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Subject: hidey-holes From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 05:23:08 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Many houses, specially larger estate homes, Engladn, Ireland and Scotland,but even some smaller houses, had hidey holes for priests during the time of king Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Regarding hiding places, escape routes and such in early American homes, my grandmother's and grandfather's house had 2 such places on either side of the fireplace for hidingn from Indian attacks, as well as a sub-cellar with a small door (iron) that opened onto a tunnel that led to the the Greater Egg Harbor Bay. I was shown these as a child and then showed them to the later owners as an adult. The orginal owner of the house was a sea captain. It may give rise to rumors that are untrue. Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, TX

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 04:23:22 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Marcia wrote that her grandparents' house had "a sub-cellar with a small door that opened onto a tunnel that led to the Greater Egg Harbor Bay." It is my understanding that those were used during Prohibition. In which direction the 'beverages' were headed is still to be determined. :) :) :)

Mary Anne

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: "Debbie Welch" <debquiltingposs.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 08:05:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I've been in a hidey hole in a house in Essex, Mass where a portion of the wall beside the fireplace moved and behind the fireplace was a small room. I was told at the time it was to hide from Indians. I was about 12 at the time and it was incredibly neat!

Debbie in NJ

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Subject: Re: Civil War Quilts From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 05:29:56 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

I agree - the class I am doing today is entitled "Make a Civil War Era" block. I am struggling with the name of the series I am doing and thinking about Piece before War, since most of the blocks I am using were actually pieced during the events that led up to to the War Between the States.

Kris

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Subject: Re: Civil War Quilts From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 08:25:41 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

The word you want is ante-bellum

Kim

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Subject: Re: Civil War Quilts From: Kittencat3aol.com Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 09:25:57 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 6

There were rumors for years that a dormitory at my college had been a stop on the Underground Railroad...and by God, the rumors turned out to be true. The dorm, Sessions House, had originally been the first house in Northampton to be built outside the wooden stockade in the early 18th century, and excavation in the cellar a few years ago revealed a tunnel that led underneath the street (Elm Street/Route 9) to a trail beside the Mill River.

The tunnel was originally built so that the owners could escape in case of attack by the local Native Americans, which was not nearly so paranoid as you might think so soon after the Deerfield Massacre. Later it was used to hide escaping slaves in the early 19th century; Northampton was an abolitionist stronghold, and the next town over, Florence, was the home of Sojourner Truth and a small, strongly abolitionist colony of silk manufacturers.

So sometimes the legends are true!

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 10:08:31 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

What Debbie describes is what was in my grandpartent's house. and used for exactly the sasme reason. The sub basement and tunnel where built at the time of the home, early, early 1800s, and so pre-date Prohibition by a century or so. I believe the Good Captain might have moved a few "items" from shipboard to his house quietly, if you know what I mean. But that is pure conjecture on my part with no proof of it at all, so take that with a grain of salt, please. I stayed at the house as a child and loved it, when I could stay overnight with my grandmother, in the 1960s. They had the home for several years after my grandfather died, then she was persuaded to move, finally. I miss it. Ah, OK, now I'm homesick this morning! Marcia

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Subject: Anyone living in Missouri want to take this on? From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 13:05:47 -0800 X-Message-Number: 8

http://www.hannibal.net/features/x1771579942/Johnson-s-new-character-inspire d-by-a-quilt

Or

http://tinyurl.com/85op3fz

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Re: Anyone living in Missouri want to take this on? From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 16:26:02 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 9

Will this ever end? I see now that I have my work ahead of me this season at one of Vermont's most famous Museums (the Shelburne) where I am a volunteer in their quilt building. I have tried for almost 10 years now to try to get this myth out of the way, but guess I will keep on trying. Thanks for sharing. Mitzi from Vermont

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 19:15:40 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 10

Lawrence, Kansas, had a network of tunnels under the downtown area. While it's believed that they were used during Prohibition, they were originally built to roll big barrels from the docks to the bars prior to that. Those barrels were heavy, hard to wrassle into a wagon, and required stout horses to pull them through the crowded streets...but they could be rolled easily down a tunnel into the bar's basement. :) So when a shipload arrived, they'djust roll the barrels through the tunnels, dropping them off at the various bars along the way.Jocelyn

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 22:31:29 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

I think it's human nature to go for the most dramatic version of a story, especially when it comes to "history's mysteries." Everyone loves a good story, so clandestine and secret meanings are naturally ascribed to hidey-holes and loose floor boards and false walls and dugout basements. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: QUILT SALE From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellengmail.com> Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2012 21:26:02 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi All,

At the risk of being shamelessly self-promoting, I wanted to let anyone who doesn't already know ~ that there is just ONE MORE DAYto take advantage of our sale on antique quilts. [See, it is a public service message... :) ]

Up to 50% OFF on ALL of our quilts -- through the end of Monday!

You can get there ONLY through these links:

http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2012/02/february-sale-page.html

and

http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2012/02/february-sale-page.html

Thanks, Julie Silber

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Subject: statement denying UGGR myth From: quiltarkmvyahoo.com Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 04:18:12 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Send the paper and the school principal a note with this link and the quote from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. <http://www.freedomcenter.org/underground-railroad/history/myths/>

"One of the most famous symbols of the Underground Railroad is the quilt. Supposedly used as an indicator of a safe place, it is claimed that quilts were hung from roofs, barns, and fences to signal to enslaved individuals the location was a station on the Underground Railroad. There are two pieces of evidence that allow many historians to question the validity of Underground Railroad quilts. The first being that no former enslaved individuals accounts mentioned these quilts in the Works Progress Administration Slave Narratives from the 1930s. Second, that quilts also were not mentioned in any 19th Century slave narratives. Had these quilts been utilized by those participating in the Underground Railroad, it is likely that they would have appeared in at least a few of these narratives. There is also no hard evidence of their existence; no quilt with proven Underground Railroad usage has been found. Still, these quilts remain one of the most famous symbols of the Underground Railroad."

C. Ark, Urbana, Ohio QHL member

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Subject: Re: Anyone living in Missouri want to take this on? From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larrywgreenhills.net> Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 10:47:18 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I would need help. I don't have any of the documentation sources save so if you could privately email me ammunition I would talk to this gentleman. I am sure he wants to be factual in his character. At least I would hope so. I am 2 hours away from Hannibal but would even make a road trip to meet him and show him the evidence. :^). Tell me what to say and point me in the right direction.

