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Subject: Ohio Practical Farmer From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Hi Everyone, looking for someone who might have info about the Ohio Practic al Farmer magazine ca 1890 that has a quilt pattern in it calledBEAUR EGARD'S SURROUNDINGS It's the same pattern commonly known as Burgo yne Surrounded. Thanks, best, Don

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Subject: Seeking contact info From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2012 14:40:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

If anyone has contact information for Ronda McAllen, would you please share it with me privately. The telephone numbers I have are out of date.

Thanks in advance.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: need some reproduction fabrics From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2012 16:50:53 -0400

I need some help. I have tons of reproduction fabrics and OLD fabrics, but I NEED these..... 1) Andover Reproduction Aztec Blue & Brown 2) Crimson & CloverII 3) Civil War Tribute Collection - Quilt backing BROWN (Rothermel designer) . I just need 1/4 yd. of each. If you have this and are interested in selling me a small amount, please contact me at palamporeaol.com

Working on a primarily prussian blue and brown quilt so the "look" "shade" is very very important.

Thanks!!! Lynn Gorges, New Bern, NC ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Antique Treadle Sewing Machine Questions From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>

I've spent some time online this afternoon trying to learn more about a treadle machine I purchased at a flea market this weekend.

What "sold" me on it was the fact that the dealer had the instruction book (very fragile, dated 1875), the fact that it folds away

to create a lovely piece of furniture something like an end table, and honestly the mystique (fabric remnants in the bin, a needlebook

with a home-made cover from the same fabric that has been used to create a "new" cover for the instruction booklet, the carving

on the front panel, the exquisite design in the molded foot pedals, etc. etc.) I was totally sucked in, and I'm thrilled with the thing.

The booklet's title page says: DIRECTIONS for using the "Family Favorite" SEWING MACHINES; manufactured by the Weed Sewing Machine Co., Hartford, Conn.

I know that the Weed Company was in Hartford, CT in the factory once occupied by the Sharps rifle company, but I've discovered little

else other than a couple of references on the ISMACS site (do I have that acronym right?).

If anyone here can point me to more information, I'd be obliged. I'm happy to send photos to anyone interested. I'll be checking in with the Connecticut historical society and archives,

but thought I'd ask here since there is so much knowledge represented on this loop.

This little bit of history will be a permanent fixture in my office as soon as I get some muscle to help me carry it down the stairs J.

The cabinet has "PAT July 26 1871" pressed into the wood to the right of the machine head.

Stephanie Whitson ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Weed Sewing Machine From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sun, 17 Jun 2012 00:17:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I have a good bit of info about Weed Sewing Machines acquired while writing " Quilts and Quiltmakers Covering Connecticut.". The Windham Textile & History Museum has quite a collection of antique sewing machines. They had to cons tantly check the threads manufactured there. I am sure they have a machine l ike yours. Also, check the Smithsonian online archives and the Library of C ongress. I'll try to check my stash in the next day or two.

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Subject: Re: Antique Treadle Sewing Machine From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Jun 2012 05:43:52 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Stephanie,

I have something like that - it works, too. I was told it was called a parlor treadle. I don't think it is that old, though. Lets see if this link works: http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/26916_10150097846930538_8318536_n.jpg

Kris

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Subject: Re: Antique Treadle Sewing Machine Questions From: Polly Greene <pjgreeneeastlink.ca> Date: Sun, 17 Jun 2012 11:16:26 -0300 X-Message-Number: 3

Stephanie Whitson should post her questions about her newly acquired treadle to the ISMACS site. Lots of expertise there. Polly Greene

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Subject: Re: Antique Treadle Sewing Machine From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>

Yours is much more ornate than mine. I'll attach the photos. Stephanie

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Subject: Fw: Antique treadle machine From: nan adams <nanadams1877yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 18 Jun 2012 16:26:42 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

--1938299484-806902660-1340062002:75157 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

www.treadleon.net has a wealth of information available on the use of "p eople powered" treadle and handcrank machines. Also www.needlebar.org----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sewing provisions, 1859 From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com>

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From the Prairie Traveler, 1859 (The book is available on Google Books at

http://books.google.com/books/about/The_prairie_traveler.html?idOnRNAAAAYAA J)

Included in the suggested list of provisions for a freighter who would be "on the road" for 3 months:

It includes "Stout linen sewing thread, large needles, a small bit of beeswax, a few buttons, a paper of pins, and a thimble put into a stout buckskin or cloth bag."

Thought someone on this list might be interested.

Steph Whitson----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Blog From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net>

Hi to all -

Some of you may already know this link - I just happened to stumble across it while looking for something related to the Foundling Hospital in London. I think I may spend a few hours poking around this blog... it looks lovely. I fell into the gift shop and goodness me!!!

