Subject: Argentina Quilters From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com>

This morning I read a quilting newsletter published in Australia and there was a fascinating article about the Cardoba Patchwork group in Argentina. Wow! I then went on the FB page for these quilters. I didn't understand one word written on their site....except for PATCHWORK....but I could read their faces in the "language of quilts/sewing/creativity". They were saying..."I am proud of my work. Do you like my work? I am happy to share. I belong."

It made me want to run right out and start about 10 quilt groups this morning to share the feelings of warmth and acceptance. In the article this woman talked about how she was hoping that starting quilting classes in her town would encourage fabric shops to carry cotton fabrics for sale. We take so much for granted. It made me think of all sorts of fabrics I no longer use and keep wishing someone would love them and use them. Then again, maybe I should find a group of women here in my town who could use that same uplifting "voice" in their lives.

Another comment for the morning....I have not done any NEW fabric shopping in quite a while except for nice quilt shop type reproductions, etc. I am making baby quilts so I went to the local quilt shop and bought some nice Michael Miller earlier yesterday.(Where is that now made?) Last night I went to Walmart for dog food and thought I would add some things to my quilts. When I checked out the fabrics UP CLOSE I was so annoyed to see what crappy thread counts they were selling. It appeared that Pakistan fabric was very loose with China next and then Korea was a bit better. Of course the price rose with each improvement. Oh I mourn for the loose of our cotton textile production in this country. Yes, we produced some "shoddy stuff" as well, but I still wish we were in the running.

Lynn Lancaster Gorges NC - one of the FORMER largest textile producers in the world

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Subject: Kidnapped seamstresses? From: Pat Kyser <patkyserhiwaay.net> Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2012 08:17:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

A friend sent me an article from the June 29 NY Times in which was stated: "To cut off the Confederate Army from access to new uniforms, tents and bedding, the Union troops even kidnapped female knitters, weavers, and seamstresses and deported them northward."

I have never heard this (I live "in the Heart of Dixie") and wondered if anyone can throw light on it. The article was in conjunction with an exhibit at the Lowell, MA, museum and mentioned Lynne Bassett, who is part of this list. I am aware of a mystery surrounding disappearance of women workers in a textile factory north of Atlanta (Roswell?) Apparently they were taken by Union soldiers and never heard from again. Was this an isolated incident or the norm?

Pat Kyser

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Subject: Re: The Ogier Cradle From: celia.eddybtinternet.com Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2012 11:11:01 +0100 (BST) X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi, JanI knew QHL would come up with an answer! This is so helpful. Yes, please, if you can get me an e-mail address that'll be great.

The story of how the Ogier Cradle came to be in Ohio is a fascinating digression in the story of an Ohio quilt I'm researching - made by Mary Ogier in 1846. But the digression is SO fascinating that I think it merits inclusion, and having an image of the actual cradle would certainly give the story more clout.

If possible I'll put the story of the cradle on my Blog and send the link to QHL, but today I'm 'on a deadline' and mustn't allow myself to be diverted!

Many, many thanksCelia ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: The Ogier Cradle From: celia.eddybtinternet.com Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2012 15:30:25 +0100 (BST) X-Message-Number: 4

Thought some QHL members might be interested in the story of the Ogier Cradle.

It does have a quilt connection - honest!

http://daybook-celeste.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/the-ogier-family-in-guernsey-county-ohio.html

Celia Eddy ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: The Ogier Cradle From: textiqueaol.com Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2012 13:23:43 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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I know that James Garfield was both polylingual and ambidextrous -- he coul d write in Latin with one hand and Greek in the other - simultaneously. I' m imagining him embroidering with one hand and quilting with the other!

Contact me off list and we'll see what we can do for you Don.

Jan Thomas

Hmmm, my new book is about quilt blocks named for famous Americans--What do you have tucked away about Jacob Coxey, James Garfield, Mrs. Howard Taft? I th ink they are the three from Ohio.

I wasn't aware until I did my research about how pro African American equal ity/rights Garfield was. You wonder if that was why this person made the quilt.

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Subject: Re: Kidnapped seamstresses? From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Thu, 02 Aug 2012 15:25:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

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Hi Pat,

"Kidnapped" is the wrong word. My colleague, Madelyn Shaw, was horrified when her statement was twisted around in that manner by the /NYT/ reporter. Here is the actual passage from the book:

"In August 1864, General William T. Sherman sent a detachment to Roswell [Georgia], which burned the New Manchester and Alcora cotton factories and the Ivy Woolen Mill. The monthly loss was calculated to be '900 Bales of yarns, sheeting, and sewing cotton...[and] 1500 yards of wool jeans and cassimeres.' About 400 of Roswell's workers, most of them young white women, were deported northward to Louisville, where they were imprisoned and later, infamously, abandoned to make either a living or their way home as best they could." Source: Catherine Clinton, "'Public Women' and Sexual Politics," in /Battle Scars: Gender and Sexuality in the American Civil War/, ed. Nina Silber and Catherine Clinton (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006), 70-73.