Sherrie Wohlgemuth Missouri

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Subject: escape routes From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

This isn't about the UGRR but about earlier times--my sister married a Marshall in Maysville KY and that family actually got their farm as a land grant in the 1700s. For a long time, a stone stable made of limestone slabs dominated the farmyard. Then a doctor from Lexington offered her father-in-law some $ to tear down the old building so the doctor could cart away the stones and make himself a patio at his house. In that demolition process, the chimney was found to have 'foot stones' (slabs that lay flat but could be swung out to make steps) leading from the top to the bottom. The building also had slit windows for defense. It was thought that the foot stones indicated they might have been intended as an escape route from the haymow down the outside of the building and thus into the woods. I remember the lintel above the doors was one huge walnut beam. The haymow also yielded trunks full of family pictures and even a cutter (a sled horse carriage). I was lucky to see it once before it became a patio. Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: FYI for researchers: 1940 census goes online April 2 From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 16:45:26 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 5

The National Archives will release the 1940 Census on April 2, 2012. It will be available for online searching free of charge at http://www.1940census.archives.gov. The 1940 Census will not have a name index when it opens on April 2, 2012. In order to locate someone, you will need to know his or her address and the Census enumeration district in which that address was located. For more information visit http://www.archives.gov/research/census/1940/start-research.html

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Re: FYI for researchers: 1940 census goes online April 2 From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 21:55:20 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

Jan,

Thank you for posting your note about "The National Archives will release the 1940 Census on April 2, 2012."

I'm too excited about April 2nd coming! I have a subscription to Ancestry.com and have been researching the extended family of the quilter Harriet Powers (1837-1910). There is one great-grandson, born in the 1930s, who I would LOVE to find in the 1940 census as he still may be alive. I can't tell from the 1930s census if the g-g-son's mother was in GA or Greenville, SC or not when the son was born.

There are also three granddaughters who moved to Richmond, Virginia in the late 1920s who I would also like to confirmed where they lived in the 1940 census. One, if not two, of the girls moved to Baltimore, MD, where a branch of the family still lives.

So exciting! Best, Kyra in Arlington, VA

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Subject: Civil War Quilts (book) From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 06:41:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi All,

The recent comment about "Civil War Era" quilts has spurred me to post the following:

Kris has given me permission to let you know that although Amazon is currently "out" of our book, *Civil War Quilts,* both Don Beld and I have copies available for purchase. You can contact Don directly if you are in the West or prefer to order from him. You can purchase an autographed copy from me in one of several ways--check out my website (nearly finished!) www.pamweeksquilts.com, or on Amazon, I am the seller listed as comfortcotton. OR, contact me directly--info below. The price on my website includes shipping and handling. (media mail)

The book features northern Civil War history, photos and the histories of quilts made for use by Union Civil War soldiers, and instructions for making them. "Potholder" quilt information is included in both the history and instruction sections.

These quilts were made for donation for northern CW soldiers' use, and the stories represent the information currently available. Research continues, and I hope that we'll have a second edition so that the new information can be included. We know of 16 that survive (so far) and hope that more will come out of the woodwork as the sesquicentennial of the war increases awareness. Other features include information on the Home of the Brave Project that Don Beld founded, a Civil War legend, and other quilts.

Thanks to all for the wonderful discussions on this site!

Pam Weeks -- PO Box 123, Durham, NH 03824 603-661-2245

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 27, 2012 From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 07:21:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Just want to say, Pepper, that I thank you for that story about the stone slabs, what a shame that building was taken down, and for some patio. The potential for attack was always on our early settler's minds and our present day society could learn a thing or two from that practice, perhaps? Sad to think about. I grew up in a home in MA that had a bookcase door that let to an attic staircase. When people broke into our house, the never found it. My dad filmed a silly home movie once where a few friends of his dressed as "monsters" and came out of that secret staircase. I have a copy of a photo someplace... At any rate, I sure wish there were photos of that building. There is a home in Ashland, NH, that I have passed by every year of my life, up near Lake Winnepesaukee where we have a family cabin on a small lake, and it has been rumored that under it are underground railroad tunnels. I must stop the car, one day, if I see people in the yard working and make an enquiry as to weather it is true or not. If it is true, I will ask if I could take a photo or two for sharing with you all if I am brave enough. It is a private home and my request would depend on the reception I get if I ask about it all. Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Lone Star Quilt Study Group From: Donna Keating <donnakeatingsbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 05:05:03 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

My husband and I attended the first meeting of the Lone Star Quilt Study Group in Round Top, Texas last Saturday. The topic of discuss was cotton bag quilts. If you are interested in seeing a Smilebox slide show of the meeting and to read a little more about it, please visit my blog at http://www.quiltingbeargal.blogspot.com  It was a wonderful gathering of like-minded antique and vintage quilt lovers sharing our passion.I am trulylooking forward to the next meeting on August 25th in Waxahachie! Donna Keating ~ "My soul is fed with needle and thread, my body with chocolate." You can read my Blog at: http://www.quiltingbeargal.blogspot.com ---802094031-1017339394-1330434303=:57746--

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Subject: Re: hidey-holes, mysteries, & more From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 17:09:40 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Stephanie observed that people tend naturally to invest real or self-identified hiding places with mystery.

True, but as Abigail Adams observed of Benjamin Franklin's French philandering, what is natural is not necessarily right. And people who care about right and truth must remember that.

Reading the most recent discussion of UGRR on our list, I've felt the "oh-no-THIS-again!" feeling that I suspect many have felt. After all, it is an old theme, one particularly visible during Black History Month. And it is easy to say, "Oh, let them eat fallacy, if that's what they like."

But our duty is not necessarily to any particular person or group, but to truth.

So I admire those members of this list who, like Kris Driessen, have encouraged others to do what they can to replace error with truth, fallacy with fact---and have persevered in practicing what they preach. We've seen many examples that show persistence can succeed in this effort. The statue in NYC comes to mind immediately. If we could do it there....... It's comparatively easy to resist a new outrage. It's the one that continues that is hard to resist.

