mail)

The book features northern Civil War history, photos and the histories of quilts made for use by Union Civil War soldiers, and instructions for making them. "Potholder" quilt information is included in both the history and instruction sections.

These quilts were made for donation for northern CW soldiers' use, and the stories represent the information currently available. Research continues, and I hope that we'll have a second edition so that the new information can be included. We know of 16 that survive (so far) and hope that more will come out of the woodwork as the sesquicentennial of the war increases awareness. Other features include information on the Home of the Brave Project that Don Beld founded, a Civil War legend, and other quilts.

Thanks to all for the wonderful discussions on this site!

Pam Weeks -- PO Box 123, Durham, NH 03824 603-661-2245

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 27, 2012 From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltn'comcast.net> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 07:21:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Just want to say, Pepper, that I thank you for that story about the stone slabs, what a shame that building was taken down, and for some patio. The potential for attack was always on our early settler's minds and our present day society could learn a thing or two from that practice, perhaps? Sad to think about. I grew up in a home in MA that had a bookcase door that let to an attic staircase. When people broke into our house, the never found it. My dad filmed a silly home movie once where a few friends of his dressed as "monsters" and came out of that secret staircase. I have a copy of a photo someplace... At any rate, I sure wish there were photos of that building. There is a home in Ashland, NH, that I have passed by every year of my life, up near Lake Winnepesaukee where we have a family cabin on a small lake, and it has been rumored that under it are underground railroad tunnels. I must stop the car, one day, if I see people in the yard working and make an enquiry as to weather it is true or not. If it is true, I will ask if I could take a photo or two for sharing with you all if I am brave enough. It is a private home and my request would depend on the reception I get if I ask about it all. Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Lone Star Quilt Study Group From: Donna Keating <donnakeating'sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 05:05:03 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

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My husband and I attended the first meeting of the Lone Star Quilt Study Gr' oup in Round Top, Texas last Saturday. The topic of discuss was cotton b' ag quilts. If you are interested in seeing a Smilebox slide show of the ' meeting and to read a little more about it, please visit my blog at http://' www.quiltingbeargal.blogspot.com It was a wonderful gathering of like-m' inded antique and vintage quilt lovers sharing our passion.'0A'0AI am truly' looking forward to the next meeting on August 25th in Waxahachie! '0A' '0ADonna Keating ~ "My soul is fed with needle and thread, my body with ' chocolate." '0AYou can read my Blog at: http://www.quiltingbeargal.blogspo' t.com ---802094031-1017339394-1330434303':57746--

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes, mysteries, & more From: Gaye Ingram <gingram'suddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 17:09:40 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Stephanie observed that people tend naturally to invest real or self-identified hiding places with mystery.

True, but as Abigail Adams observed of Benjamin Franklin's French philandering, what is natural is not necessarily right. And people who care about right and truth must remember that.

Reading the most recent discussion of UGRR on our list, I've felt the "oh-no-THIS-again!" feeling that I suspect many have felt. After all, it is an old theme, one particularly visible during Black History Month. And it is easy to say, "Oh, let them eat fallacy, if that's what they like."

But our duty is not necessarily to any particular person or group, but to truth.

So I admire those members of this list who, like Kris Driessen, have encouraged others to do what they can to replace error with truth, fallacy with fact---and have persevered in practicing what they preach. We've seen many examples that show persistence can succeed in this effort. The statue in NYC comes to mind immediately. If we could do it there....... It's comparatively easy to resist a new outrage. It's the one that continues that is hard to resist.

Just think: because of this list, Barbara's voice was heard beyond quilt circles, materials were compiled that can now be used to refute the UGGR myth in its various manifestations, changes in speakers and public information have been made in the direction of truth, and Ms. Burns at least added a mild, though ironic, disclaimer to perhaps the most widespread disseminator of this falsehood. We have no way of knowing the number of schools and teachers who have been required to revise their lessons because of a list member's contact.

Realizing this has reminded me that even in this time of blogs and Facebook groups that have access to photography, this list serves a really important purpose. After all, what's on Facebook today is generally forgotten by tomorrow. And blogs tend to be private in viewpoint and thus relatively limited in scope. Only Kris knows how many people read this list---and all of them joined because of an interest in history, not pleasing stories. Like Kris, we rally one another to action on the UGGR fabrications as well as others. We educate one another, but we also educate a much wider public.

