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Subject: FW: Bamboo batting From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net> Date: Sun, 15 Apr 2012 12:12:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi, all - I forwarded Larry's query about bamboo batting to my colleague at Akron U, Teena Jennings-Rentenaar who is our textiles professor. See her reply below. I was especially curious because so many of my students use bamboo batting because it is fairly inexpensive and easily attainable at the big box stores. I like it because it is so soft and has a wonderful hand after washing, nicer than many cotton battings that I have used.

Peg

 

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Subject: RE: FW: Bamboo batting From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sun, 15 Apr 2012 19:45:14 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

 

Please correct me if I am wrong. I have read in past years that the manufacturing process for making bamboo batting is very unfriendly enviornmentally using strong chemicals that are not always disposed of in an enviornmentally respsponsible manner as the batting is made in third world and some Asian countries. Is this correct? Janet H enjoying a long weekend in Santa Fe

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Subject: Poster Book of Quilts From: Patricia Lyons <patricialyonscableone.net> Date: Sun, 15 Apr 2012 17:18:19 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

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Karen, The Poster Book of Quilts by Woodard and Greenstein was published by EP Dutton in 1984. It was republished by Crown Publishers in 1987 as Classic American Quilts.

Pat Lyons Pocatello----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Bamboo batting From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net> Date: Tue, 17 Apr 2012 08:50:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

From Teena in reply to Janet's query......

-----Original Message----- From: Jennings-Rentenaar,Teena [mailto:tj9uakron.edu] Sent: Monday, April 16, 2012 12:41 PM To: Peg Bingham Subject: RE: [qhl] RE: FW: Bamboo batting

Dear Peg, The manufacturing process is crucial when determining if bamboo products are sustainable or not.

There are two processes used for reconstituting cellulose, which is what they are doing when they are using bamboo. They may be using the traditional method used for rayon, which is pretty outdated with poor reclamation of chemicals. The two extremely noxious chemicals used are a concentrated aqueous sodium hydroxide for swelling the raw materials and a highly concentrated sulfuric acid that coagulates out all of the chemicals used after extrusion.

The other method used is the same one used for Tencel which uses a closed system with amine oxide, so every bit of chemical is recaptured and reused. This is a new process and still considered to be expensive, so not the most likely one to be used for bamboo processing.

Rayon, which is suffering losses to a decline in cigarette consumption as it is the fiber used to make the filters, is happily absorbing the bamboo market. The rayon process is as likely to be in North America, close to the pulp and paper industry, as in Europe. In these locations the factories are old and probably having difficulty meeting environmental standards. In developing countries, the large multinational corporations are largely on their own albeit that the factories are more modern. Their ethical behavior, or lack thereof, remains a recurring problem.

We need to therefore uncover which process has been used which is a difficult prospect.

Wish that I was in Santa Fe!!! Teena

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Subject: RE: Bamboo batting From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Tue, 17 Apr 2012 09:36:00 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Dear Peg, Please relay my thanks to Tina for her informative reply. I am undecided about using bamboo batting, but leaning toward not using it. Good old cotton, silk, and wool just make more sense to me. Janet H --part1_5d2e.7ddb62a7.3cbecbc0_boundary-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: W.C.T.U. Nebraska From: suereichcharter.net Date: Wed, 18 Apr 2012 09:29:04 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Evening State Journal Lincoln, Nebraska September 5, 1936 pg 2

At the Central W.C.T.U. meet- ing at headquarters, Mrs. James Sullivan led the devotionals. Music was furnished by Mrs. Erna Com- mons and Mrs. Nettie Szakacak. Mrs. Curry Watson, republican na- tional committee woman from Ne- braska, gave the address. An in- teresting feature of the afternoon was the display of the national quilt made by members of the Bryan Memorial hospital kensing- ton. Each of the 48 blocks in the quilt represents a state, with the bird and flower of each state em- broidered on the respective blocks. Names are being secured by Mrs. Allie M. Jackson to accompany the quilt, which will be sent to Gov. and Mrs. Alfred M. Landon, as a gift, by Oct. 10.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: (no subject) From: mendofleuraol.com Date: Wed, 18 Apr 2012 12:01:22 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

