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Subject: Books for sale From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Sat, 18 Aug 2012 12:55:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

My Guild, the Courthouse Quilters has asked me to sell a number of books for them. These were donated to them by a former member who is no longer quilting. Many of them are very sought after and bring high prices. I'll be listing them this afternoon on Ebay. There are 3 by Ellie Sienkiewicz and 2 of the Texas books.

I am "judiostudio" on Ebay.

Judy Grow

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Subject: Morgaine Le Fay Antique Textiles From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net> Date: Sat, 18 Aug 2012 14:08:48 -0500 X-

I just thought I would throw out a source I came across while watching "The Bronson Pitchet Project" on the DIY channel. He restores old houses. If you have a chance to see him, please watch.

Most of you probably know of it already..... Morgaine Le Fay Textiles http://morgaine-le-fay.co.uk/?page_id=3D106

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Subject: show "alert" From: Linda Heminway <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2012 07:46:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Just thought I would post a reminder to those of you who are in New England that the Mancuso quilt show is in Manchester NH at the Raddison for this weekend. I was there yesterday and thought it was a very nice show. In particular, there have been a series of quilts done to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the war of 1812, I really enjoyed that part as I am quite into historical and commemorative quilts.

http://www.quiltfest.com/activities.asp?id=3D18

Some of the vendors have some lovely things as well, I could have spent lots more than I did=8Awhat fun!

It's there until Sunday. Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Ladies Art Company From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2012 11:23:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi, all. I am thinking again about this catalog and am wondering if someone could point me in the right direction for historical info and maybe even a complete catalog listing. I have a few of the reprinted (photocopied) versions, but not sure if they are complete. I got to thinking because I pulled out my Royal Star quilt for my blog posting today and I remembered I got the block from either Barbara B's block book or some other reference (this was in 2002, I think). It is LAC block #462, first published in 1922.

My quilt was made from Fossil Ferns (yes, they are still around) and black background. Very contemporary, but of course, timeless because I used such an awesome block. I've always wanted to redraft the LAC blocks (as I did the KC Star blocks), but life and work gets in the way. I could settle on some good historical reading in the meantime.

Thanks for any help! Debby

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Subject: QNM DONATION From: Barbara Gee <barbara254aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Aug 2012 09:03:43 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I would like to donate my collection of QUILTERS NEWSLETTER MAGAZINES to a museum, university, library, or other nonprofit quilt study group.

There are 391 issues dating from November, 1970, #13 to December/January 2011, #419.

The issues are in order and only a few in the sequence are missing. They are in good condition. In addition, there are about 120 duplicates of some ofthese issues.

These magazines comprise an excellent retrospective look at the resurgence of interest in quilts in the 1970's. What an evolution there has been! Theywould be a wonderful addition to a quilt history archive.

If your organization can use these, please accept all of them and sell or give away those you don't need. Also, please pay for shipping, the cost of which can be calculated once I know your ZIP code. They can also be picked up in Monterey, California.

Please contact me at <barbara254aol.com> with your interest or for more information.

> >

--Apple-Mail-7--393876560--

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Subject: In honor of the MidWest Quilt Study Group "Centennial Quilt" From: suereichcharter.net Date: Thu, 16 Aug 2012

This posting is in honor of the great Quilt Study Day I attended last weekend in Ohio, hosted by the Mid-West Quilt Study Group. The event showcased quilts of the 1870s. The day was most informative and enjoyable. I always love traveling back to Ohio, the state were I was married and all my babies were born.

This interesting article is only half of what appears in the paper. The rest goes on to explain an exhibit from the women of Florida and comments alluding to the reasons the cotton states did not participate in the Centennial. My problem with posting it in its entirety here, is the length and the inclusion of a racial slur appropriate in newsprint in 1876 but not appropriate but today's standards. I hate revisionist history, so if anyone would link me to send the link to the whole article, please email me privately. Sue

The Constitution Atlanta, Georgia June 9, 1876 Page 1

THE CENTENNIAL Some Work Shown There by Women of the South . Cor. of the N.Y. Times. It has been a matter of universal re- gret that the southern states have taken so little interest in the centennial exhi- bition. None of them are properly represented here, and one or two of them would have given no evidence of their existence were it not for the he- roic efforts of a few noble women. This is notably the case with Alabama. For a long time here legislature talked about the matter, and then decided to make no appropriation. It seemed as if the "land of rest" would send no token to the world's fair, when a brave little woman, in op- posing public sentiment and daring public criticism, and what that is only those, who have lived in the south can know. Relieved that she at least would display her handwork at the centenni- al exhibition of her country. She made a quilt, which now occupies a place of honor in the woman's pavilion; and it deserves the distinction it received not only because of the peculiar cir- cumstance under which it was made, but because of its real merit and beau- ty. It is intended for a double bed and is composed of white and rose-colored satin. On the white ground are embroidered 1,500 roses and rosebuds, in each of which there are five to nine hundred stitches. Seven thousand skeins of silk were used in the work, and the lady has been almost constantly engaged upon it during the past eighteen months.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut

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Subject: Antique yo yo quilt rescued From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2012 08:17:10 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi, all. My daughter and I breathed new life into an antique yo yo quilt. Some of you may not be happy with how we preserved it, but honestly, it was the best we could do. But I really do think that how we did it will give others an idea on how to bring theirs out into the open. I did not desecrate it, honest! It is truly beautiful and you can see the picture on my blog. I don't know how to post on the QHL board, and anyway, there's a little story about it to accompany the picture.