This was not the "norm" during the war.

All best, Lynne----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Baltimore Album Milky Way tin, 1997 From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2012 16:42:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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One of my students (quilt class) today had an awesome commemorative tin from Mars/Milky Way candy, 1997. It has a picture of a Baltimore Album quilt (9 blocks, corners are fleur de lis) on the top. I found a picture online and have posted it on my blog (http://debbykratovilquilts.blogspot.com/ ). I would love more info on this. Is it based on a real quilt or just a digital composite? The sashing doesn't seem to go with the blocks, but I'm not an historian, so that's why I defer to this group.

I'm sure the value of the tin is under $10, but to have such an awesome quilt all over the tin fascinates me. And why did Mars do this? No info about the quilt is written on the tin other than that it's a Baltimore Album quilt.

Thanks! Debby

Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://debbykratovilquilts.blogspot.com/ Quilt Trunk Shows & Workshops www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: RE: Baltimore Album Milky Way tin, 1997 From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2012 16:12:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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That's my button box! Don't know anything about the history. Can't even rem ember where I got the tinbut I love it.

Stephanie Whitson ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Album quilt on candy tin From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2012 21:04:21 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Debbie, I looked at that interesting tin, and the first thing through my mi nd was that it might be a tin from holiday (Christmas) special marketing of candy for the season. Lots of candy companies manufacture specially wra pped or colored versions of their products in various sizes for all sorts o f holidays and celebrations...it wouldn't surprise me if this was from such a promotion. I can just picture it as a prewrapped gift at CVS!! With a ribbon, of course!

But as to the quilt - have you tried writing the Mars company? Other published ephemera of the same period, such as note cards? Not that I'd have any idea where to look for them! Susan

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Subject: Album quilt on candy tin From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2012 23:47:20 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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I bought one of those tins when they came out. They were a promotion at Christmas and had, I think, bite size Snickers in them. I was hoping that the quilt theme was going to be a continuing one with tins each Christmas, but they only produced them the one year.

I got mine at Wal-Mart.

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn Associate Professor of Law Emerita Valparaiso University Law School Valparaiso, IN 46383 mary.persynvalpo.edu

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Subject: re: Milky Way Tin From: Jean Lester <jeantomlestercomcast.net> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2012 11:48:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I didn't realize that's how old it was. I got mine at Walmart (and that's the only reason I went there). I have looked a lot of Christmas's since, but never found another "quilty".

Jean

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Subject: Re: Baltimore Album Milky Way tin From: Kennalee <kennaleemaol.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2012 12:07:28 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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I have the box, too. It's full of small paper pieced blocks and some extra log cabins I made in 1998. I think it dates from then. I don't remember whe re I got it either. I tried scanning the barcode but it had no information. Hope you find one, too!

Kennalee

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Subject: seeing quilts everywhere From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 4 Aug 2012 20:27:06 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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I was channel surfing earlier and stopped when I saw Robin Willliams in a s uit made of an 1880s Broken Dishes quilt (top I think) in nice period brown fabrics, honest! I am not seeing quilts everywhere, it's just that....ther e they are. I am sure the costume designer used an old top, otherwise the s uit would have taken too long to construct. The film is called Toys, or Toy Story (not the cartoon, anearlier film set in a toy factory, quite surr eal for the 15 minutes I watched)

I remember selling a suiting quilt to a broadway show costumedesigner wh o madeit into a suit for the tap dancing star of a musical revue dealing with jazz, think the name was Black and Blue. somehow that seemed OK, whil e Norma Kamali making hot pants and bell bottoms from absolutely beautiful, not utilitarian, quilts, seemed not so.

Laura Fisher at ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Lacemaking in America? From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2012 09:37:43 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

This question is about lace, not quilts, but it is my quilting interest that generated it.

Talking yesterday to an expert lacemaker at a UK show, I was given a full run down of the sources of different lace techniques, from across Europe, and how they came to different areas of the UK at different times 'as people moved to escape oppression'. She concluded with ' ....and here it stopped. It never went to America'.

My question is, is that the case, and if so, can we draw any conclusions as to why it didn't travel in the same way as quiltmaking techniques?

Sally Ward

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: "Donna" <nilrapsgmail.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2012 06:47:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Sally - you made me think of the 4 years we lived in Cornwall, England -- I saw lace making there in abundance and thought maybe it was only in California Lacemaking had not seen it done (thinking it must be popular on the East Coast). Hearing you say it "stopped in England and not made it to America" was this necessity versus no time for frivolousness. This was something I had thought about learning and now wish I had - the fingers of these women moved so fast and beautiful to watch. Donna

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk>

I have only just started some online searching, but I may have found one reason for it not thriving, which of course not the same as not going there in the first place. Interestingly, it was on a site about Southern Californian craft. The writer pointed out that lace making depended on the import of rust-proof steel pins and Belgian linen thread, a completely uniform and small diameter thread. There was no local substitute for these materials and cash was required to buy the imports.