Just think: because of this list, Barbara's voice was heard beyond quilt circles, materials were compiled that can now be used to refute the UGGR myth in its various manifestations, changes in speakers and public information have been made in the direction of truth, and Ms. Burns at least added a mild, though ironic, disclaimer to perhaps the most widespread disseminator of this falsehood. We have no way of knowing the number of schools and teachers who have been required to revise their lessons because of a list member's contact.

Realizing this has reminded me that even in this time of blogs and Facebook groups that have access to photography, this list serves a really important purpose. After all, what's on Facebook today is generally forgotten by tomorrow. And blogs tend to be private in viewpoint and thus relatively limited in scope. Only Kris knows how many people read this list---and all of them joined because of an interest in history, not pleasing stories. Like Kris, we rally one another to action on the UGGR fabrications as well as others. We educate one another, but we also educate a much wider public.

Caryl Scheutz's recent post regarding the effect of Eleanor Burns' coming induction to the Quilters Hall of Fame struck me as particularly courageous. I'm sure there will be those who will call it a little lacking in sensitivity because it criticizes the work of a member and someone who has done so much to popularize quilting and to improve the practice of quilting. No one who quilts can deny Eleanor Burns' influence on quiltmaking in our time. And as women, we are sensitive to the feelings of other members, including those closely associated with the Hall of Fame.

Yet what Caryl said is true and important: Ms. Burns' book and the place of honor her coming honor will give her make it more difficult for others to put to rest the historical fallacy that link quilts with the UGRR. And to argue that the HOF recognizes influence alone is disingenuous. It recognizes positive contributions and established authority, and its members acquire authority by virtue of membership.

Someone said the offending book contains a new preface in which the author states the story of the quilt code is merely rumor. Did she change the title of the book? When we purchase how-to books, we seldom read prefaces or introductions anyway.

It would set a good example and make her forthcoming induction into the HOF less problematic if the author published something independent stating what appears to be the truth---that she was simply wrong about the quilt code, that she relied on unreliable information. Such a move would be courageous and would put her on the side of truth. Barring that, anyone trying to establish truth about the quilt codes can only wonder at the irony of her presence and the effect it will have on truth. After all, her bibliography will include the UGRR book. Of course, one might also take it out of publication if she were really concerned about its effects.

People like Caryl and Kris and Mitzi remind us what historians should do, and they encourage me and remind me that the historian's duty is to honor truth, even in the face of old and persevering dragons.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: RE: hidey-holes, mysteries, & more From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 17:44:18 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

I agree with everything Gaye said. Just wanted to clarify that I wasn't defending myth. I was not saying we shouldn't persist in our efforts to correct false history. My post was intended only to muse on what it is about human nature that makes myth so enduring in spite of historians' best efforts.

Not long ago I was part of a discussion that presented "proof" that Abraham Lincoln was a "born-again Christian." Apart from the obvious faux pas of impressing 21st century religious terminology on a 19th century man, for the life of me I couldn't see where in Lincoln's words (the primary document being quoted) it said anything about converting to traditional Christianity. When I made the point, it wasn't appreciated, but the fact of the matter was that the person presenting the proof wasn't reading the words. They were reading INTO the words what they wanted to see.

And that has nothing to do with quilting so I should hush. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Belfast CW Flag Quilt From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2012 20:39:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Hi all!

Since we are on the topic (among many) of "actual" Civil War quilts, I'd like to share a video that was sent to me today. It was produced by the Belfast, Maine, Historical Society. It takes an hour to watch, and the first 35 minutes are given by me as an introduction/background to the real story, which is about a Civil War flag quilt.

It was sent pretty much without fanfare to the historical society from its saviors in Montana--you really need to see the video to get the whole story, which has taken nearly a year to uncover and discover. It's truly amazing what has been found about the quilt, the group, and its trajectory back to Maine. A researcher's dream was uncovered in the Belfast library when the minutes of the Ladies Aid Society were brought out--they describe the making of the quilt as well as listing the members of the group, and in which Belfast homes it was sewn. And months later a letter arrived from Montana, explaining the history of the quilt after it left DC.

There's more--it's worth the time to watch it!

Enjoy!

http://vimeo.com/37516297

Pam Weeks

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Subject: UGRR, follow up... From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 08:00:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello friends. Just wanted to share with you the "results" based on a conversation I had with a woman in the regular quilt workshop I have been attending a few weeks ago with regard to the Underground Railroad Quilts. She made a quilt based on the Hidden in Plain view book and when I had mentioned that it was felt by most quilt historians that this was a myth, she was quite insistent, etc. She told me she believed what she read in books then, and I presumed it was Hidden in Plain View she was referring to.

Well, I came back to the group yesterday, I had printed several things for her that were on line. I spoke with her privately, I presented them to her in a way that, I felt, was just quiet and informative. I gave her all the papers and said something like "Do with them whatever you want, but I felt you might like to read these. You can believe whatever you want to believe, but here is more information. I hope you read these."

Well, she got very defensive. This is a woman who has to be in her mid-sixties and she actually told me that she was taught this stuff in history books when she was in school. She said she KNOWS that it's true and that certain patterns meant certain things and the people helping escaped slaves put them together in various quilts to give directions and "codes" to escaped slaves. I wonder what planet she was brought up on as I sure don't remember anything about quilts and the underground railroad being taught to me in school and in my history books.

At any rate, I did what I could. I chose not to discuss it with her any longer. I sat down and worked on my own Civil War Presidents commemorative quilt using authentic reproduction fabrics. I won't bring this up to her again, and I'll bet she just tossed the information I gave her, so carefully researched and printed for her alone to read. Whatever=8A. At least I tried. I find myself wondering if my paper and printer ink were waisted?

I know you all will understand this frustration I feel. I can't imagine her "imagining" that when she was back in her grammar and high school days that someone taught her this in school. As far as I know, the story was not common knowledge until Hidden in Plain View was published. But, this woman now swears she learned it in school. The myth grows, deepens and worsens, over time, I guess? Heavy sigh.

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 07:50:31 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Linda, I think you handled the situation in a diplomatic and intelligent manner. Please do not beat yourself up, but congratulate yourself for standing up for the truth in the face of high odds and an overactive imagination. You did what you could and if we all keep doing what we can, one day we will make a difference.

