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Subject: Re: board help From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 11 Jul 2012 09:02:27 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 8

Pepper,

You should be able to just go to http://quilthistory.com and click on Gallery. If you would like to upload pictures, the password is "vintage". You don't have to remember that - it is on the subscribe page, http://quilthistory.com/subscribe.htm

Kris

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Subject: Penn State this weekend From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

Hi all - if anyone is going to Penn State in State College this weekend to see the exhibition of the Kawasaki Quilt Collection there and to hear my talk on Provocative Parallels: The Modern Art of Antique Quilts, please co mesay hello.

There is going to be a brief appraisal session after also, for which I beli eve one has to sign up in advance, so do check it out if you have something that would be wonderful for us all to discuss (I think there's a limit to how many can be discussed in the scheduled time).

Laura Fisher at 212/838-2596 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 04:52:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I want to thank you personally, Mary and Jean for contributing to the cause. Mary, your guild is fantastic! Thank you so much to them. And thanks to many of the rest of you on this list who have contributed to the AAQI. I lost both of my parents and some friends to Alzheimer's. I have a dear friend who is suffering from early onset, and it's heartbreaking to see a healthy 65-year-old woman who can do nothing but sit around all day and smile once in a while. She can't speak and needs assistance for all her daily living needs. The Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative has done a wonderful job funding some important research projects as well as heightening the awareness of the disease to many.

I have a small quilt in the current traveling exhibit that offers in the language of flowers 7 important things to say to a loved one who is dying. The traveling exhibit has banners that have the names of people who have died of Alzheimer's, names submitted by their loved ones. It's an emotionally powerful exhibit and volunteers are there to offer tissues.

I'm thinking this program is worthy for mentioning on this history list because we are MAKING history through the Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative.

Barb Vlack barbbarbvlack.com I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research and am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at: www.AlzQuilts.org

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Subject: Great color combo From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 09:28:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Jean I'm not in the same part of the house as my books but I'll stick my neck out anyway. I'm guessing you will see the oxblood/teal/cheddar in bo oks about NC GA AL MS. That's where I see the ones "in the flesh. " Teddy Pruett

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Subject: Penn State museum quilt exhibition From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 10:12:00 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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10:00 am - Exhibition: "American Quilts from the Terasaki Collection"

Expand Collapse

This exhibition features twenty-one American quilts from the private collec tion of Etsuko Terasaki, a former professor of Japanese literature and thea tre at Cornell University, whose fascination with color and design dates ba ck to her childhood in Japan. Nearly forty years ago, Terasaki saw her firs t American quilt and soon after became an avid collector. With an eye for q uality in design and craftsmanship, she built a stellar collection that at one time included nearly 300 quilts. The exhibition includes highlights fro m that collection, featuring pieced quilts made in America in the nineteent h and early twentieth centuries. Sophisticated in design, these quilts test ify to the timeless human impulse to create order and beauty in our surroun dings, with whatever resources available, for utility and for pure visual p leasure.

The exhibition was organized by the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cor nell University, Ithaca, N.Y. The exhibition was curated by Cathy Rosa Klim aszewski, Associate Director for Programs / Harriett Ames Charitable Trust Curator of Education.

Continues through August 26, 2012.

Museum Hours: 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday Noon to 4:00 p.m. Sunday Closed Mondays and some holidays

FREE ADMISSION

Laura Fisher's lecture is at 1:00

Dates: 06/12/2012 - 08/26/2012

Start Time: 10:00 am

Location: Palmer Museum of Art

Address: Penn State, Curtin Road, University Park, PA, 16802 (map)

Website: http://www.palmermuseum.psu.edu

Laura Fisher at 212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts ---770455430-1965502679-1342113120:7482--

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Subject: info on lecture and get to know your quilt session at Penn State From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 14:43:08 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Saturday, July 14, 1:00 p.m. The Quilt Extravaganza! Lecture: Provocative Parallels: The Modern Art of Antique Quilts

