Subject: Joyce Gross From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2012 15:37:52 -0500

The world of quilt history has lost one of its most influential figures

Joyce Gross. Joyce died on Christmas Eve, very peacefully, after a

day of seeing family, friends, and even her beloved dog. There will be

a memorial service for her on January 17 at Point Bonita, California,

where she ran seminars for many years. Joyces lifelong dedication to

a painstaking, labor-intensive quilt research project resulted in rooms full of boxes of her notes, all cross-indexed, along with the original printed documentation: more than 1000 quilt books, vast assortments of periodicals ranging back to the early 20th century, ephemera of all kinds, including rare fabric samples. She had a library of original documents that would be almost impossible to assemble today. Luckily the Briscoe Center for American History at the

University of Texas was able to acquire this incredible body of historical reference materials, along with an important part of her quilt collection which included examples by such important quiltmakers

as Bertha Stenge, Pine Eisfeller, Florence Peto, and Dr. Jeannette Throckmorton. She was a major force in early quilt research and documentation. Karey Bresenhan Director Emeritus, International Quilt FestivalHouston, Cincinnati,

Long Beach, Chicago Co-founder, Texas Quilt Museum

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Subject: RE: Joyce Gross From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2012 15:12:22 -0600

May she rest in peace.My sympathies to her friends on this loop.

Wonderful to know that the collection will be preserved for future research ers.What a treasure. Stephanie Whitson ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Joyce Gross From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2012 16:08:54 -0500 (EST)

Is there a place online where we can leave our condolences?

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: Quilts as cake. From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

Some people's creativity just blows me away. http://www.flickriver.com/photos/10411559%40N07/sets/72157600982881378/

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Subject: Old Silk Apron From: GBHlnMT1aol.com

This eBay auction has ended, but the photos of the construction and fabrics in this old apron are very interesting. I am interested in learning more about the origin of silk fabrics from this period. Has anyone found any great sources? http://www.ebay.com/soc/itm/300787960290?rokenrF5Kqd

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Subject: Re: Quilts as cake. From: textiqueaol.com

Now ya did it Steph. I gained 5 pounds just looking at the pics! They are delicious.

Jan T

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Subject: Shelly Zegart will be at the San Jose Museum on Saturday Jan. 5- check it out and come join us!!! From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com>

From The San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles - "Finally, excitement is growing for our January 5, 2013 program featuring Shelly Zegart in person for a screening and conversation of Why Quilts Matter. Space is limited, so Purchase Tickets Online now! "

I am looking forward to seeing some of you at the museum.The program is from 2-4 with a reception afterwards.

We will be in Palo Alto with our daughter and family beginning the 30th of December.

A Healthy New Year to everyone.

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 Executive Producer and Host President, The Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

ps. Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v8RMyg1_zYgY

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Subject: Red & Green Antique quilts From: Debby Kratovil <kratovilhis.com> Date: Tue, 25 Dec 2012 06:13:08 -0500

Merry Christmas to those who celebrate the day. Even if you don't, you probably enjoy red and green antique quilts. I shared one huge antique block/quilt and two reproductions from my own collection on my blog Saturday (see url below) and thought you all might like seeing them. One is an Oak Leaf and Rose Wreath, even with the swag and bloom border! Yes, they were all machine made, even tho I tried to hand applique one of them. Enjoy and happy holidays and a very blessed, healthy and happy new year.

Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://debbykratovilquilts.blogspot.com/ Quilt Trunk Shows & Workshops www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: RE: Red & Green Antique quilts From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larrywgreenhills.net> Date: Tue, 25 Dec 2012 21:42:21 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Debby, I enjoy your blog. The red and green quilts are timeless. The lists always get really quiet this time of year. So I am glad you posted.

Merry Christmas or happy holidays(whichever one you celebrate)to all. Sherrie Wohlgemuth Missouri

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Subject: trying to track down an image From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com>

It's not a convenient time but then brainstorms rarely come when you're resting and at peace. Can't get the image of an antique quilt out of my mind. It's more or less a crazy quilt (odd patches and then assembled into blocks) c. 1890, lots of PA-type reds and pinks but the most distinguishing feature: cookie cutter-like shapes appliqued over the patchwork. Have gotten down all my PA books but am still leafing--anyone feel a twinge on this one? Would sincerely appreciate your help locating the image. Did see the quilt in person once (pre-digital camera) exhibited at Houston. Thanks for the loan of your brains... Pepper

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: It's quiet... From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com>

