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Subject: two old magazines From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Tue, 4 Sep 2012 10:51:39 -0700 (

Hi everyone. Looking for two old magazines that have patterns of interest to meNeedlecraft Supply Magazine, No. 59, c.1930 The pattern is Mrs. Smith's Favorite--wondering if it is Mrs. Al Smith.Happy Hours Magazine, c. 1900. The pattern is Mrs. Taft's Choice.If any of you have information on these two patterns, would appreciate the help.best, Don

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Subject: Re: looking for a quilt pattern book From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2012 14:36:48 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi, Peg - "Colonial Quilts" is such a generic name for a catalog - but Hubert Ver Mehren of Des Moines did published a booklet by that name, in several editions, and very often they were distributed through other sources who stamped their name and address on the back. I have 3, all from different sources.

Might that be the catalog you are looking for?

Xenia

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Subject: Re: looking for a quilt pattern book From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net> Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2012 15:15:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks, Xenia - that's it or at least one version is! I was searching on behalf of a friend. She found several clippings in her aunt's attic from the 1930s Wheeling WV News and was curious about them. Each one referred to the Colonial Quilt booklet which was available from Needlearts on Paulina St.

Merikay directed me to the Quilt Index to see if scanned copies were available under ephemera and there are! What a gold mine of information and a treasure trove of pattern history!

Thanks for the help,

Peg

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Subject: looking for a quilt pattern book From: "Peg Bingham" <pegbinghamatt.net> Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2012 14:26:41 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi, all - does anyone have a copy of "Colonial Quilt Book" published in the 30s by the Needlearts Co. of Paulina St. in Chicago? It is described as "32 pages, showing over 200 of the most popular designs in lovely color combinations." If you have any information, please contact me! Thanks, Peg

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Subject: Packwood House Museum From: Lynn <lynnquiltaol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2012 15:15:48 -0400 (EDT)

I highly recommend seeing the quilt exhibit at the Packwood House Museum in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. The quilt exhibit is on until October 13, 2012 and is well worth your time.Living in the west I don't get much exposure to Pennsylvania quilts. This exhibit and additional material I purchased especially the DVD really gave me a new appreciation for quilts of this region. Thank you to any and allthat are involved. I feel very fortunate that our travels this year took me to Pennsylvania.

 

Lynn Miller http://quilts-vintageandantique.blogspot.com https://www.facebook.com/groups/quiltsvintageandantique

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Subject: Re: embroidery question for across the pond From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 17:15:22 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

Well Candace, I have referred the question to my embroiderer friend, but meantime I had a quick google and guess what I found. (relevant note: I live in Leeds)

http://www.visitleeds.co.uk/things-to-do/Leeds-Fulneck-Moravian-Museum/details/?dms=3D13&venue=3D1580766

So I think I have to go take a look, don't you? <G>

Out of interest, what *does* Moravian embroidery mean to you?

Sally

> I am doing some work on PA German needlework and I found a mention of what > Moravian embroidery meant in England - specifically that it is some sort of > whitework on what we colonists call muslin.

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Subject: World War I quilt exhibit From: suereichcharter.net Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 11:53:41 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

 

2014-2018 are the One Hundredth Commemorative Years of "The Great War". I have a small but very nice collection and presentation of World War I quilts available on a first come basis. The exhibit is titled "At the Eleventh Hour of the Eleventh Day of the Eleventh Month: Quilts from the World War I Years." Please contact me if you are interested in an exhibit or presentation. Thanks,

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: Re: embroidery question for across the pond From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 12:40:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Sally -- Wow, that's tantalizing isn't it? PLEASE take a look -- I think this will probably be Anglo-Moravian vs. German-Moravian, but I am still intrigued!

PA Moravian embroidery that was taught in their schools is surface silk embroidery which I consider to be more academic and sophisticated than our rural Pennsylvania German girls' cross stitch. Here's link to a PA Antiques dealer's website: http://www.hlchalfant.com/products/bethlehem-moravian-seminary-silk

Trish Herr wrote a wonderful book on the subject called The Ornamental Branches, specifically about the embroidery by the students in the Moravian school at Lititz, in Lancaster County, PA.

