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Subject: Room For Seminar From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2012 11:52:33 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

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Hi again, Speedy quick - the room is now taken -

Enjoy seminar, Wish I could go!

Leah Z

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Subject: Room for Seminar From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2012 11:21:54 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

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Hi all -

Unfortunately, due to a son's wedding out of state and a daughter new little baby out of state, I am unable to attend seminar this year. I did reserve a room when I thought I would go. Before I cancel the reservation, is there anyone on list who would like to have to room put in their name? Please contact me off list privately - first come first serve!

Best,

Leah Zieber

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Subject: Homefront and Battlefield From: sgmunseycomcast.net Date: Thu, 19 Jul 2012 16:35:57 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 3

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Chiming in about the Madelyn Shaw and Lynne Bassett book and exhibit and Pam Weeks earlier comments. (Eat your heart out, Don Beld!)

My husband and I spent a loooong time at the American Textile History Museum last Saturday just soaking in the Civil War exhibit. There aren't c ongratulatory words enough to describe it. The combination of the quilts and other home textiles with the textiles used by the soldiers and sail ors and the nurses creates an outstanding juxtaposition of the significance of textiles and their use beyond keeping warm. (Even making bandages and scraping lint from cloth to use as sponges for wounds.) I congratulate Madelyn and Lynne on their skilled inclusion - weaving, if you will, the Northern and Southern experiences and finding the most amazing materials from throughout both regions. I stand in awe of their research, do cumentation and thoroughness

For those of you, like Don, who aren't close enough to New England to visit ATHM while the exhibit is hanging or to attend the several presentations that are scheduled in Sept. and Oct. (check the website www.ATHM.org ), let me assure you that the book is the next best thing It is the exhibit - and then some - between two covers. It is history in a way that you never read in school or college. Every professor and school teacher should have it because it is living history in a very readable way. BTW, the exhibit will travel to a couple of other parts of the country. Maybe some of you with museum connections can lure it to your world.

For anyone planning to go to the Lowell Quilt Festival (Aug. 9-12), give yourself an extra day or two to really "take in" the Civil War exhibit - not to mention the other five venues in addition to ATHM and the Images Quilt Show. You won't be disappointed.

Sandra on Cape Cod on a relatively cool day with a little rainat last

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Subject: Subject: The German connection to "those" colors From: Laurel Horton <laurelkalmiaresearch.net> Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2012 06:51:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

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Pepper,

The Moravians arrived in NC in the mid-18th century At the moment I'm in Old Salem, staring my final day of a four-week Summer Institute in Material Culture and Decorative Arts of the Southern Backcountry, sponsored by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts. It's been quite an experience to be back in school, especially such an intensive session, but it's worth it. For anyone seeking graduate credit for study in southern textiles, check it out. I'm the only textile person this year, but I've learned a lot about the larger context. I present my research project findings this afternoon. Wish me luck!

Laurel Horton

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Subject: Re: article about that Maine wool quilt and where it wound up From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2012 21:12:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Ooh, yes! That's the quilt from the Julia Auction! It didn't sell, and I was worried about where it would end up--I didn't want to lose track of it! Thanks for posting this information, Laura!

All best, Lynne

On 7/18/2012 11:36 PM, Laura Fisher wrote: > July 18, 2012 > Hi all - I think this is that wool counterpane that Lynne Bassett may have written up when it went up for auction at Julia's It has been returned to its place of origin in Maine. Nice story

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Subject: Re: Homefront and Battlefield From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2012 22:00:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Thank you, Sandra! I truly appreciate your comments! We worked so hard on this project, and had SO many difficulties with funding, getting respect for our efforts from academics, getting objects from reluctant lenders, and finding new venues when the original agreements fell through very late in the game, that the positive reinforcement we hear now really helps us to feel that it was worthwhile, after all.

All best, Lynne

On 7/19/2012 12:35 PM, sgmunseycomcast.net wrote: > My husband and I spent a loooong time at the American Textile History Museum last Saturday just soaking in the Civil War exhibit. There aren't c > ongratulatory words enough to describe it.

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Subject: Re: Homefront nd Battlefield: Quilts and Context in the Civil War From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2012 21:25:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Wow, Don, thank you very much for such a generous statement of your faith in Madelyn's and my work! I certainly hope that the book lives up to your expectations once you receive it!

