Subject: correction in Quilters Hall Fame quilt contest address From: sharonpinkayahoo.com Date: Thu, 26 Apr 12 06:06:11 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Hello - we are starting to receive entries in our Quilters Hall of Fame quilt contest and have been made aware of an error in the zip code address. It should read 44813 (NOT 44812).Looking forward to receiving many entries at the corrected address! In case you still need the entry form, click on this link:http://www.quiltershalloffame.net/celebration then click on "quilt contest." Thanks, Sharon

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Subject: Help "Why Quilts Matter" keep the conversation going!!! New News!!! From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com>

I wanted to share some exciting news! We're taking "Why Quilts Matter" to the next level with the creation of a Continuing the Conversation guide.

Think of the guide in terms of a "book club," you watch an episode of the series and then get together with a group to talk about it using questions from the guide. You can use the guide in guilds, classrooms, or with a group of friends. We don't care where you use it just as long as you are keeping the discussion about quilts going so that quilts and quiltmakers get the respect they deserve!

In order to raise money for printing and production of the guides we are asking for your help we need to raise $6,500 in 30 days to make these guides come to life. To make our fundraising process go as smoothly as possible, we92re using Kickstarter.com, a well-respected fundraising site that helps facilitate donations easily. Why recreate the wheel if someone else is already doing it well?

Here's what you need to do: Visit our Kickstarter page at http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/whyquiltsmatter/create-why-quilts-matte r-conversation-guidesto learn more about the guides. If you like what you see, donate. We've attached some great rewards to the various contribution levels so be sure to check it out. Your help will get the quilt conversation going with more and more people!

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 407 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

ps. Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v3D8RMyg1_zYgY

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Subject: Re: Texas fabric From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Wed, 2 May 12 15:45:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I am flabbergasted to report that I found seven yards of the ten-plus-year-old Texas fabric at a shop in Georgia. I went on missingfabrics.com and in less than twenty-four hours, a quilter in California aimed me at this particular shop. My yardage is in the mail!! So thanks, anyway. I can scarcely believe how quickly it all happened. Pat Kyser in Alabama 

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Subject: fabric dates From: Helene Kusnitz <helenekusnitzgmail.com> Date: Wed, 2 May 12 19:48:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5 859-1

I sent this yesterday and it came back so pardon if it gets repeated. Can anyone tell me what they think is the approximate time period for the Robbing Peter to Pay Paul fabric and the album quilt I posted on the eboard under the Quilt file titled Time Period of Fabrics? Sorry, the RPPP is posted twice. I didn't know how to delete one photo. Thanks, Helene Kusnitz

-- Helene Kusnitz helenekusnitz.com

 

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Subject: Re: Texas fabric From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Thu, 3 May 12 01:13:46 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 6

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What Texas fabric is this? Photo?

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland by way of Texas----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Self-Publishing Quilt Catalog From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 4 May 12 06:38:30 -0700 (PDT) X-

Hello -

So excited. Atlanta quilter Aisha Lumumba has published a catalog of her ar t quilts. She's been participating in the Publish Your Quilt blog. In today 's post, there is a short interview with her. http://publishyourquilts.b logspot.com/

Hope you enjoy - Kyra Hicks

 

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Subject: The "Why Quilts Matter " "kickstarter" project link should be active now! From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Fri, 4 May 12 09:38:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

 

Thanks to Candace Perry for letting me know the link was broken on my previous post.This should do it.Click on the link and the live link will appear right beneath the name of the link. Join us in creating these Continuing the Conversation guides to spread the word about quilts further and further!!

I wanted to share some exciting news! We're taking "Why Quilts Matter" to the next level with the creation of a Continuing the Conversation guide.

Think of the guide in terms of a "book club," you watch an episode of the series and then get together with a group to talk about it using questions from the guide. You can use the guide in guilds, classrooms, or with a group of friends. We don't care where you use it just as long as you are keeping the discussion about quilts going so that quilts and quiltmakers get the respect they deserve!