Candace

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Subject: Re: World War I quilt exhibit From: Mitzioakesaol.com Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 13:43:05 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

 

Sue - just read your email concerning your WW1 quilts. Our guild (Champlain Valley Quilters of Vermont) might be interested and also the Shelburne Museum of Shelburne, VT might show some interest (I am a volunteer there in the building that shows quilts with a new theme every season. I can get numbers to you if you need. Mitzi Oakes So. Burlington, VT

In a message dated 8/28/2012 12:30:51 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, suereichcharter.net writes:

2014-2018 are the One Hundredth Commemorative Years of "The Great War". I have a small but very nice collection and presentation of World War I quilts available on a first come basis. The exhibit is titled "At the Eleventh Hour of the Eleventh Day of the Eleventh Month: Quilts from the World War I Years." Please contact me if you are interested in an exhibit or presentation. Thanks,

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: Re: embroidery question for across the pond From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 19:32:49 +0100 X-Message-Number: 7

My friends writes:

<<Moravian work embroidery of Moravia (Czechoslovakia region =96 not sure where it is now) - Geometric satin stitch as well as chain and stem stitch Lace making and tambour work produced in Ireland by the Moravian Protestant sect who fled in the C18 work done by the Moravian sisters who fled to Bethlehem Pennsylvania in the 1740s. They established a school and taught to high standard =91floralembroideries in silks, ribbons and crepe work. Included in their work is the Pulaski banner.

Its seems that as usual other work was being done in Moravia in the C18. When the religious sects spread from their native land they took different skills to different places. Whitework to Ireland, floral embroidery to Pennsylvania >>

So..if we got the whitework and you got the embroidery, who won?<G>

Sally

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Subject: Needlework discussion From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 10:50:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

I am jumping in here in the middle of something I've only paid brief passing attention to, but it just occurred to me that I have a book relevant to this discussion.Historical Needlework of Pennsylvania by Margaret B. Schiffer. Moravian needlework is discussed at length.also Florentine embroidery in which she mentions that it is also known as bargello, Irish, fiamma, and point d'hongrie. She says, "Legend has it that a Hungarian bride of a Medici brought this work with her to Florence, Italy, in the fifteenth century. Basically, it is a straight gobelin stitch worked in a symmetrical pattern on a canvas ground over a random number of threads. The name flame stitch is most descriptive."

Hope this is not too repetitive and that it is helpful.

I have left out italics and special characters to simplify including my post on the digest. Hope it works,

Kathy Moore

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Subject: Re: embroidery question for across the pond From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 14:45:20 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

She's right -- the Moravian from Moravia folk embroidery is far different from what the members of the Protestant sect (Moravians/United Bretheren) did -- who were actually of German descent, not Czech. The model of the Moravian schools is so different than anything else our PA Germans experienced, as it was set up by the aristocratic sister of Count Zinzendorf, and I think what was taught reflected that! Candace

 

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Subject: Re: embroidery question for across the pond From:

This is just a thought, but Count Zinzendorf was born in Dresden where Dresden white-work originated. Pamela Clabburn's "The Needlework Dictionary" notes at the end of her description of Dresden work (point de saxe) that thereader should "See also Moravian Embroidery". Under Moravian embroidery, she lists three explanations:

"1. The embroidery peculiar to Moravia, a province now in Czechoslovakia, but formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It is a slav type of peasant work, making great use of geometric satin stich as well as chain and stem stitch, and is found on dress and household article.

2. Lace-making and tambour work produced in Ireland by the Moravians, members of a Protestant sect who fled from Moravia in the 18th century and settled abroad, some 400 of them in County Antrim, Ireland." [we're back to Gaye's Irish influence. Irish Quakers 'invented' Mountmellick some time around 1825 and, if you ask me, that looks a lot like Dresden work only on much heavier threads.] See http://www.untoldstories.co.uk/ie_intro.do

"3. The work done by the Moravian sisters who settled in Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) in the 1740s. They established a school and taught to a high standard 'floral embroideries in silks, ribbon, and crepe work, mourning and embroidered pictures.' They not only taught but accepted commissions for work among which was the *Pulaski banner. They also did *Dresden work." 