My admiration for lacemakers doesn't stop at the finger dexterity, it extends to the eyesight! Both ladies I watched yesterday were 'of a certain age' and neither wore glasses or contacts (I couldn't resist asking). Cause and effect, I wonder?

Sally

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: pollymellocomcast.net

I think that lace making techniques were also fiercly guarded secrets and s ome countries protected that knowledge. I read a story about Italian lace b eing smu ggled into France by using gre yhounds. They would tie it to a dog , then cover the d og and lace with the hide of another dog, so you would n ot "see" the lace tied to the dogs back and they were trained to race acros s the border to another smuggler. It has been a long time since I read lace history but I believe that Catherine Medici brought Italian lace m a k ing to France when she married King ? She and her ladies in waiting had t he knowledge of Italian lace making.

There are many lace making techniques and many instruments used to accompli sh it: bobbin lace, tatting using a shuttle, crochet uses a hook which can be wood, bone, ivory, metel, knitted lace: metel bone or wood. So the instr aments of lace making could be made here.

In Elizabethan times the wealthy and powerful were covered in lace. In Earl y America the puritans seemed to wear simple clothes. Gearge Washington had some pretty frroofy dress clothes but I think that times and attitudes and fashion changed away from wearing alot of lace. Lace may have been associa ted with the royalty that we regected, Especially for men. But, i f you hav e ever seen the fancy colonial vests that men worn: intricate embroidery an d quilting, they were still strutting peacocks.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2012 12:22:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

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Well since there is lacemaking equipment in many of the museums I have v isited that belonged to American immigrants I don't know that one cou ld say that lacemaking stopped after people left Europe. Did she perhaps me an that lacemaking wasn't as organized as an industry here perhaps? Cert ainly there were individuals who made lace. Is tatting considered a type of lace-making? What about knitted lace? But again I've seen the lacemakin g equipment ... I don't know the terms ... in museums and even at the occas ional estate auction.

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2012 12:23:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

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If there was no time in America for "frivolousness" if one things of lace-m aking as frivolous then I don't understand quiltmaking in America eit her. For surely it is the height of "frivolousness" to cut perfectly good f abric up into tiny pieces and spend hundreds of hours sewing them back toge ther again. And Baltimore Album Quilts? And broderie perse? Trapunto? All " frivolous" in a way IMHO.

Steph

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2012 12:28:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

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Reading that tatting and crochet and knitted are all considered lace ... I can say without hesitation that a LOT of lace has been made in the U.S.

Steph

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2012 12:06:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Sally- I'm sure your informant was correct, for the earliest, colonial times in North America. (Don't know about S. America, all the Spanish immigration).

But I do know that bobbin lace making arrived here in the Midwest with European nuns who came to set up convents. That would be between 1880-1910, I think.

Kim in North Dakota

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: Rose Werner <erwerner3104yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2012 11:37:10 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 9

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I have a cousin in North Dakota who learned bobin lace-making from an immigrant German nun. She taught Phyllis on the the condition that Phyllis teach someone else so that the skill would not die. Phyllis became adept at it and was selling pieces of her work. I think she also became president of an organization of lace-makers. The magazine Piece Makers usually has a yearly lace issue. Also, I have a vintage scrapbook of lace samples, all made by one woman. Lace making was definitely here, brought by imigrants, but as someone else said, never became an industry. Rosie Werner http://www.quiltkitid.com/

________________________________ From: Kim Baird <kbairdcableone.net> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 12:06 PM Subject: [qhl] RE: Lacemaking in America?

Sally- I'm sure your informant was correct, for the earliest, colonial times in North America. (Don't know about S. America, all the Spanish immigration).

But I do know that bobbin lace making arrived here in the Midwest with European nuns who came to set up convents. That would be between 1880-1910, I think.

Kim in North Dakota ---711650361-373159059-1344191830:12634--

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Subject: Lacemaking in America From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2012 21:11:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 10

About ten years ago, I had the great fortune to receive a tour of the lace c ollection at The Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. The tour included a displa y featuring the different techniques of lacemaking. I strongly recommend th is experience. Sue Reich ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 05, 2012 From: LinusDonnaaol.com

Re: Lacemaking in America

The Newark Museum in NJ and the Philadelphia Museum of Art in PA both have some lovely early Amrerican lace. But the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, a little gem in Back Bay Boston, has a wonderful collection. They have early Ipswich laces. In Ipswich MA at one time, nearly the entire population made lace.

I checked in Virginia Penny's The Employment of Women: A Encyclopedia of Women's Work from 1863. She has an interview with one lacemaker gentleman who told her that he and his wife are the only makers of hand lace in America. She notes gave her a "contradictory report" and "may fear competition."

My Dutch ancestors came to settle in New York in 1643. This is anecdotal in my family, that much of the wealth of our family in the nineteenth century was attributed to the determination of our ancestors in the seventeenth century. The men were hard working farmers and merchants, and they married up: the daughters of well-established merchants. Some of the wives were lacemaking Huguenot girls, well known in Brooklyn and Flatbush, who added greatly to the family income and status. The only one whose name I can remember was named Petronella. My cousin the genealogy maven has ledger notes about some notable New Yorkers who purchased her lace.