Can I in troduce a new topic? Nothing to do with vintage quilts really.The shop in Newtown, CT, requested pillowcases from the local quilting communit y. They were hoping for 600, one for every child in the school. Judging from the comments on their facebook page, they now have over 2000:-)) Another group started the 26 Acts of Kindness campaign, suggesting th at everyone complete 26 random acts of kindness for strangers with the hope that they will pay it forward. This could become a really great world i f everyone did!I would ask how our ancestors dealt with this sort of event, but I suspect it is the power of mass media that is triggering our r esponses. History tells us that they did have mass murderers and other horr ific events but with only the occasional newspaper to detail the events, I don't imagine these events were that well known. It's a lot easier to close a newspaper than to turn off the TV.Has anyone studied this? Kris (list mom) -

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Subject: RE: It's quiet... From: candaceschwenkfelder.com

In my humble opinion and my rather generalized knowledge of the course of human recorded history, it is all about the media. Even the most horrific events of the last century -- say the Holocaust, for example -- were probably less widely known in every little corner of the U.S. than Newtown, Hurricane Sandy, or any other recent cataclysmic event. It truly gives one pause. We are living at a time unprecedented in human history, and that is an enormous understatement on my part. It is equally frightening and enthralling. Candace Perry

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Subject: help please From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Hi everyone, I have an old, some say Civil War era, some last quarter quilt that is in perfect condition but needs desparately to be blocked. The fabrics are very sturdy. I normally would not wet a quilt thi s old; but I did once and laid it out. This helped a great deal; b ut it still needs more blocking.Looking for ideas and suggestions on what to do. thanks, Don

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 07, 2012 From: Tracy Jamar <tjamaroptonline.net> Date: Sat, 08 Dec 2012 08:35:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Here is a link to the coming exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum, looks to be very interesting.

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/quilts/

Overlapping for a couple of months is another exhibit of El Anatsui that has modern 'quilt' aesthetics85 http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/el_anatsui/

Tracy Jamar, NYC

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Subject: Exhibition book for "Workt by Hand" From: "Carol" <celmorek-state.edu> Date: Fri, 7 Dec 2012 14:02:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I just learned from Sallie Stutz, Vice Director for Merchandising at the Brooklyn Museum that the museum will publish a guide for their upcoming (March 2013) quilt show Workt by Hand. She said to watch their website in March for info. about how to purchase the guide. She said to spread the word in the quilt world. Carol Elmore Manhattan KS

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Subject: Documenting quilted clothing From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2012 11:57:26 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

I am trying to document a quilted jacket I bought at a non-profit Xmas Bazaar a couple of years ago. It was donated as a used textile and is beautifully made. The label reads "Judy Muller Original". I have posted several photos on on my blog. Does anyone know a Judy Muller who makes quilted clothing?

http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/2012/12/looking-for-judy-muller.html

Thanks! Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: Documenting quilted clothing From: Karen Musgrave <karenmusgravesbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 6 Dec 2012 16:12:02 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Yes, she was/is in California (around San Jose if memory serves me). Made some great stuff but I don't think I have heard anymore about her in more than 5 years. Hope this helps.

Karen Musgrave

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Subject: Re: Bedding in the South during Civil War From: "Judy Grow" <judy.growcomcast.net>

thank you Lynn, for posting that . But what publication was this originally in? Can you cite the source?

-----Original Message----- From: Lynn Gorges Sent: Monday, December 3, 2012 7:35 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Bedding in the South during Civil War

New post on *civilianwartime* I subscribe to a "civilianwartime" put out by an employee of the Dept. of Resources as part of the 150th anniversary. There are some very interesting articles. This one I thought many of you might find interesting. Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

Practical hints for hard times

“What man has done, man may do.”