Two thoughts come to mind: "You can lead a horse to water...etc" and this is why eyewitnesses are often notoriously wrong in investigations and testimonies!

Marcia Kaylakie, ISA AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX www.texasquiltappraiser.com

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Subject: Hannibal newspaper article-anyone in MO want to.... From: Bettina Havig <bettinaqcsocket.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 08:05:14 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I did send an email to the appropriate editor and got an email response that my comment in an effort to correct the misconceptions about the underground railroad would be published as a letter to the editor.

I was not called for further comment. While it's nice to have a response it is somewhat patronizing when no additional information was requested and there was no indication that they would follow up to find out more.

Somehow I didn't expect more. Newspapers are not fond of correcting their faux pas.

Bettina Havig

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 09:49:58 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

I feel for you, believe me.I married into a family that had a Civil War soldier (North) and his family was great quilters. His daughter had never heard of this myth - tho the UGRR did have some places in Central New York that are still recognized today (as are some here in VT). I have just hung this up with George's Cherry Tree and the Blue Dress and Monica where Bill said 'I never had sex with that woman'. Mitzi from VT   In a message dated 2/29/2012 8:43:53 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  ibquiltncomcast.net writes:

Hello friends. Just wanted to share with you the "results" based on a conversation I had with a woman in the regular quilt workshop I have been attending a few weeks ago with regard to the Underground Railroad Quilts. She made a quilt based on the Hidden in Plain view book and when I had mentioned that it was felt by most quilt historians that this was a myth, she was quite insistent, etc. She told me she believed what she read in books then, and I presumed it was Hidden in Plain View she was referring to.

Well, I came back to the group yesterday, I had printed several things for her that were on line. I spoke with her privately, I presented them to her in a way that, I felt, was just quiet and informative. I gave her all the papers and said something like "Do with them whatever you want, but I felt you might like to read these. You can believe whatever you want to believe, but here is more information. I hope you read these."

Well, she got very defensive. This is a woman who has to be in her mid-sixties and she actually told me that she was taught this stuff in history books when she was in school. She said she KNOWS that it's true and that certain patterns meant certain things and the people helping escaped slaves put them together in various quilts to give directions and "codes" to escaped slaves. I wonder what planet she was brought up on as I sure don't remember anything about quilts and the underground railroad being taught to me in school and in my history books.

At any rate, I did what I could. I chose not to discuss it with her any longer. I sat down and worked on my own Civil War Presidents commemorative quilt using authentic reproduction fabrics. I won't bring this up to her again, and I'll bet she just tossed the information I gave her, so carefully researched and printed for her alone to read. Whatever=C5. At least I tried. I find myself wondering if my paper and printer ink were waisted?

I know you all will understand this frustration I feel. I can't imagine her "imagining" that when she was back in her grammar and high school days that someone taught her this in school. As far as I know, the story was not common knowledge until Hidden in Plain View was published. But, this woman now swears she learned it in school. The myth grows, deepens and worsens, over time, I guess? Heavy sigh.

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mitzioakesaol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to  leave-qhl-1714905Ilyris.quiltropolis.com

--part1_181de.296128c5.3c7f9538_boundary--

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 11:26:55 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Linda, I agree with Marsha that you behaved thoughtfully and courteously. I also agree with Marcia about leading horses to water and so forth. I recently read a study that had been done by some political scientist about ways to change people's minds---voters, specifically. According to that particular study, a big majority of people tend to believe what they already believe, to hear everything in terms of their made-up minds. Education did not seem to make folks more open-minded. In fact, quite the reverse with voters. I guess the message for politicians is to phrase a message in terms their audiences associate with their own beliefs. Or lie.

But politics is one thing. History is different. We all know it is possible to change beliefs when "mere" facts are involved. Not guaranteed, but possible. Remember, your quilter told you she didn't believe you. You cannot be sure what she really believes.

I bet she knows you were right, and I bet when she got home, she read what you gave her. Since the materials deal unemotionally with objective phenomena and since she will recognize names like Brackman and will see similar views from a black historian, she will have a hard time not believing!

And if she is in her sixties, she invented the story about having learned about the quilt code "in school." That's a giveaway to her simply being prideful. She made that up, probably on the spot. I've kept up with the changing school curricula guidelines and text materials in history for the past thirty years, and while there have been numerous atrocities, that one did not make it into curricula until quite recently, the consequence of general political correctness and the need for materials to use during Black History Month. And then, it was not part of the core curriculum, only in teacher-submitted corollary materials.

Her defensiveness and fabrication reveal her insecurity. Don't expect her to tell you she changed her mind. But I bet she won't go around telling others about the quilt codes, now that she knows the truth.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Lone Star Quilt Study Group video From: <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 12:11:15 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

I commend Donna Keating for posting her pictures of our first meeting at Winedale and I hope all of you were able to visit her blog to see it. We had a wonderful location, a beautiful day, and we had a fantastic first meeting. And yes, that=E2=80=99s me putting fork to mouth. I saw her take that picture just as she clicked it...to late, nothing to do but grin and bear it!

Thank you,

Kathy Moore

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 13:33:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Thanks, Gaye. I didn't receive Marsha's message but am glad you agree. I am on a daily digest and do not get individual messages from this group, so I will see whatever she wrote tomorrow. I tried very hard not to be what I guess I would call "upity" about it all. I'll never bring it up again unless she chooses to discuss it. This woman does beautiful work and I'm sure her quilt is quite lovely and looking back upon my conversation I wish I had added something about that to end on an upbeat note. But, I shall never bring it up again, to be sure. Like most who dabble in quilting history, I hope that those who make these quilts (and there will be more of them) know the facts. While I was printing the one page flyer written by Brackman as well as a few other web sites, (Pat Cummings of Quilter's Muse has an excellent article on her web site) I printed several extra of Brackman's fact sheets to bring to the information table at my quilt guild. Why not continue to promote the truth? I will not sit in judgement of anyone in my guild if I see a quilt code quilt at show and tell or at our show, but why not at least provide some facts? I realize that African Americans have taken pride in this story and it romanticizes their situation and the horrific things they went through to escape slavery. It was a horrible thing that they had to be subject to. In no way does discredit of the quilt code information diminish their plight and attempt to take away from the circumstances. It must have been frightful to be on the run and need to find a safe house to hide. But, we should always try to be factual and I hope the vast majority would ultimately want the truth. There is plenty to be romanticized about considering what they went through and those kind strangers who provided them with a place to sleep, a meal and other things to help them on their journey. I know I would have been one to help, but I would have been so scared! Thank you so much for backing me up. Linda Heminway In snowy Plaistow NH, where I am delighted to stay in and watch it snow with a warm fire and quilting to do. : )