Of course, we benefited greatly from the work of other scholars who have published on the topic--Barbara Brackman, Virginia Gunn, Merikay Waldvogel, and Bets Ramsey, to name a few. And so many list members helped us by sharing quilts from their own collections or pointing us towards important pieces. And Don and Pam helped too!! We could not have done as complete a job as we did without the help of many colleagues, and we are truly grateful. And of course, we would have done more if there'd been time and money (sigh)...but as my dear friend Linda Eaton says, "A good book is a done book."

Thanks again!

All best, Lynne

On 7/18/2012 9:05 PM, Donald Beld wrote: > It ill undoubtedly become the classic > reference text to which all future boks will be compared. > >

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Subject: Turkey red prints in Scotland From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2012 21:46:31 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Dear List,

I am currently enjoying a research fellowship at Winterthur--studying the Romantic Era for an upcoming costume exhibition at the Wadsworth Atheneum. One of my fellow fellows is a scholar from Scotland, who is working on the American market for Turkey red prints produced in Scotland. Here's the website about the project: http://feastbowl.wordpress.com/2012/06/22/turkey-red-a-study-in-scarlet/ Here's another of her websites: www.colouringthenation.wordpress.com Please check it out, and if you want to see more, leave a comment! The more positive feedback they get, the more likely they'll be able to expand the website with HUNDREDS more photos of historic Turkey red prints!

All best, Lynne----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: is this a good thing? From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2012 09:20:58 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I stumbled across this link for online valuations of antiques. My mind turned at once to quilts, of course, and my initial reaction was horror; perhaps I'm not being fair. It seems to be UK-based. Does anyone have any experience with this sort of thing?

http://www.valuemystuff.com/

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: RE: Turkey red prints in Scotland From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2012 07:20:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Lynne - Thank you so much for the great links - Turkey Red is a favorite and it is so great to see them on line and available for comparison and research.

Best regards Leah Zieber

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Subject: Re: is this a good thing? From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2012 07:37:39 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi Andi,Did you see their Terms and Conditions? They can use your sub mitted images for anything they want to. "1.209 By submitting the photographs of the object to be valued and any related information, the Cl ient: (a)09 accepts of the Conditions of Business as set out here; a nd(b)09 grants the Company a world-wide non-exclusive, perpetual, ro yalty-free licence on all the material provided."They offer Insurance Valuations...but then:"4.509 The Valuation may not be used for officia l or formal purposes such as (without limitation) in legal proceedings, insolvency or bankruptcy proceedings, divorces cases, for insurance purp oses, or anything such like. "It looks like once they value your i tem, they offer to sell it for you on eBay. Their experts look so esteem ed in their descriptions, but no names except the founders. I'm wi ncing. My best,Dana_____________________________ ___ From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>To: Quilt History List <qhl lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, July 21, 2012 10:20 AMSubject : [qhl] is this a good thing? I stumbled across this link for online valuations of antiques. My mind turned at once to quilts, of course, and my initial reaction was horror; perhaps I'm not being fair. It seems to be UK -based. Does anyone have any experience with this sort of thing?http: //www.valuemystuff.com/Andi in Paducah --500512351-326333416-1342881459:46334--

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Subject: Moravians in NC From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2012 13:42:39 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

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Re: Moravians in NC. As early as 1811, a few Moravians made it to NC from the Nazareth PA area. The Schenck brothers got here and Michael in particular is known as the first Moravian mill owner and his mill opened in (I think) 1815. The reason I remembered this factoid: the surname 'Schenck' is not common but EE Schenck is a present-day distributor in the quilt industry (from Portland OR) and I buy stuff from them. Laurel's right in that most of the Moravians got to NC mid-century. Maybe Michael and his brothers wrote home and said, "Come on down!" Don't you love history? Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: Homefront & Battlefield future exhibits From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2012 20:08:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

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I'm in Boston for a conference. Today I rented a car to drive to Lowell to see the Homefront & Battlefield exhibit at the American Textile History Museum. It is every bit as wonderful as has been previously described. Congratulations again to Madelyn and Lynne.

For those of you who can't make it to Lowell, the verso of the title page (librarian speak) states that the exhibit will travel to the New York Historical Society, NY April 14- Aug. 31, 2014, Shelburne Museum VT, Sept. 20, 2014 to Jan. 1, 2015, and (for us Midwesterners) Nebraska State Historical Society, Lincoln Feb. 1- June 1, 2015.