Bright blessings! ~Donna Laing

_www.northstarqualityquilting.com_ (http://www.northstarqualityquilting.com/)

_http://www.facebook.com/northstarqualityquilting_ (http://www.facebook.com/northstarqualityquilting) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lacemaking in America? From: Judy Roche <judyqrocheclan.com> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2012 06:49:08 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

May i suggest you follow a thread to Ipswich MAss...had am 'industry ' of lacemaking in the 1700's.........there is a book , and a novel, and well....lots of information........ Judy Roche Stockton Springs Maine ...very foggy this morning On Aug 5, 2012, at 8:42 AM, Sally Ward wrote:

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Subject: Lace Making From: Linda Eaton <LEatonwinterthur.org>

Both needle and bobbin lace (also known as bone lace) were taught to young women at many schools in early America, listed in the teachers' advertiseme nts. The Ipswich lace industry is well known, due to the excellent researc h and publication by Marta Cottrell Raffel (her book is titled The Laces of Ipswich: The Art and Economics of an Early American Industry 1750-1840), b ut little has been widely published about the schools, domestic practices, or possible other groups of outworkers. This is a topic wide open for furt her research.......

Linda Eaton

http://www.winterthur.org/

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Subject: Fw: book From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net>

This is an excellent book if anyone wants to learn more about lace making in American. I was going to edit the long text, but it had a lot of valuable information.

Brenda Applegate

The Laces of Ipswich: The Art and Economics of an Early American Industry, 1750-1840 Raffel, Marta Cotterell Reviewer: Miller, Marla R. Published by EH.NET (July 2004)

Marta Cotterell Raffel, The Laces of Ipswich: The Art and Economics of an Early American Industry, 1750-1840. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 2003. xii + 156 pp. $24.95 (paperback), ISBN: 1-58465-163-6.

Reviewed for EH.NET by Marla R. Miller, Department of History, University of Massachusetts -- Amherst.

From the 1750s to the 1840s, women throughout the town of Ipswich, Massachusetts were heavily engaged in creating and sustaining the only successful commercial production of handmade bobbin lace in the United States, an enterprise that thrived for almost a century before the advent of machine-made lace undermined their efforts. The New England lace makers described in Marta Cotterel Raffel's The Laces of Ipswich: The Art and Economics of an Early American Industry, 1750-1840 certainly have not garnered sufficient attention among historians of early American labor, craft and women. Raffel, an independent scholar and lace-maker herself, seeks to remedy this oversight by providing the first-ever study of this important chapter in the braided histories of women and work, craft production, and industrialization.

In the eighteenth century, most North American consumers purchased French, Flemish, Brussels or English lace imported by local merchants. A constellation of factors, however, combined to create a thriving network of lace makers in Ipswich, as environmental, economic and political change conspired to reconfigure the local economy. Though once a port town rivaling Salem, in the 1740s shifting sands gradually reduced the opening of the Ipswich River, closing the harbor to larger ships; at the same time, a general mid-century economic depression was exacerbated by events associated with the mounting imperial crisis. Lace-making, Raffel argues, enabled Ipswich women to cushion these blows. By 1776, she asserts, enough women were engaged in the craft that, "unlike other areas, the residents were poised to meet the demand for domestic lace" brought about by the Revolution and its aftermath (p. 20). By the turn of the nineteenth century, some 600 women -- more than 1 in 4 of the adult female population -- across as many households were engaged in lace production, creating a uniquely identifiable domestic alternative to imported lace, and a major commercial enterprise for Ipswich families.

The subtitle aside, this is really a book about art; economics is discussed in only the most general sense, in ways that specialists will find largely unsatisfying. But as a study of the art and craft of lace-making, this slim volume is effective and informative. In many ways a model of material culture study, Raffel's well-illustrated book demonstrates clearly the value of cultivating an intimate understanding of the processes and tools associated with early American crafts. As a lace-maker, she is able to extract extraordinary insight from the surviving bobbins, pillows (the platform on which the lace is created), and parchments (the paper patterns), from portraits showing lace on garments, and of course from extant examples of the lace itself. Close study of the bobbins and kits, for example, suggests that these tools were supplied by a single source, hinting at the presence of commission merchants. Patterns of pricking in surviving parchments can reveal whether the lace produced from them was intended for personal or commercial use. Careful examination of a lace-trimmed cape revealed that the garment's maker was not necessarily familiar with the lace itself, since the embellishment was applied with the wrong side facing out, giving a fascinating little glimpse into the limits of one consumer's fashion knowledge. Insights like these throughout the book provide readers with an intimate view of the lace-maker's craft from the perspective of a practitioner.