SingIe m0m makes reaI m0ney w0rking fr0m h0me http://fireshieldindia.com/domitloe.php?owufriend3D70

Wed, 18 Apr 2012 17:01:20 __________________ " He said, Jesus Christ, where did you find this thing? and so on, and he had to tell the other clerks about the pervert who wanted to buy the window dressing." (c) danita york

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Subject: "Why Quilts Matter" in Paducah next week From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Wed, 18 Apr 2012 15:30:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

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If you're heading to Paducah for the big show there's a couple of ways you can connect with "Why Quilts Matter:" The Maiden Alley Cinema will be airing episodes throughout the weekend, I'll be speaking and showing two episodes at an AQS event on Friday night at the Carson Center and the series will be on The Quilt Channel airing on TV at local hotels. For more specific timing and details on these events check out our site. ( http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/welcome/events/). Last, but not least, if you think there's a way for "Why Quilts Matter" to partner with your guild or group, feel free to reach out to me at zegartquiltgmail.com and we can set some time up for coffee or a quick chat. I'm always open to new ideas and excited to keep the conversation going!

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

ps. Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v8RMyg1_zYgY

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Subject: Grace Snyder Online From: mose2unlnotes.unl.edu Date: Mon, 16 Apr 2012 10:46:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

This is a multipart message in MIME format. --_alternative 0056A1AD862579E2_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"

We have posted an online exhibition of Grace Snyder's quilts at this link: http://www.quiltstudy.org/exhibitions/online_exhibitions/grace_snyder/snyder.html

You will find several other resources there: gallery guide, video, teacher's resources, etc.

Enjoy! You will see that we have many online exhibitions and we invite you to experience them all.

Maureen Ose, Communications Coordinator International Quilt Study Center & Museum Department of Textiles, Clothing and Design PO Box 830838 1523 N. 33rd Street Lincoln, NE 68583-0838

www.quiltstudy.org 402-472-7232 FAX 402-472-2008 mose2unl.edu

Located at: Quilt House, Intersection of 33rd & Holdrege Streets----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Quilt in Movie Alert From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Wed, 18 Apr 2012 23:43:03 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

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Hi All, was just watching netflix while I scanned family photos from 100 years ago. It was fun. Wanted to alert you to a quick glimpse at an English Hexagon quilt on a bed in the movie and the young Maggie makes a comment about doing her patchwork bedcover - in her opinion it was  "stupid". (Clearly she he didn't like sewing.)

The movie was called "The Mill on the Floss" and the quilt comes in  briefly during the first 10 minutes... Don't blink, you may miss it!

Best,

Leah Z

Temecula CA

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Subject: A Quilt Knotting (Nebraska) From: suereichcharter.net Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2012 05:39:57 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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The Nebraska State Journal Lincoln, Nebraska January 30, 1898 pg. 6

Mrs. V. L. Douglas of 1100 G street entertained a number of her friends Friday evening at a quilt knotting. Her guests passed a very enjoyable evening in this unique way. Those present were: Mrs. Fay; Misses Peters, Van Buskirk, Garry, Herminghaus, Swanz, Robertson, Swanson, Castle, Minnie Volkman, Estelle Douglas, Clara and Martha Wolf; Messrs. Myer, Robertson, Gettler, Spencer, Topas, Hultz, Leek, Max Peters, Julius Erlen- born, Bennie Wolf, James and Robert Lawlor.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: buttonhole stitching by machine From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2012 08:27:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

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I had the pleasure to see quilts belonging to friends of mine yesterday that were made by a great grand and grandmother in western Penn. They were made in the early 1930's up to maybe early 1940's. One of the quilts had an element that tripped me. It was a lovely rose wreath style and all of the leaves and stems were hand appliqued. THEN all of the rosebuds and flowers had buttonhole stitching....heavy stitching outlining them. I could see a tiny bit of irregularity, but it really appeared to be machine done it was so closely stitched and so perfect. THEN the outer border was done with a blue border of blue roses that certainly had to be machine stitched with the buttonhole stitch. Not normally a fan of that time period, but these quilts were lovely. These women quilted with 8-10 stitches per inch and were very precise. The owner said he remembered as a child adding a few stitches to their quilts in the 1950's. I told him that he definitely didn't get to touch one of the ones I saw!!!