Caryl Scheutz's recent post regarding the effect of Eleanor Burns' coming induction to the Quilters Hall of Fame struck me as particularly courageous. I'm sure there will be those who will call it a little lacking in sensitivity because it criticizes the work of a member and someone who has done so much to popularize quilting and to improve the practice of quilting. No one who quilts can deny Eleanor Burns' influence on quiltmaking in our time. And as women, we are sensitive to the feelings of other members, including those closely associated with the Hall of Fame.

Yet what Caryl said is true and important: Ms. Burns' book and the place of honor her coming honor will give her make it more difficult for others to put to rest the historical fallacy that link quilts with the UGRR. And to argue that the HOF recognizes influence alone is disingenuous. It recognizes positive contributions and established authority, and its members acquire authority by virtue of membership.

Someone said the offending book contains a new preface in which the author states the story of the quilt code is merely rumor. Did she change the title of the book? When we purchase how-to books, we seldom read prefaces or introductions anyway.

It would set a good example and make her forthcoming induction into the HOF less problematic if the author published something independent stating what appears to be the truth---that she was simply wrong about the quilt code, that she relied on unreliable information. Such a move would be courageous and would put her on the side of truth. Barring that, anyone trying to establish truth about the quilt codes can only wonder at the irony of her presence and the effect it will have on truth. After all, her bibliography will include the UGRR book. Of course, one might also take it out of publication if she were really concerned about its effects.

People like Caryl and Kris and Mitzi remind us what historians should do, and they encourage me and remind me that the historian's duty is to honor truth, even in the face of old and persevering dragons.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: RE: hidey-holes, mysteries, & more From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephanie'stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 17:44:18 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

I agree with everything Gaye said. Just wanted to clarify that I wasn't ' defending myth. I was not saying we shouldn't persist in our efforts to correct false ' history. My post was intended only to muse on what it is about human nature that ' makes myth so enduring in spite of historians' best efforts.

Not long ago I was part of a discussion that presented "proof" that ' Abraham Lincoln was a "born-again Christian." Apart from the obvious faux pas of ' impressing 21st century religious terminology on a 19th century man, for the life of me I couldn't see where in Lincoln's words (the primary ' document being quoted) it said anything about converting to traditional Christianity. ' When I made the point, it wasn't appreciated, but the fact of the matter was that the person ' presenting the proof wasn't reading the words. They were reading INTO the words what they ' wanted to see.

And that has nothing to do with quilting so I should hush. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Belfast CW Flag Quilt From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeks'gmail.com> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 20:39:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

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Hi all!

Since we are on the topic (among many) of "actual" Civil War quilts, I'd like to share a video that was sent to me today. It was produced by the Belfast, Maine, Historical Society. It takes an hour to watch, and the first 35 minutes are given by me as an introduction/background to the real story, which is about a Civil War flag quilt.

It was sent pretty much without fanfare to the historical society from its saviors in Montana--you really need to see the video to get the whole story, which has taken nearly a year to uncover and discover. It's truly amazing what has been found about the quilt, the group, and its trajectory back to Maine. A researcher's dream was uncovered in the Belfast library when the minutes of the Ladies Aid Society were brought out--they describe the making of the quilt as well as listing the members of the group, and in which Belfast homes it was sewn. And months later a letter arrived from Montana, explaining the history of the quilt after it left DC.

There's more--it's worth the time to watch it!

Enjoy!

http://vimeo.com/37516297

Pam Weeks----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: UGRR, follow up... From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltn'comcast.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 08:00:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello friends. Just wanted to share with you the "results" based on a conversation I had with a woman in the regular quilt workshop I have been attending a few weeks ago with regard to the Underground Railroad Quilts. She made a quilt based on the Hidden in Plain view book and when I had mentioned that it was felt by most quilt historians that this was a myth, she was quite insistent, etc. She told me she believed what she read in books then, and I presumed it was Hidden in Plain View she was referring to.

Well, I came back to the group yesterday, I had printed several things for her that were on line. I spoke with her privately, I presented them to her in a way that, I felt, was just quiet and informative. I gave her all the papers and said something like "Do with them whatever you want, but I felt you might like to read these. You can believe whatever you want to believe, but here is more information. I hope you read these."

Well, she got very defensive. This is a woman who has to be in her mid-sixties and she actually told me that she was taught this stuff in history books when she was in school. She said she KNOWS that it's true and that certain patterns meant certain things and the people helping escaped slaves put them together in various quilts to give directions and "codes" to escaped slaves. I wonder what planet she was brought up on as I sure don't remember anything about quilts and the underground railroad being taught to me in school and in my history books.