Unfortunately, Raffel's core question -- how it came to be that, in a town of some 4500 residents, more than a quarter of the women embraced lace-making for commercial markets, producing collectively more than 40,000 yards per year -- remains unanswered. Though certainly the convergence of several commercial crises would have given Ipswich women every reason to look for alternate sources of income, the same was of course true for women in communities across New England. How these Ipswich residents came to lace making, why it thrived as it did, and why nothing similar was attempted by neighboring communities, remains unexplained. Though the author posits, for example, that "most of the women who made lace in Ipswich had emigrated from the lace-making centers of England" (p. 52), no evidence is offered to support that assertion, while elsewhere in the volume, brief biographical sketches of known lace-makers include only women born in Ipswich. Moreover, close consideration of the lace itself reveals that most Ipswich lace was made in the European style (with the footside, or sewing edge, to the left of the lace) as opposed to the English style (with the footside to the right), suggesting perhaps that it was not English immigrants at all who proved influential, but rather unidentified artisans from the Continent (p. 70; on p. 68, the author also suggests that perhaps Ipswich lace reflects an "amalgamation" of the two influences). There is surely a fascinating story behind the emergence of lace-making in Ipswich, but important elements of that phenomenon are not yet understood.

Similarly, there is more complex and substantive analysis yet to be done on the gender and market relations that shaped this effort. For example, Raffel posits that the appearance of commission merchants (as evidence by the distribution of uniform bobbins and kits) corresponds with the entrance of men into what had been a primary female sphere of activity; however, later in the study she documents the efforts of lace merchant Mary Sutton, who centralized the collection of Ipswich lace for Boston and Portsmouth markets, and who seems (at least from the evidence presented) at least as likely a candidate for organizing the lace workforce and their tools as any yet-unknown male figure(s). In addition, women were "involved," she asserts, in lace-making's movement into factories, but how and to what extent is not described. Raffel does not attempt to ground her project in the sizeable scholarly literature of women, work, artisanry and industrialization, and so the study does not engage in any sustained way with the larger questions scholars in those fields have been wrangling with in recent years.

Though specialists in the history of clothing and textiles will find much of value here, professional historians with broader interests will find much to quibble with in this book. Still, Raffel has made a significant contribution to the study of women and work in early America simply by recovering, with great sensitivity and insight, the work of the lace-makers themselves. The story of this early and isolated foray into domestic lace production is fascinating, and this volume provides a real service in its informed analysis of the material remains of lace making as it emerged in coastal Massachusetts.

Marla R. Miller directs the Public History program at the University of Massachusetts --Amherst. Her research and writing explores women and work in the early Republic. Her book on women's work in rural New England's clothing trades, The Needle's Eye: Women and Work in the Age of Revolution, is scheduled to appear in Spring 2005 from the University of Massachusetts Press.

Geographic Area: North America Subject: Social and Cultural History, including Race, Ethnicity and Gender Time period: 19th Century

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Subject: Need address From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>

Please forgive personal utilization of the list. Andi Reynolds and I have been bosom buddies for many years and my computer refuses to give up any e- addresses for her. Andi please e-mail me.

Teddy Pruett

www.teddypruett.com

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 11:34:03 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Regarding lacemaking in America later in the 19th century, what about the influence of published patterns and directions/ instructions in ladies magazines? I'm browsing my tattered copy of Petersen's Magazine January 1888 and there is a hefty chapter devoted to "Lacemaking and Crochet". Pictures show primarily crocheted lace, with many pattern instructions.

What about Godeys, Harpers, Delineator, Ladies Home Journal, etc?

Martha Spark Edmond, OK ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 11:44:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

I think that's one of those vast generalizations -- that it never came to America. I think it is also how one defines lace -- we find bits of lace-like needlework, though not as sophisticated as one might have found in the old world -- on baby caps and on women's caps in the 18th and 19th century among the PA Germans, and other items also -- but that's what comes to mind at the moment. Candace Perry

-----Original Message----- From: Kim Baird [mailto:kbairdcableone.net] Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2012 1:06 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] RE: Lacemaking in America?

Sally- I'm sure your informant was correct, for the earliest, colonial times in North America. (Don't know about S. America, all the Spanish immigration).

But I do know that bobbin lace making arrived here in the Midwest with European nuns who came to set up convents. That would be between 1880-1910, I think.

Kim in North Dakota

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Subject: Women's World Magazine From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 09:27:59 -0700 (PDT)

Looking for someone who collects old issues (1932) of Women's World Magazin e. Or knows of an accessible archive.Thanks, Don Beld --83567325-759044376-1344270479:61410--

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America From: textiqueaol.com

A definition is needed as to what constitutes "lacemaking" but I refer you all again to the U of Arizona website: http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/ weaving/books.html

There were many books on lace techniques sold in the US in the second half of the 19th century so someone was interested in making lace. I second Mar tha's sources and Brenda's information on" The Laces of Ipswich".

Additionally, the Miss Sybil Carter Indian Lace Association trained Native American women during the later 19th century in, at least, Minnesota, Wisco nsin and Southern California using Belgian linen thread. Their product so ld to an intermediary who sold it to the fashion industry in New York.