According to a docent at least one piece won't travel - an American flag made in Lowell that is too fragile.

I hope additional museums sign on to the travel schedule.

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn Associate Dean for Law Library Services Valparaiso University Law School 656 S. Greenwich St. Valparaiso, IN 46383 (219) 465-7830 FAX (219) 465-7917 mary.persynvalpo.edu

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Subject: Re: is this a good thing? From: Quilltraol.com Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2012 21:38:48 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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That's one of the things I hate about Pinterest. Once something is on there, you give them the rights to sell the image, or do anything they want with it, and they assume the person putting it on there had the right to do that. It's such a bad thing for artists who then no longer have the copyright on their work. Some people that use it think it's good exposure, though, that makes up for that.

Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/)----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Homefront & Battlefield future exhibits From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Sun, 22 Jul 2012 09:11:55 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Thank you, Mary, for also helping to spread the word! Just so everyone knows, the objects in the other exhibitions are more or less *different* than what you see in Lowell. Due to loan arrangements or concerns over an object's fragility, we had to devise rotations of objects. The second two exhibitions are quite different from the Lowell venue. So you can see Homefront & Battlefield twice!!

We are very disappointed that the exhibition won't travel to the South--we tried, but both of our southern venues backed out of the agreement. We do not plan to create any more rotations of the full exhibition than what we already have, due to the time and expense involved, but especially due to the limited availability of objects, which are inherently fragile and can't be exhibited for lengthy periods of time--nor handled too much. (And then there's the reason of Madelyn's and my exhaustion....) So, if you want to see the full exhibition, you'll have to see it in Lowell, NYC, Shelburne, or Nebraska!

We are considering the possibility of smaller exhibitions of just quilts and graphic materials--so if you know anyone who'd be interested in hosting an abridged version of H & B, let us know.

All best, Lynne

On 7/21/2012 9:08 PM, Mary Persyn wrote: According to a docent at least one piece won't travel - an American flag made in Lowell that is too fragile.

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Subject: Subject: Moravians in NC From: Laurel Horton <laurelkalmiaresearch.net> Date: Sun, 22 Jul 2012 09:49:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Nor to belabor a detail, but the Moravians arrived inthe NC Piedmont (from Pennsylvania) in 1753, purchased a tract they called Wachovia (*Wachau)*, and founded three settlements, including Salem.

My Friday presentation was well received, and I'll let you know when the podcast is available from the MESDA website.

Laurel

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Subject: movie alert From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 22 Jul 2012 10:24:12 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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I didn't notice any French quilts in it, but there are tons of French fabri cs in Farewell My Queen about literally the last few days of Marie Antoi nette. She loved her finery and they show her consulting her swatch books f or fabrics to embellish, and every detail is so sumptuous, filmed in Versai lles yet. So where did they get all the silk, those royals, and what a surp rising amount of all different shades of blue in the silks. Would love to k now more. The closeups on the woven silk upholsteries are divine too. On on e I saw the motif that centers a whitework quilt I have, making me rethink maybe mine originated in France though it was collected in New England. Evi dently the movie has been lauded for its visual accuracy, as well as story told from the servants' perspective.

Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --944242502-272227213-1342977852:82232--

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Subject: Re: movie alert From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Sun, 22 Jul 2012 16:08:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Where do we find Farewell My Queen if we live outside of NYC? ----- Original Message ----- From: "Laura Fisher" <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, July 22, 2012 12:24 PM Subject: [qhl] movie alert

I didn't notice any French quilts in it, but there are tons of French fabrics in Farewell My Queen about literally the last few days of Marie Antoinette. She loved her finery and they show her consulting her swatch books for fabrics to embellish, and every detail is so sumptuous, filmed in Versailles yet. So where did they get all the silk, those royals, and what a surprising amount of all different shades of blue in the silks. Would love to know more. The closeups on the woven silk upholsteries are divine too. On one I saw the motif that centers a whitework quilt I have, making me rethink maybe mine originated in France though it was collected in New England. Evidently the movie has been lauded for its visual accuracy, as well as story told from the servants' perspective.

Laura Fisher at

FISHER HERITAGE

305 East 61st Street

5th floor

New York, NY 10065 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Wachovia From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2012 05:15:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Thank you, Laurel, for mentioning the date:

Not to belabor a detail, but the Moravians arrived in the NC Piedmont (from Pennsylvania) in 1753, purchased a tract they called Wachovia (*Wachau)*, and founded three settlements, including Salem.