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 13:41:20 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 8

Not snowing here in VT YET! But everyone is hoping it will......not only the skiers but the snowmobilers too. Enjoy the comments about all of this - it sure helps to have more knowledge when I am confronted with the UGRR story that seemed to start with HIPV. Stay warm and cozy as I do the same. Spring can not be too far away. Mitzi

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Subject: Re: Lone Star Quilt Study Group video From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 19:26:19 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 9

Kathy,

 What a great video. I really enjoyed it.Thanks for sharing. I would love to make it to Waxahachiethe "Gingerbread" Capitol of Texas!

Polly Mello

Cold drippy Maryland

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 15:37:30 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Thanks Stephanie! I was thinking the same about her taking it as a blot on her character. I wouldn't think that at all of her, well=8A not until the taught in school part of it, at least. : ) So many were deceived about this. There is nothing wrong with correcting mis-information and she did no wrong whatsoever when it comes to taking that book as true information. We sure know that lots of people have done the same.

I remember watching an episode of Simply Quilts years ago with a woman (perhaps the author of the infamous book?) on there making quilt code blocks and Alex Anderson gushing over them and acting quite like she went along with the entire thing. She was duped as well, I guess, or at least that is how it was portrayed on the show. By the way, I sure do miss that show, too bad HGTV stopped it and went to just home dec.

Thanks again, Linda Heminway

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Subject: Re: Lone Star Quilt Study Group video From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 15:29:44 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 11

Dear Polly, Do plan to come to our next meeting in Waxahachie. After all, you are a Lone Star girl. Carolyn Miller will be doing a presentation of Pennsylvania Quilts from the 19th Century and some of her collection will be on display. Janet H in Fort Worth --

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Subject: RE: Lone Star Quilt Study Group From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 16:21:35 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 12

Donna, you did a fabulous job of photographing and then setting up a slide show! Thank you so much for putting our day into something we can look back on whenever we want.

See you in August.

Warm regards, Sharron

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 16:26:49 -0600 X-Message-Number: 13

I don't know the actual per cent, but it would be interesting to know. My history professor mentioned that a very small per cent of slaves ever used the UGRR. Something like maybe 1%. I'm going to ask him where he got the statistic. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 18:56:09 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 14

Just to add to that, I have learned that most slaves headed west when they could, not east and north. Sounds like this could be a whole new look at this whole thing, maybe ? Mitzi

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 16:01:41 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 15

This is from Historic Camden County:

http://www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml

Kris

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 18:53:00 -0600 X-Message-Number: 16

Kris, I can't thank you enough for sending that link. This is exactly what is needed and it removes the charge of racism that might be filed against me, a white woman, for saying this is a myth. Wonderful information. I will forward this to my history professor, who must now deal with the student who wanted to do a lesson for her 4th graders about the quilt code and spirituals being coded messages for escape. I am not as familiar with the latter, but apparently historians question that as well, for many of the same reasons that we know the quilt code is a myth. Stephanie Whitson

This is from Historic Camden County:

http://www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml

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Subject: question on pattern name From: donbeldpacbell.net Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 15:42:22 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 17

Hi Everyone, I have found a conflict that I need to resolve. There is a pattern called Pike's Peak by Clara Stone. It is Brackman number 3835 on page 464 of hardback old edition and 4525 on page 348 of Maggie Malone's 5500 Quilt Block Designs. They are not the same pattern--BUT Malone has the Brackman patern next to hers and listed a 4526 and called Star Spangled Banner.--no so urce listed.

I desperately need to know the right answer on which block by Clara Stone is called Pike's Peak.

Does anyone have the source material/book for Clara Stone, or know the answer to this question?

thanks, Don --83567325-491191748-1330558942=:823--

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Subject: Re: UGRR, follow up... From: Quilltraol.com Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 19:57:06 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 18

Thanks Kris. Very comprehensive article. I especially liked Mr. Wright's logic about why slaves would waste their time passing along the quilt code when they could just pass along the directions instead. That thought alone should be enough to give any UGGR believer pause.

Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/) _http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays_ (http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays) _http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery_ (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery)

In a message dated 2/29/2012 7:29:05 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, krisdriessenyahoo.com writes:

This is from Historic Camden County:

http://www.historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11.shtml

Kris

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Subject: hair jewelry at auction From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Wed, 29 Feb 2012 22:38:23 -0600 X-Message-Number: 19

Just a note for those who follow such things, hair and mourning jewelry coming up for auction at Augusta Auctions shortly. Interesting stuff! Marcia Kaylakie, in spring-like Austin

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Subject: New topic --technique and materials From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2012 02:07:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Does your supermarket offer sanitary hand towels at the entrance? Have you ever looked at the fabric? I think they are indestructible, but very lightweight and could be used as lightweight foundations for piecing. Has anyone ever used them? I have no idea what the material is, but they won't stretch when I pull at them.

I am asking because when I had my picture framing business that same fabric was used to wrap picture frame moulding. Being the pack rat that I am I couldn't stand to throw the stuff away and have a number of strips that are 4 1/2" by at least 10 feet -- and longer. I am seeing foundation pieced flying geese -----

Does anyone know what material they are?

Judy Grow

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Subject: Re: Lone Star Quilt Study Group From: Quiltsappraisedaol.com Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2012 10:59:36 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

Donna,

Thank you for the video. I received an application for your study group and with the subject being so close to my heart I really wanted to make the first meeting. But the long distance and my schedule prevented me from attending. The video was the next best thing to being there!