I have an American-made wedding hankie with an exquisite Point de Gaze (a p illow lace) border. It dates to the last quarter 19th century and came to me with three of the corners finished and on the hankie and the fourth corn er finished but unattached. The woman who designed the US Postal Service l ace stamps, a member of the International Old Lacers, finished it for me.

Several of the pre-1850 female schools I studied in conjunction with the Oh io Schoolgirl sampler documentation advertised that they taught "lace-makin g" and "netting". Mrs. William advertised in the Western Star, Lebanon, Oh io, in 1830 ..."Young Ladies (not daily pupils) desirous to learn Ornamenta l Work, Marking, also Lace and Worsted Works, can attend on Wednesday when they will receive instruction in those branches. $1.25 per quarter"... If it was being taught in Ohio, it was being taught earlier on the east coast. Many early samplers have lace borders designed to fit the specific size o f the piece, not pieced from something they could have purchased from Engla nd. One mourning sampler (circa 1818) I documented shows three females wit h elaborate lace-made gowns. It was certainly US-made, probably in a Kentu cky female academy by antecedents of Ohio governor Thomas Corwin. And, the re are many extant American-made lace samplers showing the various forms of lace-making.

We all know about lace edges on crazy quilts (and some earlier silk quilts I've seen). Some of the reports I've read about those designate the crazy -quilt-maker also as the lace-maker. I haven't studied these enough to com ment further.

I think lace-making was alive and well in the US. As Linda Eaton stated, i t has been under-studied. There is currently a revival in lace-making in t he US so I suspect that will change. Our local lace guild teaches more tha n tatting.

I'll post photos of the hankie and the mourning sampler.

Jan Thomas On a side note to Gail Bakkom: a few of the schools I studied in Ohio state that they taught Candlewick. I forgot about it until I looked for the lac e information. I'll find the original ads for you.

Regarding lacemaking in America later in the 19th century, what about the influence of published patterns and directions/ instructions in ladies magazines? I'm browsing my tattered copy of Petersen's Magazine January 1888 and there is a hefty chapter devoted to "Lacemaking and Crochet". Pictures show primarily crocheted lace, with many pattern instructions.

What about Godeys, Harpers, Delineator, Ladies Home Journal, etc?

Martha Spark

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 20:09:03 +0100 X-Message-Number: 10

Thanks for all the great information and leads to follow. I now have a year before the next time I will cross paths with this lady in which I can gather my information and consider how I might present it. I do so dislike sweeping generalisations. And people who make them also seem to dislike the 'why/why not' response which springs too easily from my lips.

Thanks

Sally Ward/Tatters

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Subject: Helpful books about lace From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 15:48:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

"Graced by Lace" by Debra S. Bonito, published by Schiffer is also a helpful book to understand the different kinds of lace in fashion, bed linens and t able linens. The book includes a price guide for these of us who are appra isers. Sue Reich

Sent from my iPad

---------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: A monograph on American Lace From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

Thought some might be interested. http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/monographs/cmc_lace.pdf

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: For Don, apology to the list From: Gloria Hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2012 13:05:49 -0800 (AKDT) X-Message-Number: 15

Don's server rejected my email address.

I thought I had more WW magazines, but my stash is heavy on Home Arts. I don't have a 32 issue.

I did look in my 1931 catalog The Patchwork Book by the Women's World Service Library and did not see any baskets with that label.

Gloria

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Subject: Baltimore Album Milky Way Tin, 1997 From: sgmunseycomcast.net

I store embroider floss in my tin - need a bigger one for a button box

The tin was a Milky Way promo for Christmas. My sister bought 3 - kept one and gave me and her twin the others. I think I gave away the Milky Way bars because I am allergic to some of the ingredients. But th e box is great No other info.

Sandra on Cape Cod ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Lacemaking in America? From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Sun, 05 Aug 2012 16:03:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 18

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------090007070600090600020402 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1; formatflowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Lace making did NOT stop in Europe. It could also be argued that it did not begin in Europe, either. South Americans practiced a twining lace technique four thousand years ago. For a Yale publication called /American Lace and Lace-makers/ (1924), see: http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books/ven_lace_1.pdf

However, lace as we generally think of it--the bobbin or needle lace techniques, did indeed start in Europe in the early 16th century.

If you look at 17th-and 18th-century portraits of colonial Americans, you will see that they wore lots of lace and that the idea of the dour Puritan in drab clothes is a myth. For example, see the portraits of John Freake and Elizabeth Freake with Baby Mary (a Boston family): http://www.worcesterart.org/Collection/American/1963.134.html http://www.worcesterart.org/Collection/American/1963.135.html

And finally, Ipswich, Massachusetts, had a thriving bobbin lace industry from the mid-18th century to the mid-19th century. See: Marta Cotterell Raffel, /The Laces of Ispwich/ (Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 2003).

All best, Lynne

> Talking yesterday to an expert lacemaker at a UK show, I was given a full run down of the sources of different lace techniques, from across Europe, and how they came to different areas of the UK at different times 'as people moved to escape oppression'. She concluded with ' ....and here it stopped. It never went to America'.