I want to know when did machines start to do this type of decorative stitching and is this an approach used often in this time period. I am not extremely knowledgeable with this time period.

Thanks, Lynn Lancaster Gorges (New Bern, NC) also palamporeaol.com

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Subject: Re: buttonhole stitching by machine From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2012 13:08:39 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 4

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Do you have a pictureC2 Lynn? I would love to see the quilt.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: buttonhole stitching by machine From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2012 09:08:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Hi Lynn,

Did you know that you can do a patent search on Google? Go to Google and on the far right you'll see a "MORE" search button--click on that and then hit "EVEN MORE." Keep on scrolling down until you see "Patent Search." You can type in whatever you're looking for--I did "buttonhole machine," and came up with scores of possibilities. The earliest patent I found--looking quickly--was for an "improvement" in buttonhole machine stitching in 1876.

All best, Lynne

> I want to know when did machines start to do this type of decorative stitching and is this an approach used often in this time period.

> Thanks, Lynn Lancaster Gorges (New Bern, NC) also palamporeaol.com

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Subject: "A Most Unique Quilt." Nebraska From: suereichcharter.net Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2012 22:43:15 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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The Evening News Lincoln, Nebraska December 16, 1893 pg 8

A Most Unique Quilt. The most unique quilt ever seen or heard of has been worked up by the ladies of Trinity M.E. church, corner Sixteenth and A streets, next Wednes- day evening. This famous quilt, upon which the ladies have been at work for the past two months, contains 480 blocks of diamond shape (one-half of white the other of red-cloth). Of these 151 con- tain business and professional ads, and fifty-two blocks the private names of 495 persons. All of the other work is done by hand and painted in oil, all with most careful attention to detail and with an eye to beauty of general effect. Nothing of this kind has ever been attempted upon so large a scale. The quilt is by no means of the well- known "crazy quilt" order, but "a thing of beauty and of joy forever," not to mention the comfort.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: buttonhole machine stitching patent From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2012 12:10:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Wikipedia.com ---- Ezekiel House ---- below is only a portion of what is written about his inventions. OK, we have now established that buttonhole stitching could be done in the 1930's. How often was this done with quilt applique? Polly, I will ssend a photo to you personally. I don't know how to download photos on the board. Lynn L. Gorges, New Bern, NC

Ezekiel House left Owego in the spring of 1854 as he had taken a contract to build a county court house in the suburbs of Rockford, Illinois<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockford,_Illinois>. Henry and his brother went to Rockford in the fall and started in business with their father. In 1857 Henry took a position with his father who was superintending the raising and reconstructing of the old city hall in Chicago <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago>. While working on a building in New York <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York>, Henry had the misfortune of having the extension muscle of his right hand severed by a chisel which dropped from a scaffold. This incapacitated his doing any carpentry work for several months. During this enforced idleness, he designed and patented an automatic gate. [edit<http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?titleHenry_Alonzo_House&actionedit&section3> ] Automatic buttonhole machine

When the Civil War <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Civil_War> broke out and Henry was rejected as a volunteer on account of his slightly cripped right hand, he turned his attention to making a button<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Button>hole machine. He and his brother James entered into partnership with Mr. Seaman and in 1862 they perfected an automatic buttonhole sewing machine. It was then tested in a clothing shop in New York on army overcoats and capes, where its average was from 1,000 to 1,200 buttonholes per day. This caused hard feelings among the hand buttonhole workers, and one day during the noon hour they smashed the machine. However, the next morning another machine was working in its place. All together there were over one hundred thousand button holes made there. The patents were taken over by the Wheeler and Wilson Manufacturing Company<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheeler_%26_Wilson>of Bridgeport, Connecticut <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridgeport,_Connecticut>. While House was in Washington D.C. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_D.C.>looking after the patent application, he met Abraham Lincoln <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln>, for whom he cast his first vote.