I grew up exploring the two historic settlement sites of Bethabara (first to be established - all men) and Bethania (second establishment a few miles away, for women). They were unattended sites, which meant we kids could run around the foundation digs imagining all kinds of things... These days, visitors learn accurate information.

Salem, the third settlement, came about when the pioneers felt the area was stabilized and they could form the community they had planned. Bethabara and Bethania were abandoned. In the early 20th century, Salem merged with its near neighbor, Winston.

Now known as Old Salem, Salem has a year-round interpretive history program that is just wonderful. Christmas gets all the glory, but you can see architecture, interior decor, gardening, and life skills every month of the year. It is adjacent to the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) and the campus of Salem College, Home Church, and God's Acre (cemetery). Go to www.oldsalem.org to learn more.

Andi in Paducah

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Also if you visit Lowell, MA . . . From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com>

Also, don't miss the 25th anniversary exhibit at the New England Quilt Muse um, just 4 blocks from the American Textile History Museum! "Backstitch" includes 26 quilts by quilt artists who had a lasting impact on the innova tions and milestones in quilting in the last 25 years and 12 antique quilts from the NEQM collection. Included are quilts by:Deirdre Amsde n, Barbara W. Barber, Rosemary Bawn, Jinny Beyer, Sancy Bonbsib, Barbara Br ackman, Hollis Chatelain, Jane Burch Cochran, Jane Crutchfield, Jo Diggs, C arol Doak, Christine Fries, Carol Anne Grotrian, Harriet hargrave, Michael James, Nancy Kerns, Mickey Lawler, Therese May, Paula Nadelstern, Sue Nicke ls, Teddy Pruett, Bethany Reynolds, Ami Simms, Linda Taylor & Cheri Meineke -Johnson, and Laura Wasilowski.----------------------------------- Anita B. Loscalzo & Laura Lane, Co-Curators"Backstitch" --916410903-1308731218-1343052333:41176--

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Subject: Re: movie alert From: Senoperaaol.com Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2012 08:30:45 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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It looks like Netflix has Farewell My Queen - along with a one month free trial if you don't already subscribe to their service.

Sue

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Subject: Two new positions available at AQS From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> : 7bit

Kris,

I hope it is OK to post these job openings. If not, I'll understand.

The American Quilter's Society seeks an editor for how-to quilt books. This full-time position is located in Paducah, Kentucky. A cover letter and resume should demonstrate how-to quilt editing experience, skills in quilt pattern and text editing, and be accompanied by work samples (before and after edits if possible). Quilt related experience is required. Position is available immediately. Send materials to Executive Book Editor, AQS, Box 3290, Paducah, KY, 42002. Include sufficient return postage to have materials returned. No phone calls or emails.

**

The American Quilter's Society seeks an associate show director for event planning. This full-time position is located in Paducah, Kentucky. A cover letter and resume should demonstrate strong communication skills, a broad knowledge of the quilting industry including teachers and vendors, and event planning. Self-motivation, initiative, and reliability are essential. Position is available immediately. Send materials to Executive Show Director, AQS, PO Box 3290, Paducah, KY 42002, or eventsAQSquilt.com. No phone calls.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Seeking quilt viewing opportunities OH, western PA From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2012 18:35:46 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Hi All -

I will be in western PA and Ohio (maybe Indiana) on Wed, Aug 8, Thurs, Aug 9, and Fri, Aug 10 and am seeking quilt viewing opportunities that will be available during that time. These can include "wonderful" antique malls, museums, exhibits, etc. If anyone knows of an historical society that will offer "behind the scenes" viewing of their quilts, that would be great.

Thank you for any help you can offer.

Sincerely, Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Seeking quilt viewing opportunities OH, western PA From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2012 23:06:49 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 7

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The Elisabeth Keckley quilt is on display in Cleveland somewhere. I think.

PollyMello

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Subject: RE: Turkey red prints in Scotland From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2012 19:24:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

Wow! You guys are great! Sally, the Fellow from Scotland, said they got almost 400 hits for the Turkey red website the day I posted to QHL about it. Thanks so much for supporting this worthy endeavor! Sally is thrilled!