No. III – Clothing

- Quilted garments – Any think stuff may be made suitable for winter use, by doubling and enclosing between the two surfaces a spongy stratum of cotton batting, wool, or down. This last may be obtained in quantity by stripping from the part of the feather next to the skin of all our large birds, such as turkeys, geese, barn-door fowls, &c. This down should be inserted in each quilted square as soon as three sides have been produced by the needle. The warmth of such a garment can be known only by experience. It is exceedingly light as well as warm. Would that each of our boys who shiver in the bleak valleys of Virginia had the trial of one! - Substitute for socks – In Galton’s “Art of Travel” (an English work containing many useful hints) it is intimated that in some respects a foot square of soft cloth is more pleasant to the foot than a sock. To wear it, he says the foot must be placed on one of the diagonals, the corners being toward the toe, heel, and sides; the corners at the sides are to be first folded over the instep, then the cover at the toes; lastly, the foot is to be carefully inserted in the shoe, so as to leave no wrinkle, for every wrinkle will raise a blister. “Socks similar to these,” he adds, but made of blanket, and called “blanket wrappers,” are in use at Hudson’s Bay, instead of shoes. Should any one living in a city wish to wear a substitute of this sort, a pair of high gaiters, either knitted or made of cloth, will probably be necessary for appearance sake. - Bedclothes – A bed cover so warm as to be almost uncomfortable during a bitter cold night was one so light that it could scarcely be felt – it was a comfort of edier down. No family that owns a feather bed need be in want of plenty of bed cover – only let the feathers be quilted into coverlets. - The secret of warm sleeping at a cold night consists not so much in having a soft nest in which to half bury the body, as in keeping the outer air from having access to the person, and especially the feet. The wagoners in Germany practice a device from which we may learn a lesson; when away from home they use what they call a sleeping bag; this is half filled with straw, into which the person inserts himself and draws the mantle close around his neck. The outer air is thus excluded and warmth is ensured. Persons troubled with cold feet will luxuriate in the comfort to be afford by a pair of drawers, or its equivalent, drawn half way up the legs and then doubled under the feet so as to form a kind of temporary bag. - Paper is an excellent non-conductor of heat. English cottages often enclose sheets of it within their quilted counterpanes. Several newspapers tacked or pasted together at the edges, so as to give sufficient size, and spread upon one’s bed in two thicknesses, will give the warmth of a blanket. (In raveling of a cold windy day nothing protects the chest better than a newspaper folded several times and worn under the vest.) - Cowhair blankets – Since commencing this article information has been received that in the neighborhood of August some one has manufactured blankets of cowhair, which are said to be surprisingly warm. The mode of their manufacture was not mentioned, but probably by combination with cotton. - Buttons and pins – A few evenings since a gentleman laughingly remarked that he had seen a lady using what she called Confederate Pins. These consisted of the thorns of the large Cactus or Prickly Pear, which is furnished by nature with both head and point. It is well known that during the Revolutionary war or our fathers the thorns of the Plum tree were used for the same purposes. - Buttons of almost any size may be extemporized from the hard shell of the gourd, cut and covered with cloth. If anything harder or more durable is required it can be made of horn, boiled till it is soft and then trimmed with a knife to the proper size and bored.

*Source:* *Fayetteville Observer*, November 27, 1862 as found on www.digitalnc.org.

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 28, 2012 From: jfbauer1066yahoo.com

I am still LOL about Sally's no-doubt-accurate observation. How about these?

1. Taxpayers question the point of pencil museum 2. Taxpayers shoot off about firearms museum 3. Toy museum playing around with taxpayers' money 4. Baseball museum catching heat from taxpayers 5. Shoe museum walking off with taxpayer money 6. Film museum "reely" annoys taxpayers 7. Taxpayers cut down lumbering museum 8. Museum of ballet not on its toes, claim taxpayers 9. Taxpayers hammer antique tool museum 10. Entomology museum bugs taxpayers

Hmm. I wonder if the Times Free Press is looking for a headline writer..

Judy Bauer in brisk and bright central PA

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 28, 2012 From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2012 16:33:20 +0000 X-Message-Number: 3

Magnificent, Judy. I bow, still chuckling, before you!

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: November 28, 2012 From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

Don't forget the barbed wire museum. Barbed Wire Museum Sticks it to Taxpay ers. Steph Whitson

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Subject: Target and Quilts in the Attic From: Karen Musgrave <karenmusgravesbcglobal.net>

Yesterday I was playing around with different search engines and discovered that my book Quilts in the Attic: Discovering the Hidden Stories of the Quilts We Love is available at Target.com at 30% off list. I have never thought about purchasing quilt books from Target and am curious have you?

I guess the other thing that I am curios about is if you are aware my book is out there. It has essays that involve Julie Silber, Joe Cunningham, Shelly Zegart, Karen Alexander, as well as other known and unknown quiltmakers.

With gratitude, Karen Musgrave http://connectionsbykaren.blogspot.com

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Subject: RE: Target and Quilts in the Attic From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2012 13:24:21 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 6

Ppffttt! Of course we are aware of your book. We all bought it when it first came out, silly!

Seriously, a fabulous book.