In November 1862, he again returned to Little Meadows and married his cousin Mary Elizabeth House, daughter of William House, a miller. As his mother was very ill they hurried to Brooklyn where his mother died on November 28, 1862.

He then took his bride to Bridgeport, Connecticut<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridgeport,_Connecticut>where he was engaged by Wheeler and Wilson to superintend the making of his buttonhole machine. In the Spring of 1863 his father Ezekiel House died in Brooklyn. During that year four patents were issued for the automatic buttonhole sewing machine. In 1867 House represented the company at the Paris Exposition <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposition_Universelle_(1867)>Universelle, which opened in France <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/France> in May 1867. [edit<http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?titleHenry_Alonzo_House&actionedit&section4> ] Another sewing machine patent

In 1864 his shop was moved from Brooklyn to Bridgeport, with his brother James joining him there. They soon perfected an attachment to be used on the family sewing machine. This system was entirely new and since the patent was issued in 1868, it has been adopted throughout the world. On February 27, 1865, Henry Alonzo House Jr. was born. Another son, William Ezekiel, was born on February 22, 1874. On November 21, 1875, a daughter, Libbie Grace, was born.

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Subject: machine stitching history - book From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2012 12:37:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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http://books.google.com/books?idxWi_h7ZeOuwC&printsecfrontcover&dqmachine+stitch+perspectives&hlen&saX&eiwI-RT-yDJcni2QW55b2JBQ&ved0CDoQ6AEwAA#vonepage&qmachine%20stitch%20perspectives&ffalse

*MACHINE STITCH PERSPECTIVES* ** This book could shed some light on what "embroidery" technqiues were available to home quilters. I do know that this type of stitching is used with eyelet fabrics. I am now curious if these women had access to a machine that did the edging on eyelet and then used it to outline these roses?

Inquiring minds................Lynn L. Gorges (palamporeaol.com)

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Subject: Re: buttonhole machine stitching patent From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca> Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2012 14:37:44 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

>Wikipedia.com ---- Ezekiel House ---- below is only a portion of what is >written about his inventions.... >...He and his >brother James entered into partnership with Mr. >Seaman and in 1862 they perfected an automatic buttonhole sewing machine....

I'll bet the homestead that this patent was for a machine that made buttonholes, not one that made the decorative stitch that we know today as the "buttonhole stitch". I can't see that there would be much incentive for industrial embroidery developemnt during the Civil War, but pratical useful components like buttonholes would have been very important technology for clothing armies.

I'm a tad suspicious of machine wrought buttonhole stitch applique as early as the 1930s. Home machines with that stitch capability were still 20+ yrs in the future, although I'm not familiar with what would have been available in the industrial market. Who did the examination and deemed these stitches machine made? I've seen much fine hand work that a cursory inspection leads many to conclude must be made by machine, particularly by those who are unfamiliar with hand sewing.

Jennifer Hill Calgary, AB ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: more on buttonhole stitching From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Sun, 22 Apr 2012 12:09:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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I am the one who examined the stitching. At first I said --- hand done ---- then upon magnification and eagle eye examination I have a hard time immagining that it was possible to do that many stitches and that PERFECT all by hand. So I then threw this out as a question to the list. You gals/guys are pretty danged smart so I thought you could help me out. So I am still searching to see if this quilt could hae been stitched my machine in the 1930's or 1940's. Thanks..... Lynn Gorges in New Bern, NC

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Subject: name of block From: Helene Kusnitz <helenekusnitzgmail.com> Date: Sun, 22 Apr 2012 22:05:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi,

Can anyone tell me the name of this block? And if it's Barbara Brackmans Encyclopedia? It is listed on the eboard under Quilts labeled "name of block".