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: Seeking quilt viewing opportunities OH, western PA From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2012 20:44:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

The Keckley quilt is on display at Kent State U. museum.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Seeking quilt viewing opportunities OH, western PA From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net> Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2012 22:46:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

I don't know if the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh has any quilts on display at this point or not. You could call them.

Where will you be in western Pa? The Indiana Historical society has quilts and the Westmoreland Museum of Art has 30 quilts. I don't know if any are on display either. Let me know where you will be, and I can pass the word around.

Brenda Applegate (north of Pittsburgh in Beaver County)

-----Original Message----- From: Barb Garrett Sent: Monday, July 23, 2012 6:35 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Seeking quilt viewing opportunities OH, western PA

Hi All -

I will be in western PA and Ohio (maybe Indiana) on Wed, Aug 8, Thurs, Aug 9, and Fri, Aug 10 and am seeking quilt viewing opportunities that will be available during that time. These can include "wonderful" antique malls, museums, exhibits, etc. If anyone knows of an historical society that will offer "behind the scenes" viewing of their quilts, that would be great.

Thank you for any help you can offer.

Sincerely, Barb in southeastern PA ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ELIZABETH KECKLEY QUILT From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2012 07:12:00 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Here is a link to the Kent State Exhibition

http://www.quiltersworld.com/webbonuses/pdfs/elizabeth_keckley_mary.pdf

Regards,

Darwin D. Bearley

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Subject: Re:Quilts in Ohio From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2012 08:14:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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The Ohio Historical Society has a museum in Columbus. They have quilts, but I'm not sure what's on display since this Ohioan lives on Long Island!

--Boundary_(ID_PTny6e8YPwe85DxlDHsRyg)--

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Subject: Re: ELIZABETH KECKLEY QUILT From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2012 08:29:17 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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In a message dated 7/24/2012 6:27:50 AM Central Daylight Time, DDBSTUFFaol.com writes:

http://www.quiltersworld.com/webbonuses/pdfs/elizabeth_keckley_mary.pdf

Thank you for the link, Darwin. Janet H in Fort Worth --part1_382f1.3e740979.3d3fef1c_boundary--

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Subject: Re: "Those Colors" and Moravians in NC From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2012 14:56:22 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I think Lynn Gorges and I and maybe Pepper invented the phases "those colors" and "those North Carolina Colors" to designate the combination of oxblood, blue-green, and cheddar solids in quilts often seen in the quilts of NC and included in the NC documentation book. They teased us as they seemed not to have teased others, so there was no good name to assign the usage.

Therefore, I include myself when suggesting that viewing this color combination as peculiar to North Carolina was premature.

It is not peculiar to NC. I myself have encountered as many and probably more quilts in this color way in Texas, for instance, than in any other section of the South. Certain parts of Georgia and Alabama still have a lot of them in family hands and some in museums. Kentucky has many, particularly the section along the Ohio Rive from Frankfort to Cincinnati. And knowing dealers in the area tell me many crop up just north of the river in this region. Two in my collection originated there.

I've studied these colors for at least a decade, and I simply do not believe we can fairly assign them to NC. I've traced Moravian use of color and symbol, seen store account records in the areas Moravians settled and sub-divided around Salem. I've also looked briefly at the Bethlehem, PA holdings, which are vast. While this has been enlightening in terms of symbols, especially, I've found nothing that would argue strongly for this group's being the principal source of either the dyed fabrics or the combination of colors. The Moravian community certainly had influence, for they set up a wide trade and themselves traveled widely in their missionary efforts to the Cherokee and others. Yet the Moravians too shared in a larger reservoir of cultural traditions.

When one turns to pottery and other crafts, he encounters a similar phenomenon to that seen in this body of quilts, for instance.

Joey Brackner, head of the folklife division in the state of Alabama, was the first person to put me onto a more promising path to discovering at least a general source for this group of quilts. In an unrelated conversation, he made me aware of the large German immigration into the Mobile area, the big potteries set up and maintained through the present century by German potters, and their influence on other potters. Joey's superb book "Alabama Folk Potters" is, in my view, a terrific aid to anyone studying design in any of the folk/domestic arts in the South. John Burrison's "Brothers in Clay" and "From Mud to Jug" are also helpful, especially with bibliographies.

By expanding the context, we recognize "those colors" appear all over the Texas hill country in stencil and house paints. The first Whig's Defeat quilt I saw was made by a woman named Eppinger, a German name, who lived near ta large German settlement near Minden, Louisiana (Germantown is preserved and open to visitors). There are towns named Minden all over the South, and this, like other cultural clues, suggests the much greater Germanic presence in the South than has been noted by quilt historians or students of design.

