Subject: Shelburne Exhibit From: clproductsgmail.com Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2012 08:42:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Was fortunate to see the glorious exhibit of Man Made Quilts: Civil War to the Present. Oh my! What a wonderful gathering of great quilts from so many places. The book by the same name is well worth buying at a very reasonable price if you don''t get to the exhibit. They must have the best curator in the quilt world to pull those really important quilts together for us.

I was totally dismayed by the "Amish" quilts the gift shops were selling. They looked to me like some of the worst Asian ever made. I filled out a complaint form asking that the buyer email me. I'd really like to send her some of the news articles on the Amish/Cambodian controversy. These were really shoddy. One of the sellers in the Artisan shop assured me that they have dealt with the same reputable Amish man for years. Does anyone know why this is? It just doesn't make sense to have such a good reputation for exhibits and collections and then sell trash. I also noticed that the other foreign handmade offerings in the gift shop were not fair traded. Wonder why they can't sell American Crafts that are so accessible in New England. I thought that's what they were all about.

Linda Laird

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Subject: World War I quilts From: suereichcharter.net Date: Thu, 6 Sep 2012 22:04:26 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 1

I finished the web site on World War I quilts. The Centennial Memorial of the "Great War" is upon us. I hope by viewing this you will recognize these quilts if they ever come across your documentation table. They are humble, scarce and very special. Go to coveringquilthistory (see below) and scroll down to World War I quilts. Enjoy.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut

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Subject: Jinny Avery's passing From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 07 Sep 2012 01:09:33 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I learned early on Thursday of Jinny Avery's passing. Jinny was inducted into The Quilters Hall of Fame in 2006. I have written a tribute to Jinny on both the TQHF blog

http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-passing-of-virginia-av ery.html

and a more personal tribute on my own blog. She was one very unique person and a dear friend.

http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/2012/09/virginia-averys-passing.html .

If anyone would like to send condolences to the family, I would suggest you post a note in the comment field of the TQHF blog like so many did for Bonnie Leman when she passed.

Jinny would have turned 100 on September 23.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: What is the Amish/Cambodian controversy? From: "Janet Finley" <jquiltercomcast.net> Date: Thu, 6 Sep 2012 07:45:22 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

I'd really like to send her some of the news articles on the Amish/Cambodian controversy.

I am ignorant of this controversy. Can anyone explain? I would like to read some of these news articles. A web reference would be helpful.

Thanks,

Janet Finley

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Subject: Lost my roommate From: JAN MASENTHIN <quiltsrmesbcglobal.net> Date: Fri, 7 Sep 2012 13:12:17 -0

She's not completely lost -- I know where she is, but she's unable to come to AQSG next month. Boo hoo! I have a room reserved at Embassy Suites for check in on the 3rd and check out on the 7th. If interested, email me offlist. You will need to know that I am a night owl, but am fine with or withoutTV. Jan Masenthin Topeka, Kansas (where it's finally raining)

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Subject: Re: What is the Amish/Cambodian controversy? From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Fri, 07 Sep 2012 20:42:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

On 9/6/2012 9:45 AM, Janet Finley wrote: I am ignorant of this controversy. Can anyone explain? I would like to read some of these news articles. A web reference would be helpful.

Hi Janet -

I don't know if this is what you are seeking, but several years ago, the Allentown, PA, Morning Call newspaper did a 4 part series about "What's not Amish about Lancaster County Amish quilts." It's been known locally for many years (20?) that some (not all) Amish quilt sellers employ Hmong ladies to do the applique, and Mennonite ladies to do the piecing, and then have the quilts quilted by Amish ladies, so they can sell "quilts quilted by the Amish". Most tourists don't know enough about quilts to realize that that statement doesn't mean "made by the Amish" -- they assume it does, and happily go home with their "handmade Amish quilt".

It got more complicated with imported quilts flooding the market, and being sold as "locally made" -- I haven't closely followed it recently, but did find this article that might be helpful -- http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date060511&slug=thaiquilt11

I remember reading that these imported quilts totally deflated the local quilt market when they were sold at local mud sales (firehouse fundraising auctions). Too many quilts and tops so the local ladies couldn't sell what they had made over the winter at reasonable prices.