Laura Fisher, author, editor, lecturer, and owner of Fisher Heritage gallery in New York City, will discuss the eye-dazzling compositions of historical quilts and compare their visual qualities to the monumental canvases of iconic twentieth-century artists. Fisher's lecture will be followed by an informal "get-to-know-your-quilt" session in the Palmer Lipcon Auditorium. Bring along an antique quilt, learn more about its design and condition, and share its history with other interested quilt makers and collectors. This event is open to the public; however, due to time constraints, the number of quilts discussed will be limited to ten. Interested attendees may sign up at the time of the lecture. The Quilt Extravaganza! is co-sponsored by the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts and the Palmer Museum of Art and is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Dana Carlisle Kletchka, Ph.D. Curator of Education, Palmer Museum of Art

Laura Fisher at ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: re: AAQI exhibit From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Fri, 13 Jul 2012 04:24:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

The traveling portion of the AAQI will be on display at the AQS show in Grand Rapids, Michigan, August 22 - 25. Not only is the exhibit powerful (and the quilts are extraordinary), watching people experience it is quite moving. And I agree with Barb -- it is making history.

Thanks to the awareness raised in me by this exhibit at previous AQS shows and the occasional discussions on this list, I paid special attention to a headline yesterday: Basketball coach legend Pat Summit gave a short speech at the ESPY Awards as she received the Arthur Ashe Courage Award. The ten minute clip they showed, narrated by Reese Witherspoon, is a tremendous reminder of all that goes before this disease sets in, and why it is so devastating to family and friends. I believe if you search for "ESPY 2012 Pat Summit," you can find this portion of the awards ceremony. Have tissues on hand.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Alliance for American Quilts gets new name & logo From: megmaxcaol.com Date: Fri, 13 Jul 2012 09:39:48 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Dear QHL List friends: When it was founded in 1993, the Alliance for American Quilts wanted to create a voice and visual online archive for the exploding quilt scene in the United States. But these days, the whole world is making and studying quilts, and the nonprofit's board has voted for a new name and bigger future. Welcome to Quilt Alliance, whose mission is still to document, preserve and share the stories of quilts and their makers, but on a global basis. Read today's press release, and see what you think of the new logo, here: http://tinyurl.com/8x5v7b3

gratefully, Meg Cox, president, Quilt Alliance

www.megcox.com Read the latest issue of Quilt Journalist Tells All

Find me on FaceBook

Watch the video trailer for my new book!

----------MB_8CF2F141AD655EA_2014_1D6850_webmail-d060.sysops.aol.com--

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Subject: magazine seeks quilt history articles From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Fri, 13 Jul 2012 17:23:41 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

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My colleague, Chris Brown, editor-in-chief of /American Quilter/ magazine, asked me to post this request for articles on this list. Kris, I hope this is OK. I'm thrilled that my Chinese water torture approach for more quilt history at AQS seems to be working...

Andi in Paducah

I'm looking for more articles incorporating quilt history and beautiful, publishable quilts. (We have two good ones in the September issue, presently at press.) The manuscripts should be 1,500 words or less, interesting to a wide spectrum of quilters, and previously unpublished in a quilt magazine or book, accompanied by excellent visuals. The article submission guidelines are on the website under the American Quilter tab on the home page (www.americanquilter.com), or I'll be happy to answer general queries.

Thanks! /Chris /

Christine N. Brown, Editor-in-Chief /American Quilter/ Magazine Email: ChrisBrownAQSQuilt.com Web: www.AmericanQuilter.com <http://www.AmericanQuilter.com> Blog: www.QuiltViews.com <http://www.quiltviews.com>

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Subject: Backstitch From: Pam Weeks <curatornequiltmuseum.org> Date: Fri, 13 Jul 2012 22:18:09 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi All,

We had a busy week at the New England Quilt Museum in Lowell, MA, installing our latest exhibition. *Backstitch: a 25-year Retrospective of Advances and Milestones in Quiltmaking,* runs from now 'til October 14. The exhibition includes works by Jinny Beyer, Hollis Chatelain, Micheal James and twenty-two others. Innovations include fabric dying for quilts, photo-transfer, machine quilting, rotary cutting, paper piecing and more. Think of a way in which quiltmaking has changed in the last 25 years, and we've tried to represent it.

Co-Curators Anita Loscalzo and Laura Lane have hung a thought-provoking as well as beautiful show. It's another reason to RUN to Lowell for a visit.