Alma R. Moates Pensacola, Florida AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser quiltsappraisedaol.com _www.almarmoates.com_ (http://www.almarmoates.com/)

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Subject: UGRR-Campbell Folk School follow-up From: "Virginia Berger" <cifbanetins.net> Date: Thu, 01 Mar 2012 09:55:57 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

Back in Dec, I discovered that the John C Campbell Folk School was going to offer a workshop making an UGRR quilt. I sent a message to the school and I think several of you may have also sent messages. I received the following response in Jan from the resident quilter but have never heard from the person teaching the class:

Thank you for your recent communication about the "Underground Railroad" class. I am the Resident Quilter at the Folk School and just wanted you to know that I too am aware of the myth surrounding these stories and because of that talked extensively to the instructor about what she planned to do. At first I don't think she was aware of the controversy until I sent her the websites I had uncovered giving the facts of how this one person was perpetuating "the code". I reluctantly agreed to let her use that title but asked that she not teach this as fact but only use it as a jumping off point to teach a variety of beginning patterns and that is why the class description says "it is theorized…" and "were said to…". These phrases were intended to tip the reader that we are not fooled into believing these things.Unfortunately, it has generated just the kind of negative respond that I feared. I apologize for letting it go forward. I have written Ms McKay and asked if she could respond to our concerns so you may be hearing from her. She really is a lovely lady and I feel sure does not wish to give out bad information.

Thank you for your concern, Pat Meinecke Folk School Resident Quilter

Just thought you all might like to know.

Virginia Berger

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Subject: New Smithsonian Museum From: Edwaquiltaol.com Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2012 09:31:57 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

I just received the current issue of Smithsonian magazine. There is a short article about the new African-American Museum which will be opening. In addition to describing it's purpose this statement is made."....it is also a tale of triumph over adversity: the resistance of the Underground Railroad and Rosa Parks; the jazz and blues......" etc. Quilts are not mentioned. However, the myth could very well be there in glorious detail.

Holice

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Subject: Singing&Stitching: different traditions From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2012 11:50:40 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Stephanie recently mentioned that Negro spirituals had been linked with quilts as escape codes on the now defamed UGRR and that historians also questioned the validity of them as well.

As highway signs, they would not have been worth much, but slave owners definitely recognized the dangerous implications of those songs.

Their predominant theme is freedom. The point of view is generally that of the enslaved Israelites during the Egyptian Captivity and the hope created by God's promise to them that He will bring them out of Egypt and into a homeland where they might worship Him freely. Crossing the river Jordan generally represented the crossing from a life of earthy captivity to the eternal freedom of Heaven in such songs as "Deep River." But that metaphor has other obvious references.

Almost equal in number are the joyous, triumphant songs that celebrate the victory of an underdog from this group---e.g. David's defeat of Goliath, Joshua when he 'fit the battle of Jerico', or Elijah's glorious, golden-charioted ascent to God. They are deeply, primitively Christian, and although they have been adapted by most major American choral masters for performance, folk versions still can be heard by back porch singers, black and white, throughout the Deep South. Their evolution is particularly clear in "Elijah Rock," which acquired a reference to the telephone sometime in the twenties or thirties. (see, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBV_2S62qsE&feature=related .

Even a dim-witted slave owner could scarcely escape the implications of these songs and their impassioned yearnings for freedom and victory over oppressors. Thus they, along Bible and reading instruction and teaching, were often forbidden. This became increasingly true after the 1831 Nat Turner rebellion in which slaves hacked to death over 50 whites in their homes in Southampton, Virginia in a period of three days.

While we talk a lot about slavery now, it is hard even in the South, where the black and white populations are more nearly equal, to imagine the world where it became a central fact of life for many or the fear that always haunted slave owners. Journals, newspapers, and letters from the time reveal the terror that lay beneath all that crinoline and all those mint juleps. Along River Road in Louisiana, for instance, it was not uncommon for there to be five or six whites on a plantation worked by 150 black slaves. It was understood that if all the blacks in an area wanted to, they could easily destroy the few whites, and the wonder is that did not happen more often, particular there, where the sugar plantations combined the worst of agricultural work with the worst factory work---in the steamy sugar houses. In harvest season, sometimes slaves there worked 18 hours a day.

To permit such people to assemble and to think and sing of freedom and the victories of the enslaved Israelites struck even those slaveholders who idealized the institution as inviting insurrection. Thus the religious gatherings and Bible instruction were often forbidden---and along with them, the songs.

When Thomas J. Jackson, who later became a General in the Army of Northern Virginia and acquired the name "Stonewall," was an instructor at VMI in Lexington, VA, the town had laws forbidding the instruction of slaves in reading and the Bible. In the face of these laws, Jackson, who was a quiet, eccentric man, continued his Sunday afternoon Bible and reading classes for slaves. A devout Presbyterian, he was acting on that church's belief in the importance of reading the Bible as a means of knowing God. Jackson's connections to church leaders and his status as a faculty member at VMI and veteran of the Mexican War were solid. His determination was clear. So the town fathers backed down. But that took a while, and was an exception. It took place in a small university town in the Shenandoah Valley of western Virginia.

All of this is simply to suggest that the spirituals, which accompanied Bible instruction, did play a real role in slave life and thought, so real that laws were enacted to prohibit them. They encouraged the enslaved to think about freedom, which was inimical to their owner's interests. There is ample evidence of this. Such evidence does not exist for the quilt code.

A short novel that I believe evokes a vividl sense of the fear that gripped slaveowners and the bestiality both of the system and the uprisings is "Property," written by Valerie Martin.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Civil War Children From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2012 10:30:29 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 6

This is an interesting photo series. I would have liked to known more.

http://tinyurl.com/86mtpbt 

Kris

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Subject: Re: Civil War Children From: textiqueaol.com Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2012 14:58:58 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 7

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CEC5FCDFBEB632_14B8_49FC8_webmail-m051.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Kris,

There is a paper on this group of pictures in "The Girls' History and Culture Reader:The Nineteenth Century", ed. Miriam Forman-Brunell and Leslie Paris, 2011, U ofILL Press. It is titled "Rosebloom and Pure White," Or So It Seemed" by Mary Niall Mitchell.

They were all freed from slavery in Louisiana and sent to Philadelphia for portraits in 1863 under the orders of Union Major General N.P. Banks. General George Hanks served on a commission, appointed by Banks, and was responsible for the education andlabor of freedpeople. Representatives of the American Missionary Association and the National Freedman's Relief Association photographed and toured the group to raise money to fund newly established schools for freedpeople in LA.