At any rate, I did what I could. I chose not to discuss it with her any longer. I sat down and worked on my own Civil War Presidents commemorative quilt using authentic reproduction fabrics. I won't bring this up to her again, and I'll bet she just tossed the information I gave her, so carefully researched and printed for her alone to read. Whatever'8A. At least I tried. I find myself wondering if my paper and printer ink were waisted?

I know you all will understand this frustration I feel. I can't imagine her "imagining" that when she was back in her grammar and high school days that someone taught her this in school. As far as I know, the story was not common knowledge until Hidden in Plain View was published. But, this woman now swears she learned it in school. The myth grows, deepens and worsens, over time, I guess? Heavy sigh.

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciark'earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 07:50:31 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Linda, I think you handled the situation in a diplomatic and intelligent manner. Please do not beat yourself up, but congratulate yourself for standing up for the truth in the face of high odds and an overactive imagination. You did what you could and if we all keep doing what we can, one day we will make a difference.

Two thoughts come to mind: "You can lead a horse to water...etc" and this is why eyewitnesses are often notoriously wrong in investigations and testimonies!

Marcia Kaylakie, ISA AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX www.texasquiltappraiser.com

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Subject: Hannibal newspaper article-anyone in MO want to.... From: Bettina Havig <bettinaqc'socket.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 08:05:14 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I did send an email to the appropriate editor and got an email response ' that my comment in an effort to correct the misconceptions about the ' underground railroad would be published as a letter to the editor.

I was not called for further comment. While it's nice to have a response ' it is somewhat patronizing when no additional information was requested ' and there was no indication that they would follow up to find out more.'

Somehow I didn't expect more. Newspapers are not fond of correcting ' their faux pas.

Bettina Havig'

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Mitzioakes'aol.com Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 09:49:58 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

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I feel for you, believe me.I married into a family that had a Civil War soldier (North) and his family was great quilters. His daughter had never'

heard of this myth - tho the UGRR did have some places in Central New York'

that are still recognized today (as are some here in VT). I have just hung this up with George's Cherry Tree and the Blue Dress and'

Monica where Bill said 'I never had sex with that woman'. Mitzi from VT

In a message dated 2/29/2012 8:43:53 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, ibquiltn'comcast.net writes:

Hello friends. Just wanted to share with you the "results" based on a conversation I had with a woman in the regular quilt workshop I have been attending a few weeks ago with regard to the Underground Railroad Quilts. She made a quilt based on the Hidden in Plain view book and when I had mentioned that it was felt by most quilt historians that this was a myth, she was quite insistent, etc. She told me she believed what she read in books then, and I presumed it was Hidden in Plain View she was referring to.

Well, I came back to the group yesterday, I had printed several things for her that were on line. I spoke with her privately, I presented them to her in a way that, I felt, was just quiet and informative. I gave her all the papers and said something like "Do with them whatever you want, but I felt you might like to read these. You can believe whatever you want to believe, but here is more information. I hope you read these."

Well, she got very defensive. This is a woman who has to be in her mid-sixties and she actually told me that she was taught this stuff in history books when she was in school. She said she KNOWS that it's true and that certain patterns meant certain things and the people helping escaped slaves put them together in various quilts to give directions and "codes" to escaped slaves. I wonder what planet she was brought up on as I sure don't remember anything about quilts and the underground railroad being taught to me in school and in my history books.

At any rate, I did what I could. I chose not to discuss it with her any longer. I sat down and worked on my own Civil War Presidents commemorative quilt using authentic reproduction fabrics. I won't bring this up to her again, and I'll bet she just tossed the information I gave her, so carefully researched and printed for her alone to read. Whatever'C5. At least I tried. I find myself wondering if my paper and printer ink were waisted?

I know you all will understand this frustration I feel. I can't imagine her "imagining" that when she was back in her grammar and high school days that someone taught her this in school. As far as I know, the story was not common knowledge until Hidden in Plain View was published. But, this woman now swears she learned it in school. The myth grows, deepens and worsens, over time, I guess? Heavy sigh.

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mitzioakes'aol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1714905I'lyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Gaye Ingram <gingram'suddenlink.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 11:26:55 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Linda, I agree with Marsha that you behaved thoughtfully and courteously. I also agree with Marcia about leading horses to water and so forth. I recently read a study that had been done by some political scientist about ways to change people's minds---voters, specifically. According to that particular study, a big majority of people tend to believe what they already believe, to hear everything in terms of their made-up minds. Education did not seem to make folks more open-minded. In fact, quite the reverse with voters. I guess the message for politicians is to phrase a message in terms their audiences associate with their own beliefs. Or lie.