If you google variations on Allentown PA Morning Call Amish Quilts you might be able to come up with more references.

Hope this helps, Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: OFFER: QNM From: Barbara254 <barbara254aol.com> Date: Sat, 8 Sep 2012 13:20:43 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I would like to donate my collection of Quilters Newsletter Magazines to a library, museum, school, guild or anyone interested in archives of fairly recent quilting history that has evolved since the 1970's.

I have Issue # 13 from 1970 up to several years ago. I have them sorted intochronological order and very few are missing.

I will offer these without charge and only ask that you pay the cost of shipping by media mail. (They can also be picked up in central California). There are about 5 boxes and the cost of shipping would depend on the recipient'sZIP code.

I got little response the first time I offered these. I really hate to put them in the recycling bin! Can't anyone use these?

Barbara in Monterey, California > > --- >

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Subject: Do you believe quilt history has remembered our Nation's Presidents in a kindly manner? From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sat, 8 Sep 2012 16:58:49 -0400

Do you believe quilt history has been kind to our Presidents? In an effort to add some levity to a stressful election season, I have posted numerous images of President Washington taken from 100 years of quilts on my web page. Look each day for the Presidents in chronological order. Only you can decide if quilt history has treated them kindly.

http://tinyurl.com/956bxrv

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Subject: Hmong - Amish in PA From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com> Date: Sat, 08 Sep 2012 17:27:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Janet Finley,

I will send you privately a file with 4 articles I saved in 2006 about Hmong women making quilts in Pennsylvania. It is long, so I will not send it to the group. It was originally published online from the Lehigh Valley newspaper "The Morning Call" (http://www.mcall.com/) starting on April 23, 2006 and written by kathleen.parrishmcall.com, Tel 610-820-6627. I apologize if I violated any copyrights by sending the articles to Janet privately, but I will not send to anyone else. Anyone else can try to locate Kathleen.

I have followed closely the progress of Hmong women integrating into USA starting in the 1980s in Philadelphia where they were assisted by people at UPenn, and publicized in the PA Inquirer newspaper. I was living in Montgomery County at the time. Someone from Main Line Quilters may know more. The Inquirer had a long piece on that Philadelphia Hmong group's eventually move to MN to be near other Hmong. A friend sent it to me since I had moved by then, but I can't find that I kept the article. I met MN Hmong at quilt shows later, selling their applique, cross-stitch, and other needlework. A fellow quilt guild member in Raleigh NC helped promote Hmong women's sewing in NC in the 1990's when her church was helping a group of Hmong families from a Thai refuge group settle in the NC mountains which reminded them of their homeland.

Susan Seater Raleigh NC

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Subject: Hmong - Amish in PA From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com> Date: Sat, 08 Sep 2012 18:10:02 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

Here are the 4 articles from April 2006 about the Hmong women helping with "Amish" quilts and the less well made Thai imported quilts!

http://www.mcall.com/news/all-quilt-storygallery,0,171575.storygallery

Hidden Hands, Common Thread - Story Gallery April 23, 2006 How a hill tribe from Laos changed a Pennsylvania tradition First of a four-part series

April 24, 2006 A way of life woven from misery Second of a four-part series

April 25, 2006 Prosperity amid new set of troubles

April 26, 2006 Imports buoy Thai villages, hurt Lancaster County sales

Last of a four-part series April 27, 2006 Transcript of chat with Doug Benedict and Kathleen Parrish

Copyright © 2012, The Morning Call

Susan Seater Raleigh NC

Dear Janet Finley,

I saved several articles in 2006 about Hmong women making quilts in Pennsylvania. They were originally published online from the Lehigh Valley newspaper "The Morning Call" (http://www.mcall.com/) starting on April 23, 2006 and written by kathleen.parrishmcall.com, Tel 610-820-6627.