Thanks, Helene Kusnitz

-- Helene Kusnitz helenekusnitz.com----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: name of block From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 04:32:46 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

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"Robbing Peter to pay Paul"

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: RE: Name of block From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 03:10:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Helene asked: << Can anyone tell me the name of this block? And if it's Barbara  Brackmans Encyclopedia? It is listed on the eboard under Quilts labeled "name of block".>>

RESPONSE: Helene, I found one that is very similar, in Maggie Malone's book,  945,500 Quilt Block Designs." Look at 94Dolly Madison's Workbox94 or 94Butter  and Eggs." In Brackman's Encyclopedia, it's #2685. The difference between  Butter and Eggs and your block is the size of the points of the center piece. I didn't find the block with narrower points after checking Brackman's Encyclopedia, Malone's book or Jinny Beyer's 94Album."

Hope this can point in the right direction.

Barb

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research  and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at:  www.AlzQuilts.org

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Subject: unidentified block From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 06:25:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

No. 3110 in Blockbase, one of it's names is Orange Peel. It has several other names as well.

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Buttonhole Machine Stitch From: seamstress6139bigpond.com Date: Sun, 22 Apr 2012 09:01:45 +1000 X-Message-Number: 4

I can remember using a buttonhole attachment for my mother's Singer machine in the 1950s. It was a clunky thing and there would be no way of using it to do machine appliqu. There was also a zig-zag attachment that produced a so-called satin stitch - once again this was not simple to use.

In 1952 the Swiss company Elna introduced the Supermatic - a revolutionary concept as the first domestic sewing machine with fully automatic stitches. Interchangeable cams controlled the sideways movement of the needle as well as the forward and reverse feed of the fabric.

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Subject: Re: Buttonhole stitching by machine From: sgmunseycomcast.net Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2012 13:41:21 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 5

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Lynn In 1886 the Domestic Sewing Machine Co, published a "A Complete Book of Instructions for all kinds of Decoration Art Needlework on the Domestic Sewing Machine". Apparently they also published other handbooks for other kinds of machine stitching art, including a monthly magazine. In the reproduction copy I have, there are several attachments that may be purchased to use for various types of embroidery and "art needlework". The first stitches described are for "Outline or Outline Etching" and continues on for some 40 pages of descriptions of "art needlework" by machine. The handbook also describes s.everal attachments available for the sum of $3.00 each. I am not sure whether buttonhole stitching was available among the selections. Clearly, those old fashioned machines were more adaptable that we realize!

Sandra on Cape Cod

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Subject: RE: more on buttonhole stitching From: seamstress6139bigpond.com Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 08:43:09 +1000 X-Message-Number: 6

I can remember using a buttonhole attachment for my mother's Singer machine in the 1950s. It was a clunky thing with templates for different sizes of buttonholes and there would be no way of using it to do machine appliqu. There was also a zig-zag attachment that produced a so-called satin stitch - once again this was not simple to use.

In 1952 the Swiss company Elna introduced the Supermatic - a revolutionary concept as the first domestic sewing machine with fully automatic stitches. Interchangeable cams controlled the sideways movement of the needle as well as the forward and reverse feed of the fabric. In the 1960s I used the automatic blanket stitch in my Bernina to overlock seams since at that time I was not quilt making. I still use the same stitch on a Bernina today (not the same one!) to blanket stitch around fused appliqu.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Machine v. hand stitching From: JAN MASENTHIN <quiltsrmesbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 07:29:09 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

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Not to brag, but . . . I've had my own hand stitching identified as having  been done by machine. An "expert" viewing one of my hand pieced quilts insi sted itwas machine pieced. When I took issue with her, she insisted she  knew she was right because the stitches were so small and tight they couldn 't have been done by hand.I'm not sure I ever convinced her otherwise, e ven though I had done the stitching. I also own a large embroidered rose made by my grandmother. My mother saw her make it and it is one of my g reatest treasures. Mom had it framed and it hangs next to Grandma's photo p ortrait. It's always mistaken for machine work because of the fine stitc hes and gentle shading in the colors. Grandma taught me to embroider and I  can attest to her standard of perfection from my memories of ripping and do ing it over and over until it was perfect, front AND back.