But politics is one thing. History is different. We all know it is possible to change beliefs when "mere" facts are involved. Not guaranteed, but possible. Remember, your quilter told you she didn't believe you. You cannot be sure what she really believes.

I bet she knows you were right, and I bet when she got home, she read what you gave her. Since the materials deal unemotionally with objective phenomena and since she will recognize names like Brackman and will see similar views from a black historian, she will have a hard time not believing!

And if she is in her sixties, she invented the story about having learned about the quilt code "in school." That's a giveaway to her simply being prideful. She made that up, probably on the spot. I've kept up with the changing school curricula guidelines and text materials in history for the past thirty years, and while there have been numerous atrocities, that one did not make it into curricula until quite recently, the consequence of general political correctness and the need for materials to use during Black History Month. And then, it was not part of the core curriculum, only in teacher-submitted corollary materials.

Her defensiveness and fabrication reveal her insecurity. Don't expect her to tell you she changed her mind. But I bet she won't go around telling others about the quilt codes, now that she knows the truth.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Lone Star Quilt Study Group video From: <kmoore81'austin.rr.com> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 12:11:15 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

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I commend Donna Keating for posting her pictures of our first meeting at ' Winedale and I hope all of you were able to visit her blog to see it. We ' had a wonderful location, a beautiful day, and we had a fantastic first ' meeting. And yes, that's me putting fork to mouth. I saw her ' take that picture just as she clicked it...to late, nothing to do but ' grin and bear it!

Thank you,

Kathy Moore -

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltn'comcast.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 13:33:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Thanks, Gaye. I didn't receive Marsha's message but am glad you agree. I am on a daily digest and do not get individual messages from this group, so I will see whatever she wrote tomorrow. I tried very hard not to be what I guess I would call "upity" about it all. I'll never bring it up again unless she chooses to discuss it. This woman does beautiful work and I'm sure her quilt is quite lovely and looking back upon my conversation I wish I had added something about that to end on an upbeat note. But, I shall never bring it up again, to be sure. Like most who dabble in quilting history, I hope that those who make these quilts (and there will be more of them) know the facts. While I was printing the one page flyer written by Brackman as well as a few other web sites, (Pat Cummings of Quilter's Muse has an excellent article on her web site) I printed several extra of Brackman's fact sheets to bring to the information table at my quilt guild. Why not continue to promote the truth? I will not sit in judgement of anyone in my guild if I see a quilt code quilt at show and tell or at our show, but why not at least provide some facts? I realize that African Americans have taken pride in this story and it romanticizes their situation and the horrific things they went through to escape slavery. It was a horrible thing that they had to be subject to. In no way does discredit of the quilt code information diminish their plight and attempt to take away from the circumstances. It must have been frightful to be on the run and need to find a safe house to hide. But, we should always try to be factual and I hope the vast majority would ultimately want the truth. There is plenty to be romanticized about considering what they went through and those kind strangers who provided them with a place to sleep, a meal and other things to help them on their journey. I know I would have been one to help, but I would have been so scared! Thank you so much for backing me up. Linda Heminway In snowy Plaistow NH, where I am delighted to stay in and watch it snow with a warm fire and quilting to do. : )

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Mitzioakes'aol.com Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 13:41:20 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 8

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Not snowing here in VT YET! But everyone is hoping it will......not only the skiers but the snowmobilers too. Enjoy the comments about all of this - it sure helps to have more knowledge when I am confronted with the UGRR story that seemed to start with HIPV. Stay warm and cozy as I do the same. Spring can not be too far away. Mitzi

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Subject: Re: Lone Star Quilt Study Group video From:

Kathy,

What a great video. I really enjoyed it.Thanks for sharing. I would ' love to make it to Waxahachiethe "Gingerbread" Capitol of Texas!

Polly Mello

Cold drippy Maryland

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltn'comcast.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 15:37:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Thanks Stephanie! I was thinking the same about her taking it as a blot on her character. I wouldn't think that at all of her, well'8A not until the taught in school part of it, at least. : ) So many were deceived about this. There is nothing wrong with correcting mis-information and she did no wrong whatsoever when it comes to taking that book as true information. We sure know that lots of people have done the same.