I suspect most of the Germans who settled in the South were Lutherans, though places like Wachovia also existed. There is a wonderful little hand-lettered sign nailed to a post near Independence, Texas, that points down a narrow dirt road and announces "11 Lutheran Churches" lie down that tiny road! Eleven!---and at least one had services in German.

Most have thought of the South---and Texas is part of the South---as almost completely a region settled by Scots-Irish (the Ulster Scots) and English migrants. While those groups provided the bulk of the South's early population, they lived in a much more diverse world than is commonly acknowledged. German groups existed in every southern state, and while Germans tended to band together originally, they were never isolated. Their skills and agricultural and commercial acumen brought them into contact with the general population. Evidence suggests most of these groups were highly respected by their neighbors.

It's tempting to assign the source of certain designs and color choices to one group or another, but until someone has located dye records, store or manufacturer account books, or similarly convincing evidence, I don't think we can currently account for the popularity of the tri-colors and the patterns with which they are associated. In general they seem to have replaced the brighter red, yellow, and blue calicoes in patterns.

We might begin by dating the known examples.

They do seem to be southern in the period of their heyday, and the use of solid fabrics is a key identifier. Certain designs are associated with them. But a quick thumb-through of "Plain & Fancy: Country Quilts of the Pennsylvania-Germans" by Anita Schorsch makes clear they have kinfolks elsewhere.

The Arts & Crafts Movement popularized these "muddy" colors, but we have examples of quilts made in them before the influence of that movement, which influenced the Northeast and Midwest more than it did the South, I think.

The red-brown is still called "German Brown" in South Louisiana, where it was often used for ceiling paint. The blue-green is sometimes identified as "indigo" in journals and letters.

For whatever reason, not a lot of research has been done about the total body of Southern quilts. The South is a big region, yet one bound by many important traditions. It is NOT monolithic, however. Nor was it ever monolithic.

Growing up in Central Louisiana, where Anglo-Protestant North Louisiana came smack up against French-Catholic South Louisiana, and having spent my adult life in North Louisiana, I am sensitive to the subtleness of cultural borrowings. You see it in furniture, cooking, language, gardening---everywhere. It is generally more unconscious absorption than conscious borrowing. And I think when/if we address the issue of "these colors," we need to remember that.

There are now scholarly books on the Germans in nearly every southern state, I believe. I recommend Scott Rohrer's "Wandering Souls: Protestant Migrations in America, 1630-1865," which also has chapters on the Mormon migrations, which account for many pattern transfers from the South and, I'm sure, other sections.

Okay, so yes, it's a long post. But it's a big subject. And an unsolved question. And we should acknowledge that. It has buzzed like one of those annoying gnats around in my brain for a long time. And I know it has done the same thing with Pepper and Lynn. I don't think it will have a simple, single answer. But we ought to work on it.

Hot but grateful for occasional rains in North Louisiana, Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: "Those Colors" and Moravians in NC From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2012 13:52:29 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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what an excellent post, Gaye. Much knowledge, thanks for sharing it. best, Don________________________________From: Gaye Ingra m <gingramsuddenlink.net>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis .com>Cc: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com>Sent: Tue, July 24, 2012 1:17: 12 PMSubject: [qhl] Re: "Those Colors" and Moravians in NCI think Lynn Gorges and I and maybe Pepper invented the phases "those colors" an d "those North Carolina Colors" to designate the combination of oxblood, blue-green, and cheddar solids in quilts often seen in the quilts of NC and included in the NC documentation book. They teased us as they seemed not to have teased others, so there was no good name to assign the usag e. Therefore, I include myself when suggesting that viewing this c olor combination as peculiar to North Carolina was premature. ---1130813930-1123498336-1343163149:65883--

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Subject: Ohio Quilt Study Day in August From: sharonpinkayahoo.com Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2012 17:41:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Hello all - just a reminder for those interested in the Ohio Quilt Study Day Aug. 11, that there are still a few openings. The motel discount rate expires July 27, so if you are considering a trip to Ohio, contact me immediately for more details! Thanks, Sharon Pinka Sharon Pinka Rainbow Quilt Blocks, Quilt Study & Research6323 Possum Run Rd.Bellville, OH 44813 USA419.938.8040 sharonpinkayahoo.com

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Subject: Antique quilt exhibit and trunkshow Salt Lake July 28th From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2012 23:28:49 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 7

If you are anyone you know is within driving distance of Salt Lake City, Utah this weekend, this is a great opportunity to see a lot of early 1800's quilts and fabrics. Quilt Masterpieces- learn history the fun way - by looking at quilts.