My blog address is below. If others have done similar things or just would like to share about their yo yo quilts, I know my daughter Audrey (and me, of course) would love to know about and see them.

Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil Blog: http://debbykratovilquilts.blogspot.com/ Quilting Programs & Workshops www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: Lowell Quilt Shows From: Judy Knorr <jknorroptonline.net> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2012 08:28:09 -0400 X-

I was excited to be able to attend the quilt show in Lowell last Saturday. I was also able to view the displays at both the New England Quilt Museum and the Museum of American Textiles. What a wonderful treat. The special exhibits at each museum were very different but the display of quilts was truly a treat. Enjoyed seeing the progression of quilt design over the 25 years NEQM has been with us and loved getting to see Teddy Pruent's quilt which I had never seen in person! Loved it Teddy! The Civil War display was amazing in its depth and variety. In addition to the quilts (which were a special treat) it was so interesting to consider the role that textiles played in the Civil War. Well done! Judy Knorr

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Subject: Re: Antique yo yo quilt rescued From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2012 15:45:49 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I think it's lovely!! Lonnie Schlough www.fixquilts.com

Hi, all. My daughter and I breathed new life into an antique yo yo quilt.

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Subject: RE: Antique yo yo quilt rescued From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larrywgreenhills.net> Date: Tue, 14 Aug 2012 17:39:08 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I think what you did to that yo yo quilt is lovely. No Hate here. Sherrie Wohlgemuth Missouri

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Subject: Potholder Quilt-Lincoln From: Lynn <lynnquiltaol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2012 08:53:34 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CF4769C8DA676C_1618_1C80B8_webmail-d136.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I will be visiting the IQSC in Lincoln Wednesday, August 15. I have recently acquired a magnificent sampler quilt c. 1880 done in the "potholder style". If you are in the Lincoln area and would like to see the quilt I am happy to share. Contact me off list. 

Lynn Miller lynnquiltaol.com http://quilts-vintageandantique.blogspot.com

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: August 12, 2012 From: maureenbooksandoldlace.com Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2012 07:45:28 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I'm so jealous! Judy what a wonderful outing! Maureen in southern oregon ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 

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Subject: Re: question re: Rebecca Kohler quilt From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2012 12:12:06 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Thanks Xenia and Mary Anne -- I'm trying to see if I can get any other info out of the State Museum (I'm muttering to myself, "Good luck with that!") Candace

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Subject: RE: Press photos on ebay - caution From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2012 11:28:39

Permissions about using photos can raise sticky questions for bloggers as well. I have an author friend who ended up owing someonea LOT of money because of using a photo on her blog without getting permission. She assumed a blog is non-profit so she didn't haveto get permission. Wrong. The digital community is raising all kinds of questions like these in regards to copyright and permissions. And even after reading some policies I still don't know if I can use a photo or what I should pay or who. The legaleze can be very confusin. I've hadthese recommended to me:freestockphotos.bizwww.freephoto.comwww.istockphoto.com (not all free)www.public-domain-photos.com Getty Images also has some free photos.

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: Lowell quilt exhibits From: carylschuetzyahoo.com Date: Mon, 13 Aug 2012 09:53:19 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-

Pam and All, We are going to Lowell to see all the quilt exhibits. Wednesday or Thursday. Couldn't get to the New England Quilt Festival this weekend.>I have posted about the Lowell exhibits on my blog: http://aboutquilts.wordpress.com/ It's wonderful that there are so many quilts on view at the same time in Lowell. What a town! Caryl PS Got your and Don's "Civil War Quilts" book; can hardly wait to read it.

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Subject: Monday August 20th quilt study day -- field trip in NJ! From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net> Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2012 01:21:50 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi friends,

Read on and if you plan to come, you must RSVP to me by Saturday, the 18th, but sooner would be better. If you have a friend who would like to attend with you, let me know as well.

I hope you put MONDAY August 20th in your date book, because Pat Lundervold, a member of the Mid- Atlantic Quilt Study Group has done all the leg-work to give us a smashing day at the Monmouth County Historic Association in Freehold, NJ. You will be expected to give a donation of $5.00 to the Association.

Along with Director Bernadette Rogoff, Pat picked about 40 wonderful quilts and tops with some bonus pieces 1770-1900 for us to see. 1770??!!!!! WOW!

There will be 3 tables with a member of the H. A. as scribe for each, so be your most brilliant. We start at 10, and plan to end at 1 PM. Three hours straight through. Lunch will be after the meeting and then another activity is planned ..... read on.

The Monmouth County Historical Association is on Court ST, Freehold NJ. We will park in the Court House lot and walk about 2 blocks toward town. The Asso, faces the statute of Lady Justice. Street parking is limited to two hours. So beware. If anyone absolutely needs handicapped parking there will be 2 spaces that the staff usually uses available to you. Let me know ahead of time to make sure the spot is saved for you.

Bernadette doesn't require gloves to handle quilts, but due to limited restroom facility, gloves or a handwash kit would be helpful. I amy be able to bring a box of those purple gloves left over from our last Regional Quilt Study Day -- if I can find them.

We will return to our cars and continue east on Court St past the MCHA and make a left on Lafayette. Make a right into the parking lot and park close to Main St. We will walk across Main to Federici"s which faces the parking lot (next to Court Jester).

Lunch at Federici"s 1:30 PM. Back room is reserved for our group of 40 plus. No credit cards. Bill by table. Please choose from this menu to facilitate service. Individual Pizza $6.75 plus $1.75 more for meat topping or $1.25 for vege topping Linguini with red or white clam sauce $7.50 Caesar salad $7.75 with chicken $3.00 Hamburger $4.50 with cheese $1.00 more California burger $4.95 $1 more with cheese Sausage and pepper sandwich $4.95 Parmigiana $%.95

Soda $2.75 with 1 refill 18% tip Iced tea $2.95 " " " Coffee or tea $1.95

At 2:30-2:45 PM we will leave for Mouse Creek Quilts. Claire has planned a goody for us , and has a wonderful selection of repro fabrics. To visit her shop, make a left as you exit lot on Lafayette and a right on Sheriff St. Turn right and stay on Main St which crosses Rt 33. Entrance for 9 SOUTH is on the Left. You will pass the entrance to 195 west in about 15 min., and continue another 10 to 15 min on Rt 9 south. We will pass her shop which is in the northbound lane and use the jug handle at Lanes Mill Rd to make a left on Rt 9 north. After you pass the Howell Commons move to the right La. You will see a sign for Locust Rd and Affiliated Foot and Ankle Center. Pull into the parking lot before Locust and park in front or to the sides. If you miss the turn, you can park on Locust and walk back or make a right into the lot.

Please find directions on the internet for Monmouth Co Ct House and/ or MCHA.

http://www.monmouthhistory.org

I hope you can join us and look forward to another great day.

Judy Grow Flemington NJ

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Subject: almost made it... From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2012 07:30:53 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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I was browsing the All People Quilt website, clicked on slide shows: antique quilts. All was fine until I came to this: "The Log Cabin block is attributed to Lincoln=99s run for the presidency, symbolizing therustic home and frontier he came from. The logs of the block are built around colored centers with a variety of meanings--red for the hearth as the center of the cabin, yellow for candles in the cabin windows, andblack to denote safe houses on the Underground Railroad."If you want to check it out, go to: http://www.allpeoplequilt.com/projects-ideas/decorating/traditions-remember_ss6.htmlMary Anne --

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Subject: photos on ebay From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2012 11:13:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Recently I came across on ebay the thousands of photos being sold by the Baltimore Tribune newspaper. The seller name is tribunephotos. Within the search box I put 'quilt' and then went "Whoooo-" This source has *lots* of old quilt photos for sale and some may be historically significant for quilters. There's modern and vintage and back into the 1920s and 30s. Unfortunately I want ALL of them but cannot have so am doing the next best thing: alerting all my friends who love antique quilts that original photos from the history of our craft are on sale. Go get 'em Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: Noank! From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2012 15:26:42 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

The Great Noank QUilt Factory - Lord have mercy that was back in the dark ages. One of the first quilt books I ever had! I was so desperate to know anything about quilts. Don't know that I actually made anything it was probably mostly for inspiration and to validate that it could in fact bedone. We've come a long long way since that book. I'll bet half ofthe list doesn't even know the book. 

Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com

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Subject: The Great Noank Quilt Factory From: Pam Weeks <curatornequiltmuseum.org> Date: Sat, 11 Aug 2012 09:43:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Dear all,

We are the proud repository of the quilt made for the cover of "The Great Noank Quilt Factory" written by Sharon McKain. It will be displayed as part of our exhibition this fall titled "Great Quilts, Great Stories."

Did anyone in this group ever make any of the projects from this book? Dresses? Quilts? Or does anyone have anything in their collection that might have been sourced from this book?

If so, would you please be so kind as to contact me off-list?

Thanks so very much! There's one day left of the Lowell Quilt Festival, a city wide celebration of quilts. And our current exhibition, "Backstitch," is wonderful, too!

Pam Weeks

-- Pamela Weeks Binney Family Curator New England Quilt Museum 603.661.2245 (cell is always best!)

--047d7b33cad0119c4604c6fda7b4--

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Subject: On the road again From: Sarah Hough <dougandsarah1gmail.com> Date: Sat, 11 Aug 2012 10:22:20 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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I am going to be in the Toronto area from Aug 30 thru Sept 9. Anything not-to-miss quilt related? Fortunately, the daughter-by-marriage I am visiting is a quilter.

Thanks

Sarah

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Subject: Re: miniature quilting designs From: "Marilyn M. Withrow" <mmwmarilynquilts.com> Date: Sat, 11 Aug 2012 11:20:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

If I recall correctly, someone on this list was looking for a book of quilting designs for miniatures. I have a booklet with this title, it also says Blocks and Borders. Compiled by Mary Alice Johnson of Castroville, CA. I don't see a date on it. It's small, maybe 5" x 7" and spiral bound. Perhaps 25 pages of little designs. lf you're interested, contact me off list. I'm downsizing my studio and will be selling many books and notions from my studio. Marilyn Withrow, mmwmarilynquilts.com

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Subject: Back Door quilts From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net> Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2012 08:21:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Did you see this quilt on Facebook by Back Door Quilts? Pieces are die cut and fused, "ready to paste and stitch"

--Apple-Mail-18--925596038--

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Subject: Re: question re: Rebecca Kohler quilt From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2012 06:02:26 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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I have the 1992 'first paperback edition' of the Orlofsky book and this quilt is illustrated in color on page 105. It is plate 51 and the caption reads: Cradle Quilt, c. 1832. Appliqued cotton, 43-1/2 x 42". Courtesy Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg. Made by Rebecca Kohler, Pennsylvania.Though the picture is only about 3" square, it is a beautiful quilt for a very lucky little boy.Mary Anne>________________________________> From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net>>Subject: [qhl] Re: question re: Rebecca Kohler quilt> >"Saved forthe People of Pennsylvania," p. 50, says:>>Rebecca Kohler made the delightful original design quilt on the facing page for her son Jacob who was born in 1832. Radiating from a central star are pieced and appliqued blocks of varying sizes. The tulip and whirligig motifs are typically Pennsylvania German. The back of the quilt is an imported green pillar print (see detail), a very expensive fabric popular in the 1820s and 30s. This is a summer spread made without batting or quilting.>>The footnotefollowing says the quilt is pictured on p. 89 of Orlofsky, Quilts in America.>>The quilt itself is catalog 29.35.>>Hope this helps. Nosignature is evident ->>Xenia>>> --844607989-1011669680-1344603746=:11574--

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Subject: Back Door quilts From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net> Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2012 10:19:33 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Please disregard the email about Back Door quilts -- cyber mystery -- my email was sent to the wrong address.

With regrets, Neva Hart

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Subject: National Recovery Act Quilt NRA blue eagle quilts From: Wildemuth Susan <wildemuthsewgmail.com> Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2012 09:12:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I have been and am in the process of researching and documenting National Recovery Administration quilts (Blue Eagle Quilts 1933-1935) in public and private collections. I have documented most of them in public collections. I know about the ones at the FDR museums, the one in West Virginia, the California one, and others in museums scattered throughout the U.S. I know about the newspaper pattern. I have checked both the Quilt Index and the Nebraska Index. What I am looking for now are ones in private hands and possibly in smaller museum collections. I know about the Bauers NRA quilt from up north, the one from the Thomas Woodward book down south, the yo-yo banner, I have one in my collection, but there are others out there. I have documentations (and photos) of quilts that have not surfaced.

Maybe you have one in your private collection, that I have information about?

There is a sub-classification of NRA quilts that are not totally NRA focused, but the symbol was included on the quilt. Think friendship or presentation quilts. I'm documenting those too.

This old URL http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2011/01/1932-friendship-quilt.html is one that I am looking for. Do any of you own this friendship quilt now?

Do any of you have an NRA quilt in your private collection that you would be willing to share information about with me?

You can contact me off list.

Thank you all.

Sue in Illinois

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Subject: Re: National Recovery Act Quilt NRA blue eagle quilts From: michele mclaughlin <mickiemclaug58yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2012 08:08:45 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Susan, I think that one just came up at our local auctions. I wanted to attend but with one son moving and another in the hospital, life just didn't allow it to happen. It looked enough like the eagle that I thought it was similar, why don't you check it out and see? It doesn't have NRA on it but it sure hit me as similar, in a folky kind of way.   Donna Vitale who owns GB Best on Ebay purchased it. The auction was just last Saturday so if it meets your criteria, you may be able to get more information. I hope it can help!  http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Applique-Blue-Birds-Eagles-Scallops-Pennsylvania-Berks-County-/140818724782?pt=3DQuilts&hash=3Ditem20c97337ae

Warmly, Michele McLaughlin Allentown PA

--- On Fri, 8/10/12, Wildemuth Susan <wildemuthsewgmail.com> wrote:

From: Wildemuth Susan <wildemuthsewgmail.com> Subject: [qhl] National Recovery Act Quilt NRA blue eagle quilts To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Date: Friday, August 10, 2012, 10:12 AM

I have been and am in the process of researching and documenting National Recovery Administration quilts (Blue Eagle Quilts 1933-1935) in public and private collections. I have documented most of them in public collections. I know about the ones at the FDR museums, the one in West Virginia, the California one, and others in museums scattered throughout the U.S. I know about the newspaper pattern. I have checked both the Quilt Index and the Nebraska Index. What I am looking for now are ones in private hands and possibly in smaller museum collections. I know about the Bauers NRA quilt from up north, the one from the Thomas Woodward book down south, the yo-yo banner, I have one in my collection, but there are others out there. I have documentations (and photos) of quilts that have not surfaced.

Maybe you have one in your private collection, that I have information about?

There is a sub-classification of NRA quilts that are not totally NRA focused, but the symbol was included on the quilt. Think friendship or presentation quilts. I'm documenting those too.

This old URL http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2011/01/1932-friendship-quilt.html is one that I am looking for. Do any of you own this friendship quilt now?

Do any of you have an NRA quilt in your private collection that you would be willing to share information about with me?

You can contact me off list.

Thank you all.

Sue in Illinois

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mickiemclaug58yahoo.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1839470Slyris.quiltropolis.com

--661806066-623022039-1344611325=:44215--

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Subject: Re: National Recovery Act Quilt NRA blue eagle quilts From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2012 11:35:34 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

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Have you ever contacted the Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, VT. I am a volunteer there (I am a one day a week quilter in their quilt building! I know they have over 500 quilts in their collection and they may be able to help you out some (I know they do have some quilts of the same era you are working on, You may contact them at (802)985-3346 or _www.shelburnemuseum.org_ (http://www.shelburnemuseum.org) . Mitzi Oakes from South Burlington, VT

In a message dated 8/10/2012 10:39:34 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, wildemuthsewgmail.com writes:

I have been and am in the process of researching and documenting National Recovery Administration quilts (Blue Eagle Quilts 1933-1935) in public and private collections. I have documented most of them in public collections. I know about the ones at the FDR museums, the one in West Virginia, the California one, and others in museums scattered throughout the U.S. I know about the newspaper pattern. I have checked both the Quilt Index and the Nebraska Index. What I am looking for now are ones in private hands and possibly in smaller museum collections. I know about the Bauers NRA quilt from up north, the one from the Thomas Woodward book down south, the yo-yo banner, I have one in my collection, but there are others out there. I have documentations (and photos) of quilts that have not surfaced.

Maybe you have one in your private collection, that I have information about?

There is a sub-classification of NRA quilts that are not totally NRA focused, but the symbol was included on the quilt. Think friendship or presentation quilts. I'm documenting those too.

This old URL http://shop.thequiltcomplex.com/2011/01/1932-friendship-quilt.html is one that I am looking for. Do any of you own this friendship quilt now?

Do any of you have an NRA quilt in your private collection that you would be willing to share information about with me?

You can contact me off list.

Thank you all.

Sue in Illinois

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mitzioakesaol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1714905Ilyris.quiltropolis.com

--part1_3d3d9.4dde7e54.3d568445_boundary--

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Subject: RE: National Recovery Act Quilt NRA blue eagle quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2012 20:14:56 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I appraised one years back...I did a quick search and don't see the photo or owner info but will keep looking and get in touch if I find it. jean

Subject: FDR's Postage Stamp Quilt - Indiana Quilter From: kyra hicks <kyra262yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 04:15:24 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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Good morning -

I wanted to share news of my new book, Franklin Roosevelt's Postage Stamp Quilt: The Story of Estella Weaver Nukes' Presidential Gift.=C2=C2 Here is the link:=C2 http://amzn.to/N9aee8

From the backcover: A Saturday morning search of African American newspapers from the 1930s uncovered a startling headline: =9CPresident Roosevelt Gets Present of Novel Quilt Designed By Indiana Woman.=9D Who was this Hoosier quiltmaker? What inspired her to gift the President of the United States with a quilt? What was so =9Cnovel=9D about the bedcovering that Black newspapers across the country carried itsstory? Where is the celebrated quilt today? Follow the surprising pursuit from a WPA Sewing Room in Marion, Indiana to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenuein Washington, DC and even on to England and France.

The bibliography includes references for the research itself as well as a list of books and articles about presidential quilts, quilt patterns, etc.

I hope you enjoy this true story!=C2 Best,=C2 Kyra

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Subject: Scroop From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com> Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 09:04:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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I went to New York to spend a week studying with Rabbit Goody many years back. SHe teaches that scroop is actually the feel of rubbing two layers of silk together in your fingers. Yall know that feel. Not to argue the otherstatements simply to add to the pot.

Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com

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Subject: RE: roommate for Seminar From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu> Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 15:36:22 +0000 X-Message-Number: 3

Judy -- please call me on my cell 608-290-8129 or work 262-472-1580. Hope you haven't cancelled your reservation! Maretta

-----Original Message----- From: Judy Schwender [mailto:sister3603yahoo.com] Sent: Wednesday, August 08, 2012 1:00 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] roommate for Seminar

Hi all, I will be attending the AQSG Seminar in Lincoln, NE this coming October.If you need a roommate for Tuesday night through Sunday night, please email me off list. Thanks! Judy Schwender

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: millermkuww.edu. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1718012Olyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: RE: roommate for Seminar From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu> Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 15:56:12 +0000 X-Message-Number: 4

OOPS! Replied to the wrong email! Sorry...please forgive! Maretta

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: millermkuww.edu. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1718012Olyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: question re: Rebecca Kohler quilt From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 14:10:36 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Dear all: Is there any known history of the Rebecca Kohler quilt in the collection of the PA State Museum? I assume if there is it may be in the Saved for the People of PA book, but I'm not sure if we have a copy and I am killing my budget with books as of late. Does anyone know if the quilt is actually signed, or if it is family history that it was made by Rebecca Leiby Kohler? Thanks, Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: question re: Rebecca Kohler quilt From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 15:03:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

"Saved for the People of Pennsylvania," p. 50, says:

Rebecca Kohler made the delightful original design quilt on the facing page for her son Jacob who was born in 1832. Radiating from a central star are pieced and appliqued blocks of varying sizes. The tulip and whirligig motifs are typically Pennsylvania German. The back of the quilt is an imported green pillar print (see detail), a very expensive fabric popular in the 1820s and 30s. This is a summer spread made without batting or quilting.

The footnote following says the quilt is pictured on p. 89 of Orlofsky, Quilts in America.

The quilt itself is catalog 29.35.

Hope this helps. No signature is evident -

Xenia

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Subject: RE: Weighted Silks From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 23:19:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Lisa- They were weighted to give them the feel and sound of heavier, more expensive silk. The better quality silk was still being made, but the cheaper version was available even to middle class women, and working girls, so there was more of it around. Not all old silks were weighted, and not all have deteriorated.

Kim Textile historian

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Subject: RE: Weighted Silks From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2012 10:42:29 +0100 X-Message-Number: 2

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Hard on the heels of 'froofy' and 'frou-frou', we have 'scroop', the noise made as women walked in the densely gathered silk skirts. Always a favourite of mine.

Sally Ward

> > > They were weighted to give them the feel and sound of heavier, more > expensive silk.

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Subject: roommate for Seminar From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2012 10:59:45 -0700

Hi all,I will be attending the AQSG Seminar in Lincoln, NE this coming October. If you need a roommate for Tuesday night through Sunday night, please email me off list.Thanks!Judy Schwender --473274965-619548776-1344448785=:81076--

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Subject: Dresden lace From: Laurel Horton <laurelkalmiaresearch.net> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2012 10:13:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Hi Lisa,

I'm impressed and intrigued with your experience with lacemaking. I'm particularly interested in Dresden work appearing in white embroidered counterpanes. I have seen a half-dozen examples dating from the early nineteenth century, most of them from Kentucky (or South Carolina). I know very little about this kind of work, but I understand it was popular in the eighteenth century in Europe. I'm compiling information on female academies and needlework instructors active in Kentucky before about 1820. I'm looking for possible connections among the makers of the surviving examples I've seen. though they lived in different parts of the state, they may have attended the same boarding school or learned from individuals who received the same training.

The Museum of Early Decorative Arts (MESDA) owns what I consider the most elegant example of an embroidered counterpane with Dresden work, made by one or more of the daughters of Amelia Chenoweth Nash. An image is available on the MESDA website.

Anyway, I just thought I would let you--and others--know of my interest, just in case you come across any information about the technique or its practitioners in the early nineteenth century.

Laurel Horton Seneca SC

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Subject: Amish quilt book author dies From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2012 15:03:49 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

This man is the art critic who wrote the big book on the Esprit Amish quiltcollection. I wonder if among the works of his that will be noted in any obituary there will be a mention of this beautiful book we all treasure?!