Jan MasenthinTopeka, Kansas

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Subject: S.Schwabe & Co calico prints From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 12:42:07 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

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Haven't been on QHL in months and now I am on here daily. I just "unearthed" in my "stuff" a package of calico samples wrapped with a band that has on it S.Schwabe & Co (written in a lovely handwriting in ink). Sure it is a sample packet. Looked up the company.Was sent to a site run by the University of Wisconsin. What a wonderful site for research. Thought I would share it.

http://uwdc.library.wisc.edu/collections/DLDecArts I mentioning this company it said that they specialized in colors that would work better with dark complexions.....bright colors. It said that the European skin tones required more muted tones in fabric.

Never read such "reasoning" for textile designs in the 1800's. Another way to look at antique calicos. I would think that these samples I have are teals, mauvenes, oranges that are pre-CW dress fabrics. There are 16 different pieces of fabric. The fabric is rather thin and sized. I will try to photograph them in a few days and share in some way. Stamped leaves are the primary "theme" of the collection. I think the fabric is probably from the 1850's...not a fabric that would have been used in quilts, but would have been lovely in dresses. Reminds me of 2 "leaf printed" delaines I have from that time period.

S.Schwabe & Co http://middletonia.co.uk/peopleandplaces/schwabes.html

Lynn Gorges in New Bern, NC

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Subject: Buttonhole stitches From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 13:02:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

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I used a Bernina 930 for 27 years until it was hit by lightning. It's pro bably one of the best machines on the planet2C so I never even thought of  replacing it. As I got to doing more and more quilting and began developin g my style2C I found I needed a fast decorative way to attach odd elements - i.e.2C buttonhole stitching. When I talked to a dealer about it2C he  said that the buttonhole stitch was only available on more computerized mod els. Now2C that's hardly research2C but it is my one enlightenment as to butto nhole stitching. FOr what it is worth.

Teddy Pruett

www.teddypruett.com Art is the only way to run away without leaving home. -Twyla Tharp

 

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Subject: RE: Machine v. hand stitching From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 11:31:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Jan, love that story ... and it's a cautionary tale for those of us who look at and evaluate old quilts in any way, shape, or form. We just can't always know for sure, can we. Good to remember that. Steph Whitson

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Subject: Unusual combo of crochet and redwork quilt From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 13:05:32 -0700 X-Message-Number: 11

Have never seen anything like this before. Has any other QHL member seen one of these? Found it on eBay.

http://tinyurl.com/7agh4em

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: more on buttonhole stitching From: Jennifer Hill <jennifer.hillshaw.ca> Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 19:05:41 -0600 X-Message-Number: 12

>I am the one who examined the stitching. At first I said --- hand done ---- >then upon magnification and eagle eye examination I have a hard time >immagining that it was possible to do that many stitches and that PERFECT >all by hand....So I am still searching to see if this quilt could >hae been stitched my >machine in the 1930's or 1940's.

Lynn, is it possible to post a magnified photo of these stitches somewhere? Hand-made buttonhole stitches have a completely different structure than those made by machine.

It is not impossible that there were industrial sewing machines in that time period that did buttonhole stitch embroidery, although I don't know where to look for such evidence. They would have been uncommon - very specialized, single purpose/stitch factory machines, and it is unlikely that a quilter would have had access to such a machine.

Jennifer Hill Calgary, AB----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lairdsville, Lycoming County PA From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Tue, 24 Apr 2012 18:50:34 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Hi All - Wonder if anyone on the list knows of a historical society or museum of sorts that is in or near Lairdsville, Lycoming County Pennsylvania? I have something that may be of interest to them (or to an individual who may be doing genealogy for that area) and was hoping to sell or donate the items.