I remember watching an episode of Simply Quilts years ago with a woman (perhaps the author of the infamous book?) on there making quilt code blocks and Alex Anderson gushing over them and acting quite like she went along with the entire thing. She was duped as well, I guess, or at least that is how it was portrayed on the show. By the way, I sure do miss that show, too bad HGTV stopped it and went to just home dec.

Thanks again, Linda Heminway

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Subject: Re: Lone Star Quilt Study Group video From: JLHfw'aol.com Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 15:29:44 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 11

 

Dear Polly, Do plan to come to our next meeting in Waxahachie. After all, you are a Lone Star girl. Carolyn Miller will be doing a presentation of Pennsylvania Quilts from the 19th Century and some of her collection will be on display. Janet H in Fort Worth --

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Subject: RE: Lone Star Quilt Study Group From: quiltnsharron'charter.net

Donna, you did a fabulous job of photographing and then setting up a slide show! Thank you so much for putting our day into something we can look back on whenever we want.

See you in August.

Warm regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Tue, Feb 28, 2012 at 7:05 AM, Donna Keating wrote:

> My husband and I attended the first meeting of the Lone Star Quilt Study Group in Round Top, Texas last Saturday. The topic of discuss w' as cotton bag quilts. If you are interested in seeing a Smilebox slide'

show of the meeting and to read a little more about it, please visit my blog at http://www.quiltingbeargal.blogspot.com <http://www.quiltingbeargal.blogspot.com> <http://www.quiltingbeargal.blogspot.com> It was a wonderful'

gathering of like-minded antique and vintage quilt lovers sharing our passion.

I am truly looking forward to the next meeting on August 25th in Waxahachie!

Donna Keating ~ "My soul is fed with needle and thread, my body with chocolate." You can read my Blog at: http://www.quiltingbeargal.blogspot.com <http://www.quiltingbeargal.blogspot.com> <http://www.quiltingbeargal.blogspot.com>

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephanie'stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 16:26:49 -0600 X-Message-Number: 13

I don't know the actual per cent, but it would be interesting to know. My history professor mentioned that a very small per cent of slaves ever used the UGRR. Something like maybe 1%. I'm going to ask him where he got the statistic. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Mitzioakes'aol.com Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 18:56:09 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 14

Just to add to that, I have learned that most slaves headed west when they could, not east and north. Sounds like this could be a whole new look at this whole thing, maybe ? Mitzi

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen'yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 16:01:41 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 15

This is from Historic Camden County:

http://www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml

Kris

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephanie'stephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 18:53:00 -0600 X-Message-Number: 16

Kris, I can't thank you enough for sending that link. This is exactly what is needed and it removes the charge of racism that might be filed against me, a white woman, for saying this is a myth. Wonderful information. I will forward this to my history professor, who must now deal with the student who wanted to do a lesson for her 4th graders about the quilt code and spirituals being coded messages for escape. I am not as familiar with the latter, but apparently historians question that as well, for many of the same reasons that we know the quilt code is a myth. Stephanie Whitson

This is from Historic Camden County:

http://www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml

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Subject: question on pattern name From: donbeld'pacbell.net Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 15:42:22 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 17

--83567325-491191748-1330558942':823 Content-Type: text/plain; charset'iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Everyone, I have found a conflict that I need to resolve. There is a pattern called Pike's Peak by Clara Stone. It is Brackman number 3835 on page 464 of hardback old edition and 4525 on page 348 of Maggie Malone's 5500 Quilt Block Designs. They are not the same pattern--BUT Malone has the Brackman patern next to hers and listed a 4526 and called Star Spangled Banner.--no so urce listed.

I desperately need to know the right answer on which block by Clara Stone is called Pike's Peak.

Does anyone have the source material/book for Clara Stone, or know the answer to this question?

thanks, Don --83567325-491191748-1330558942':823--

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Quilltr'aol.com

Thanks Kris. Very comprehensive article. I especially liked Mr. Wright's logic about why slaves would waste their time passing along the quilt code when they could just pass along the directions instead. That thought alone should be enough to give any UGGR believer pause.

Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/) _http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays_ (http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays) _http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery_ (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery)

In a message dated 2/29/2012 7:29:05 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, krisdriessen'yahoo.com writes:

This is from Historic Camden County:

http://www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml

Kris

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Subject: hair jewelry at auction From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciark'earthlink.net>

Just a note for those who follow such things, hair and mourning jewelry ' coming up for auction at Augusta Auctions shortly. Interesting stuff! Marcia Kaylakie, in spring-like Austin