If this is your blog and I didn't know - all I can say is job well done on creating something great!

Leah Zieber

from Goldilocks Land - Southern California - where the temperature is always... Just right!

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Subject: Blog From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Wed, 20 Jun 2012 21:31:23 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Bhaa hahahah! That's how I know menopause has hit me square in the face! Gosh I hope the other side of 50 is better than the last few years getting here!

The blog I was talking about is... wait for it...

http://needleprint.blogspot.com/

Sorry for being such a dope!

Leah Z.

(glad I check my email before I go to bed... imagine that hanging out there over night!)

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Subject: Alamance Plaid From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2012 07:42:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

My parents give me an annual subscription to the magazine, Our State: Down Home in North Carolina. This is a thinly disguised ploy to entice me to return to my home state. It isn't working, but the magazine is often fascinating. In the July 2012 issue, the regular feature, Our State Quiz, is titled Tar Heel Textiles. Question 4 reads:

Edwin M. Holt built a cotton mill near Burlington in 1837 that became the first to produce factory-dyed cotton cloth south of the Potomac. The cotton's blue-and-white design was known by what name?

A. Guilford Stitching B. Alamance Plaid C. Chatham Crossweave

Thanks to this list, I knew the answer! Although I grew up just a couple of counties over in Winston-Salem in Forsyth County, I had never heard of Alamance Plaid until joining this list and reading Lynn's posts. The other questions on this quiz might also be of interest to the list, but I hesitate to bore.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Re: Alamance Plaid From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2012 11:00:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I think I will look up the mag to see what the aricle looks like and should I add it to a resource list. Marcia Kaylakie, who loves Mission Valley Mills plaids here in Texas

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Subject: RE: Blog From: "Stephanie Whitson" <stephaniestephaniewhitson.com> Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2012 11:39:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

For shame! Now I want to book a trip to Antwerp! Thanks so much for sharing this. Steph Whitson

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Subject: RE: Alamance Plaid From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2012 12:37:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

I've learned something from your post, Andi. I'd heard about Alamance yellow but not plaid. I looked up images for it on Google. (To see Alamance yellow in a quilt click here http://www.alamancemuseum.org/portal/Collections.aspx) and go to Quilts and Textiles. thanks again! Jean ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Erma Kirkpatrick - article in newspaper From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com>

Raleigh News & Observer Monday June 18, 2012 There is an article about Erma Kirkpatrick --- Volunteer Lived to Aid Others, WWII Crytographer, Quilter Reached Out Across Cultures. It is a very nice tribute to Erma and her work as a volunteer and quilter. Didn't mention Uncle Eli's Quilt Party or her work on Alamance County produced plaids, but still a great article!

I take the State Magazine for NC but haven't had time to read it. Will try to find that puzzle on textiles in a couple of days. It is one of the prettiest magazines published. I love getting it every month. This month's cover is Doc Watson who I got to see perform at the 25th Merlefest in April.

Off to pack to go on a little fabric feeling trip with Pepper Cory in Raleigh. They are having an expo so we will be there tonight for an event being done with the American Quilt Alliance. Hope to see some of you there!

Lynn Gorges, New Bern, NC ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Our State, North Carolina From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2012 08:29:29 -0400

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Just can't end the discussion about this magazine without telling you that my introduction to this publication was a year ago when my son, Kent Knorr (who lives in Wilmington, NC) was featured in one of the articles. He owns The North Carolina Ukulele Academy in Wilmington. The article was about his business and their website featured him playing different styles of music on his ukulele. I am going to check out the textile quiz. Sorry about this non quilting post, but quilters are proud mothers also! Judy Knorr----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Erma Kirkpatrick's other article From: Laurel Horton <laurelkalmiaresearch.net> Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2012 19:33:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

--bcaec52be4edc06b0a04c32c2ce5 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8

Erma's first *Uncoverings* article was a survey of quilt articles, patterns, etc. in the *Progressive Farmer.*

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Subject: Re: Our State, North Carolina From: Laurie Woodard <lwoodardhawaii.edu> Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2012 13:57:58 -1000 X-Message-Number: 2

Well, when Judy Knorr mentioned her son's Ukulele Academy in North Caroloina, naturally, I had to check it our! <G> One link provides background info on Kent and his music school. The other is a link to a YouTube video produced by Our State North Carolina featuring Kent.