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Subject: Re: Hmong - Amish in PA From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com> Date: Sat, 08 Sep 2012 18:19:44 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Dear qhl'ers,

Also read a transcript of Pat Cummings interviewing Kathleen Parrish and Doug Benedict about the Hmong and Amish in 2006.

http://www.mcall.com/news/all-dk-transcript,0,4040199.story

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Subject: President John Adams, our 2nd President From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sun, 9 Sep 2012 13:45:46 -0400

Here's John Adams, our Nation's 2nd President. See the link below to view four more quilt versions of President Adams.

http://tinyurl.com/956bxrv

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut

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Subject: Re: Hmong - Amish in PA From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2012 10:43:00 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Also -- Janneken Smucker discusses this fairly extensively in her dissertation. It is available for purchase online and I believe is a must-have for any good collection of quilt history reference. Candace Perry

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Subject: President Thomas Jefferson, see all 5 images. From: suereichcharter.net Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2012 13:05:12 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Our Nation's 3rd President, Thomas Jefferson. See the link below to view four more quilt versions of President Jefferson.

http://tinyurl.com/956bxrv

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

------=_Part_13255524_550390490.1347296712688--

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Subject: Quilt Exhibits at Sacramento State From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net> Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:06:03 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Good Monday morning, QHLers - There is a wonderful quilt exhibit currently at the University Library Gallery Annex on the Sacramento State University (California) campus. The website for the University Library Gallery (http://www.al.csus.edu/sota/ulg/) doesn't yet have the info about the exhibit posted but does have the information about parking and a campus map. Check out the press release:

http://tinyurl.com/SacQuiltExhibit

The exhibit, "Artistry of the Traditional Quilt", runs Sept. 7-Oct. 20 in the University Library Gallery Annex. The hours for the University Library Gallery Annex are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The quilts are from the collection of Carol Gebel.

Additional quilts from the same collection are also on display in the Special Collections & University Archives office, "Piecing the Past Together: Nineteenth Century Quilts", and runs Sept. 7-Dec. 20. Exhibit hours are 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Special Collections & University Archives office is in the same building as the University Library Gallery Annex.

You can get right up to most of the quilts and the light levels are more than high enough to get a really good look. No catalogue, gallery guide or handouts available.

Regards,

Meg

. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney

Textile/Costume Conservator &

Collections Management Consultant

Professional Associate - AIC

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Subject: Quadrigo cloth From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 12:52:16 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Hi all,I am prepping a loaned quilt for an exhibit and this is printed on an apricot solid:F [or E] & W QUADRIGO CLOTH=I know this has been discussed before on QHL but does anyone know the timeline of these solids?=Thank you in advance.=Best regards.Judy SchwenderNational Quilt MuseumPaducah, KY ---853603208-1591472243-1347393136=:51914--

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Subject: Re: Quadrigo cloth From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 17:02:30 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Judy, I will be doing a study center on Ely & Walker Quadriga Cloth at AQSG, on sunday afternoon. These solids appeared in fabric sample catalogs from at least as early as 1936, and were known into the Bicentennial era and beyond. In other words, they are not a good indicator of age.

Xenia

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Subject: FW: Quadrigo cloth From: "Jean Carlton" <quiltsetccomcast.net> Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 16:21:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Judy Google quadriga cloth to find numerous references including Brackman - I have an ad from 1980's for it. jean

QUADRIGO CLOTH > > I know this has been discussed before on QHL but does anyone know the > timeline of these solids? > >

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Subject: Re: FW: Quadrigo cloth From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 15:03:12 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

Hi all,Thank you to the many who replied to my request for info about "E&W QUADRIGO CLOTH".As it tirns out, on another part of the quilt,I found the whole thing and it is "F&W QUADRIGA CLOTH".The prints wereDepression Era prints so I just wanted to be sure of the date since I had such a notation on the cloth.Best regards,Judy SchwenderNational Quilt MuseumPaducah, KY ---853603208-882717950-1347400992=:74593--

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Subject: Shirtings prints from the 1800s From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 18:46:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

One of the fabric companies I partner with (Windham) has a new collection out called "Somerset Shirtings". They say that they came on the quilting scene around 1875. (I am not trying to get anyone to buy them; just asking a question here).

Since I am more focused on the quilts and quilt blocks than the actual fabrics and dates, can someone give me some historic context about shirtings (yes, I figure they were prints that were used to make "shirts") but some quilt context?