In Memoriam: Robert Hughes, Australian art critic, writer, 74

Written by AFP Wire Service

Tuesday, 07 August 2012 08:30

SYDNEY (AFP)  Influential Australian art critic, historian and writer Robert Hughes has died in New York after a long illness, his family said Tuesday. He was 74. Hughes, whom the New York Times once proclaimed the world's most famous artcritic, died at the Calvary Hospital in the Bronx on Monday. "He had been very ill for some time," said a statement from his wife, DorisDownes, who was with him when he died, without giving further details. His niece Lucy Turnbull, married to high-profile Australian politician Malcolm Turnbull, said her uncle was a "real man's man=94he was a hunter,shooter and a fisher." "(He had) a lifelong sense of curiosity and always wanting to know more about the world," she told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, adding that he worked with fervor on anything he put his mind to. Prime Minister Julia Gillard said Hughes would be "very, very sorely missed." "Robert Hughes was one of our finest voices," she said. Born in Sydney in 1938, Hughes studied arts and architecture at Sydney University. He left Australia for Britain in the early 1960s, writing for publications such as The Times and The Observer before landing a position as art critic for Time magazine in 1970, where he made his name. Outspoken and sometimes abrasive, he went on to write The Art of Australia,a comprehensive review of Australian painting from settlement to the 1960s, which is still considered an important work. Hughes further established himself with his 1980 BBC The Shock of the New television series and book, which has been widely hailed as one of the most provocative accounts of the development of modern art ever written. In 1987 he published international best-seller The Fatal Shore, which examined the harsh life of convicts during the early European settlement of Australia, a work Time called "a staggering achievement." "I think that the work that he had to undertake to do the research to writeThe Fatal Shore was extraordinary and he applied that sort of knowledge and expertise and passion to whatever task he put himself to," Turnbull said. While in his homeland in 1999, Hughes had a head-on car crash that nearly claimed his life and Turnbull said he never fully recovered. "It was a life-changing event ... and climbing out of that experience was avery, very hard one, and one that was possibly never fully achieved," she said. He also had to deal with his only son, Danton, committing suicide aged 34. Despite living overseas for more than 50 years, Hughes never relinquished his citizenship and became a prominent supporter of Australia's republican movement. John McDonald, art critic at the Sydney Morning Herald, said Turnbull helped put his homeland on the map. "People knew Australia often through Robert Hughes ... but his way of life,his turn of phrase, his interests were things which transcended Australia," he wrote in the newspaper. "We'll look at Bob Hughes. We'll look at the stuff that he's written. We'llalways go back and say he was a truly great writer and somebody who, in the ranks of art critics, I think of all time, will rank very, very high."

Read more: http://acn.liveauctioneers.com/index.php/features/people/7872?utm_source=3Dfeedburner&utm_medium=3Demail&utm_campaign=3DFeed%3A+ACNlatestnews+%28Auction+Central+News+-+Latest+News%29&utm_content=3DYahoo%21+Mail#ixzz22zimeZN6 Laura Fisher at FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street 5th floor New York, NY 10065

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --1287737115-702118433-1344463429=:13208--

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Subject: weighted silk From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2012 18:49:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Lisa, I did a research paper on silks in grad school and as I recall none of my readings indicated that silks were weighted to treat for insects. According to the sources I consulted and cited, weighting was done by soaking the filaments in metallic salt solutions to increase their weight because silk was sold by weight and because the import market in the west liked the sound silks and taffetas make when the wearer moves (as in walks). It's called "scroup" and it's that lovely rustle or whispery sound you will hear when the fabric brushes something or moves. Weighting increased that sound. The practice was outlawed around the turn of the nineteenth century, if I remember correctly. It's those metallic salts that cause silks to break and shatter. You may have noticed that some early 19th century silks seem to have weathered time a little better. That's because they were probably produced before weighting became standard practice. Someone else on this list probably can provide more information, especially regarding dates when weighting was practiced. It's been a long time since I wrote that report and the final copy was not returned to me, so referring back to it is a bit problematic.

Hope this helps.

Kathy More

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Subject: re American laces From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 1:57:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I've been interested in the discussion of American laces. I had the good fortune to inherit some fine laces and linens that incorporate European or Anglo laces,and I've always read about laces and lusted after certain varieties.

Fine lacemaking is learned in childhood and practiced, practiced, practiced. The U.S. has always leaned in the direction of the easily mastered, the quickly turned out craft, "quickly" being a relative term. We are an impatient people and have always been on the move. The fine European laces seem almost incongruous with the American mind.

But as Rose Wilder Lane reminded her readers, we DO have laces that are identified with America in other parts of the world. Consider crochet, for instance. Wilder tells of being in a museum in northern Europe and spying a piece of crochet. When she asked the guide to identify it, the woman said, "That is our example of American lace."

Think of it: there might be another Ipswich out there, but is there a style of lace so typical of the work done there that it is associated with the place?

We might turn up corners of bobbin and even tape lace made in America, but that does not make it "American lace" in style. What I've seen, the work seems to have been highly imitative, not inventive and idiosyncratic. There is no American style, no lace named for an American town or region that I know of. Consider quilts, on the other hand, and how freely makers combined traditional designs to distinguish their quilts and themselves, what inventive pattern makers American quiltmakers have been..