Contact me privately please.

Thanks and Happy Spring (If mother nature would only make up her mind out here in So. Cal)

Leah Zieber

Leah.zieberverizon.net----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Shot cotton and P.N.G. From: JAN MASENTHIN <quiltsrmesbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 25 Apr 2012 09:43:06 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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My two subject items aren't related, but wanted to present both questions.  First, what is the difference between shot cotton and chambray?

Second, does anyone have any information about a group with the initials P. N.G.? I bought a signature quilt at an antique store with was no provena nce except the center of the quilt contained those initials and the date 19 33. It's a fan quilt and all the signatures are embroidered but they appear authentic because the handwriting is different in each one. I realize ther e were many unique sewing, craft or church groups and circles during that e ra, and P.N.G. may be one of a kind, but it never hurts to ask.

Jan Masenthin Topeka, Kansas --793883113-958727592-1335372186:55280--

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Subject: RE: Shot cotton and P.N.G. From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 25 Apr 2012 12:37:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Just thinking that the three initials could be a person....to whom the piece was given or even the one putting it together. Seems an organization might be more forthcoming about its name? jean

>

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Subject: RE: Shot cotton and P.N.G. From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu> Date: Wed, 25 Apr 2012 13:17:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

"Second, does anyone have any information about a group with the initials P .N.G.? I bought a signature quilt at an antique store with was no proven ance except the center of the quilt contained those initials and the date 1 933. It's a fan quilt and all the signatures are embroidered but they appea r authentic because the handwriting is different in each one. I realize the re were many unique sewing, craft or church groups and circles during that  era, and P.N.G. may be one of a kind, but it never hurts to ask."

Some years ago I purchased a set of signature blocks that contained one blo ck with J. F. S. because several of the blocks contained signatures of rela tives. In my parallel genealogy endeavors I met one of the signers (a rela tive) and discovered JFS meant Jolly Friends Society (a neighborhood group) .

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Subject: RE: Shot cotton From: seamstress6139bigpond.com Date: Thu, 26 Apr 2012 08:24:10 +1000 X-Message-Number: 4

Chambray is a cotton plain weave with a coloured warp and a white weft (or vice versa). In the 19th century the development and rationalization of mechanical weaving led to the replacement of the traditional coloured warp and white weft by the opposite, white warp and coloured weft, which allowed for longer warps.

Chambray in the late 19th century could be "made from any colour as you may wish, in the warp, and also in the filling; only have them differ from each other." (Wikipedia)

The only difference I can see in shot cotton is that both warp and weft are coloured.

Of course I stand to be corrected!

Janet O'Dell

Melbourne Australia----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Info on George Bascomb Keefer of Ohio From: "Betsy Lewis" <BetsyLewis100gmail.com> Date: Thu, 26 Apr 2012 10:57:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I am researching the quilt making of George “Fussy” Bascomb Keefer of Butler, OH (Mansfield area). He was a prolific quilt maker during the 1920s and 1930s, making quilts for high school seniors at the Butler High School. If any of you have info about George or his descendents, please contact me offline, BetsyLewis100gmail.com. Thank you!----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Shot cotton and P.N.G. From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Fri, 27 Apr 2012 00:21:31 -0700 (PDT)

It wasn't a missionary group was it? From Associations Unlimited, PNG st ands for Papua New Guinea! You might try calling your local librarian for a list of local vintage organizations. Check old phone books and ci ty directories.....arden(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, O R----------

Subject: Before I recycle these . . . From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Sat, 28 Apr 2012 11:48:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

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In sorting out my book collection I came across a Directory of Quilt Dealers fro 1991, and two directories of quilt shops, one from 1988 and the other from 1987.

If any of you are interested in them, let me know, first come first served.

Mary

Is everybody in Paducah this week? Things have been quiet.

-- Mary G. Persyn Associate Dean for Law Library Services Valparaiso University Law School