In order to raise money for printing and production of the guides we are asking for your help we need to raise $6,500 in 30 days to make these guides come to life. To make our fundraising process go as smoothly as possible, were using Kickstarter.com, a well-respected fundraising site that helps facilitate donations easily. Why recreate the wheel if someone else is already doing it well?

Here's what you can do: Visit our Kickstarter page at

http://tinyurl.com/whyquiltsmatter-kickstarter to learn more about the guides. If you like what you see, donate. We've attached some great rewards to the various contribution levels so be sure to check it out. Your help will get the quilt conversation going with more and more people!

We appreciate your support as always!!! Please help us spread the word to anyone you think might be interested. Best regards, Shelly

http://tinyurl.com/whyquiltsmatter-kickstarter -- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 407 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

ps. Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v3D8RMyg1_zYgY

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 407 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org <http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/whyquiltsmatter/create-why-quilts-matt er-conversation-guides>

ps. Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v3D8RMyg1_zYgY

--f46d0408d3bf75c73b04bf360aa5--

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Subject: reference question From: <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Fri, 4 May 12 16:59:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

 

Ladies, I hope you can help me find a reference IE28099ve run across in the past but now I cannot remember where. It regards a discussion of the kind of basic geometry girls would have been taught in the nineteenth century that would have enabled them to draft the complex patterns we see in quilts from that century including the marinerE28099s compass pattern. I remember seeing drawings of circles, rectangles, triangles, etc. and some discussion of when and how it would have been taught.

Does this ring a bell with any one else? Can anyone point me toward the book I would have seen that in? I am pretty sure it was an early book on quilting, but which one...by whom????

Can anyone help me??

Thanks,

Kathy Moore ------_NextPart_000_0005_01CD2A17.47DE2E50--

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Subject: Re: reference question From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 04 May 12 18:59:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

THi Kathy,

That sounds like something I wrote about (briefly)--and an image that was included--in my book for Old Sturbridge Village's quilt collection--/Northern Comfort: New England's Early Quilts, 1790-1840/.

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: Drafting, geometry and Mariner's Compass From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Fri, 4 May 12 21:57:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Kathy, If you check the curricula of most of the Female Academies of the nineteenth century, you will find geometry is definitely included. You will also find these kinds of geometric drawings in some of the journals of girls from the se academies. > Sue Reich > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: suereichcharter.net. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1569982Qlyris.quiltropolis .com

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Subject: RE: reference question From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Fri, 4 May 12 21:33:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I think there was a little about that in the catalog for the Chintz exhibit at the IQSC ... the one with paper piecing if you got the catalog. Steph Whitson----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: reference question From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Sat, 5 May 12 12:58:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Kathy, I know this is sort of a wild goose chase answer, but if you can access any ciphering books of the period, you would be able to see what they were taught...my experience is with my German girls only, and they DID NOT learn any form of geometry in their schooling, at least prior to the PA free public school act of 1834. As a matter of fact, the only geometry evidence I have is from boys who went on to what I term as advanced education -- not college, just more preparation for a trade etc -- and those boys are rare. These are not people who didn't have means, either; they just did not see the necessity of that type of education. The boy in these academies learned geometry in addition to navigation, surveying, astronomy etc. Our girls learned long division, fractions, percentages, "the rule of three" and that type of math -- the same thing that boys learned. Candace Perry

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Subject: help for removing latex paint on quilt From: carylschuetzyahoo.com Date: Sat, 5 May 12 11:10:08 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Would anyone on our list have info on getting dried latex paint off a quilt made in the late 1980's? Can you believe that a workman used the quilt as a drop cloth while he painted a room? We are stunned that anyone could be so ignorant. (Ignorant is being kind in my book.)I saw the quil t and there are a few drops about the size of half dollars in the right quadrant of the quilt.The screen printed photos quilt was commissioned by my friend and was made by a well known textile artist in my area. I have nothing in my files about what to do.Caryl