There are even browns that I would actually like to sew with. Brown is not my color, but it sure looks good as a fabric. They are going to send me some pieces to sew with and I will consult my quilt block books for blocks from that era. If you want to see what they have, you can go here: http://www.windhamfabrics.com/cgi-bin/fabricshop/gallery.cgi?Category=585

Again, I am not paid to sew with these fabrics. But I do want to get my facts straight! That's why I stay on this informed list! Debby

Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://debbykratovilquilts.blogspot.com/ Quilt Trunk Shows & Workshops www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: crocheted spreads From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net> Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2012 07:43:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Does anyone know when the cotton crocheted spreads/coverlets/table cloths began to be offered to general public?

Thanks!

Neva Hart Virginia Quilt Museum Volunteer & Exhibit Curator See "HEXED!" - Designs & Dimensions May 21 - August 24, 2013

http://vaquiltmuseum.org/ Harrisonburg, VA

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Subject: knit and crochet spreads From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2012 07:30:38 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

I've had published pamphlets from the 1930s with instructions to make them,so I presume the trend developed earlier and the thread/yarn producers were capitalizing on it. The knit and crochet spread I think were the bedcovering of choice (in addition to quilts of course)=in England and France in=the 19th c. There were books in the 1980s(?) called something like=theEnglish Woman's Bed and the French Woman's Bed that show many many yummy ones in very inviting room settings. Check college extension service=courses for this kind of publication too. Laura Fisher at 212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --1287737115-563630644-1347546638=:45138--

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Subject: Re:crocheted spreads From: Barbara Woodford <haqgalenalink.net> Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2012 11:36:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Neva and group,

I,m guessing, because I have a pair that were made of tobacco twine and were said to be made in the 1920-30's. Crocheting probably came in as a substitute for other bed covers during the depression, using less material.

Barbara Woodford

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Subject: seeking quilt block name From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 08:17:58 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

Hi all,I am trying to locate the name of a quilt block for a lady who stopped at the museum.I posted a picture of the block on the eboard underquilts.The pattern it was made from was probably published in the Gritmagazine in Kansas City.This magazine was more like a newspaper in format.If any one can help me out I would be most appreciative.Best regards,Judy SchwenderPaducah, Kentucky --1344379368-1064114633-1347635878=:526--

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Subject: question From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 08:30:50 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

Hi everyone.Have a question.I know that in the late 1800's time consuming quilts were kind of a fad--postage stamp quilts, quilts with thousands of pieces, crzy quilts, etc.(I know they have been popular in other periods as well).My question: Is there a collective name for this?We have "Baltimore Album", Crazy Quilts, Commemorative Quilts, Signature quilts, etc.=But what to call to the time consuming quilts?best, Don ---43608285-1402318635-1347636650=:26425--

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Subject: RE: question From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 12:05:58 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Don, I know this isn't what you're asking -- but this fad would make our local papers. There were often reports (just came across another one the other day), around the turn of the 20th century, of the quilting of local ladies, and the reports always included the number of pieces she had used. The articles did not report the pattern, color, fabric anything of that nature -- just the number of pieces. This apparently was big news, especially when she used over 10,000 pieces. I think you're right, there's something to this, and is deserving of more research. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Subject: Amish/Hmong quilting From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmvyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 08:47:46 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

The traditional needlework of the Hmong quilters includes very detailed & embroidered story quilts with needle turned applique.It is very beautiful and different from our traditional American domestic quilts.There is a long history of quilting services between the shops in Pennsylvania located in Amish tourist areas and all the other Amish communities like Holmes County here=in Ohio.=I have Amish friends from the Old Order Amish communities in Ohio=who take in quilting from the shops in Pennsylvania.==And I=know of several members of the Hmong community based in Columbus, Ohio (and from other Hmong communities around the U.S.) who do very beautiful applique quilt workfor the same shops.So it wasn't a surprise to me to see my Old Order Amish friends quilting on applique tops done by Hmong stitchers that had been sent by a shop to Pennsylvania! =They had been appliqued in Columbus, Ohio & sent to Pennsylvania and then back to Ohio's Amish community to be hand quilted & finally returned to the quilt shop in Pennsylvania to be sold.Some of those quilts travel more than I do! Add to this story the fact that you can purchase very elaborately appliquedquilt tops made in China from eBay vendors ......which I have also seen sent out to Ohio's Amish quilters for completion.It always pays to ask the seller about the origin of your quilt no matter what kind it is--antique or newly made.It all makes for an interesting provenance for the quilt! Enjoy--Connie Ark in Ohio --411857043-2138057045-1347637666=:46108--