The darker-skinned children were eventually left behind because that didn'tproduce the desired effect Abolitionists expected. Rosina [Rosa Downs], Rebecca, Charles and, earlier, Fanny, were chosen to elicit sympathy and provoke more outrage at the peculiar institution of slavery. The clear message was that white women and children could have been enslaved - indeed, that was the intent, so we must end slavery immediately. 

The children were also used to promote emancipation but, in many ways, had the opposite effect. The girls, in particular, were so 'white' that it could be possible to marry 'one' and not know she wasn't white' Many in the North were ok with the idea of emancipation but were concerned about 'mixing' of the races. People were not prepared to beliving next to freed slaves.

A very simplistic explanation of a fascinating article.

Jan Thomas

This is an interesting photo series. I would have liked to known more.

http://tinyurl.com/86mtpbt

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Subject: Quilting designs for antique Applique Quilts From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Thu, 01 Mar 2012 14:57:20 -0500 X-

What types of straight line and grid designs you have observed as background hand quilting on antique applique quilts? I am getting ready to hand quilt an applique quilt adapted from an antique quilt and would like to use an authentic background quilting design. I have already used a 1/2" to 3/4" grid on several of my quilts and was hoping to come up with something different from that. Any suggestions? Judy Knorr

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Subject: RE: Quilting designs for antique Applique Quilts From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2012 16:51:35 -0600 X-Message-Number: 9

Parallel lines in groups of three. About 1/4" apart. Set of three lines, then a space, then three lines, then a space. Usually set at an angle to the seam line.

Double line hanging diamonds.

Steph Whtison

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: March 01, 2012 From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Fri, 02 Mar 2012 07:16:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Virginia, thank you for sharing the communication about the Folk School and the teaching of the infamous UGRR myth. This remark really bothered me:

I reluctantly agreed to let her use that title but asked that she not teach this as fact but only use it as a jumping off point to teach a variety of beginning patterns and that is why the class description says "it is theorized=85" and "were said to=85". These phrases were intended to tip the reader that we are not fooled into believing these things.Unfortunately, it has generated just the kind of negative respond that I feared. I apologize for letting it go forward.

I know this woman is probably being paid to teach and she is in difficult circumstance due to an employer/employee relationship but if this were me and I knew the truth, I would probably walk away from a job that would further the myth. She may be under contract, though. She apologized for letting it go forward, but does not say she will do anything else, sadly. Times are tough and jobs are hard to come by, but=8A.

As for me, I have a suggestion for all of you. Each of us belongs to a guild and/or has a quilt shop nearby and a public library. Why not print a few of the Barbara Brackman handouts and leave them in such places?

http://www.antiquequiltdating.com/Fact_Sheet_on_the_Quilt_Code.html

If we just bring a few of these fact sheets to various places and leave them to be picked up by others, people will eventually find and read them. If we at least try, we may succeed in a non-confrontational way to dispel this myth?

My recent conflict in the quilt workshop has truly made me think more and more about this. I disliked feeling confrontational with a fellow quilter, but I truly dislike when an untruth is being fostered by people. It saddens me to read about this woman working at the Folk School, knowing full well what the truth is and still making these quilts. Will the kids working on the quilts come away with the thinking that this myth actually happened? You bet they will, as quilts are living and tangible objects and if they participate in making one and the terms "it is felt that" and "people were said to=8A" are used, you can be sure the kids will think of it as gospel. 

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Bolton & Coe From: textiqueaol.com Date: Fri, 2 Mar 2012 15:28:15 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

American Samplers by Ethel Stanwood Bolton and Eva Johnston Coe has been scanned online. It was written about American schoolgirl embroideries but the chapter on sampler verses is very useful when studying the sayings on early signature quilts. 

Thought you'd all be interested.

Jan Thomas

http://preview.tinyurl.com/7kodugk

 

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Subject: Sampler Archive dot org From: textiqueaol.com Date: Fri, 2 Mar 2012 15:44:37 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

Pleased to announce:

http://samplerarchive.org/

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Supermarket sanitary wipes From: JAN MASENTHIN <quiltsrmesbcglobal.net> Date: Fri, 2 Mar 2012 14:57:47 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

I don't know what material they are but my hippie daughter gets her pantiesin a bunch every time she sees them. According to her they are not biodegradable and therefore evil. I think they feel similar to Pellon interfacing, although you're right, Judy, they don't stretch. Please don't let mydaughter know that I said that -- then she'd know I use them. 

As long as I'm posting I want to mention the tornado that hit Harveyville, Kansas and wiped out half of that very small town a couple of days ago. One man died in the storm. If you've read the book, Persian Pickle Club,you might remember that it took place in Harveyville, which happens to be 6 miles west of where I grew up. Although small in comparison to other tornadoes, it is still a tragedy with victims who needs our prayers. Jan Masenthin

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Subject: Re: Supermarket sanitary wipes From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Fri, 2 Mar 2012 19:25:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I don't know what material they are but my hippie daughter gets her panties in a bunch every time she sees them. According to her they are not biodegradable and therefore evil. I think they feel similar to Pellon interfacing, although you're right, Judy, they don't stretch. Please don't let my daughter know that I said that -- then she'd know I use them.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- JAN,

I didn't know there were hippies around anymore -- except in Portlandia.

I really think I am going to try and make endless strips of flying geese of that fabric and leave it in the quilt. It will never pull out of shape.

Or Chinese Coins. Oops!~ Is that not a politically correct name anymore?

Forced to spend the day cleaning up my sewing room because of overnight company coming. No one will sleep in there -- but they might look in. As Bette Davis would say -- "What a dump!"

Judy Grow

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Subject: Re: Sampler Archive dot org From: Quilltraol.com Date: Fri, 2 Mar 2012 19:27:44 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 6

Jan, Thanks so much! This will be a great reference for a couple of current projects!

Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/) _http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays_ (http://flickr.com/photos/lisa-kays) _http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery_ (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/woolstitchery)

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Subject: Spunlace nonwoven cloth From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 2 Mar 2012 16:34:38 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 7

I did a little googling, and found a product called spunlace - made of 60% viscose and 40% polyester. It is a nonwoven fabric used in the manufacture of lots of absorbent, disposable wipes. I can't say that is what Judyhas available to her, but it sounds relatively benign.