Many thanks go to our supporting guilds and members, and to the Mass Council for the Arts, Janome, and the Dallas Quilt Guild for sponsoring the exhibition.

Pam Weeks ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: AQS magazine seeks quilt history articles From: "Pam Conklin" <pam.conklinatt.net> Date: Sat, 14 Jul 2012 10:24:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

KUDOS Andi Reynolds & Chris Brown, of AQS & American Quilter magazine for publishing more articles on quilt history!!! Looking forward to my Sept issue!

Pam Conklin ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Help please! From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2012 08:16:29 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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I am looking for someone who is very good at Electric Quilt to help me repr oduce a pattern from Brackman's Encyclopedia that is just a shade beyond my skill. Is # 3436--Nelly Bly, originally found n the Farm Journal. It has a series of circles and then spikes off some of the circles a nd I have never been able to master the "how to" on conversion between c ircles and straight lines. If you can help or would like to try, plea se contact off the list. thanks, Don Beld --83567325-1428596620-1342538189:44370--

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Subject: RE: Help please! From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2012 15:43:33 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Sorry Don. I just never mastered EQ.

Warm regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~ ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Teal/brown/yellow, etc. From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Wed, 18 Jul 2012 14:26:59 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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This quilt that Kris mentioned was on exhibit at the Greg Museum at NC State. The exhibit was curated by Kathlyn Sullivan and it is probably a 3/4 bed quilt, but not sure. I thik it was made in Greene County, NC. It was truly a show stopper. http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/553062_3370995270390_1342872466_n.jpg

As for the location of some teal/brown/yellow/orange quilts....there are several in the NC quilt book and several in the TX quilt documentation book. Any other suggestions? You an also see some in the archives of the Brunk Auctions in Asheville, NC and on the Quilt Index/NC quilts. These quilts span from about ca. 1850-1910. Most of these quilts are done in patterns that are traditionally applique. However, in the South women often hand pieced quilt patterns that in other areas would have been hand appliqued.

I understand that color don't need a reason, but I do think they have an influence. I think that some of the influence of the more vivid examples in the 1880-1910 time period could be the arts and crafts and William Morris. Also there were fairs all over the place after 1870. The country was growing and more wealthy and fabrics were being made at an amazingly fast rate. In the South the textiles were primarily solid colors and woven plaids during this time period.

I do however think that probably German dyers coming down the migration trail to the Piedmont section of NC influenced this color pallett in the 1840-50's time period. (In 1853 it is said that a Frenchman came to teach Mr. Holt how to dye fabric. Wonder if Germans followed?) I saw NC pottery made by Germans using this color pallett in their glazes at Winterthur. Often the patterns of the teal/brown/yellow quilts are patterns that are also seen in red/green/white. I have often wondered if the daughter said.....I like Mother's 1850's red/green/white Tulip, but I want it in more popular colors that "fit" my house..........so she did it in the teal/brown/orange/yellow. http://textilehistory.org/HoltsofAlamanceCountyNC.html

I am getting things in order to paint a "modified French Star" block to put on our barn down at the beach. (Thanks to Kathy Sullivan for telling me to look at French Stars.) It is from a quilt made by my husband's great grand/and grandmother in about 1890. It was reported to have been made for the husband at the time of their marriage. It will be sort of a DARK teal, red and goldy orange. I call it "the sun (red), moon (goldy orange) and the stars". Will try to figure out how to post a photo when it is done. Have only seen this pattern one other time and that was in Belhaven, NC at a small museum.

As for the teal........it varies in shades and varies in it's leaning toward green and blue. The same goes with the brown. It is heavy on the orange end of brown, but can vary.

Fun sharing with all of you and great getting the responses. We also have to be detailed. Please remember that some folks are new to the list and learning.

Think how young women today are "mixing it up" with some patterns that their grandmothers did in very traditional ways.