> ---929011800-424647395-1336241408:5529--

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Subject: Lone Star Quilt Study Day August 12 From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sat, 5 May 12 16:58:08 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Just a note to let you know that the second Lone Star Quilt Study Group Study Day will be held August 25 in Waxahachie, Texas. The topic will be Late 19th Century Pennsylvania Quilts and Carolyn Miller will be our speaker. Her quilts are currently on exhibit at the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum. If you would be interested in attending, go to _www.lonestarquiltstudygroup.org_ (http://www.lonestarquiltstudygroup.org) . The $30 fee includes lunch. Registration is limited to the first 100. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth --part1_92df.3c3c1f92.3cd6ee60_boundary--

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Subject: RE: help for removing latex paint on quilt From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Sat, 5 May 12 15:49:10 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Good afternoon, QHLers - If the drops are sorta thick, first try peeling them off using your fingernail. You might try freezing up the spots first using an ice cube wrapped in a plastic bag. Remove as much of the spots physically by scrapping first.

Next step is to try plain ammonia. BUT YOU MUST TEST THE FASTNESS OF THE SCREEN PRINTED IMAGES TO AMMONIA FIRST!! IF IF the screen printing is fast, swab at the spots with a cotton swab moistened with the plain ammonia - moistened, NOT dripping. Another tricky part is the colour of the paint - if it is a light/white/beige colour, it may be difficult to see on the cotton swab. If it looks like the plain ammonia is removing the paint, continue swabbing. The final step must be a swabbing with deionized water (just moistened AND AFTER TESTING THE FASTNESS OF THE SCREEN PRINTED IMAGES TO DEIONIZED WATER) multiple times to serve as the rinsing. You do not want to soak the spots/quilt as this may drive the paint further in to the fabric.

The sooner you can attend to these spots, the better. Good luck!

Please feel free to contact me off line for further clarification if needed. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator & Collections Management Consultant Professional Associate - AIC 707-763-8694 mgmooneymoonware.net

...getting dried latex paint off a quilt made in the late 1980's? Can you believe that a workman used the quilt as a drop cloth while he painted a room? ... I saw the quilt and there are a few drops about the size of half dollars in the right quadrant of the quilt.The screen printed photos quilt was commissioned by my friend and was made by a well known textile artist in my area. ...

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Subject: Re: reference question From: textiqueaol.com Date: Sat, 5 May 12 :59:24 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CEF93A9D33FE42_CE4_E8ECF_webmail-m041.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset"utf-8"

Kathy,

I recall coming across a few references to Euclid's "Elements" in some late first quarter or early second quarter female school catalogues. Euclid is known as 'the father of geometry' so you might want to check a copy. Will go through my catalog files.

Jan Thomas

Ladies, I hope you can help me find a reference IE28099ve run across in the past but now I cannot remember where. It regards a discussion of the kind of basic

geometry girls would have been taught in the nineteenth century that would have enabled them to draft the complex patterns we see in quilts from that centu ry including the marinerE28099s compass pattern. I remember seeing drawings of circles, rectangles, triangles, etc. and some discussion of when and how it would ha ve been taught.

 

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Subject: Re: reference question From: Quilltraol.com Date: Sat, 5 May 12 21:39:39 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

--part1_13601.4db1cb2b.3cd7305b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Kathy, Here is a paper on New England education for girl's in the 19th Century, and it included algebra and geometry.

_http://www.bostonhistory.org/pdf/Kermes%article_final.pdf_ (http://www.bostonhistory.org/pdf/Kermes%article_final.pdf)

Lisa----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Study Days From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Sun, 06 May 12 09:03:45 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Good Morning -

Our Quilt Study Group is considering doing a Southern California Regional Study Day in association with a quilt show and I am heading up a committee to investigate the possibilities, the dos and don't as well as cost, income, etc, etc. . I was hoping that any of you who have headed up one of these in the past could contact me privately and allow me to ask a few questions regarding the process and necessities to make the event successful.