I myself have been experimenting with used dryer sheets as foundations for strips and strings, and as a lining/back for easy applique. It has virtually no bulk! Susan

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Subject: supermarket sanitary wipes From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Sat, 03 Mar 2012 06:36:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Just want to add that a woman makes "stitch and flip" quilt tops for a group I lead that look much like crazy quilts. She uses fabric softener sheets that have been used as her foundation and her blocks all come out a uniform size. The pellon-like sheets stabilize her work and she sews each block together afterwards. The effect is a lovely quilt, each time. We save used fabric softener sheets and press them for her. I feel it is the ultimate recycling to re-use them this way instead of toss them.

My group is called "My Brother's Keeper" and we make quilted sleeping bags for The Homeless. We also make comfort quilts for children with life threatening illnesses as well as twin size quilts for the oncology units and hospice. Our quilts are carried by police and fire staff, at times, to give to a child in distress after an accident or fire. We also make quilts for a residential center for homeless families. We are a pretty busy group. To date, we have made and distributed, through area shelters, over 500 quilted sleeping bags and approximately 160 of the other types of quilts. I'm rather proud of this small group of women that come together 2 times each month and donate their time, fabric and energy.

The lady who makes these tops for us turns out an amazing array of quilt tops using the sheets and they work really well. She is a costume seamstress for a theater company and the amazing scraps she uses in the quilt tops dazzle our members. We are quite fond of her tops and the children who have received them love them.

From an archival standpoint, some of you who research older quilts and what acids might deteriorate fabric/threads might have a concern about the fabric softener being sewn into the quilts. I am unsure if the fabric softener would hurt things, but our quilts are utilitarian in nature and not meant to be museum pieces and last for centuries. I would love to know, though, if fabric softener or the fragrance might hurt the fabric down the road, but we still will continue to use the sheets anyway.

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Fabric softener sheets From: Margaret Keirstead <pkeirsteadmac.com> Date: Sun, 04 Mar 2012 10:15:22 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

I would like to know if these sheets could be damaging to quilts. I use them to face my labels; it's easier than ironing under 1/4".

Peggy Keirstead Richardson, TX

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Subject: Re: [Spam] Fabric softener sheets From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Sun, 4 Mar 2012 18:56:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

The only problem I see is from too high heat from the iron, but wash them to get all the chemicals out first. The material itself is inert and won't off-gas.

Thanks to Susan for your sleuthing on the fiber in the handi wipes -- a much thicker and sturdier fabric than dryer sheets.

Judy Grow

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Subject: fabric softener sheets From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Mon, 5 Mar 2012 06:11:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I've enjoyed this discussion. I used to use the dryer sheets for all  my applique (ie, gentle curves like circles, basket handles, hearts,  etc), along with face my quilt labels for easy turning. I did an  article for Quilt Magazine in 1995 about this which I called  Unorthodox Appliqu=E9. I remember exactly when I took a box of Bounce

and held up a used dryer sheet in my hand and solved a dilemma I had  for finishing up a bunch of applique blocks for a project. In the mid

90s, those sheets were sturdier and more like interfacing than they  are now. They could handle a little more heat from the iron (though  you never should apply much heat - they shrivel). Then when they  became much flimsier, I went over to lightweight interfacing. But, you

are on the right track! I would take a bunch of the USED ones and  throw then into the wash with a load of towels to remove any lingering

chemicals. They were just convenient interfacing, which we all have in

our clothing, etc - and that's what gives body to some of these items.

So, hail to those dryer sheets! My editor loved that story, I loved  getting paid for it, and I loved the convenience of having interfacing

without having to make a trip to the store.

Debby, who does NOT Twitter, Facebook, Blog, Linked In, or any other  networking services. I'm too busy working.

Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil Quilt Trunk Shows & Workshops www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: Re: Fabric softener sheets From: "Edith L. Taylor" <etaylorku.edu> Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2012 15:20:22 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi all -

I don't know about others, but the smell of dryer sheets starts me sneezing and my eyes watering! Can you really get all of the smell (and the chemicals) out of them?

Edie

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Subject: Re: Fabric softener sheets From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 5 Mar 2012 15:48:34 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

I am such a tightwad! After I use the dryer sheet in the dryer, I will throw it into the next wash in lieu of fabric softener. It gets really soft, so I just press it and it stiffens up just enough to be used for foundation piecing. Works for me.

Kris

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Subject: Re: Fabric softener sheets From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 5 Mar 2012 20:55:50 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

As to the scent, I only buy the unscented ones ... And yes, they are absolutely good for 2 loads IMHO. Of course if I were selling them, would I tell? Ha. Steph Whitson

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Subject: dryer sheets From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 5 Mar 2012 20:51:59 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

Hmm, will have to try them in the wash, too....I have noticed, though, thatfor my purposes, I only need to put one in every other dryer load - I suspect some residual in the dryer drum. All the laundry products at our house are fragrance free.

I do notice a difference between the Bounce and generic brands, the genericdo not seem to have as even a distribution of fiber, and the abrasion fromthe dryer seems to make them look fuzzier, to me. So I prefer the Bounce but not to the exclusion of a great deal on something else!

Has anyone tried gluing them to anything?

How I appreciate this group!!!! If I talk about these things with some people, they think I am N-U-T-S!!! But I learned a new word for it - UPCYCLING!

Fondly, Susan

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Subject: Re: dryer sheets From: Jean Carlton <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 06 Mar 2012 09:08:06 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I cut them in half...plenty of 'softening' and they go twice as far...we are a thrift conscious lot! But why waste? I don't apologize. Being 'green' is the current phrase but to us it's nothing new. Jean

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Subject: dryer sheets From: Tracy Jamar <tjamaroptonline.net> Date: Wed, 07 Mar 2012 06:29:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

For those experimenting with dryer sheets this information about printing on used dryer sheets from "Cloth, Paper, Scissors" might be of interest.

http://e1.interweave.com/dm?id=D98D6C4B0BECBB42817E09D20005466A4A50DCDD5D303444

Best, Tracy Jamar