Not quilt-related but it's nice to learn a bit, if indirectly, about our frequent contributors.

http://www.alohau.com/index.php?akahai3Dkent http://www.youtube.com/watch?v3DBG3qZN05HXo&feature3Drelated

This is Hawaiian http://www.youtube.com/watch?v3DypQNOobgH8A ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "Why Quilts Matter" would like you to complete a survey that will help us determine how to spread the word about quilts even further! From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Wed, 27 Jun 2012 12:25:36 -0400

The KQP is trying to determine our next steps to spread the word about quilts through the documentary and its upcoming companion guide. We are exploring electronic options and want to know how or if you engage with the new technologies.

We invite you to complete a brief survey that will help us determine how to continue to spread the word about quilts . Please click the link below to start. When you complete this survey, you will have a chance to win a $100 Amazon.com Gift Card!

Thanks for your help!

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s_prize.aspx?sm53Sj22adnEwxJ6KUeJV27g%3d%3d

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

ps. Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v8RMyg1_zYgY

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Subject: Nora Ephron and quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

If anyone plans to revisit any of the enduring films Nora Ephron made, keep your eyes open for the antique quilts she had in most of them. Last one was Julie and Julia, where a wool suiting swatch plushwork quilt was draped on the back of Julie's sofa, just at the time my menswear quilt exhibition was shown at NEQM in which this type was featured, It was quite exciting to see that as a choice, but sad to say it did not stimulate any uptick in interest in such quilts! Other quilts I recall on her sets are in When Harry Met Sally (think it was a Whirling Tulips 1930s) and a nice chintzy Broken Dishes in You've Got Mail. I don't know if she had Americana in her home, too, but she made believable residences for her characters by adding an antique quilt. So sad - she is gone too soon, so now more wry and sensitive observations about love and life from her.

Laura Fisher at

FISHER HERITAGE

305 East 61st Street

5th floor

New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596

www.laurafisherquilts.com

fisherheritageyahoo.com

find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: On the Quilt Flap blog From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com>

Hello all-Forgive the repeat if you're a faceook friend but I wrote recently about two lovely old NC quilts on my blog Quilt Flap. here's the addy: http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com . Enjoy Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

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Subject: Re: On the Quilt Flap blog From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Thu, 28 Jun 2012 16:32:43 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Why does Pepper's blog have a background noise that sounds like a toilet flushing? I notice this strange noise every time I visit.

two lovely old NC quilts on my blog Quilt Flap. here's the > addy: http://quiltflapper.blogspot.com . Enjoy > Pepper

Christine Thresh on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog and http://www.winnowing.com <-- quilting and http://www.threshpublications.com <-- spinning

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Subject: New York Times article about Civil War quilts show opening Sat at American Textile History Museum From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

ANTIQUESStitching Together Civil War HistoryBy EVE M. KAHNPublished: June 2 8, 2012FACEBOOKTWITTERGOOGLE+EMAILSHAREPRINTREPRINTSFabric supplies were cr ucial for both sides in the Civil War, so the Northern soldiers invading th e South would expressly set out to trash cotton fields and burn textile fac tories.Enlarge This ImageKelly Kinzle CollectionA quilt from Pennsylvania i llustrating the life of a Civil War Zouave-unit soldier, at the American Te xtile History Museum.Breaking newsabout the arts, coverage of live ev ents, critical reviews, multimedia and more.Go to Arts Beat A sortabl e calendarof noteworthy cultural events in the New York region, selec ted by Times critics.Go to Event Listings Enlarge This ImageChristie Images Ltd. 2012A Meissen harlequin, about 1740, in the Hart Col lection.Enlarge This ImageJorge ZamanilloLinen Cuban guayabera from about 1 948, at HistoryMiami.To cut off the Confederate Army from access to new uni forms, tents and bedding, the Union troops even kidnapped female knitters, weavers and seam stresses and deported them northward. CYou dont just let t hem stay there so they can move a hundred miles south and work in another m ill,D said Madelyn Shaw, a curator of the exhibition CHomef ront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War,D opening Sat urday at the American Textile History Museum in Lowell, Mass.Ms. Shaw and h er co-curator, Lynne Zacek Bassett, traveled to private and public collecti ons on and off for three years. They studied all aspects of Civil War-era f abrics, including abolitionists slogans on silk handkerchiefs, pla ntation owners deals with Rhode Island mills for rough wool to clo the slaves, and French exports of shirts patterned with crisscrossing Confe derate flags.Two dozen quilts and about 125 related objects are on view, an d the wall texts and catalog are full of irony and pathos. Union soldiers f ound family monograms stitched on Southern sandbags, which wealthy women on plantations had desperately sewn out of their costliest tablecloths and pillowcases. Northern department st ores did a brisk business in mourning fabrics, used to make black dresses, veils and bunting for doorways and mirrors.Confederate and Union sympathize rs on the home front would send delicate gifts of pin cushions and mittens to the battlefields, and the extras were sometimes just abandoned at campsi tes when knapsacks grew too heavy. Troops also found weird uses for nonesse ntial fabrics. The museum has borrowed a floral cotton bandanna that a Kent ucky cavalryman used to Ctie his boots together and hang them aroun d his neck while he crept silently past the guards during his escape from C amp Douglas, Ill.,D the curators write in the catalog.During three years of research, however, the curators found that not all wartime legends about antiques turned out to be true. A few quilts long believed to have b een used to wrap prisoners of war and dead bodies were actually made of 1880s textiles. CMemory is fallible,D Ms. Shaw said. CLab els get lost or pinned to the wrong thing.DA recent book, C Civil War QuiltsD (Schiffer Publishing), by the historians Pam Week s and Don Beld, explains how girls and women sewed scraps into flag pattern s and added generals names, poems and slogans in indelible ink. A Sunday school teacher in Maine inscribed her address on a quilt sent for us e in Washington hospitals, so the wounded could correspond and encourage he r students to keep sewing. CYour letters would prompt us to more ex ertions for our patriots,D she wrote, asking to have the textile re turned if it survived the war. (It now belongs to the Smithsonian Instituti on.)Twenty blankets made by the sisters and mothers of soldiers are on view through Sept. 14 at the Illinois State Museum Chicago gallery, i n CCivil War Era Quilts From the Illinois State Museum.D One checkerboard contains fragments of Union and Confeder ate uniforms; family lore has it that the quilter had relatives serving on both sides. An 1870s blanket with a star pattern was formed from 14,320 pie ces by a wounded veteran who sewed alongside his new bride as a form of pos twar therapy. Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: glitches in copy From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2012 10:26:34 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