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: "Janet O'Dell" <seamstress6139bigpond.com> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 08:18:40 +1000 X-Message-Number: 19

Thank you Polly, I have learned a new word today 'frroofy' - what a delightful adjective ;-)

There is an Australian Lace Guild and a Lace Study Centre at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney. I was born in the county of Bedfordshire in England where there is a strong lace making tradition, so while I am not a lace maker I am interested in the craft. http://www.make-lace-with-us.com/bedfordshire-lace.html

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Re: Lacemaking in America? From: kittylovesbluehotmail.com Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 06:59:48 -0500 X-Message-Number: 20

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In Britain machines invented in the first quarter of the 19th century nearly destroyed the lace-making industry by the 1840s. Women could purchase machine-made imitations of handmade pattern laces for a fraction of the price. The cottage lace industry continued for the rest of the century but by 1907 handmade lace was a rare luxury item. Perhaps this was also characteristic of the United States?

Kitty Ledbetter kittylovesbluehotmail.com

--_805e1b4d-3c96-4236-a65e-1718f56e1cb4_--

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Subject: lacemaking in America From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2012 07:59:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 21

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------070505030904050205080805 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1; formatflowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I sent an answer to this question yesterday afternoon, but it hasn't popped up yet, so I'll try again.

Lace making did NOT stop in Europe. It could also be argued that it did not begin in Europe, either. South Americans practiced a twining lace technique four thousand years ago. For a Yale publication called /American Lace and Lace-makers/ (1924), see: http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books/ven_lace_1.pdf

However, lace as we generally think of it--the bobbin or needle lace techniques, did indeed start in Europe in the early 16th century.

If you look at 17th-and 18th-century portraits of colonial Americans, you will see that they wore lots of lace and that the idea of the dour Puritan in drab clothes is a myth. For example, see the portraits of John Freake and Elizabeth Freake with Baby Mary (a Boston family): http://www.worcesterart.org/Collection/American/1963.134.html http://www.worcesterart.org/Collection/American/1963.135.html

And finally, Ipswich, Massachusetts, had a thriving bobbin lace industry from the mid-18th century to the mid-19th century. See: Marta Cotterell Raffel, /The Laces of Ispwich/ (Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 2003).

All best, Lynne

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Subject: RE: Lacemaking in America? From: pollymellocomcast.net

Janet,

I got to many "r"s in froofy. A fun word.http://www.urbandictionary.c om/define.php?term3Dfroofy

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: Lacemaking in America? From: textiqueaol.com

Kitty, I'm sure they effected the lace industry around the world. Pat Earn shaw wrote a wonderful book, pub. in 1986, titled "Lace Machines and Machin e Laces". She follows their development from the middle-1500s to today. They were so well done that many look like hand-made lace until you start f ollowing the threads. Examples of 'some' machined laces cost more to colle ct than certain hand-made laces. There is a third class that has a machine d ground with hand-work over-layed.

I have never seen a 'burnt lace' that looks good, although some from the la te 19th and early 20th look passable. And, in my opinion. the ones coming out of China are looking even cheaper.

Jan Thomas Colorado

In Britain machines invented in the first quarter of the 19th century nearl y destroyed the lace-making industry by the 1840s. Women could purchase machine-made imitations of handmade pattern laces for a fraction of the pri ce. The cottage lace industry continued for the rest of the century, but by 190 7 handmade lace was a rare luxury item. Perhaps this was also characteristic of the United States?

Kitty Ledbetter kittylovesbluehotmail.com

----------MB_8CF42422C2B53DF_13C8_28F27_webmail-d094.sysops.aol.com--

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Subject: quilt making in Moline, IL From: litwinow62msn.com Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 09:51:02 -0500

Hi, There is a Belgium Lacemaking group that meets the first Saturday of every month at the Center of Belgian Culture in Moline, IL. Catherine Litwinow IA where some places got rain on Saturday. ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 05, 2012 From: gebelearthlink.net Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 10:12:09 -0700 X-Message-Number: 25

Lacemaking in America?

The Lacis Museum of Lace & Textiles in Berkeley CA may have some information on the arrival of lace in the United States.

Carol

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Subject: Album tin From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net>

Bonnie Browning of AQS shared this label on the bottom of her tin:

Milky Way "Baltimore Album Quilt" Limited Edition Canister 1997

This limited edition canister celebrates the making of classic appliqued quilts during the mid-nineteenth century in America. The Baltimore Album appliqued quilts were known for their decorative Victorian design style.

Each pattern in the quilt was symbolic. The corner pattern on this canister is "fleur de lis," representing Light, Life, and Power.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: OT-froofy From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 18:36:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 27

OK, I looked this one up in a legitimate dictionary after looking at Urban dictionary. didn't turn up in dictionary.com!

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Subject: Fw: Lacemaking in America? From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net> Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2012 23:27:01 -0400 X-Message-Number: 28

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I asked a friend of mine (who is a lace maker) to reply to the bobbin lace question and below is her response. I have forwarded it because she mentioned additional resources that I have not been brought up before. I am very fortunate to have a lace teacher who has gone to Europe as well as California to teach in our area. I also have to add, that in the book Keeping House, an advertisement is included for a boarding day school for young ladies. On November 11, 1786 the following were taught in western Pa: plain work, coloured ditto, flowering, lace, both by the bobin and needles, fringing, dresden, tabouring and embroidery.

Brenda Applegate (who is not a good lace maker)

Hi

Since I don't have Sally's email address, please pass this info along to her and the Quilt History List...

Talking yesterday to an expert lacemaker at a UK show, I was given a full run down of the sources of different lace techniques, from across Europe, and how they came to different areas of the UK at different times 'as people moved to escape oppression'. She concluded with ' ....and here it stopped. It never went to America'.

My question is, is that the case, and if so, can we draw any conclusions as to why it didn't travel in the same way as quiltmaking techniques?

Before I begin, a disclaimer... I'm not an expert on the subject, nor have I researched this question thoroughly. I'll also add that I'm addressing only one form of lacemaking: bobbin lace. There are many, many other lacemaking techniques including tatting & needlelace (knotted laces), knitted, crocheted, & hairpin laces (looped laces), and cousins like drawnwork and cutwork to name a few. Additionally, many of these hand-made techniques have been more or less successfully replicated in machine-made lace.

Honestly, I don't know if we can ever definitively answer the question of why bobbin lacemaking didn't jump the pond. At best, we can only make educated guesses. Now, on to my best guess and a little more info about bobbin lacemaking in America.

I would argue that quiltmaking traveled to the US from Europe because of its practicality. In addition to being a lovely art form, the end product is warm and useful. Quilting a blanket not only adds visual interest, it also increases the thermal capacity by adding layers and little pockets where warm air can reside.

Lace, on the other hand, is purely decorative. As pretty as it may be, it is not useful or functional in the least. There would really be no reason to spend so much valuable time and effort making a product that could easily be imported. Because lace is both small and light, it does not contribute significantly to a ship's cargo, so it wasn't a hardship to send. Also, the US population was comparatively small. We had neither surplus workers to make lace nor a sufficient market for it. It is not that Americans didn't wear lace; they did, but it was imported from Europe. Again, this rationale is all speculation on my part and just one hypothesis.

To learn more about lace in colonial America, I recommend "The Availability of Lace in the Chesapeake Region of Colonial British America, 1607-1790," a dissertation by Joyce Marie Camacho (University of Maryland College Park, 1992). Unfortunately, it's a little hard to come by. For a list of libraries that have copies, see http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/29240722 . It is also available for members to borrow from the International Old Lacers Inc. (http://www.internationaloldlacers.org) or for sale from UMI Dissertation Express (http://disexpress.umi.com/dxweb).

There was one commercial bobbin lacemaking endeavor in America in Ipswich, Massachusetts from 1750-1840. As relations with England cooled, patriotic Americans decided to decrease their reliance on importing lace from abroad and take matters into their own hands. You can read the interesting story in the book "The Laces of Ipswich: The Art and Economics of an Early American Industry, 1750-1840" by Marta Cotterell Raffel (now Marta Sprout). I believe the book is out of print, but it's available used for $8 or so. There is a superb little three-minute video by the author at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v3DpSFnXP76Mus

In the late 19th century, Sybil Carter, an Episcopalian missionary, founded a lace school for Ojibwa women at the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota. In time, with the help of other missionaries, she expanded operations to reservations from New York to California. Finished lace was sent to the Sybil Carter Indian Lace Association shop in New York where it was sold and profits were returned to the reservations. The Association ceased operation in 1926. For some nifty photos, visit http://wisconsinobject.wordpress.com/2011/03/17/now-online-lace-from-onei da-nation-museum/ Michelle Chase discussed this and much more in her paper "American Lace," available online at http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/monographs/cmc_lace.pdf

In 1901, Sylvester G. Lewis founded the Torchon Lace Company. By 1903, he patented the Princess Lace Machine which he sold to American women on the premise that they could make lace at home and sell it to the company for cents on the yard. It is doubtful that this early "make money from home" scheme was profitable for many, if any, who bought into it. Much of the lace illustrated in accompanying advertising absolutely could not have been manufactured on the Princess, a crude roller pillow. Likewise, the instructional booklets that accompanied it were positively byzantine. For an article on the Princess Machine, visit http://www.spurlock.illinois.edu/explorations/online/whyknot/images/princ ess.pdf

Despite being supplanted by machine-made lace beginning in the 1830s and being subject to the whims of fashion, a small population of enthusiasts maintained an interest in bobbin lacemaking. The Needle and Bobbin Club existed from 1916 until 1989 or so, and archives of its bulletin are available at http://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/articles165.html

Today, the largest US organization for bobbin lacemaking is the International Old Lacers Inc. (IOLI) with over 70 chapters across the country. Even though there isn't a strong historical precedent in America, the art still attracts the interest of women and men who enjoy a challenging, unique fiber art.

-Regina Hart (ReginaHartgmail.com)