I will be sharing 30 or more antique quilts and early fabrics (toiles, chintz, bedcovers, 1850's signature quilts, lots of red and green applique, etc.) in an exhibit and hands on antique quilt study trunkshow. I will also be doing appraisals in the afternoon.

Here is the venue information and a bit about the antique quilt series: http://www.thisistheplace.org/what_to_do/quilts.shtml

More about the event: https://www.facebook.com/#!/events/421165977925519/

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: NQR -- but of interest to those researching African-American history and material culture From: textiqueaol.com Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2012 00:42:06 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Wow! Thanks, Candace. I read about this when they were calling for submis sions so nice to know it is done AND in ebook form too.

Jan Thomas

A new book "World of a Slave: Encyclopedia of the Material Life of Slaves in the United States" (ABC-CLIO/Greenwood)

Candace Perry

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Subject: selling quilt frame From: Helene Kusnitz <helenekusnitzgmail.com> Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2012 10:53:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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I have a Pleasant Mountain 3 rail quilt frame I'd like to sell. It has two sets of poles, one is king sized the other is 60" long. It is in excellent condition from a smoke free pet free home. I just don't have room for it anymore. I'm looking for someone in the Long Island, NYC or northern NJ area (we can meet to drop off) so it doesn't have to be shipped. Please email me for price if you're interested.

Helene Kusnitz -- Helene Kusnitz helenekusnitz.com----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Seasonal shopping reminder: Pool Noodles From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2012 21:02:35 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Good evening, QHLers - Just a reminder to buy those pool noodles during the height of the Summer season for storing your quilts, yardage, etc. This Summer I have seen two different diameters for sale: 2-3/8" and 3". To stiffen the pool noodles and to extend the length, I suggest using Plexiglas acrylic tubing from an acrylic fabricator or EMT (electrical metallic tubing) from the hardware store. You might find metal curtain rods that fit snugly as well in the center hole. I always wrap the pool noodle first with heavy-duty aluminum foil before rolling on a piece of cotton sheeting to act as a leader.

I'ld be happy to clarify further off line if needed. Regards, Meg . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney Textile/Costume Conservator & Collections Management Consultant Professional Associate - AIC 707-763-8694 mgmooneymoonware.net

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Subject: The series "Why Quilts Matter" now has a brochure titled "Exhibition Programming Opportunities" which offers free content ideas for exhibitions-take a look!! From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:09:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics, the documentary series, has announced that we now have a brochure titled Exhibition Programming Opportunities. It contains suggestions for using the series to add content to your exhibitions and also to get people to come back to the exhibition, whererever it is, more than once. Take a look on our site www.whyquiltsmatter.org and go to the Resources section to download the brochure.

On that note I am asking you if you are aware of who in the quilt and museum world are travelling exhibitions these days so that we mnight be in touch . I am already working with SAQA and the NQM and both are adding our brochures to their exhibitions as they travel and suggesting the use of the series to others

The Discussion Guides for the series are also well underway and should be available to you and your groups in the early fall.

All of this work is being done with profits from the sales of DVDs to benefit the world of quilts in a variety of ways.We are all very excited to be extending the use of the series way beyond watching it !!!Thanks for all your support!

On another note, I am looking for any information any of you might have on great quiltmakers past or present who have been from Paducah. I am also doing research for an article.

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

ps. Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v8RMyg1_zYgY

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Subject: Re: The series "Why Quilts Matter" now has a brochure titled "Exhibition Programming Opportunities" which offers free content ideas for exhibitions-take a look!! From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2012 14:07:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Sorry, group - that message was meant to go to Shelly privately. The heat got to my brain!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: The series "Why Quilts Matter" now has a brochure titled "Exhibition Programming Opportunities" which offers free content ideas for exhibitions-take a look!! From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2012 14:06:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Hi, Shelly - On your query about quilters from Paducah, do you know about Guy Hughes and her sisters Belle Reynolds and Frances Ozment? The three made wonderfully precise miniature quilts through the winter, and used to sell them at the show (sometimes at a satellite location). Guy, at least, also made big quilts. I have an unfinished quilt of hers, all incredible hand-embroidered birds in their natural habitats, made for her husband in the late 1970s-early 1980s. One of her sisters made a similar quilt that I saw once in the collection of a dealer from Nebraska. Guy died in 2009, and I don't know if her sisters are still living. There was also a 4th sister, also deceased.