Sincerest thanks,

Leah Zieber

Temecula California

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Subject: RE: Study Days From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sun, 6 May 12 14:42:57 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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Dear Leah, You might want to contact Kathy Moore. Janet H in Fort Worth -

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Subject: Inside the Quilt From: maureenbooksandoldlace.com Date: Sun, 6 May 12 10:36:25 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

Spent the last couple of hours carefully clipping green acrylic ties out of a peach and white millwheel patterned quilt that I collected in Wayne, Nebraska years ago. What a trip. You know sometimes when you pull apart an old quilt you find magic inside - an older quilt used as batting, hand carded cotton sometimes in Alabama. Not this time. But I knew that going in.

The top is so fragile, it's frayed and comes apart readily if I'm too quick with the clippers, pulling aside the binding and muslin backing. The batting is long yellowed wool, bunched in spots and sewn to the top in the many places where the quilt's needed repair. I'm imagining a woman clipping the sheep that spring, cleaning the wool and carding it thin as she thinks about the quilt she's been piecing through the long dark nights. This is a eavy quilt, and used for years I'm quite sure to keep a family warm in the freezing winters of the Great Plains.

There was magic inside after all.

Maureen In Southern Oregon----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: MOKA Quilt Study Group From: JAN MASENTHIN <quiltsrmesbcglobal.net> Date: Mon, 7 May 12 13:15:25 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

The Missouri-Oklahoma-Kansas-Arkansas Quilt Study Group will be meeting in Topeka, Kansas on June 15 - 16. We are going to meet at the Kansas State Historical Society Museum, and will be studying star quilts with the help of "star historians" Terry Thompson, Martha Sparks and Libby Russell. As a special treat, we're going to have a fabric/block swap. The fee of $25 w ill include lunch. We don't have a website (yet) but if you are interest ed, please email me offline and I will to send you details.

Jan Masenthin ---374830607-1192828014-1336421725:72611--

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Subject: reference question and answers From: <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Tue, 8 May 12 12:13:11 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Thank you, ladies, for such quick and good answers to my question. I wasnE28099t imagining things, I really did see a reference to early geometry instruction. It was in Northern Comfort: New Englands Early Quilts by Lynne Bassett.

Thank you, Lynne, for recognizing it and pointing me in the right direction.

You all are the best resource imaginable.

Many thanks, Kathy Moore----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Looking for a member From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Wed, 9 May 12 16:29:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

 

Hi all many months ago I was corresponding with someone from Texas. I s aid I would sell her six antique packages of dye but something happened and I let it all get away from me. There was a reason. If you happen to b e that person could you please -email me and let me apologize and tell y ou what happened. I think you'll be amazed at a coincidence that came up - I know I was!!

Teddy Pruett----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Tennessee Regional Quilt Study Group From: nedjanaol.com Date: Thu, 10 May 12 11:43:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

We are a new group that has held two meetings in east Tennessee. We have organized a meeting in central Tennessee for May 16 in Murfreesboro. We would l ike to encourage anyone who is interested to join us next Wednesday for a fascinating presentation on Civil War quilts by Cathy Crabtree, a graduate of t he University of Nebraska and a professor at Middle Tennessee State University. We will start the program at 10 am with Show & Tell and the speaker will start at 12:30 with this timely topic: How quilts were used by women in support of the Civil War. The program should be over by 2 pm. Murfreesboro and nearby Franklin were the sites of some of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. Bring your spouses and explore the Stones River Battlefield and the plan tation houses that were in the middle of the fighting. Adrianne Barnett has organized this event and has arranged special rates at some local hotels and box lunches for those who reserve them. Please bring you quilts for Show & Tell.