My best to all of you....Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

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Subject: STAR SPANGLED BANNER QUILTS From: donbeldpacbell.net Date: Wed, 18 Jul 2012 12:48:54 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi everyone, well, I recently purchase two extraordinary quilts for the new book I am working on--they are the third and fourth version of a quilt found at the Shelburne Museum in Vermont that they call the Star Spnagled Banner quilt because their version (which is gorgeous!) has four eagle s and verses from the Star Spangled Banner quilted into the white squares. It is signed and dated 1840.There is another much later, c. 1890-1900, version at the IQSCM at Lincoln. My two quilts come somewhere in between--probably pre-Civil War and Civil War era. One of mine is unbelievable! because it has both Princess Feather applique in the white areas, but also a swag border with vines, flowers and urns! The other isn't too bad either as each block (it's a feathered star!) has 760 pieces andhas 1 inch saw tooth sashing!!! which means there are over 6000 pieces in it. Anyway, I have fallen in love with this block--it is much work (760 pieces!) but actually consist of 16 idential feathered triangles that are composed of a center 5 inch solid triange and 1 inch saw tooth surround--Only two templates! I'm looking to see if anyone has seen, knows of, or has another--and any clues to the pattern origin. Thanks for any help.best, Don Beld p.s. I'm going to get my home guild to make a raffle quilt of the SSB with its Princes s Feather and Swag Border! --30101251-576902467-1342640934:53181--

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Subject: Nelly Bly From: donbeldpacbell.net Date: Wed, 18 Jul 2012 12:27:34 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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Thanks to everyone who assisted me in getting this block into my EQ7--I guess I should break down and by Brackman's CD version of her Encyclopedia! But Nelly was the final needed block for my new book. best, Don --30101251-335874525-1342639654:53068--

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Subject: Interesting news From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Wed, 18 Jul 2012 17:35:40 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Several of us on this list might be interested in this news about vintage -- really vintage -- undergarments:

http://news.yahoo.com/600-old-linen-bras-found-austrian-castle-192408678.html

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: RE: Teal/brown/yellow, etc. From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 18 Jul 2012 19:15:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Thanks, Lynn, for your comments and input on the teal/orange/brown or oxblood etc. I have found several examples in state books - esp in the south but since quilts travel I am making my way through all of my state (and other) books. Your theory on the colors seems possible. Just curious. I see nothing in Barbara Brackman's Clues book or her website mentioning teal. We are sure, aren't we, that it is NOT simply an overdyed green having lost its yellow? Barbara, are you out there? I see mostly applique in style, also - maybe related to your ideas of red and green app. influence. Also, I did post a request on the Facebook page called Quilts Vintage and Antique which is a site where we madly post photos of all sort of vintage quilts. I asked of the 600 collectors and dealers who are members to post their examples. There are some beauties showing up. I checked thru the Uncoverings topics to see if keywords of those colors came up - nothing. Any other sources recommended? jean

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Subject: Homefront nd Battlefield: Quilts and Context in the Civil War From: donbeldpacbell.net

I have been eagerly awaiting my copy of Madelyn Shaw and Lynne Bassett book on their exhibit at the American Textile History Museum. Living far away in Southern California, getting the book may be as close to the exhibit as I will get.I want to say uncategorically that I believe this is probably the finest Civil War era quilt book ever written. It ill undoubtedly become the classic reference text to which all future boks will be compared.I can't image the amount of research these two fine women did; but it must have been all consuming for many, many years. It is an absolute must have for every quilt historian, quilter, teacher and anyone interested in the workings of 19th Century America. adelyn and Lynne, congratulations! You and the American Textile History Museum MUST find a way to put this book in general distribution so that thousand can see this exception work.best, Don Beldp.s yes, there are no patterns--Pam Week's and my book was intended as a cross over book that we wanted to appeal to general quilters as well as quilt hi storians; this book is much, much more in depth with outstanding scholarship and should be in every University library.