Like Candace, that last item is new to me. I've never seen Dresden work attributed to any Moravian school. I must take to the search engine.

http://www.metmuseum.org/pubs/bulletins/1/pdf/3258791.pdf.bannered.pdf

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Re: embroidery question for across the pond From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 15:08:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 11

I am familiar with the Anglo-American "Dresden work" as in that Met article-- but I guess I don't know anything about the Moravian variety! Candace Perry

"

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Subject: Re: Needlework discussion From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 15:11:04 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 12

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I have an extra copy of this wonderful book that is going into the box for the AQSG auction.

Jan

Subject: [qhl] Needlework discussion

I am jumping in here in the middle of something I've only paid brief passing attention to, but it just occurred to me that I have a book relevant to this discussion.Historical Needlework of Pennsylvania by Margaret B. Schiffer. Moravian needlework is discussed at length.also Florentine embroidery in which she mentions that it is also known as bargello, Irish, fiamma, and point d'hongrie. She says, "Legend has it that a Hungarian bride of a Medici brought this work with her to Florence, Italy, in the fifteenth century. Basically, it is a straight gobelin stitch worked in a symmetrical pattern on a canvas ground over a random number of threads. The name flame stitch is most descriptive."

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Subject: Re: Morgaine Le Fay Antique Textiles From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 12:56:57 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Gaye, Did you see Jan's post -- she had some good references. And ja, SE PA and specifically among our regional Quaker/Anglo population. Our Schwenkfelders were the exception to the rule with this -- they made wallets, pocketbooks and pinballs using Irish stitch, but this was generally not a German thing. Candace

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Subject: embroidery question for across the pond From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 16:15:37 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

I am doing some work on PA German needlework and I found a mention of what Moravian embroidery meant in England - specifically that it is some sort of whitework on what we colonists call muslin. Sally, do you have any insight into this? What we think of as Moravian embroidery is not that!

Candace Perry

Colony of Pennsylvania

 

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Subject: Re: embroidery question for across the pond From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 13:35:56 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Hey Candice, did Pennsylvania succeed from the Union??? to become a Colony again?? Wonder how man of us would like to do that! best, Don Beld________________________________

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Subject: TN Regional Quilt Study Group meeting, Sept. 19 From: nedjanaol.com Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 16:51:55 -0400 X-

Tennessee Regional Quilt Study Group Meeting

When: Wednesday, September 19, 2012 from 10:30 am to about 3:00 pm (Eastern Time) Where: McMinn County Living Heritage Museum, 522 W. Madison Avenue, Athens, TN 37303 423-745-0329 www.livingheritagemuseum.com

10:30 - Introductions, Old Business, New Business 11:00 - Show & Tell  Bring your favorite antique quilt. 12:00 - Lunch  Bring a brown bag lunch or order a box lunch (See Info Below). Drinks will be provided

1:00 - Program: A bed turning of Quilts from the Collection of the Living Heritage Museum. Lisa Chastain, Curator of Collections and Exhibits, will show us ten quilts from the museum=99s collection including two from Quilts of Tennessee by Bets Ramsey & Merikay Waldvogel.

2:00 - View current exhibit: "Best of the Best" a juried and judged show of contemporary quilts at the Living Heritage Museum. The exhibit will be on view from September 12 through September 29.

Lunch: A box lunch may be ordered for $7.00 by contacting Mary Alton, Coordinator of Visitors Services, at maltonlivingheritagemuseum.com or 423-745-0329. 

There is no charge for the day. We will pass a hat at the end to donate to the Museum for their assistance providing the venue and the program.

Please publicize the event through guild newsletters, webpages, and Facebook.

Spread the word. Bring a friend. Bring a carload of friends!

Directions to the Museum: =46rom South off I-75: Take Exit 49, and bear right on Decatur Pike. Go 3.2 miles until you come to the 6th light (in downtownAthens), and turn right onto Washington Avenue. The Museum will be five blocks on the right.

=46rom North off I-75: Take Exit 52 (Mt.Verd Road), and turn left. Travel through four traffic lights to downtown Athens, where the street becomes Washington Avenue. The Museum will be five blocks on the right.

If you have questions, contact:

Jan Wass at nedjanaol.com, Merikay Waldvogel at quiltaliveaol.com, Joyce Knauff atgolfwidow115yahoo.com, Mary Alton at maltonlivingheritagemuseum.com or Lisa Chastain atlchastainlivingheritagemuseum.com.

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Subject: Ladies Art Company again From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2012 05:56:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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I received some good information about the LAC last week (Royal Star quilt), especially in regard to Jinny Beyer's book which lists ALL of the LAC blocks, their dates and then references them as they are listed in her book in color (The Quilter's Album of Patchwork Patterns - 4,500 blocks)

I have several old LAC catalogs. Visited Connie Chunn's very informative website about the LAC. As I look back on my 18 years creating quilts for publication, most of them are based on these traditional blocks. For years I was stuck in a time-warp (1930s) with those lovely Kansas City Star blocks and quilts. But I often used older patterns (Fair Play, Royal Star, Storm at Sea, etc) with new fabric. Why try to reinvent the wheel?

I have digital versions of dozens of old catalogs and I think I want to post about them on my blog. I have jpgs of their covers and I might pair them up with some of my own quilts and then give a pattern or two as represented in the catalog. Today I uploaded a Storm at Sea which first appeared in the LAC . . . Wait! Do you know when?

What I find fascinating about this is how the pattern was drafted without all the technology of today. Simple paper folding, drawing of lines, a compass. How straight lines can create the illusion of curves. I am more interested in the patterns than the history. But without the history, the patterns don't have as much personality. And knowing WHEN the pattern first made its appearance makes me stand in awe of what women did with just basic elementary education. I visited Barbara Brackman's Material Culture blog this morning and read all sorts of history. Love it!

Thanks to those who gave me more resources for this LAC interest. I press on!

Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://debbykratovilquilts.blogspot.com/ www.quilterbydesign.com

--Apple-Mail-3-448075244--

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Subject: Re: Ladies Art Company again From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2012 07:19:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Read with interst Debby's post. Has anyone ever taken the 8th grade test that floats around periodically. I believe it's from the late 1800s!! Wow! Puts our current knowledge to shame. Everyone could do a great deal more math, knew a great deal more geography and history and had working knowledge on many more topics. Wish I could get hold of that again. I had it in a file for many years, but it seems to have been stolen by the "file gremlin"! Marcia Kaylake, Austin, TX

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Subject: Re: Ladies Art Company again From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2012 17:01:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

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I'm not sure the 8th grade test was authentic. Seems I read something questioning it.

Stephanie Whitson

> From: marciarkearthlink.net > To: qhllyris.quiltropolis.com > Subject: [qhl] Re: Ladies Art Company again > Date: Sun 26 Aug 2012 07:19:23 -0500 > > Read with interst Debby's post. Has anyone ever taken the 8th grade test > that floats around periodically. I believe it's from the late 1800s!! Wow! > Puts our current knowledge to shame. Everyone could do a great deal more > math knew a great deal more geography and history and had working knowledge > on many more topics. Wish I could get hold of that again. I had it in a file > for many years but it seems to have been stolen by the "file gremlin"! > Marcia Kaylake Austin TX > > > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: authorsgwmsn.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1813299Dlyris.quiltropolis.com

--_b02f41fb-018f-4b9b-97e3-270a618a5aae_--

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Subject: Re: Morgaine Le Fay Antique Textiles From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2012 17:19:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Candace, you said the flame/bargello stitch is called "Irish Stitch" in your part of country---is that your part of PA?

I know you said you didn't know why, but guess, please. I've never heard the stitch called "Irish stitch" or encountered it in writing. Perhaps from Scots-Irish in region? Other?

Gaye

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Subject: Re: Morgaine Le Fay Antique Textiles From: textiqueaol.com Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2012 20:21:12 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Gaye,

Reference Susan Swan (who was also an Ohio girl) in "Plain and Fancy", page95 - "The Irish stitch was by far the most common canvas-work stitch used during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries if we are to judge by the number of surviving pieces and written references. [for a description of the stitch] No doubt its appeal lay in how rapidly it progressed and its facility, for it covered, vertically, three or four threads of the canvas rather than only one thread, as in the tent stitch... Elizabeth Drinker made a covering for a fire screen 'in Irish stitch flowers'..." [Erica Wilson 'taught' me this stitch was called Bargello.]

and, in her "A Winterthur Guide to American Needlework" on pages 45 and 46,"The flamelike designs that were so often produced with Irish stitch probably gave rise to the twentieth-century term flame stitch. Actually, many other designs were worked with Irish stitch, including diamond-within-diamond patterns, zigzag patterns, carnations, and fanciful geometric shapes. Other names given to Irish stitch today are Florentine, Bargello, and Hungarian, but all of these terms would have been meaningless to our ancestors - at least until the late nineteenth century."

As contrast, Lanto Synge in her book on English embroidery, "Antique Needlework" mentions "Florentine stitch hangings...also known as Hungarian or flame stitch (the equivalent of the modern bargello)..." Irish stitch is not even in the index.

Jan Thomas

 

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Subject: education in previous times From: Gloria Hanrahan <gloriaak.net> Date: Sun, 26 Aug 2012 18:22:19 -0800 (AKDT) X-Message-Number: 6

http://www.snopes.com/language/document/1895exam.asp

Even if this test were real, it needs to be remembered that our kids have a much larger body of knowledge to learn now. I think many of those items are outdated in their content. Most teachers of the time only had a very limited education themselves. The knowledge on this "test" is just spitting out information, with no critical thinking skills. Thank goodness we now question the white, European version of US History.

We also need to remember that not everyone had the opportunity to go to school in 1895. Children of immigrants were put to work with no education. Even though my family is from the South, and has been here since Revolutionary War times, they were poor. My grandmother was on her own by the time she was 11 and working as a live-in maid at that time.

Gloria Hanrahan

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Subject: Irish Stitch From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Fri, 24 Aug 2012 16:37:20 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

The answer from my guru...

Sally Ward

> > > We had Irish stitch on this side of the Atlantic as well, back when America > was a Colony. Whether it was the same stitch as that named now is unclear. I > suspect it was the same pattern as flame ie the zig zags but a different > stitch. > > The names of stitches are very interesting. We've had 200 years apart doing > our own language evolution and now the internet has brought us closer > together using the same words often with different meanings. Basket weave > and redwork are other examples.

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Subject: Trying to find Sue Kreft From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Fri, 24 Aug 2012 15:32:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Hello all-Does anyone on this list know a Sue (Susan M) Kreft from Salem, oregon? If you do and know how to contact her, would you please email me privately at pepcorygmail.com ? I would be very grateful Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516

-

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Subject: Re: Morgaine Le Fay Antique Textiles From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Thu, 23 Aug 2012 20:06:07 +0100 X-Message-Number: 1

As this is getting off-quilt topic, the short answer for the list (from my friend, I'm just the messenger) I paraphrase:

As with some quilting terms we have a confusion of American and British generic terms. You say Bargello, we say Flame or Florentine etc. What our embroiderers call flame stitch came from Hungary (hence Hungarian stitch) to Italy (hence Bargello and Florentine stitch). 

The colours probably have faded, though without any real evidence other than that some of the silk embroideries my friend has worked with in archives are very vibrant. 

Her detail on gros and petit point is probably more than quilters want to know <G>

The full answer is going direct to Heather, anyone else who wants it privately I'll be happy to forward to it.

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: Morgaine Le Fay Antique Textiles From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 23 Aug 2012 15:13:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Sally, we have 18th century flame stitch pocketbooks and wallets, and it's frequently called Irish stitch around here. Why, I don't know, but would love to know! Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center Pennsburg, PA

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: August 17, 2012 From: pam.conklinatt.net Date: Sat, 18 Aug 2012 13:23:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Debby and all,

Connie Chunn (St. Louis, MO) is the leading authority of LAC and she redrafted the LAC blocks. C&T Publishing printed her LAC Block Tool. You might want to check with her she is a wealth of information. Good luck, Pam

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Subject: cathedral windows quilt pattern From: Jocelyn Martin <martinjocelynrocketmail.com> Date: Wed, 22 Aug 2012

I can't seem to find my Cathedral Windows pattern, but I'm hoping someone will have the info I need. If I want to make the quilt using a 2.5 inch window shape, how many of them will I need to make a queen-sized top?=

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Subject: Fw: Brussels Flower Carpet From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 21 Aug 2012 07:33:09 -0700

Hi all,This is not really quilt history, but I thought you might enjoy this.Here are photosof the Brussels Floral Carpet that is displayed inthe Grande Place in the center of Brussels every two years! It must be incredible to see it there.Also, you can see an image of the full design(and more info) at: http://www.flowercarpet.be/flower-carpet-2012/. Judy Schwender ---1911863903-386065211-1345559589=:97551--

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Subject: Re: floral carpet From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 21 Aug 2012 08:10:14 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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Neat!! And informative! I recently did a jigsaw puzzle on line of that carpet, but didn't know really what it was! Thanks!

Susan

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Subject: Re: Fw: Brussels Flower Carpet From: Jeanne Henry <jeannehenry55gmail.com> Date: Tue, 21 Aug 2012 12:35:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I saw the carpet in 1986. Spent days watching it being created and finally saw the completed flower carpet from Louis XIV's concubine's apartment on the Grand Platz. It was incredible!

Jeanne Henry Austin

http://www.flowercarpet.be/flower-carpet-2012/.

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Subject: Re: Morgaine Le Fay Antique Textiles From: hknight453aol.com Date: Tue, 21 Aug 2012 17:18:29 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Sally- I was sure the piece with inset facial detail was done on Penelope.It's very Victorian.  Bargello goes back a long way to Italy. I agree the piece is not suitable for anything but ornamental use. Does your friend think the colors have faded over time? Doesn't gros point and petit point refer to the size of canvas used, notthe actual stitch used? Heather

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Subject: Cuesta Benberry article From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Tue, 21 Aug 2012 16:11:49 -0700 (

Hi everyone, I am looking for info on an article Cuesta Benberry wrote a number of years ago for Thimble Needle Treasures Magazine that gives an explanation of the LAC pattern Mrs. Morgan's Choice. Apparently, Ms. Benberry was able to narrow down who Mrs. Morgan was. Would appreciate anyone who might have the article contact me. Thanks, Best, Don

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Subject: Re: Morgaine Le Fay Antique Textiles From: hknight453aol.com Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2012 00:17:35 -0400 (EDT)

I never saw this dealer before, and I enjoyed looking at her wares. I also do Bargello, so was intrigued by the c.1900 piece she had for sale. It is very English, as the back has very little thread. I work in a more expensive American fashion, where the back is as deeply covered as the front. The piece remains much more square that way, and wears better as well. TheBritish still tend to use Halfd Cross stritch in needlepoint, wheras Basketweave is a superior technique. It does require over twice as much yarn, however.

Heather

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Subject: Re: Morgaine Le Fay Antique Textiles From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2012 15:03:56 +0100 X-Message-Number: 2

Curious about this, I passed the link to a friend who is a UK embroidery historian. She actually suspects that the piece may be older than c1900, this based on some ongoing research she has into flame stitch, and also that it may not in fact be English. As for total covering on the back, she suggests that the use of silk suggests this particular piece is a hanging rather than an upholstery, hence there being no necessity to cover the back (also being the reason it is not at all 'suitable for making a cushion').

She tells me that certainly in historic pieces European needlewomen would have used gros point and petit point on furnishings to give the triple thickness of yarn which you are talking about.

Oh, and looking at the first piece on Morgan La Fay's site, she pointed out

'The first of her embroideries which she dates to 1750-1800. Clever, if you look at the back of the needlework you'll see that Penelope canvas has been used, invented in mid C19'.

And I thought I was sending her the site as a Sunday morning treat <G>

Sally Ward