I have several of the miniatures, and know at least one other person who has some, and I will be bringing my "Birds" piece to Paducah in the spring, for a little show&tell at our hotel.

See you in October at AQSG -

Xenia----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Ogier Cradle From: CELIA EDDY <celia.eddybtinternet.com> Date: Wed, 1 Aug 2012 14:30:55 +0100 (BST) X-Message-Number: 1

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I'm researching the history of the Ogier family, who settled in Guernsey Co unty, Ohio, in the early nineteenth century. Legend has it that Thomas Ogie r,one of the first settlers there, was a fugitive from justice in Guernsey in the British Channel Islands but that in his flight to America he carried with him the family cradle! This may or may or not be true, but I understa nd that at one time there was, indeed, an 'Ogier Cradle' in one of Ohio's m useums. Nowadays the story of Thomas's adventures is told in almost all the the websites which give information about Ohio's early days, and the cradl e is mentioned as being in the possession of the Ohio branch of the America n Legion. I've tried every avenue I can think of to contact the ri ght branch of the Legion, but with no success. Does anyone have any ideas o r know anything about this cradle?Oh, yes, I should add that this is definitely in relation to some quilt research I'm doing! Just thought I'd b etter mention that as I know my enquiry sounds recondite!Thanks in ad vanceCeliaCelia EddyThe Brown HouseFleming PlaceMar yportCumbria CA15 6ESTel: 01900 81499907969333923 ---503279681-1344690153-1343827855:56101--

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Subject: Re: The Ogier Cradle From: textiqueaol.com Date: Wed, 1 Aug 2012 15:16:21 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Celia,

According to the genealogist at the Guernsey County library (740-439-5884), this cradle is in the possession of the Guernsey County Historical Society (both of which are in Cambridge). The telephone number for the HS is 740- 439-5884 and they are only open on Tues, Thurs., and Sat. It seems the lib rary had it on display several years ago and, after developing a ceiling pr oblem, returned it to the museum. My guess is, like some small museums, it might be loaned to them permanently from Post 84 of the American Legion. If you like, I'll call the HS tomorrow and ask for more information and an email address for you. The American Legion Auxiliary in Cambridge has an o ffice at 1100 Maple Court Office, Cambridge, Ohio, 43725-1700. It doesn't appear they want to give up their phone number easily but I have sent anoth er contact email. Awaiting an answer.

Jan Thomas who wants to see a picture of this cradle.

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Subject: Re: The Ogier Cradle From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Gosh, Jan--how wonderful that you had all this information for Celia. be st, Don

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Subject: Re: The Ogier Cradle From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Wed, 1 Aug 2012 20:48:02 +0100 X-Message-Number: 4

And Celia gets her answer within hours. I love this list!!!

Sally Ward/Tatters

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Subject: Re: The Ogier Cradle From: textiqueaol.com Date: Wed, 1 Aug 2012 19:43:48 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Don,

I traveled the state for almost 5 years learning about schoolgirl samplers and early female education for the Ohio sampler documentation book. Since I still research and document newly discovered pieces, I've kept a tidy lit tle contact list. All sorts of goodies tucked away in Ohio and I'm happy t o do it.

Jan Thomas

Gosh, Jan--how wonderful that you had all this information for Celia. best , Don

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Subject: Re: The Ogier Cradle From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Wed, 1 Aug 2012 17:21:04 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 6

Hmmm, my new book is about quilt blocks named for famous Americans--What do you have tucked away about Jacob Coxey, James Garfield, Mrs. Howard Taf t??? I think they are the three from Ohio.Bought a contemporary Ladies Art Company Garfields Monument top that is completed except for the appliqued G. It was made by an African American in Kentucky (Sout hwest corner) c. 1895. I wasn't aware until I did my research about h ow pro African American equality/rights Garfield was. You wonder if that was why this person made the quilt.It's amazing some of the folks on the QHL--how helpful and nice they are. best, Don