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Subject: article about that Maine wool quilt and where it wound up From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 18 Jul 2012 20:36:15 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 7

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July 18, 2012 Hi all - I think this is that wool counterpane that Lynne Bassett may have written up when it went up for auction at Julia's It has been returned to i ts place of origin in Maine. Nice story July 18, 2012ARTICLEAntique Quilt Returns to North Havenby Andrew Frederick The top row of the Lucy Dyer Denham Quilt provides a snapshot of the Dyer f amily history.Photo: Andrew FrederickA true heirloom has a certain haunting beauty about it. A patina comes with age, care and loving use, creating a subtle but powerful aura to behold in person. The gift that was recently bestowed upon the North Haven Historical Society has that ver y sense of deep, storied history.The gift is a quilt, dubbed the CL ucy Dyer Denham Quilt,D after the mother of the four Denham brother s who generously donated the 200-year-old family treasure to the North Have n Historical Society (NHHS). The Dyer family has a long history on the Fox Islands, reaching back to some of the earliest settlements, and the quilt i s evidence of the life the Dyers left behind when they came to the islands. Jean Baker White, a fount of knowledge on the history of quilts and a talen ted designer herself, encouraged the audience in attendance at the celebrat ory ceremony on June 6 to investigate what the Lucy Dyer Denham Quilt expresses about the family that created it. CLook here, at the top row of blocks,80 9D she said. CWhat makes this quilt unique is the personalization of this top row.DWhite pointed out four quilt blocks that adorn the top edge of the quilt, just below the hem, which show codfish, a crudely r endered eagle and a traditional fishing boat. CThese people had mov ed from Cape Cod and settled on Vinalhaven and North Haven when cod was a b ig industry on the Fox Islands, hence these codfish,D she explained . CAs for the eagle4remember that this is soon after the Re volutionary War, so patriotism is high. This next block shows the fishing b oat they used.DAn heirloom like this can be easily overlooked80 94its vegetable-sourced dyes are anything but eye-catching. However, the i nsights White provided made the piece seem absolutely enchanting. A small g roup of schoolchildren came to the ceremony, and one politely asked how long a quilt like this takes to make. White paused for a beat, and then, with a gleam in her eye, replied, CWell, first yo u have to raise the sheep80A6DEvents like this help tighten th e social fabric of a community. CThe whole quilt thing,D sa id Rick CSonnyD Denham, Chas really been in the bac kground of this process. At a certain point, after it had spent some time t he State House in Augusta, then briefly in the hands of James Julia Company and the Farnsworth Art Museum, we began to question: Where does this reall y belong?After I talked with Nan [NHHS president], and after I talked with my brothers, everything just sort of blossomed and fell into place. DIt was, many noted, as if the quilt was Ccoming home. D That sense of belonging permeated the air during the celebration, an d the quilt became a proxy for family storytelling. Islanders jockeyed for speaking time on the floor, each one more excited than the last to share some salient tidbit of family lore. Some in attendance had traced th eir ancestry back to theMayflower. There was talk of theSea Ven ture, a ship whose mythic journey inspired ShakespeareThe T empestand whose noted passenger Stephen Hopkins was a forebear of the Denham brothers, as well as other Hopkins in attendance.There is a true se nse of community and shared ownership in the history and story the quilt te lls. In a sense, this simple object is an illustration of the family itself 4with its neatly hand-stitched hems and embroidery and vibrantly pr eserved colors, it is evidence of a sense of responsibility and stewardship that was passed from generation upon generation, preserving not only the m emory of their ancestors, but their handwork as well.Andrew Frederick is a freelance contributor living in Owls Head.by Andrew Frederick The top row of the Lucy Dyer Denham Quilt provides a snapshot of the Dyer f amily history.Photo: Andrew FrederickA true heirloom has a certain haunting beauty about it. A patina comes with age, care and loving use, creating a subtle but powerful aura to behold in person. The gift that was recently bestowed upon the North Haven Historical Society has that ver y sense of deep, storied history.The gift is a quilt, dubbed the CL ucy Dyer Denham Quilt,D after the mother of the four Denham brother s who generously donated the 200-year-old family treasure to the North Have n Historical Society (NHHS). The Dyer family has a long history on the Fox Islands, reaching back to some of the earliest settlements, and the quilt i s evidence of the life the Dyers left behind when they came to the islands. Jean Baker White, a fount of knowledge on the history of quilts and a talen ted designer herself, encouraged the audience in attendance at the celebrat ory ceremony on June 6 to investigate what the Lucy Dyer Denham Quilt expresses about the family that created it. CLook here, at the top row of blocks,80 9D she said. CWhat makes this quilt unique is the personalization of this top row.DWhite pointed out four quilt blocks that adorn the top edge of the quilt, just below the hem, which show codfish, a crudely r endered eagle and a traditional fishing boat. CThese people had mov ed from Cape Cod and settled on Vinalhaven and North Haven when cod was a b ig industry on the Fox Islands, hence these codfish,D she explained . CAs for the eagle4remember that this is soon after the Re volutionary War, so patriotism is high. This next block shows the fishing b oat they used.DAn heirloom like this can be easily overlooked80 94its vegetable-sourced dyes are anything but eye-catching. However, the i nsights White provided made the piece seem absolutely enchanting. A small g roup of schoolchildren came to the ceremony, and one politely asked how long a quilt like this takes to make. White paused for a beat, and then, with a gleam in her eye, replied, CWell, first yo u have to raise the sheep80A6DEvents like this help tighten th e social fabric of a community. CThe whole quilt thing,D sa id Rick CSonnyD Denham, Chas really been in the bac kground of this process. At a certain point, after it had spent some time t he State House in Augusta, then briefly in the hands of James Julia Company and the Farnsworth Art Museum, we began to question: Where does this reall y belong?After I talked with Nan [NHHS president], and after I talked with my brothers, everything just sort of blossomed and fell into place. DIt was, many noted, as if the quilt was Ccoming home. D That sense of belonging permeated the air during the celebration, an d the quilt became a proxy for family storytelling. Islanders jockeyed for speaking time on the floor, each one more excited than the last to share some salient tidbit of family lore. Some in attendance had traced th eir ancestry back to theMayflower. There was talk of theSea Ven ture, a ship whose mythic journey inspired ShakespeareThe T empestand whose noted passenger Stephen Hopkins was a forebear of the Denham brothers, as well as other Hopkins in attendance.There is a true se nse of community and shared ownership in the history and story the quilt te lls. In a sense, this simple object is an illustration of the family itself 4with its neatly hand-stitched hems and embroidery and vibrantly pr eserved colors, it is evidence of a sense of responsibility and stewardship that was passed from generation upon generation, preserving not only the m emory of their ancestors, but their handwork as well.Andrew Frederick is a freelance contributor living in Owls Head. Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE

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Subject: Re: Interesting news From: kittencat3aol.com Date: Thu, 19 Jul 2012 06:14:02 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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I expect to see a lot of those at re-enactments in the next year or so - I might actually make one! The panties are similar to what Roman women wore, but the bras are completely unlike anything else that's been found. Great stuff!

Lisa Evans

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Subject: The German connection to "those" colors From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com>

Thanks to Lynn Gorges (Palampore) for her overview on the teal/golden-orange/oxblood brown color scheme of so many Southern late 19th, early 20th century quilts. She's right in that NC did not have prints plants like New England. Rather we specialized in solids, tickings, stripes, and plaids---fabrics on the low-end. Am not sure about dye plants (meaning the factories that did cloth dying) here. From NC history we know the first people to set up weaving mills in this state were Moravians who followed the old cattle trails down from Pennsylvania sometime in the first quarter 19th century. Made sense: build the mill near the cotton fields and eventually the railroad line that took goods north for printing and finishing. The strong golden-orange (also called cheddar by quilt dealers later in the 20th century) is a color found in Pennsylvania German folk art so there may have been a cultural inclination at work. But I'm still itching to see the dye sample card or advert from a dye company that groups these shades. I have bought both NC and PA quilts in this color scheme. More one day on this subject Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: fyi glitches in text From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 19 Jul 2012 10:42:32 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

 

so I copied the text of the article about the embroidered wool quilt that w as given back toa Maine historical societywith a right click, as it w as suggested, then inserted i t into a fresh emaiil to qhl, and STILL it comes out with those annoying gl itches. Anyone have any better suggestions?? how to eliminate it,,,do I hav e to have a spiritual ceremony over my keyboard or something?! thanks Laura Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --944242502-1211489974-1342719752:22678--

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Subject: RE: fyi glitches in text From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Thu, 19 Jul 2012 14:25:01 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

------_Part_4884597_14387500.1342722301443 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8; formatflowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Disposition: inline

Printed it out nicely so I could read it at my leisure. I had no problems.

Best regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~