Happy holidays, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: RE: Target and Quilts in the Attic From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2012 13:41:57 -0600

Congratulations Karen. That's a huge kudo for an author!Hope it sells li ke CRAZY. And no ... I haven't though of quilt books at Target although my day jobas a novelist tells me that it's very good to be there. The potential of novel salesjust about triples if one of the big box stores accepts a title . Don't know if that translates to quilting books or not ... but when folks t old methat A Patchwork Christmas was in some of the WalMarts and Sam's Club s I dida little happy dance. The "downside" of that placement though is that those big box stores also have thepower to make HUGE returns to publishers ... so I'm holding my breath for a few monthsuntil I spend the hoped-for royalty check ... even in my imagination. Again congratulations. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: Target and Quilts in the Attic From: aharkins5216comcast.net

Karen Musgrave, I just saw your book featured in The Glancer (our local ad/promo mag). First Target, then this!! Surely fame and fortune will be your lot. Congrats on the good PR.

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Subject: Bedding in the South during Civil War From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Mon, 3 Dec 2012 19:35:33 -0500

New post on *civilianwartime* I subscribe to a "civilianwartime" put out by an employee of the Dept. of Resources as part of the 150th anniversary. There are some very interesting articles. This one I thought many of you might find interesting. Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

Practical hints for hard times

What man has done, man may do.

No. III Clothing

- Quilted garments Any think stuff may be made suitable for winter use, by doubling and enclosing between the two surfaces a spongy stratum of cotton batting, wool, or down. This last may be obtained in quantity by stripping from the part of the feather next to the skin of all our large birds, such as turkeys, geese, barn-door fowls, &c. This down should be inserted in each quilted square as soon as three sides have been produce d by the needle. The warmth of such a garment can be known only by experience. It is exceedingly light as well as warm. Would that each of our boys who shiver in the bleak valleys of Virginia had the trial of one! - Substitute for socks In Galtons Art of Travel (an English work containing many useful hints) it is intimated that in some respects a fo ot square of soft cloth is more pleasant to the foot than a sock. To wear i t, he says the foot must be placed on one of the diagonals, the corners bei ng toward the toe, heel, and sides; the corners at the sides are to be firs t folded over the instep, then the cover at the toes; lastly, the foot is to be carefully inserted in the shoe, so as to leave no wrinkle, for every wrinkle will raise a blister. Socks similar to these, he adds, but made of blanket, and called blanket wrappers, are in use at Hudsons Bay, instead of shoes. Should any one living in a city wish to wear a substit ute of this sort, a pair of high gaiters, either knitted or made of cloth, w ill probably be necessary for appearance sake. - Bedclothes A bed cover so warm as to be almost uncomfortable durin g a bitter cold night was one so light that it could scarcely be felt it was a comfort of edier down. No family that owns a feather bed need be i n want of plenty of bed cover only let the feathers be quilted into coverlets. - The secret of warm sleeping at a cold night consists not so much in having a soft nest in which to half bury the body, as in keeping the out er air from having access to the person, and especially the feet. The wagoners in Germany practice a device from which we may learn a lesson; when away from home they use what they call a sleeping bag; this is half filled with straw, into which the person inserts himself and draws the mantle close around his neck. The outer air is thus excluded and warmth is ensured. Persons troubled with cold feet will luxuriate in the comfort t o be afford by a pair of drawers, or its equivalent, drawn half way up the legs and then doubled under the feet so as to form a kind of temporary b ag. - Paper is an excellent non-conductor of heat. English cottages often enclose sheets of it within their quilted counterpanes. Several newspape rs tacked or pasted together at the edges, so as to give sufficient size, a nd spread upon ones bed in two thicknesses, will give the warmth of a blanket. (In raveling of a cold windy day nothing protects the chest bet ter than a newspaper folded several times and worn under the vest.) - Cowhair blankets Since commencing this article information has bee n received that in the neighborhood of August some one has manufactured blankets of cowhair, which are said to be surprisingly warm. The mode of their manufacture was not mentioned, but probably by combination with cotton. - Buttons and pins A few evenings since a gentleman laughingly remarked that he had seen a lady using what she called Confederate Pins. These consisted of the thorns of the large Cactus or Prickly Pear, which is furnished by nature with both head and point. It is well known that duri ng the Revolutionary war or our fathers the thorns of the Plum tree were us ed for the same purposes. - Buttons of almost any size may be extemporized from the hard shell of the gourd, cut and covered with cloth. If anything harder or more durabl e is required it can be made of horn, boiled till it is soft and then trim med with a knife to the proper size and bored.

*Source:* *Fayetteville Observer*, November 27, 1862 as found on www.digitalnc.org.