--1287737115-531401348-1340990794:98944 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii

OMG now anything I post has an E280-90D and all kinds of letters and numbers inserted in the text, yikes!! sorry, Wish I could get this corrected so it no longer appears. I am submitting info in plain text, and no matter which computer I send it from, these glitch imps seem to follow my postings. Help..........thanks. Laura. Anyway, you can find a legible version of Eve Kahn's article in the New York Times Thursday,

Laura

Laura Fisher at

FISHER HERITAGE

305 East 61st Street

5th floor

New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596

www.laurafisherquilts.com

fisherheritageyahoo.com

find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --1287737115-531401348-1340990794:98944--

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Subject: Re: New York Times article about Civil War quilts show opening Sat at American Textile History Museum From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com>

Thank you, Laura, for posting the NYT article that includes information about our Civil War exhibition and book, /Homefront & Battlefield/. The exhibition just opened last night, and I am *exhausted*! But so pleased that it's done! It's great to have the publicity from the NYT also!! (My colleague, Madelyn Shaw, is very distressed that the term "kidnap" was used to explain the deportation of southern mill workers north--you know how reporters kind of twist things around!)

For anyone who is interested, our book is available from the American Textile History Museum in Lowell, Mass.

Now I'm going to go put my feet up and veg out for awhile....

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Christine Thresh's comment From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com>

Thank you, Christine, for posting your question about the sound on Pepper's blog site. I thought I was hearing something, too, but told myself I was imagining it.

Okay, Pepper. What gives????

Kathy Moore

Round Rock, Texas----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The sound effects on my blog From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com>

For years I never used the audio components on my computer. I didn't download music etc etc. And then came YouTube and I discovered the joys of sound. The watery whish-splash-whish people hear on my blog is my counter. Go to the lower right hand corner of the blog and you'll discover the culprit: a leaping dolphins counter complete with waves and ocean sounds. I live on the coast of North Carolina and am (still) enamored of all things watery. Or maybe the toilet flushing if you're Christine! Thanks for the laughs-have a happy July 4th all Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: Pepper's Blog From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net> Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2012 07:04:08 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Kathy and Christine:

The sound on Pepper's blog is coming from the Neo Counter. There is a dolphin pictured in the background of the counter and the sound you hear is the dolphin jumping out of the water.

Carol Berry Merced, CA

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Subject: RE: The sound effects on my blog From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Sat, 30 Jun 2012 11:28:54 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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I knew it was the ocean but I never noticed the dolphin! I'll have to go back and look for it.

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Sat, Jun 30, 2012 at 8:56 AM, Pepper Cory wrote:

> For years I never used the audio components on my computer. I didn't download music etc etc. And then came YouTube and I discovered the joys of sound. The watery whish-splash-whish people hear on my blog is my counter. Go to the lower right hand corner of the blog and you'll discover the culprit: a leaping dolphins counter complete with waves and ocean sounds. I live on the coast of North Carolina and am (still) enamored of all things watery. Or maybe the toilet flushing if you're Christine! Thanks for the laughs-have a happy July 4th all Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117