For more information contact Adrianne Barnett at barnettaphotmail.com or 615-437-2744 (cell) or Jan Wass at nedjanaol.com

Hope to see you there. Jan Wass

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Subject: World's Fair Quilts From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Thu, 10 May 12 13:53:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

--_b025ec62-47e8-47f7-a4-cf39dbb19301_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Does anyone know the number of discovered 1933 World's Fair quilts Merikay has in her database these days? The last time I checked it was just ove r 0 but I'm sure more have been added since then. I don't need the ex act number just a ballpark figure. Thanks!

Teddy Pruett

www.teddypruett.com Art is the only way to run away without leaving home. -Twyla Tharp

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Subject: Drafting patterns in the 18th century From: mose2unlnotes.unl.edu Date: Thu, 10 May 12 17:26:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Regarding Kathy Moore's question about math taught long ago: there were similar images in the International Quilt Study Center & Museum's exhibition "Elegant Geometry: American and British Mosaic Patchwork", guest curated by Bridget Long, which was on display here last year. It is available for online viewing at http://www.quiltstudy.org/exhibitions/online_exhibitions/mosaic/paper_pieces1.html

There is a picture of the display case which showed a number of texts, tools and references that may have been available to quilters of the era. The accompanying catalog to the exhibition discusses that in some detail and includes numerous footnotes with related references. I have included one from the curator, Bridget Long:

Bridget Long, ߀?What DID Eighteenth Century Women Know? Clues about Girls߀™ Education to be Found on Some Textile Objects,߀? Education in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar, Institute of Historical Research, London, presented June 5, 10.

Bridget's lecture about the exhibition and her related research is also online at http://www.quiltstudy.org/connections/podcasts1.html , listed under 11 podcasts.

Maureen Ose, Communications Coordinator International Quilt Study Center & Museum Department of Textiles, Clothing and Design PO Box 830838 1523 N. 33rd Street Lincoln, NE 68583-0838

www.quiltstudy.org 402-472-7232 FAX 402-472-08 mose2unl.edu

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Subject: Drafting Patterns in the 18th century From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 10 May 12 17:23:22 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Maureen has been having problems posting to the QHL list. I am posting thi s on her behalf:

Regarding Kathy Moore's question about math taught long ago: there were similar images in the International Quilt Study Center & Museum's exhibition "Elegant Geometry: American and British Mosaic Patchwork", guest curated by Bridget Long, which was on display here last year. It is

available for online viewing at http://www.quiltstudy.org/exhibitions/online_exhibitions/mosaic/paper_piece s1.html

There is a picture of the display case which showed a number of texts, tools and references that may have been available to quilters of the era.

The accompanying catalog to the exhibition discusses that in some detail and includes numerous footnotes with related references. I have included

one from the curator, Bridget Long:

Bridget Long, What DID Eighteenth Century Women Know? Clues about Girls Education to be Found on Some Textile Objects, Educ ation in the Long Eighteenth Century Seminar, Institute of Historical Research, London, presented June 5, 10.

Bridget's lecture about the exhibition and her related research is also online at http://www.quiltstudy.org/connections/podcasts1.html , listed under 11 podcasts.

Maureen Ose, Communications Coordinator International Quilt Study Center & Museum Department of Textiles, Clothing and Design PO Box 830838 1523 N. 33rd Street Lincoln, NE 68583-0838

www.quiltstudy.org 402-472-7232 FAX 402-472-08 mose2unl.edu

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Subject: Basting From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 10 May 12 18:26:28 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

 

Xenia, I am wondering if you (and Annie) use a 3 rail frame? I see how t hose work, with the layers rolling separately in the back, and brought toge ther at the front rail...but can't picture how the layering would be done a s you described, except in a large flat frame such as those hung from the c eiling. I have always needed to baste my quilts, but I was self taught a nd never had a full sized frame, either. Susan ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: basting From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com>

Xenia, but of course!! An elegant use of simple machinery. Thank you for your explanation. Susan