Lynn, I was happy to see you mention the heavy laces worn by the Puritans. The American notion of who the Puritans were was first warped in elementary school history classes that stereotyped them and then crushed by Arthur Miller ("The Crucible"). Most were part of the rising middle class that partly defined itself through consumerism---and the fine laces of Europe and the British Isles were highly prized. Their purchase would have been well within the means of most members of this group.

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: OT-froofy From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 10:42:32 +0100 X-Message-Number: 2

Admittedly it is not in my paper Oxford English Dictionary either, but 'frou-frou' ('frills or other ornamentation particularly of women's clothing, from French imitative of the sound of a woman waling in a dress' ) is, and I'd be willing to bet that is its derivation.

Sally Ward

On 7 Aug 2012, at 00:36, Marcia's Mail wrote:

> OK, I looked this one up in a legitimate dictionary after looking at Urban dictionary. didn't turn up in dictionary.com!

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Subject: Re: OT-froofy From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 10:45:49 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

Many women might have waled in their dresses, but of course my fingers meant walking!

Sally Ward O > Admittedly it is not in my paper Oxford English Dictionary either, but 'frou-frou' ('frills or other ornamentation particularly of women's clothing, from French imitative of the sound of a woman waling in a dress' )

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Subject: argh!!! From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Mon, 06 Aug 2012 19:49:08 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

I don't know why my posts show up one or two days late to the list. Sorry about the redundant information about lace making in America. Clearly, the question had already been answered.

All best, Lynne

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Subject: Re: OT-froofy From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 07:46:04 -0700 X-Message-Number: 5

I subscribe to A Word A Day. Today, the word was froufrou. See it here: http://wordsmith.org/words/froufrou.html

Christine on an island in the California Delta http://winnowings.blogspot.com <-- my blog and http://www.threshpublications.com <-- spinning

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Subject: eboard and Gaye From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 18:58:19 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

I finally posted the photos of my Point de Gaze hankie, one of the lace gowns on the Corwin Mourning Sampler and a reticule for Gaye. Since she loveslace as much as I do, she'll understand why it wanted to live with me. All three under 'general'.

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Lacemaking in America From: Quilltraol.com Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 20:04:38 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

It's been several days since I sent messages, and they haven't shown up, so I'm going to resend them.

I'm not at the level of knowledge of the others on here, so I don't talk much, but I might be able to contribute to this. I have been making lace for about 25 years. I've made Bobbin Lace, Carrickmacross, and am currently learning Dresden Lace, which I can say without reservation is making me tear my hair out. When I started in the 80's lacing was quite big here, with an International Group, and the Great Lakes Lace Group. There are now several local lace groups that meet here in town.

In 1987, our own Mary McPeek finally achieved her dream of getting the US Post Office to issue Lacemaking stamps, and my friend Leslie made one of the four designs used. She was the first certified Lace teacher here,and I think she knows almost every type of bobbin lace. as well as Carrickmacross.

Although the rust proof pin idea makes sense, I have seen lace pillows in France with some very rusty pins, so I'm not sure that's the main reason. I find it interesting how lace traveled from country to country, each devising their own techniques to imitate the "look" of another countries lace, so surely it didn't have to "come" to America. Couldn't we have done as other countries did, and devised our own methods? I wonder if, since commerce drove the lace market, there simply wasn't the commercial market for it here as there was in the royalty of European countries. I'm finding it hard to imagine how anyone could make this Dresden lace fast enough to make money at it, although by looking at Embroidered With White, by Heather Toomer, I can see that they did! And much more intricate than what I'm doing. I can't imagine how they managed to count the threads in fine cloth without an Ott Lite. I think this is the only type of stitching I've ripped out more than I've put in!

I love this discussion. Thanks Sally.

Lisa _http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/)

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Subject: Weighted Silks From: Quilltraol.com Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 20:06:00 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 8

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The West Michigan Quilt History Study Group is doing an exhibit of Victorian Quilts for our Biennial Quilts On the Grand show coming up in October. I am doing all the materials for it. I always though that the silks were weighted to make them weigh more, and therefore command more money, but I recently attended a lecture that put forth the theory that they were actually treated to prevent insect infestation. Does anyone on here have any information on this topic, or know where I could obtain some? Thanks,

Lisa

_http://quilltr.blogspot.com_ (http://quilltr.blogspot.com/)

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Subject: Seattle WA quilts From: Kennalee <kennaleemaol.com> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 20:19:45 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 9

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Hi - I will be traveling in the Seattle area from Aug 18 to Sept 1, visiting the quilt show in Tacoma on the 24th and the Whatcom museum for Julie Silber's exhibition. What else should I see there? Thanks Kennalee