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Subject: RE: question From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 11:05:55 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

thanks Candice.You're right--it is an interesting fad.Kind of like the second millenium=quilts that needed to have 2000 pieces.My 9-11 Pentagon quilt (now in the collection at the International Quilt StudyCenter and Museum) is a postage stamp with 2977 pieces--the official number of casualties on 9-11.I am also working on a Star Spangled Banner quilt (named for an 1840's quilt at the Shelbourne and two other later quilts at the IQSCM where each block has 760 pieces! and several of the finished quilts have over 6000 pieces.But what to calll them????==Folks should suggest ideas.Crazy quilts is already taken! :-)best, Don

________________________________From: Candace Perry <candaceschwenkfelder.com>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>Sent: Fri, September 14, 2012 9:06:31 AMSubject: [qhl] RE: questionDon, I know this isn't what you're asking -- but this fad would make ourlocal papers. There were often reports (just came across another one theother day), around the turn of the 20th century, of the quilting of localladies, and the reports always included the number of pieces she had used.The articles did not report the pattern, color, fabric anything of thatnature -- just the number of pieces. This apparently was big news,especially when she used over 10,000 pieces.I think you're right, there'ssomething to this, and is deserving of more research. Candace PerrySchwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center---You are currently subscribed to qhl as: donbeldpacbell.net.To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1870667Wlyris.quiltropolis.com --1928892885-1998489709-1347645955=:57343--

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Subject: Re: seeking quilt block name From: Getfruitaol.com Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 14:57:46 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

--part1_1f650.5ffa90.3d84d829_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I know this as a "Mammy" block.

Violet

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Subject: RE: question From: Karan Flanscha <sadierosecfu.net> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 14:39:39 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

--14dae9399de3b937e4c9ae95e4 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Sue Reich has an excellent book on this phenomenon:

Quilting News of Yesteryear: One Thousand Pieces and Counting

--14dae9399de3b937e4c9ae95e4--

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Subject: RE: question From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 15:04:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

--_ad9c2d45-266f-4614-b27d-ba7eb1ef5077_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Omnibus quiltsMagnum opus quilts Steph Whitson (who has an article or two from old Nebraska newspapers about these thigns)

--_ad9c2d45-266f-4614-b27d-ba7eb1ef5077_--

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Subject: Quilts with thousands of pieces From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 20:01:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

Lacking a better term, I call these multitudinous-pieced quilts.  Quilting News of Yesteryear: 1,000 Pieces and Counting published in 2007 contains hundreds of period newspaper articles about these quilts. Some made mostly in the mosaic pattern, were from the Charleston and Savannah areas in the 1830s. However, the majority of them were made from just before the Centennial celebration through to the early twentieth century. Charm quilts andCrazy quilts are actually part of this genre of quilt with thousands of pieces. They were made in our country when the textile mills were thriving. This was such a time of abundance it is often dubbed as "the age of excess". We all know what they look like. They are generally one patch quilts composed with squares, rectangles, hexagons, diamonds, etc. These Quiltmakers were the original fabricholics. Their scrap bags were very deep. Scrapbooking and charms were also popular activities during this era. SueReich

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Subject: 1882 Howe Sewing Machine Alphabet From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sun, 16 Sep 2012 08:56:27 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Check out my web site for the Howe Sewing Machine Alphabet in Poetry booklet. It was printed in 1882. Thanks for viewing. Enjoy. www.coveringquilthistory.com/howe-sewing-machine.php.