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Subject: RE: Grandmas Apron From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com>

Stephanie,I know I'm replying late, but this story is too good to leave un-told.During WWII, my father was the chief cook on a troop transpor t- cooking for up to 22,000 men every day! He brought home his aprons, and big, lovely items they were...white cotton gaberdine, with big bib fronts t hat would cover you from sternum to knees, and wrapped around almost to tou ch in the back. Dad was in the Pacific, and a lot of the time was spent in tropical zones, so you can imagine the kitchen was pretty hot. One day Dad showed up for duty to find that one of the cooks had gotten creative- he wa s wearing an apron in the front, and an apron in the back, and that was all ! (well, maybe he was wearing skivvies) This cook found out that the Navy r eally was serious about its rule about reporting for duty in one's proper u niform! Jocelyn ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: geometry souce From: <kmoore81austin.rr.com>

Thank you, Maureen, for the pointer. I have the book and the brochure and, sure enough, there the information is, big as life.

Thank you for taking the time. This is a big help,

Kathy Moore ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: stories of basting quilts From: <kmoore81austin.rr.com>

Dorothy raises interesting questions and suppositions. I think she is right about sample blocks being used for doll quilts.

With regard to her comments on carefully piecing a top:

I acknowledge the remark about the badly-pieced top, but have this thought: First, if I were piecing and quilting my own quilt, I'd piece it "right" because I would know I'd have to deal with issues in the quilting process. If I were a new quilter I'd have my mother and other experienced quilters -- relatives, neighbors -- to instruct me if I were going astray. And if I were piecing a top expecting to have help with the quilting, then I'd REALLY be careful with my piecing knowing that my quilting helpers would set me straight if I'd gone astray.

I have to say, my comments were based on personal experience. The group of older ladies I learned from had been quilting as a group for probably 40+ years and were intimately acquainted with each other...they were like sisters. There was one woman in the group who was a prolific piercer, but her tops were always a challenge to quilt. Perfection was not her strong suit and seams always had puckers and pooches. Whenever we put one of her quilts in the frame we basted the heck out of it and they would all stand back and say, E2809CDonE28099t worry, it will quilt out.E2809D And you know what, they nearly always did!

Best wishes,

Kathy Moore ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: May 14, 12 From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 15 May 12 06:59:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Good morning! Leaving later on for a 10 day trip to the UK. This is kind of last minute to ask (but I'll have Internet Access the entire trip so would see something posted) but is there any "must see" antique quilt in either Alton, Bath, in Dorset (staying there part of my time with friends) or in London? I might be able to engineer a quick trip somewhere if it is near some of our stops. Thanks if you have anything, Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Quilts in Bath From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Tue, 15 May 12 09:34: -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

 

When we were in Bath a couple of years ago, the American Museum in Bath had some antique quilts on permanent display in their textiles area.

Of course, they were American quilts. (+:

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn Associate Dean for Law Library Services Valparaiso University Law School 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 (219) 465-7830 FAX (219) 465-7917 mary.persynvalpo.edu

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Subject: Rabbit Goody's Textile Forum in June From: suereichcharter.net

Is anyone going to the Textile Forum at Hyde Hall in June.? Can you recommend a place to stay? Please contact me off the list at suereichcharter.net. Thanks,

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: RE: Rabbit Goody's Textile Forum in June From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 15 May 12 13:27:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Sue, I'm not going this time (wish I could) but I went in the past when it was at Cooperstown, and as I recall I had a bear of a time finding somewhere reasonable to stay --meaning on the cheap and that ruled out Cooperstown. I ended up in a motel fairly near Glimmerglass. It was just fine, actually, clean and pleasant, but that was several years ago -- I think it was the Village Motel. Definitely a motel though! Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: Rabbit Goody's Textile Forum in June From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Tue, 15 May 12 16:05:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

I stayed at the same motel as Candace. I agree. I too think it was the Village Motel. Definitely a motel.