Sue Reich

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: RE: Tons of pieces quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 16 Sep 2012 12:10:44 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I've heard 'Competition' quilts - the makers surely were aware of each other in many cases and tried to best even their own previous efforts. jean

> From: Donald Beld [mailto:donbeldpacbell.net] > Subject: [qhl] question > > Hi everyone.Have a question.I know that in the late 1800's time consuming > quilts were kind of a fad--postage stamp quilts, quilts with thousands of > pieces, crzy quilts, etc.(I know they have been popular in other periods as > well).My question: Is there a collective name for this?We have "Baltimore > Album", Crazy Quilts, Commemorative Quilts, Signature quilts, etc.=But what > to call to the time consuming quilts?best, Don > >

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Subject: RE: Tons of pieces quilts From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Sun, 16 Sep 2012 10:48:28 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

---1506696528-211058797-1347817708=:14795 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I like that name--although might get confused with "quilt show" quilts.best, Don________________________________From: Jean Carlton <jeancarltoncomcast.net>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>Sent: Sun, September 16, 2012 10:26:49 AMSubject: [qhl] RE:Tons of pieces quiltsI've heard 'Competition' quilts - the makers surely were aware of each otherin many cases and tried to best even their own previous efforts. jean> From: Donald Beld [mailto:donbeldpacbell.net]> Subject: [qhl] question> > Hi everyone.Have a question.I know that in the late 1800's timeconsuming> quilts were kindof a fad--postage stamp quilts, quilts with thousands of> pieces, crzy quilts, etc.(I know they have been popular in other periodsas> well).My question: Is there a collective name for this?We have"Baltimore> Album", Crazy Quilts, Commemorative Quilts, Signature quilts, etc.=Butwhat> to call to the time consuming quilts?best, Don> > ---You are currently subscribed to qhl as: donbeldpacbell.net.To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1870667Wlyris.quiltropolis.com ---1506696528-211058797-1347817708=:14795--

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Subject: RE: 1882 Howe Sewing Machine Alphabet From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Sun, 16 Sep 2012 14:12:53 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

--_d668656c-65-4879-89b5-ce0c8dc39235_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Thanks for sharing that! Fascinating!My favorite was the "W" ... poor=2C woeful=2C weary=2C woman.... Steph Whitson

--_d668656c-65-4879-89b5-ce0c8dc39235_--

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Subject: Knit coverlets/counterpanes explained From: Jackie Joy <joysbeesyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 16 Sep 2012 14:15:47 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

--1344379368-1229556757-1347830147=:6504 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

=I found this blog referring to Mrs. Rachel Lynde's (of Green Gables fame) "knitting cotton-warp quilts".It appears to be a good explanation of this needlework and the thread used.Very interesting to this big=fan of L. M. Montgomery's stories.=lady_n_thread.blogspot.com for November 13, 2010.=JackieReno, Nevada --1344379368-1229556757-1347830147=:6504--

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Subject: RE: 1882 Howe Sewing Machine Alphabet From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sun, 16 Sep 2012 18:04:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Mine too. Sue

Sent from my iPad

On Sep 16, 2012, at 3:12 PM, Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> wrote:

> > Thanks for sharing that! Fascinating!My favorite was the "W" ... poor, woeful, weary, woman.... > Steph Whitson >  > > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: suereichcharter.net. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1569982Qlyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: PDF file for the Howe Sewing Machine booklet From: suereichcharter.net Date: Sun, 16 Sep 2012 20:08:49 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 7

Success! The booklet has been converted into a PDF file and the link can be found on the web site.

http://tinyurl.com/9ah494g

Enjoy!

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: RE: PDF file for the Howe Sewing Machine booklet From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Sun, 16 Sep 2012 22:10:25 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 8

------=_Part_15327340_44278198.1347847825159 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Disposition: inline

Wow. Thanks, Sue!

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Sun, Sep 16, 2012 at 7:08 PM, suereichcharter.net wrote:

> Success!=C2The booklet has been converted into a PDF file and the link can be found on the web site.

http://tinyurl.com/9ah494g <http://tinyurl.com/9ah494g> =C2<http://tinyurl.com/9ah494g>

Enjoy!

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut w